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February 12, 2014 Meeting
Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
MEETING AGENDA
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
12th Council Meeting
Tallahassee, Florida
February 12, 2014 – 9:00 am to 4:00 pm
Meeting Objectives



Receive an update on Council’s previous recommendations
Identify and discuss possible framework for developing BPPC recommendations for the
2013-14 Annual Report
Review and discuss Pedestrian Safety Action Plans

Receive updates on related Agency and Other Partner plans

Receive an update on Legislative activities
Meeting Agenda
9:00 a.m.
Welcome and Introductions
9:10 a.m.
Recap of BPPC Activities To-Date
9:20 a.m.
Update on Council’s Previous Recommendations
9:45 a.m.
Identify and Discuss Framework for Developing BPPC Recommendations for the
2013-14 Annual Report
10:30 a.m.
Break
10:45 a.m.
Review and discuss Pedestrian Safety Action Plans: New State Planning Emphasis
Area (Safety & Cultural Change)
12:00 p.m.
Lunch - Onsite
1:00 p.m.
Updates on Related Agency and Other Partner Plans
 Implementation of FDEP’s Florida Greenways and Trails System Plan
(Completing the System)
 2014 Chronic Disease Prevention Implementation Plan (Health)
 Rising Rate of Illegal Motorist School Bus Passing (Safety & Cultural Change)
 Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety Coalition’s Coordination of Legislation,
Regulation and Policy (Cultural Change)
 Report on Safe Streets Summit (Safety)
2:45 p.m.
Break
3:00 p.m.
Legislative Update
3:30 p.m.
Public Comment
3:45 p.m.
Next Steps
4:00 p.m.
Adjourn
1
12th Bicycle &Pedestrian Partnership Council Meeting
Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Charge
The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) has established a standing statewide
“Partnership Council” on bicycle and pedestrian mobility. The Council includes key
partners and other stakeholders. The Council will promote the livability, health and
economic benefits of bicycle and pedestrian activity by serving as a forum to provide
guidance to the FDOT, its partners and other stakeholders on policy matters and issues
affecting the bicycle and pedestrian transportation needs of the State of Florida. The
Councils functions include the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Provide policy recommendations to bicycle and pedestrian partners and
stakeholders, including FDOT, on selected issues of importance to bicycle and
pedestrian mobility and safety.
Provide advice and input to bicycle pedestrian partners and stakeholders, including
FDOT, on bicycle and pedestrian issues, plans and operations.
Support bicycle and pedestrian advocates in identifying and promoting best
practices.
Provide an opportunity for bicycle and pedestrian advocates to exchange and
understand policy information relevant to bicycle and pedestrian mobility and
safety.
Provide a conduit for information and policy recommendations between FDOT, its
partners, and bicyclists and pedestrians.
The Council will be a standing body. It will identify focus areas for recommendations and
best practices on a yearly basis. Focus areas, best practices and recommendations will
normally be organized consistent with the “4 Es” (education, encouragement, enforcement,
engineering) and funding.
The Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council functions also include facilitating
increased coordination and collaboration by advising the FDOT, partners and stakeholders
on all transportation planning and safety activities, including the Florida Transportation
Plan (FTP). The Council will report annually on the Council’s discussions and policy
recommendations for that year’s focus areas.
1
BPPC Charge Revised
September 12, 2012
Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Roles & Responsibilities
Chair – The Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council chair is responsible for guiding the
Council meetings, directing technical staff and facilitators in meeting the Council’s
responsibilities and bringing draft language based on members’ discussions and
recommendations to the full Council.
Members – Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council members will serve on the
committee representing key stakeholder interests. Members are responsible for engaging
in the process of discussion and developing draft recommendations for full Council
consideration. Members will be expected to convey the perspectives of the organizations and
groups they represent to the Council, and to ensure that their organizations and groups are
aware of discussions and recommendations of the Council.
FDOT Staff and Consultants – will assist the Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
with their meetings; support technical and information needs, including data and
information gathering and distribution; and draft recommendation language as directed for
full Council consideration.
General Public – will be invited to offer input and make suggestions for the Council to
consider at all meetings.
Professional Facilitation – The Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council will have a
facilitator assigned to assist the chair in agenda design, produce meeting summaries and
facilitate the Council’s efforts to build consensus on its recommendations.
1
BPPC Roles & Responsibilities
November 3, 2011
Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Procedures & Guidelines
The Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council will seek consensus decisions on its
recommendations to bicycle and pedestrian partners, including FDOT. General consensus
is a participatory process whereby, on matters of substance, the members strive for
agreements which all of the members can accept, support, live with or agree not to oppose.
The Council will develop its recommendations using consensus building techniques with
the assistance of facilitators, such as the use of brainstorming, acceptability ratings and
prioritizing approaches. In instances where, after vigorously exploring possible ways to
enhance the members’ support for the final decision on a package of recommendations, the
committee finds 100 percent acceptance or support is not achievable, final decisions will
require at least an 80 percent favorable vote of all members present and voting. This
super-majority decision rule underscores the importance of actively developing consensus
throughout the process on substantive issues with the participation of all members to arrive
at final recommendations with which all members can agree.
The Council chair will work with the facilitators to design both efficient and effective
agendas. The Council Chair will be responsible, in consultation with the Council members
and facilitators, for proposing meeting agenda topics. The Council meetings will be led by
the Chair and the use of a facilitator will enable the chair to participate directly in the
substantive process of seeking agreement on recommendations.
FDOT staff and
consultants will help the Council with information and meeting logistics.
Council members will be given full opportunity to rank, discuss and develop consensus on
all recommendations. Draft recommendations developed by the Council will ultimately be
compiled into an Annual Report for the Council’s review and approval.
1
BPPC Procedures & Guidelines
November 3, 2011
Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Membership List (as of February 12, 2014)
Jim Wood, Florida Department of Transportation (Chair)
Lisa Bacot, Florida Public Transportation Association
Adam Biblo, Florida Department of Economic Opportunity
Samantha Browne, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Karen Brunelle, Federal Highway Administration
Ken Bryan, Rails to Trails Conservancy
Timothy Bustos, Florida Bicycle Association (Alternate: Ted Wendler)
Leilani Gruener, Florida Department of Health
Sue Hann, Florida League of Cities
Thomas Hawkins, Florida League of Cities
Charlie Hood, Florida Department of Education (Alternate: Tracey Suber)
Laurie Koburger, Florida Department of Elder Affairs (Alternate: Marcus Richartz)
Zoe Mansfield, Florida League of Cities
Patricia Northey, Florida Association of Counties
Heather Murphy, Pedestrian Representative
Cyndi Stevenson, Florida Association of Counties (Alternate: Andrew Ames)
M. R. Street, Florida Department of Health
Sarah Ward, Metropolitan Planning Organization Advisory Council
Major Mark D. Welch, Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles
Vacant, Florida Association of Counties
Vacant, Transportation Disadvantaged Representative
Advisers/Non-Members
DeWayne Carver, FDOT Roadway Design Office, State Bicycle/Pedestrian Coordinator
Billy Hattaway, FDOT District One, Secretary
Trenda McPherson, FDOT Safety Office, State Bicycle/Pedestrian Safety Program Manager
1
BPPC Membership List
February 12, 2014
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Summary of Meeting
November 12, 2013
Council Members or designees present (in alphabetical order by last name):
Council Member, Organization
Designee (if applicable)
Bob Romig, FDOT (Chair)
Jim Wood
Lisa Bacot, Florida Public Transportation Association
Adam Biblo, Florida Dept. of Economic Opportunity
Mark Yelland
Samantha Browne, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Doug Alderson
Karen Brunelle, Federal Highway Administration
Carl Mikyska
Ken Bryan, Rails to Trails Conservancy
Timothy Bustos, Florida Bicycle Association
Laura Hallam
Leilani Gruener, Florida Department of Health
Sue Hann, Florida League of Cities
Thomas Hawkins, Florida League of Cities
Charlie Hood, Florida Department of Education
Tracey Suber
Laurie Koburger, Florida Department of Elder Affairs
Marcus Richartz
Zoe Mansfield, Florida League of Cities
Patricia Northey, Florida Association of Counties
Carol Pulley, Pedestrian Representative
Cyndi Stevenson, Florida Association of Counties
Andrew Ames
M.R. Street, Florida Department of Health
Sarah Ward, Metropolitan Planning Organization Advisory Council
Greg Burke
Major Mark Welch, Florida Dept. of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles
Vacant, Florida Association of Counties
Vacant, Transportation Disadvantaged Representative
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Summary of Meeting #11
November 12, 2013
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Facilitators:
Hal Beardall and Rafael Montalvo (FCRC Consensus Center)
FDOT & Support Staff:
Rob Magee, Melanie Weaver Carr, Paula San Gregorio (FDOT Office of Policy Planning); DeWayne
Carver and Mary Anne Koos (FDOT Roadway Design Office); Lora Hollingsworth and Trenda
McPherson (FDOT Safety Office) and Mike Neidhart (FDOT Office of Policy Planning/Gannett
Fleming)
Observers:
Melissa Vansicke and Sandra Whitehead (Florida Department of Health); Lynn Barr and Harry Reed
(Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency); Heather Murphy (Safe Routes to School National
Partnership); Grady Carrick (Enforcement Engineering, Inc.); and Henry Stevenson (Citizen)
Meeting Highlights
Please refer to the Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council page on the FDOT website,
http://www.FDOTBikePed.org, for all meeting materials, including the agenda, presentations, and
summary documentation.
Opening Remarks, Introductions, and Agenda Review
The eleventh Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council meeting commenced at 9:10 AM at
the FDOT Headquarters in the Burns Building Auditorium. Rob Magee, on behalf of alternate
Chairman Jim Wood, welcomed the Council members and thanked them for their participation.
Rob introduced the following three alternate Council members Laura Hallam (representing the
Florida Bicycle Association), Mark Yelland (representing the Florida Department of Economic
Opportunity), and Greg Burke (representing the Florida Metropolitan Planning Organization
Advisory Council).
As part of the introduction Rob reviewed the agenda and the meeting’s objectives. In addition Rob
provided a summary of the Council’s Charge and Purpose, each of which were provided to the
Council in their agenda packets.
Rob noted that the Council is a “partnership” in the truest sense, that FDOT gains information and
different perspectives on bicycling and pedestrian issues, while simultaneously Council members
take what they learn back to their respective partner agencies and organizations.
Hal Beardall of the Florida Conflict Resolution Consortium (FCRC) Consensus Center provided an
overview of the materials for today’s meeting. Hal noted that today’s meeting is the beginning of a
new year for the Council after it finalized recommendations for 2014 at its previous meeting. He
asked members to note the summary from the August meeting and offer any corrections to Rob
Magee. Mr. Beardall also reminded members that they are subject to the Sunshine Law.
Recap of BPPC Activities To-Date
Hal Beardall and Rafael Montalvo of the FCRC Consensus Center provided an update on the
Council’s activities, which included:
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Summary of Meeting #11
November 12, 2013
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council

The Council’s Mission/Objective
o to promote the livability, health and economic benefits of bicycle and pedestrian
activity by providing guidance to its partners and stakeholders on policy matters
affecting bicycle and pedestrian needs

The Council’s Charge
o Develop policy recommendations for bicycle and pedestrian partners
o Provide advice and input on bicycle and pedestrian issues
o Support identification and promotion of best practices
o Provide an opportunity to exchange and understand policy information

The Council’s Role and Responsibilities

Reviewed the Council’s 2012-2013 Recommendations
o Completing the System – pursue opportunities that contribute to the implementation
of bicycle and pedestrian connections
o Safety – focus on and promote bicycle and pedestrian safety through on-going and new
initiatives, driver awareness training, and law enforcement training
o Cultural Change – FDOT and its partners should promote the use of design discretion
to accommodate bicycle and pedestrian needs and support policies that encourage
mode-shift
o Health – FDOT and its partners should promote the State Health Improvement Plan
(SHIP) through polices that advance bicycle and pedestrian transportation for school,
work, recreation and other purposes

Reviewed the Council’s 2013-2014 Focus Areas
o Completing the System
 Bridge Designs
 Transit & Bicycle/Pedestrian Connections
 Greenways & Trails
o Safety
 Local Law Enforcement & Community Traffic Safety Teams
o Cultural Change
 Education of Driver Attitude Towards Bicyclists and Pedestrians
 Pedestrian Safety Action Plans
 Legislation, Regulation and Policy
o Health
 Healthy Weight Initiative
Discussed the Council’s Work Plan will be developed using these four broad categories
(Completing the System, Safety, Cultural Change, and Health) to set the stage for the coming
year’s work.

Review and Discussion of Draft BPPC Work Plan
Hal Beardall provided a review and discussion of the Council’s draft Work Plan, which features a
meeting schedule along with major tasks to be completed at subsequent meetings for the next year.
Tasks identified within the Work Plan have been designed to address specific focus areas identified
for 2013-2014.
3
Summary of Meeting #11
November 12, 2013
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Update on the Limited Bridge Access Study
Ms. Mary Ann Koos, FDOT Roadway Design Office, provided an overview of the Limited Access
Study Pilot Project on Bridges. The legislature directed the FDOT to identify three limited access
highway approaches and bridge segments over water bodies by October 2012 and open them to
bicycle traffic by March 2013. As part of this “pilot” study FDOT will submit a report to the
Governor and Legislature by September 2015. The three limited access bridges that are being
evaluated as part of the Pilot Project are:
o
o
o
Pineda Causeway,
William Lehman Causeway, and
Julia Tuttle Causeway
Design features were created for pedestrians and cameras were set up along the bridges to assess
behavioral factors. During the discussion of these projects Council members were briefed on some
of the unique aspects of each project; such as special green pavement markings, warning signs, speed
limits, and lane-widths. It was noted that the green bike lane pavement markings have been
successful in other cities by providing a visual delineation for motorists to see where bike lanes are
located. In addition to these items, a new research project was also discussed—one that is being
incorporated with the Limited Access Pilot Project, which involves adding additional lane-width to
the outside travel lanes.
A few policy lessons were noted that the Council may want to consider for future reference:

Need to review why some roads (such as the Pilot Project facilities) are classified as “limited
access”

Avoid the creation of travel barriers through the construction or reconstruction of roadway
facilities – need to have accommodations for bicyclists and pedestrians

Pavement markings such as the green bike lanes seem to work in reducing crash rates
Following Ms. Koos’ update, members were asked if they had any comments or items needing
additional clarification. (Note: responses from staff are indicated in italics.)
Member Questions and Comments:
Is driver behavior changing as a result of these projects?
Yes, with the new pavement markings drivers are becoming accustomed to the presence of bikes on these
facilities.
Why has there been opposition from the city regarding these projects?
The city’s perception is they think that allowing bicyclists on these facilities is dangerous, and therefore
is a liability for the city. However, since these are State Roads, the cities are not liable.
If you build it they will come-does this always happen? Or do you need to build where people
already are?
We didn’t see a lot of riders before these facilities were built, which led us to conclude that there was
pent-up demand for these facilities; people are looking for ways to move more, eat less, and be healthier.
We find that when we build these facilities there is a latent demand, and as a result we see increased
ridership. We are looking at making these facilities context sensitive, which means that they need to be
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Summary of Meeting #11
November 12, 2013
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
designed differently based on the urban, suburban, or rural context in which they exist. We need to be
able to explain why these facilities are located here vs. elsewhere as well as develop criteria for design
standards.
Is there much coordination with local governments during these projects?
Yes, we coordinate with our local partners as we work towards implementation.
It is interesting that bikes are prohibited from riding on these limited access causeways. What are
the implications if something goes wrong? Do these facilities promote pedestrian use since bikes are
being allowed to access them?
Police are not enforcing non-pedestrian use of these facilities. We need to develop and design facilities
for the people that are using them.
A potential recommendation that the Council may want to consider for the future is:

To build on the success of these three Pilot Projects – consider expanding this program to
similar facilities around the State.
“Roll Call” Project: Law Enforcement Awareness and Action
Mr. Grady Carrick, a former charter member of the BPPC, gave a presentation on a video that he is
currently working on for Law Enforcement, entitled “Roll Call.” The discussion included a review
of the information that would be needed to get law enforcement on board to promote safety and
reduce bicycle and pedestrian fatalities. The video would include an introduction of the issues,
nature of vehicle/bike/pedestrian crashes, behavior, common violations, laws, and enforcement
outcomes. It was noted that two videos would be created, one on bicycle safety and another for
pedestrian safety.
Following Mr. Carrick’s presentation, members were asked if they had any comments or items
needing additional clarification. (Note: responses from staff are indicated in italics.)
Member Questions and Comments:
It is interesting when you consider that people often yell or throw objects at cyclists, and yet
bicyclists are “presumed guilty” when crashes occur with cars.
We have heard this too, and it is something that needs to be dealt with.
Will you be providing educational materials to Police Officers once they see the video? How do you
get the resources and videos in the hands of law enforcement? We have great safety products but
we need to get them in the hands of the right people; delivering the message is key to making it
work.
It would be good to reach out to the local Community Traffic Safety Teams (CTSTs) to help us provide
safety and training materials to agencies. We are including some of the work that was in your video in
what we are creating.
When will the videos be ready?
We are looking to find a production company to film the videos sometime in December 2013, with
production and distribution in 2014.
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Summary of Meeting #11
November 12, 2013
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Side swipes occur when roads are narrow, and law enforcement tends to tell bicyclists to move over
which causes confusion when, by law, the bicyclist has the right of way to be there. The rules are
difficult to delineate; we need to make the law clearer and easier for law enforcement officers to
understand. The TIP Card only provides a summary of bicycle and pedestrian laws, which
potentially can cause further confusion since the summary does not provide the entire language or
nuance of every law related to bicyclist and pedestrians. It was noted that we should emphasize the
three-foot rule, and look at when passing is safe.
Three feet does not feel like a safe passing distance between bicyclists and large vehicles at high
speeds. Is the three foot rule on the Driver’s Test?
Four out of the twenty questions on the driver’s test include bicycle and pedestrian related issues.
In addition, training related to bicycle and pedestrian safety should be offered to both law
enforcement officers as well as judges. Having judges mandate bicycle and pedestrian safety courses
may be a good tool as well. Also, bringing in celebrities may assist in getting the message across.
Potential recommendations that the Council may want to consider for the future are:

Prosecution

Resources for law enforcement officers when interacting with bicyclists and pedestrians

Clarification of legislative language

Manners (etiquette) vs. law
Healthy Weight Initiative
Ms. Sandra Whitehead, Florida Department of Health (FDOH), presented the Florida Surgeon
General’s Healthy Weight Initiative, which is examining linkages between health and the built
environment. One of the goals of this initiative is to reduce the number of Floridian’s who are at an
unhealthy weight by five percent.
This will be accomplished through the following initiatives:

Provide technical assistance for Complete Streets policies

Coordinate with FDEP on Greenways and Trails projects

Encourage public participation in the Walking Challenge
Following Ms. Whitehead’s presentation, members were asked if they had any comments or items
needing additional clarification. (Note: responses from staff are indicated in italics.)
Member Questions and Comments:
Is there an outreach effort with major healthcare providers that we could sponsor?
In areas like Orlando and Jacksonville, healthcare providers are engaged, for example with the
Coalition of Hospitals. In that instance we are working with local Health Councils. Another example
is Healthy Volusia in Volusia County, where healthcare providers are also involved.
Some companies provide reduced health insurance rates if their employees meet certain cholesterol
or wellness levels.
Yes, this is a great idea.
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Summary of Meeting #11
November 12, 2013
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
FDOT has Performance Measures on “mobility” and “percent of bicycle and pedestrian facility
coverage” that positively impacts health, which FDOH may be interested in.
We have been keeping an eye on this.
Potential recommendations that the Council may want to consider for the future are:

Complete Streets Policies

Tie the State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) goals and objectives back to the BPPC Focus
Areas and Recommendations
Review of the Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety Coalition’s Coordination of Legislation, Regulation
and Policy
Ms. Melanie Weaver Carr, FDOT Office of Policy Planning, gave an update on the status of the
Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety Coalition’s Legislation, Regulation and Policy subcommittee. Council
members were briefed on the work that is currently underway as well as future efforts by the
Coalition.
After Ms. Carr’s update, members were asked if they had any comments or items needing additional
clarification. (Note: responses from staff are indicated in italics.)
Member Questions and Comments:
What does it mean for local jurisdictions that FDOT is looking to adopt a “Complete Streets” policy?
FDOT is looking to incorporate a Complete Streets” (CS) policy that can be applied to both the
Department’s Plans Preparation Manual (PPM) as well as to the Florida Greenbook. The PPM is
used for the design and construction of state roads, while the Florida Greenbook is used by local
governments for the design and construction of non-state roads. The development of a statewide CS
policy will provide a level of consistency that currently does not exist, especially at the local level where
some local governments have already adopted CS policies. It should also be noted that the Florida
Greenbook has an existing chapter titled Traditional Neighborhood Design (TND) that contains CS
concepts within it.
Who is responsible for developing an area’s Pedestrian Safety Action Plan (PSAP)?
PSAP’s are typically prepared by metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) or local governments
(cities or counties).
Are MPOs required to develop Pedestrian Safety Action Plans (PSAPs)?
MPOs (or any local government) are not required to develop PSAPs – they are optional. However,
MPO’s are required to accommodate bicycle and pedestrian planning within their planning process.
Have we developed any legislative plans and/or policies?
We have not developed any specific legislative plans and/or policies. The work of this Council is to
draw up recommendations and determine how we best transmit those recommendations back to our
partner organizations.
It was noted that the language on the bicycle and pedestrian law TIP Card is confusing. It was
suggested that this area could be a good avenue for the Council to work with the Pedestrian &
Bicycle Safety Coalition’s Legislation, Regulation and Policy subcommittee.
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Summary of Meeting #11
November 12, 2013
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
It was also suggested the Council should consider a recommendation related to the next federal
transportation bill that federal dollars continue to be available to fix the problems of bicycle and
pedestrian safety that we have been discussing today. A reduction in federal dollars that supports
safe bicycling and walking is not conducive to making our communities more livable.
Potential recommendations that the Council may want to consider for the future are:

Complete Streets Policies

Pedestrian Safety Action Plans

Clarification of legislative language on the bicycle and pedestrian law TIP Card

Bicycle and pedestrian funding in the next Federal Transportation Bill
Opportunity for Updates from Agencies and Other Partners
Florida Department of Transportation
Jim Wood, FDOT Office of Policy Planning acting Council Chair, proposed a concept to use State
Trust Fund dollars to support the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s (FDEP) Priority
Trails network. Current law does not provide for this however, it does not prohibit it either. A key
provision of this proposal would be that if State Trust Fund dollars are used, then there would have
to be a local sponsor. The proposal would also require that the local sponsor/government be the
maintaining agency. This can provide an opportunity to have a little extra money go towards these
types of trail projects.
This project has advanced one of the Gulf Cost-to-Atlantic trail segments by one year within the
program, and they are currently looking to see if there are other segments that could be advanced
forward.
Florida Department of Education
Charlie Hood, Florida Department of Education, mentioned that the Lake County school district has
decided to withdraw “Courtesy” busing in Lake County. This proposal has been met with
opposition from parents. Since then, Lake County has implemented a “pay to ride” program. They
have also adopted local hazardous walking criteria to assess areas that are hazardous for walking to
school. And finally, twenty-nine states including Florida participated in a nation-wide survey on
the number of drivers that, on average, illegally pass school buses. Data from the survey, entitled
the “2013 Stop Arm Violation Survey,” showed that Florida ranked the second highest of the number
of states that participated in the survey, second only to California.
Review of Best Practices Tool on Website and New Additions
Mike Neidhart, with Gannett Fleming, Inc./FDOT Office of Policy Planning, provided an overview
of the latest updates to the Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council’s website, which can be found
at (www.FDOTBikePed.org). Council members should send their suggestions for highlighting “best
practices” to Rob Magee (BPPC project coordinator) for review with the full Council at the next
meeting.
Following Mr. Neidhart’s presentation, members were asked if there were any items needing
additional clarification. (Note: responses from staff are indicated in italics.)
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Summary of Meeting #11
November 12, 2013
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Member Comments:
Can you send out e-mail alerts for when there are major changes/updates to the Council’s website?
Yes, we can send out e-mail alerts when there are major changes or updates to the Council’s website.
Public Comment
An opportunity was given to members of the public to offer comments or suggestions for the Council
to consider. No public comments were offered.
Next Steps
Mr. Beardall reminded members that the next meeting will be scheduled sometime in
January/February 2014 based on the draft Work Plan discussed earlier today. He also reminded
members of their role representing their organizations or jurisdictions at the Council meetings, but
also their role in sharing information from the Council’s meeting back to those they represent.
Based on member comments, staff will undertake the following actions:

Revise the draft Work Plan based on the identified topics, and

Set date for next meeting as soon as possible
The next meeting will likely be scheduled sometime in February.
Meeting Evaluation Survey
Hal Beardall asked members to fill out the meeting evaluation form (see results in Appendix A).
Adjourn
The Chair thanked members for their participation. Hearing no additional comment or issues to be
discussed, the meeting was adjourned at 2:30 pm.
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Summary of Meeting #11
November 12, 2013
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
APPENDIX A: Meeting Evaluation Summary
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
11th Council Meeting
Tallahassee, Florida
November 12, 2013 – 9:00 am to 3:45 pm



Agree

Disagree
CIRCLE ONE
5
4
3
2
1
Summary
WERE THE MEETING OBJECTIVES MET?

To review and discuss draft BPPC Work Plan for 2013-14
7
1
1
0
0
4.67

To receive update on FDOT’s Limited Bridge Access Study
6
3
0
0
0
4.67

To receive and discuss “Roll Call” Project presentation
8
1
0
0
0
4.89

To receive and discuss Healthy Weight Initiative presentation
7
2
0
0
0
4.78

To review and discuss Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety Coalition’s
coordination of legislation, regulation and policy
5
3
0
0
0
4.67

To receive updates on other related Agency and Other Partner plans
7
2
0
0
0
4.78

To review and discuss use of the Council Website to promote best
practices
7
2
0
0
0
4.78
MEETING ORGANIZATION

Background and agenda packet were helpful
9
0
0
0
0
5.00

Presentations were effective and informative
7
2
1
0
0
4.78

Plenary discussion format was effective
8
1
0
0
0
4.89

Facilitator guided participant efforts effective
9
0
0
0
0
5.00

Participation was balanced
8
1
0
0
0
4.89
What Did You Like Best About the Meeting?






Presentations
Very organized and informative
It feels as if we are making progress on bicycle and pedestrian issues
Meet and greet
Good tie of the presentations to the four topic areas
I thought the presentations were very informative
10
Summary of Meeting #11
November 12, 2013
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
What Could Be Improved?




Coffee? Also a little cold in the room
Ask all speakers to use the microphone - one talked softly and I had trouble hearing comments
Would like to have had the work plan discussion at the beginning
I think making presentation discussion more relatable to the Council’s activities/charge would help
our recommendations
Other Comments (use the back if necessary)


Great use of my time!
When Rob sends meeting notices, remind us to provide items for agency updates
11
Summary of Meeting #11
November 12, 2013
Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Florida BPPC Focus Areas for 2013-14
Council members said they would like to continue with the current focus areas, but with a few additional
or different topics:




Completing the System
Safety
Cultural Change
Health
In addition to or within the focus areas there was interest in hearing from each of the partners at the table
on their respective efforts and initiatives related to enhancing bicycle and pedestrian access and safety.
Council members identified the following potential topics within each focus area:
Recap of 2012/2013 Council Recommendations

Completing the System – pursue opportunities that contribute to the implementation
of bicycle and pedestrian connections

Safety – focus on and promote bicycle and pedestrian safety through on-going and new
initiatives, driver awareness training, and law enforcement training

Cultural Change – FDOT and its partners should promote the use of design discretion
to accommodate bicycle and pedestrian needs and support policies that encourage
mode-shift

Health – FDOT and its partners should promote the State Health Improvement Plan
(SHIP) through polices that advance bicycle and pedestrian transportation for school,
work, recreation and other purposes
Potential Focus Areas for 2013-2014

Completing the System
o Bridge Designs
o Transit & Bicycle/Pedestrian Connections
o Greenways & Trails

Safety
o Local Law Enforcement & Community Traffic Safety Teams

Cultural Change
o Education of Driver Attitude Towards Bicyclists and Pedestrians
o Pedestrian Safety Action Plans
o Legislation, Regulation and Policy

Health
o Healthy Weight Initiative
(* Note land use and design was identified as a cross cutting issue, including walkable/bikeable
communities, multi-modal element of local comp plans, and promoting good designs)
1
BPPC Recommendations & Focus Areas
February 12, 2014
Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
Draft 2013-2014 Work Plan
MEETING 1 – November 12, 2013







Review and discuss draft BPPC Work Plan for 2013-14
Receive update on FDOT’s Limited Bridge Access Study (Completing the System)
Receive and discuss “Roll Call” Project presentation (Safety)
Receive and discuss Healthy Weight Initiative presentation (Health)
Review and discuss Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety Coalition’s coordination of
legislation, regulation and policy (Cultural Change)
Receive updates on other related Agency and Other Partner plans
Review and discuss use of the Council Website to promote best practices
MEETING 2 –February 12, 2014





Receive an update on Council’s previous recommendations
Identify and discuss possible framework for developing BPPC recommendations for
the 2013-14 Annual Report
Review and discuss Pedestrian Safety Action Plans
Receive updates on related Agency and Other Partner plans
Receive an update on Legislative activities
MEETING 3 – April 2014






Receive updates on other related Agency and Other Partner plans
Receive and discuss “Roll Call” Project Video – Law Enforcement Awareness and
Action (Safety)
Review and discuss Broward County “Complete Streets” (with DOH role)
Review and discuss bicycle and pedestrian connections to transit (Completing the
System)
Review and discuss addressing drivers’ attitudes towards bicyclists and
pedestrians (Cultural Change and Safety)
Review and Discuss Potential BPPC Recommendations
MEETING 4 – August 2014

Discuss potential Council recommendations for BPPC Annual Report

Review Draft Annual Report
Discuss candidate Focus Areas for 2015

MEETING 5 – November 2014



Refine Council recommendations
Finalize BPPC Annual Report
Identify candidate Focus Areas for 2015
1
Draft BPPC 2013-2014 Work Plan
February 12, 2014
Florida Department of
TRANSPORTATION
Framework for Developing
Recommendations for the Annual
Report
Presentation to: Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
February 12, 2014
Rob Magee
Florida Department of Transportation
1
Council’s Purpose and Mission
♦
Purpose:
- To make recommendations on the state’s walking,
bicycling and trail policies, programs and facilities
♦ Mission:
- To promote the livability, health and economic
benefits of bicycle and pedestrian activity by
providing guidance to FDOT, its partners and
stakeholders on policy matters and issues affecting
the bicycle and pedestrian transportation needs of
the state
Florida Department of Transportation
2
Council’s Background
♦
Founded April 2010
♦
Council has met 12 times since its first meeting
♦
Opened lines of communication between partner
agencies
♦
Prepared 2 Annual Summary Reports
♦
Year 1 Focus (2010/2011)
♦ Investment Priorities
♦ Performance Measures
♦ Safety
♦ Coordination
♦ Funding
Florida Department of Transportation
3
Council’s Background (cont.)
♦
Year 2 Focus (2012/2013)
♦ Contributions to Connecting the System
♦ Safety
♦ Cultural Change
♦ Health
♦
Year 3 Focus (2013/2014)
♦ Completing the System
♦ Safety
♦ Cultural Change
♦ Health
Florida Department of Transportation
4
Council’s 2013/2014 Schedule
♦ November 2013
♦ February 2014
♦ April 2014
♦ August 2014
♦ November 2014
(3rd Annual Report)
Florida Department of Transportation
5
Step Back
♦
Council’s Role
♦ Develop recommendations
♦
Organize/categorize Subject Areas
♦ Identify focus areas
♦
Framework for Moving Forward
♦ Advocacy
♦ Implementation of recommendations
Florida Department of Transportation
6
Council’s 2012/2013 Recommendations
♦
Completing the System – pursue opportunities that
contribute to the implementation of bicycle and
pedestrian connections
♦
Safety – focus on and promote bicycle and pedestrian
safety through on-going and new initiatives, driver
awareness training, and law enforcement training
♦
Cultural Change – FDOT and its partners should
promote the use of design discretion to
accommodate bicycle and pedestrian needs and
support polices that encourage mode-shift
Florida Department of Transportation
7
Council’s 2012/2013 Recommendations (cont.)
♦
Health – FDOT and its partners should promote the
State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) through
policies that advance bicycle and pedestrian
transportation for school, work, recreation and other
purposes
Florida Department of Transportation
8
Council’s 2013/2014 Focus Areas
♦
Continue with Previous Year’s Focus Areas
♦
Completing the System
♦
Safety
♦
Cultural Change
♦
Health
(*Note land use and design was identified as a cross cutting
issue, including walkable/bikeable communities, multi-modal
element of local comp plans, and promoting good designs)
Florida Department of Transportation
9
Organization/Agency Role
Partners
Advocate
♦
Continuum – each
organization / agency
incorporates aspects of
each within their role
on the Council
Provider/
Planner
User
♦
Agencies / Organizations:
-
FHWA
FDOT
DEO
DHSMV
DOE
DOH
DEA
DEP
-
Florida Department of Transportation
Rails to Trails Conservancy
Florida Bicycle Association
Florida Public Transportation
Association
Florida League of Cities
Florida Association of
Counties
Pedestrian Representative
Transportation Disadvantaged
Representative
Metropolitan Planning
Organization Advisory Council
10
DEO Example: Technical Assistance
Florida Department of Transportation
11
DEO Example: Why Is It Important?
Florida Department of Transportation
12
DEO Example: Best Practices
Florida Department of Transportation
13
Broad Areas & Relation to Council’s Focus
Part 1 - Increase Access, Availability and Use of
Facilities
♦ Completing the System
♦ Health
Part 2 - Overall Safety of Present and Planned
Facilities
♦ Safety
♦ Cultural Change
Florida Department of Transportation
14
Part 1: Increased Access, Availability & Use
♦
Support of Florida Trails System
(Florida Greenways & Trails System Plan)
♦
Bicycle Access to Limited Access Facilities
(Legislation/Pilot Projects)
♦
Health Programs based on Exercise
(Florida Surgeon General’s Healthy Weight Initiative)
♦
Finance / Increased Funding
Florida Department of Transportation
15
Part 2: Overall Safety of Facilities
♦
♦
Problem Clear- The Top 4 unsafe cities in 2002 and
2011 were in Florida:
1. Orlando
3. Jacksonville
2. Tampa-St. Pete-Clearwater
4. Miami-Ft. Lauderdale
Approach
♦ Programs
♦ Policies
♦ Implementation/Operational
Strategic Highway
Safety Plan
Pedestrian and Bicycle
Strategic Safety Plan
Council’s
Recommendations
♦
Not clear as to how this fits together – how are we
operationalizing policies/goals
♦
Framework in place but is not tied together
Florida Department of Transportation
Local Level
Implementation
16
Approach of Safety Programs
Safety Approach Continuum
Reactive
Proactive
Fix
Prevent
♦
Enforcement
♦
Complete Streets
♦
Hot Spot Identification
♦
Education
♦
Safety Audits
Florida Department of Transportation
17
FDOT/FHWA Approach
♦
Immediate Response to Problem
♦
Secretary’s Bicycle/Pedestrian
Focused Initiative
♦
Safety campaign for
designated urban areas
Florida Department of Transportation
18
Planned Response (Institutional)
♦ Florida Strategic Highway Safety Plan
(SHSP)
♦
Required by the FHWA
♦ Florida Pedestrian and Bicycle Strategic
Safety Plan (PBSSP)
♦
Provides technical assistance and
resources
Strategic Highway
Safety Plan
Pedestrian and Bicycle
Strategic Safety Plan
Council’s
Recommendations
Local Level
Implementation
Florida Department of Transportation
19
Florida’s SHSP
♦
SHSP speaks to Vulnerable Road Users (bicyclists &
pedestrians)
♦
SHSP identifies 6 strategies for bike/ped which we
matched with the Council’s 4 Focus Areas:
Increase awareness and understanding of safety issues related
to Vulnerable Road Users; (Safety)
Encourage adequate funding levels for effective pedestrian
and bicycle safety programs and initiatives;
(Safety, Completing the System, Cultural Change)
Increase compliance with traffic laws and regulations related to
pedestrian and bicycle safety through education and
enforcement; (Safety, Cultural Change)
Promote, plan, and implement built environments (urban,
suburban, and rural) which encourage safe bicycling and
walking; and (Safety, Cultural Change, Health)
Develop and use a systemic approach to identify locations and
behaviors prone to pedestrian and bicycle crashes and
implement multidisciplinary countermeasures;
(Safety, Completing the System, Cultural Change)
Support national, state, and local legislative initiatives and
policies that promote bicycle and pedestrian safety; (Safety)
Florida Department of Transportation
20
Florida’s PBSSP
♦ Expands on the SHSP
by Providing Detailed
Objectives & Strategies
to Improve Bicycle and
Pedestrian Safety
Florida Department of Transportation
21
Florida’s PBSSP (cont.)
♦
Goal 3.10 (Outreach Program): Advocate
extensive community involvement in
pedestrian and bicycle safety education and
skills training by involving individuals and
organizations outside the traditional highway
safety community, to include a focus on older
pedestrians, young children, and immigrant
populations.
♦
Objective 3.10.7: Develop campaigns
targeting transit users that promote
pedestrian and bicycle safety.
♦
Objective 3.10.8: Increase awareness of
the safety, accessibility, and mobility needs
of aging pedestrians and bicyclists.
Florida Department of Transportation
22
Federal Resources/Programs
♦
Training, Technical Support & Funding
♦
Sample Resources Available from FHWA that
Promotes Pedestrian Safety
♦
A Guide for Maintaining Pedestrian Facilities for
Enhanced Safety
♦
Pedestrian Safer Journey 2013
♦
Pedsafe 2013: Pedestrian Safety Guide and
Countermeasure Selection System
♦
Proven Countermeasures for Pedestrian Safety
Florida Department of Transportation
23
Federal Resources/Programs (cont.)
Florida Department of Transportation
24
Federal Resources/Programs (cont.)
Florida Department of Transportation
25
Federal Resources/Programs (cont.)
Florida Department of Transportation
26
Operationalizing Safety
These Provide Good Guidance, But How
Do We Operationalize Pedestrian
Safety?
Working with our Partners at the local level and
Partners from around the table to Promote and
Implement
Strategic Highway
Safety Plan
Pedestrian and Bicycle
Strategic Safety Plan
Council’s
Recommendations
Opportunity
Use
Local Level Implementation
Florida Department of Transportation
27
Operationalizing Plans
♦
Programs/Policies
♦
Translate to Operational
♦
How Does This Fit Together?
♦
FDOT/FHWA Role
♦
Tools
♦
Pedestrian Safety Action Plans
♦
Road Safety Audits
♦
Planning Emphasis Areas
♦
Planning Programs
-
Local Government Comprehensive Plans
Long Range Transportation Plans
Complete Streets
Transit Development Plans
Florida Department of Transportation
Strategic Highway
Safety Plan
Pedestrian and Bicycle
Strategic Safety Plan
Council’s
Recommendations
Local Level
Implementation
28
Local Safety Program
♦
Who Is Doing It?
♦
Is It Required?
♦
How Is It Funded?
♦
Is It Effective?
♦
Could There Be Synergy From Other Programs Or
Partners?
Florida Department of Transportation
29
Context – Part of Annual Report
♦
Recommend
♦
Promote
♦
Provide Guidance
Florida Department of Transportation
30
How Does It Fit Together?
Legend
Planning Programs
Tools
Road
Safety
Audits
Advocacy
Groups
FHWA
MPO LRTPs
Entities
Entities
Partners
Local
Gov’t
Planning
Programs
Safety
Countermeasures
DOE
Local Gov’t Plans
Partners
MPOs
Pedestrian Bicycle
Safety Plans
Pedestrian
Safety Action
Plans
Transit
Development
Plans
FDOT
DOH
Florida Department of Transportation
31
Questions or
Comments?
Florida Department of Transportation
32
Florida Department of
TRANSPORTATION
Pedestrian Safety Action Plans:
New State Planning Emphasis Area
Presentation to: Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
February 12, 2014
Rob Magee
Florida Department of Transportation
1
New State Planning Emphasis Area (PEA)
♦
New State PEA – Pedestrian Safety Action Plans (PSAPs)
♦
PEAs are topics that MPOs should focus on during the
coming year
♦
MPOs incorporate PEAs into their bi-annual Unified
Planning Work Program (UPWP) prior to adoption in
June
Florida Department of Transportation
2
Why this PEA?
♦
Florida’s 2011 pedestrian fatality rate was nearly double
the national average
♦
Florida had the highest pedestrian fatality rate in
the nation
♦
Florida has the top 4 metropolitan areas on the list
of “most dangerous large metro areas for walking in the
U.S” (Dangerous by Design report)
Orlando
Tampa
Florida Department of Transportation
Jacksonville
Miami
3
Pedestrian Safety Action Plans (PSAPs)
♦
Developed by local communities (local
governments or MPOs) to improve pedestrian
safety
♦
Meant to help local communities know where
and how best to address pedestrian safety
issues
♦
Certain areas have developed these beneficial
plans
♦
PSAPs will help communities implement the
goals of Florida’s Strategic Highway Safety Plan
and Florida’s Pedestrian and Bicycle Strategic
Safety Plan
Florida Department of Transportation
4
Adopted PSAPs in Florida
Florida Department of Transportation
5
Operationalizing Plans
♦
Provide Operational Link:
- Florida Strategic Highway
Safety Plan (SHSP)
- Florida Pedestrian and Bicycle
Strategic Safety Plan (PBSSP)
Strategic Highway
Safety Plan
Pedestrian and Bicycle
Strategic Safety Plan
Council’s
Recommendations
- Pedestrian Safety Action Plans
(PSAPs)
Local Level
Implementation
Florida Department of Transportation
6
How to Develop a Plan for Your Community
Florida Department of Transportation
7
Advantages of PSAPs
♦
Tailored to specific problems and needs of the community
♦
Developed by community stakeholders
♦
Intended to improve pedestrian safety in the community
♦
Provides specific guidance for implementation
Florida Department of Transportation
8
Specific Guidance / Operationalize
♦
Analyze Data
♦
Identify Problems
♦
Provide Countermeasures
♦
Prioritize Actions
♦
Develop Strategies
Florida Department of Transportation
9
Example: Pinellas County MPO’s PSAP
Florida Department of Transportation
10
Pinellas PSAP Recommendations
Florida Department of Transportation
11
Pinellas PSAP Action Plan Summary
Florida Department of Transportation
12
Example: MetroPlan Orlando’s PSAP
Florida Department of Transportation
13
Key Actions from MetroPlan’s PSAP
♦
Ongoing support for educational and enforcement efforts to
improve driver and pedestrian behavior; updates on these
strategies can be found at the Best Foot Forward website
(iyield4peds.org)
♦
Creation of a list of priority pedestrian safety corridors that
will be studied in detail using the Federal Highway
Administration’s Pedestrian Road Safety Audit process
♦
Findings from these audits will result in specific physical
improvements and educational and enforcement strategies;
the physical improvement needs will be placed on a separate
Pedestrian Safety Priority Project List
♦
Identification of lighting needs to improve pedestrian safety
Florida Department of Transportation
14
Specific Identification of Pedestrian Crashes
Florida Department of Transportation
15
Land Use, Transit, & Pedestrian Crashes
Florida Department of Transportation
16
Specific Corridor Analysis
Florida Department of Transportation
17
Development of Counter Measures
Florida Department of Transportation
18
Development of Counter Measures (cont.)
Florida Department of Transportation
19
Strategies
♦
Develop Safety Improvements
Priority Lists
♦
Pedestrian Road Safety
Audit Priority List
♦
Lighting Priority List
Florida Department of Transportation
20
Pedestrian Road Safety Audit Priority List
Florida Department of Transportation
21
Lighting Priority List
Florida Department of Transportation
22
Conclusions
♦
Great Tool
♦
Not Required
♦
Needs A Local Champion
♦
Funding Available, but no Specific
Pool of Funds
♦
Strategic Highway
Safety Plan
Pedestrian and Bicycle
Strategic Safety Plan
Council’s
Recommendations
FDOT Working with MPOs thru new
State Planning Emphasis Area
Pedestrian Safety
Actions Plans
Florida Department of Transportation
23
Questions or
Comments?
Florida Department of Transportation
24
Florida Planning Emphasis Area - 2014
Florida has been ranked in the top five states in regards to pedestrian and bicyclist deaths over
the past decade. A concerted effort from all partners involved is needed to reduce both
pedestrian and bicycle crashes. The Florida Highway Safety Plan contains a vulnerable road
users emphasis area. A major strategy within this area is to develop and use a systematic
approach to identify locations and behaviors prone to pedestrian and bicycle crashes and
implement multidisciplinary countermeasures. The FDOT Safety Office now has the ability to
identify clusters of bicycle and pedestrian safety crashes on a statewide basis. The system they
have developed can also access accident reports associated with the crashes to provide specific
information in addition to the locational data. Initial “hot spot “maps have been distributed to
the Districts during the first quarter of 2014.
A Pedestrian Safety Action Plan (PSAP) is intended to provide a guide to help state and local
officials know where to begin to address pedestrian safety issues. It is intended to assist
agencies in further enhancing their existing pedestrian safety program and activities, including
identifying safety problems and selecting optimal solutions. Several Florida MPOs including
MetroPlan Orlando and Pinellas MPO already have developed and adopted along with their
partners pedestrian safety action plans. FHWA provides extensive resources and guidance
regarding the development of PSAPs. Training will be available within the State in the
upcoming year.
A major planning emphasis area for this year for the MPOs is to develop or further implement a
Pedestrian Safety Action Plan. The objective is to specifically adopt and implement a process to
identify locations and behaviors prone to historical pedestrian bicycle crashes and develop with
their applicable partners countermeasures designed to eliminate them.
FHWA RESOURCES
http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/ped_bike/ped_focus/docs/fhwasa0512.pdf
http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/ped_bike/ped_focus/
PEDESTRIAN SAFETY ACTION PLANS EXAMPLES
http://www.pinellascounty.org/mpo/docs/Pinellas%20PSAP%20Final%20Report%20083109.pdf
http://www.metroplanorlando.com/files/view/pedestrian-safety-action-plan-july-2012.pdf
Division of Recreation and Parks
The Office of Greenways
and Trails Overview
Doug Alderson, Assistant Bureau Chief
Office of Greenways and Trails
FGTS Plan
2013-2017
The Plan outlines the trail
system vision for Florida.
It identifies clear linkages,
establishes priorities, and
provides a framework for
closing key trail gaps.
2
Plan Alignment
The plan aligns the FGTS with
complementary planning efforts
Economy
5 Year Strategic Plan Department of Economic Opportunity
Tourism
VISIT FLORIDA Destination Marketing Plan
Health
State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP)
Transportation
Florida Transportation Plan (FTP) 2060
Recreation
Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP)
Florida National Scenic Trail Plan (USFS)
Conservation
Cooperative Conservation Blueprint & Wildlife Action Plan
3
An Economic Giant
According to the 2012
Outdoor Industry
Association (OIA)
report, outdoor
recreation generates
big economic impacts
for Florida:
$38.3 billion in consumer spending
Nearly 330,000 jobs
$2.5 billion in state and local taxes
$10.7 billion in wages
Outdoor Industries Association, 2012. The Outdoor Recreation Economy, Florida
4
Paddle Florida/Bike Florida
Large events bring in
revenue and expose more
people to a particular area
and resource, prompting
return visits.
Bike Florida’s 2012
Forgotten Coast 7-day
event produced
an estimated $533,883
in local economic
impact*.
*2012 Bike Florida participant surveys
5
The Maps
Land Trails Opportunity Map
Paddling Trails Opportunity Map
In 2012, OGT worked with planning partners and trail users to document
existing, planned and conceptual trails, and ecological greenways.
6
Determining Priority Maps
Land Trails Opportunity Map
Priority Trails Map
Paddling Trails Opportunity Map
Through six public workshops held throughout the state and an extensive
evaluation process, OGT staff delineated the priority trails network.
7
Priority Trails Network
The priority trails
network builds on
previous state
investments,
supports longdistance and loop
trails, increases
access to
resources and
connects
populations.
8
Priority Trails Gap Map
The Priority Trails
Gap Map
delineates the
unacquired and
undeveloped
segments within
the Priority Trails
Map.
9
Top Tier Regional Trails
In December 2013, OGT finished identifying top tier projects within
each Florida Department of
Transportation District.
10
Closing Gaps in the FGTS
Florida Greenways and Trails System
Top Tier Projects
statewide list by district/region
Gap Analysis
by district/region
Gap Identification
by district/region
Priority Trails
statewide
TRAIL PROJECT
Sabal Palm Trail
SPONSOR(S)
TRAIL PROJECT
East Regional
Ponce MPO
De Leon Trail
ESTIMATED
SPONSOR(S)
COST
TRAIL PROJECT $2.1 M East Regional
Sunshine
MPO
State Trail
IDENTIFIED
ESTIMATED
FUNDING
SPONSOR(S)
COST
$1 M $2.1 M West Regional MPO
NEEDEDIDENTIFIED
FUNDING
ESTIMATED
FUNDING
COST$1.1 $1 M $2.1 M
NEEDEDIDENTIFIED
FUNDING FUNDING $1.1 $1 M
NEEDED FUNDING
$1.1 M
Primary Sources of Funding for the
Florida Greenways and Trails System
Transportation
Alternatives
STATE
Specific
Appropriations
ACQUISITION
DEVELOPMENT
FEDERAL
OTHER
Local Government
Private
Adopted by the
Florida Greenways and Trails Council
December 2012
STATE
Florida Forever/FGTS
Source may fund trails but is not
directed specifically to the FGTS
12
New Acquisition Cycle
OGT Acquisition Cycle, February 3 – April 25th, 2014
• OGT receives 1.5% FL Forever $ to “acquire greenways and
trails or Greenways and trail systems” (FS 259.105 FL
Forever Act).
• To date, acquired 9,218 acres for $67,897,141 million.
• Currently has around $2.5 million
• According to Chapter 62S-1 Rule, projects must be located
within or adjacent to a 2002 approved opportunity trail
corridor.
• Preference may also be given to those projects identified on
2013 FGTS Gap Maps.
13
New Online Trail Guide
14
NW Florida Land Trails
15
NW Florida Land Trails
16
Implementing the Vision Together
• Determine needs
• Engage public and private
stakeholders
• Focus resources to the priority
network
• Work with partners to close trail
gaps
• Publicize priority trails
17
Inaugural Winner, 2008
18
Coast to Coast Connector
SEMINOLE/VOLUSIA
GAP
East Central
Regional Rail Trail
SOUTH SUMTER
CONNECTOR GAP
GOOD NEIGHBOR
GAP
Good Neighbor
Trail
South Lake
Trail
West Orange
Trail
Spring to
Spring Trail
Rinehart Road Trail
Suncoast
Trail
Seminole
Wekiva Trail
Starkey
Trail
SPACE COAST
GAP
ORANGE
GAP
Pinellas
Trail
SOUTH LAKE
GAP
PINELLAS
GAP
Florida Department of Transportation
Coast to Coast Connector
Existing Trail Segments…
SEMINOLE/VOLUSIA
GAP
East Central
Regional Rail Trail
SOUTH SUMTER
CONNECTOR GAP
GOOD NEIGHBOR
GAP
• Fred Marquis Pinellas Trail
• Starkey Trail
• Suncoast Trail
• Good Neighbor Trail
• Withlacoochee State Trail
• Gen. James A. Van Fleet State Trail
ORANGE
• South Lake Trail
GAP
• West Orange TrailSOUTH LAKE
GAP
• Clarcona-Ocoee Trail
• Pine
Hills Trail
PINELLAS
GAP
• Seminole-Wekiva Trail
• Rinehart Trail
• Spring to Spring Trail
• East Central Regional Rail Trail
Good Neighbor
Trail
Suncoast
Trail
South Lake
Trail
West Orange
Trail
Spring to
Spring Trail
Rinehart Trail
Seminole
Wekiva Trail
Starkey
Trail
Pinellas
Trail
Florida Department of Transportation
SPACE COAST
GAP
Coast to Coast Connector: Regional Priority
Holmes
Escambia
Santa Rosa
Okaloosa
Jackson
Walton
Washington
Gadsden
Bay
Nassau
Leon
Calhoun
Jefferson
Hamilton
Madison
Baker
Duval
Liberty
Eleven
Metropolitan Planning
Organizations (MPOs)
have jointly made the
Coast to Coast Connector
a priority
Wakulla
Taylor
Gulf
Ocala/Marion County TPO
Columbia
Suwannee
Union
Lafayette
Franklin
Bradford
Clay
St. Johns
Gilchrist
Dixie
Lake-Sumter MPO
Volusia TPO
Alachua
Putnam
Flagler
Levy
Marion
Hernando County MPO
Volusia
Citrus
Sumter
Pasco County MPO
Lake
Seminole
Hernando
Orange
Pasco
Brevard
Osceola
Pinellas
Hillsborough
Polk
Indian River
Pinellas County MPO
Manatee
Space Coast TPO
Hardee
Okeechobee
Highlands
Sarasota
St. Lucie
Desoto
Martin
Hillsborough County MPO
Charlotte
Glades
Palm Beach
MetroPlan Orlando
Lee
Hendry
Sarasota/Manatee MPO
Broward
Collier
Dade
Monroe
Florida Department of Transportation
Polk TPO
Coast to Coast Connector: State Priority
Coast to Coast Connector
Florida Department of Transportation
Coast to Coast Connector
$35 million currently in
FDOT Work Program
(Years 2013-2019)
Approximately $66 million needed to
fund and complete remaining gaps
(based on estimates provided by MPOs and local govs)
Florida Department of Transportation
Florida State Health Improvement Plan
Chronic Disease Prevention
Strategic Issue
2014 Collaborative Implementation Plan
Florida State Health Improvement Plan
Chronic Disease Prevention Strategic Issue
2014 Collaborative Implementation Plan
Table of Contents
Letter from Bonita J. Sorensen, MD, MBA, Coalition Chair and.......................................................................................... 2
Director, Department of Health in Volusia County
Letter from John H. Armstrong, MD, FACS, Surgeon General and.................................................................................... 3
Secretary, Florida Department of Health
Background............................................................................................................................................................................................ 4
2014 Collaborative Implementation Plan.................................................................................................................................. 5
Goal CD1: Increase the percentage of adults and children......................................................................................... 5
who are at a healthy weight
Goal CD2: Increase access to resources that promote.................................................................................................. 5
healthy behaviors
Goal CD3: Reduce chronic disease morbidity and mortality...................................................................................... 7
Goal CD4: Reduce illness, disability and death related to............................................................................................ 9
tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure
Monitoring and Evaluation..............................................................................................................................................................10
Appendices............................................................................................................................................................................................11
Appendix A: Florida Chronic Disease Prevention.................................................................................................................11
Coalition – Steering Committee
Appendix B: Florida Chronic Disease Prevention.................................................................................................................12
Coalition Members
Appendix C: Florida Chronic Disease Prevention.................................................................................................................20
Coalition Summit – Agenda
Appendix D: Florida Chronic Disease Prevention.................................................................................................................22
Coalition Summit – Special Acknowledgements
Appendix E: Current Status of 2012-2013 CD-PIP Objectives.........................................................................................23
Page 1
Background
The World Health Organization describes chronic diseases as conditions
that are slow in progression and long in duration (http://www.who.int/
topics/chronic_diseases/en/). In 2011, chronic diseases contributed to
more than 60 percent of all deaths in Florida (Major Causes of Death for
2011, Florida CHARTS: http://www.floridacharts.com).
The impact of chronic diseases on individuals, families, communities,
and the state of Florida is reflected in the inclusion of chronic disease
prevention as one of five strategic issues in the Florida State Health
Improvement Plan (SHIP) 2012-2015 (download from http://www.
preventchronicdiseasefl.org/state-health-improvement-plan.html,
a statewide plan for public health system partners and stakeholders
to improve the health of Floridians. According to the health status
assessment conducted as a foundation for the development of the
SHIP, several chronic diseases were considered priorities by state
epidemiologists: High blood pressure; heart disease and stroke;
cervical, colorectal, and breast cancers; diabetes; and asthma.
Using findings from this assessment, a diverse group of stakeholders
and partners with a common commitment to public health in Florida
collaborated on the development of the three-year goals, strategies,
and objectives in the SHIP’s Chronic Disease Prevention strategic
issue. In May 2012, the first Florida Chronic Disease Prevention State
Plan Summit convened state and local government, health care
providers, employees, community groups, universities and schools,
and environmental groups to develop the 2012-2013 Chronic Disease
Prevention Collaborative Implementation Plan (CD-PIP) (download
from http://www.preventchronicdiseasefl.org/chronic-diseaseprevention-collaborative-implementation-plan-cd-pip-2012-13.
html). Participants identified activities for achieving priority objectives
to prevent chronic diseases, with emphasis on those in which
collaboration would help maximize the reach, impact, and return
on investment of partners’ efforts. In addition, Florida Department
of Health staff identified areas in which their grant-funded activities
aligned with and supported chronic disease prevention priority
objectives.
To promote and facilitate implementation of the CD-PIP, stakeholders
joined forces to form the Florida Chronic Disease Prevention Coalition,
a statewide partnership of representatives from a broad range of
sectors including academia, health care, human services, education,
business, advocacy, planning, government, faith-based, insurance,
and interested individuals committed to working together toward
the common goal of preventing chronic diseases. Membership
in the Coalition provides opportunities to participate in chronic
disease-related summits, meetings, and other events; share activities,
especially best practices; identify collaboration opportunities
through networking; and learn about funding opportunities. The
membership application is on the Coalition’s website: http://www.
preventchronicdiseasefl.org/join-the-coalition.html.
The Coalition Steering Committee is in Appendix A and a full list
of Coalition members and their contact information is included as
Appendix B.
After 19 months of statewide implementation of the 2012-2013 CD-PIP,
the Coalition sponsored the Florida Chronic Disease Prevention Summit
II in December 2013 to elicit recommendations from members and
partners for the 2014 CD-PIP. Prior to this Summit, Florida Department
of Health staff and partners reviewed the status of the 2012-2013 CDPIP, identifying completed objectives, objectives to retain unchanged,
objectives to update or clarify, and new objectives to consider. Eightysix Coalition members participated in the 2013 Summit. Participants
had the opportunity to provide input into the proposed revisions by
rotating through facilitated breakout sessions in all four goal areas:
Healthy Weight, Healthy Behaviors, Morbidity and Mortality, and
Tobacco Use. The Summit also featured speakers to share innovations
in key settings for chronic disease prevention collaborative activities:
State government, non-profit hospitals, schools, and worksites. The
agenda for the 2013 Summit is included as Appendix C. Special
acknowledgements for Summit planning activities are so noted in
Appendix D.
In conjunction with the 2013 Summit, a pre-survey was disseminated
to Summit registrants to identify which chronic disease prevention
activities they implemented in 2012-2013 to address CD-PIP objectives
and which activities they were planning to implement in 2014.
Responses to the pre-survey are available on the Coalition’s website:
http://www.preventchronicdiseasefl.org/uploads/1/4/5/6/14568516/
pre-summit_survey_results.pdf
After the 2013 Summit, Florida Department of Health staff and partners
integrated Coalition member input into the suggested revisions. The
result is the Florida State Health Improvement Plan Chronic Disease
Prevention Strategic Issue 2014 Collaborative Implementation
Plan, which is presented in the following section. This implementation
plan will guide chronic disease prevention activities statewide in
the year ahead as stakeholders collaborate to make progress toward
achieving Florida’s CD-PIP objectives.
As we address chronic disease in Florida, we should be aware that
people who have a chronic disease often have comorbidities, including
multiple chronic diseases, depression, and physical limitations. These
conditions should be considered when building programs, policies, and
strategies around the objectives in this plan.
Page 4
Florida State Health Improvement Plan
Chronic Disease Prevention Strategic Issue
2014 Collaborative Implementation Plan
GOAL 1: Increase the percentage of adults and children who are at a healthy weight.
Strategy 1: Promote the use of evidenced-based clinical guidelines to assess
overweight and obesity and establish principles of safe and effective weight loss.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
1-1
CD1.2.1
By December 31, 2015, reduce the percentage of adults who are at an
unhealthy weight from 65.1% to 63.5%.
1-2
CD1.2.2
By December 31, 2015, reduce the percentage of Florida public school
students in grades 1, 3, and 6 at an unhealthy weight from 39.2% to 38.2%.
1-3
CD1.2.3
By December 31, 2015, reduce the percentage of Florida public school
students in grades 6 through 12 at an unhealthy weight from 31.3% to
30.5%.
Goal 2: Increase access to resources that promote healthy behaviors.
Strategy 1: Support use of evidence-based employee wellness programs to
promote healthy behaviors.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
2-1
CD2.2.1
CD2.2.2
By December 31, 2015, establish 20 new employee wellness programs in
Florida that address nutrition, weight management, and smoking cessation
counseling services.
Strategy 2: Implement the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools
Program or USDA’s HealthierUS School Challenge.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
2-2
CD2.3.2
By June 30, 2015, increase the number of schools implementing the Healthy
Schools Program from 477 to 700.
2-3
CD2.3.3
By June 30, 2015, increase the number of schools implementing the
HealthierUS School Challenge from 0 to 340.
2-4
CD2.3.4
By June 30, 2015, increase the number of school districts that have achieved
the Florida Healthy School District Award from 23 to 33.
Page 5
Strategy 3: Include a public health component in community planning processes
to increase awareness and opportunity for the built environment to impact
healthy behaviors.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
2-5
CR1.1.2
By December 31, 2014, increase public health presence in the local
planning process by ensuring all 67 county health departments will attend
a minimum of one county planning board, planning review committee, or
regional planning meeting.
Strategy 4: Share effective strategies and messages that support the connection
between the built environment and healthy behaviors.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
2-6
CR1.2.2
By Dec. 31, 2014, the Department of Health will enter three formalized
agreements with partners to develop and promote resources and training
materials about health benefits to communities resulting from the built
environment.
2-7
CR1.2.3
By June 30, 2015, the Department of Health will conduct six live training
sessions and post six virtual training sessions on the health benefits of
specific built environment issues.
2-8
CR1.2.4
By December 31, 2015, the Department of Health will work with the Florida
Department of Transportation, cities, counties and regional entities to
increase the number of communities that have adopted complete streets
policies for implementing Section 335.065, Florida Statutes from 13 in 2011
to 70.
Strategy 5: Increase access to and participation in physical activity for all
members of a community.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
2-9
CR2.2.1
By Sept. 30, 2015, the Department of Health will partner with sister agencies
and community organizations to identify and disseminate, via three modes
and four times per year, model practices and policies that promote biking,
walking, rolling, and using public transportation to school or work.
Page 6
Strategy 6: Provide consultation to community planners to ensure healthy re-use
of land.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
2-10
HP2.4.1
By December 31, 2014, the Department of Health will offer a
comprehensive training course online and a yearly in person class to
prepare departmental staff to conduct Health Impact Assessments.
Goal 3: Reduce chronic disease morbidity and mortality.
Strategy 1: Promote chronic disease self-management education.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
3-1
CD3.1.1
By Dec. 31, 2015, increase the percentage of adults with diagnosed
diabetes that have ever taken a course or class in how to manage their
diabetes from 50.9% to 56.0%.
3-2
CD3.1.3
By Dec. 31, 2015, increase the percentage adults with lifetime asthma who
have taken a course or class to learn how to manage asthma from 6.6% to
7.2%.
Page 7
Strategy 2: Promote early detection and screening for chronic diseases such as
asthma, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
3-3
CD3.2.1
By Dec. 31, 2015, increase the percentage of women aged 50 to 74 who
received a mammogram in the last two years from 78.3% to 82.2%.
3-4
CD3.2.2
By Dec. 31, 2015, increase the percentage of women aged 21 to 65 who
received a Pap test in the last three years from 81.9% to 86.0%.
3-5
CD3.2.3
By December 31, 2015, increase the percentage of adults 50 years of
age and older who receive colorectal cancer screening based on the most
recent clinical guidelines* from 61.2% to 66.8%.
*blood stool test in the past year; or sigmoidoscopy in the past five years
and blood stool test in the past three years; or colonoscopy in the past 10
years.
3-6
CD3.2.4
By Dec. 30, 2015, increase the percentage of adults who had their
cholesterol checked in the past two years from 72.5% to 79.8%.
3-7
CD3.2.5
By Dec. 30, 2015, increase the percentage of adults 45 years of age and
older that have had a test for high blood sugar or diabetes within the past
three years from 75.9% to 83.5%.
3-8
CD3.2.6
By Dec. 31, 2015, increase the percentage of people whose prediabetes
has been diagnosed from 7.3% to 8.0%.
3-9
CD3.2.7
By December 31, 2015, increase the percentage of adults whose high
blood pressure has been diagnosed from 34.2% to 37.6%.
3-10
CD3.2.8
By December 31, 2015, increase the percentage of adults whose chronic
obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema, or chronic bronchitis
has been diagnosed from 7.9% to 8.7%.
Strategy 3: Promote use of evidence-based clinical guidelines to manage
chronic diseases.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
3-11
CD3.3.1
By December 31, 2015, increase the percentage of adults with current
asthma who received written asthma management plans from their health
care provider from 29.6% to 32.6%.
3-12
CD3.3.4
By December 31, 2015, increase the percentage of Florida adults with
diabetes who had two or more A1C tests in the past year from 73.3% to
80.6%.
3-13
CD3.3.5 (Proposed)
By December 31, 2015, decrease the age-adjusted hospital discharge rate
for diabetes as any-listed diagnosis from 228 per 10,000 Florida residents
to 205 per 10,000 Florida residents.
Page 8
Goal 4: Reduce illness, disability, and death related to tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure.
Strategy 1: Prevent Florida’s youth and young adults from initiating tobacco use.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
4-1
CD4.1.1
By Dec. 31, 2015, increase the number of committed never smokers
among Florida’s youth, ages 11–17 from 62.6 % (2010) to 68.9 %.
Strategy 2: Promote quitting among Florida’s youth and adults.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
4-2
CD4.2.1
By Dec. 31, 2014, reduce current smoking rates among Florida adults from
19.3% (2011) to 16.5%.
4-3
CD4.2.2
By Dec. 31, 2015, reduce the use of other tobacco products—smokeless
tobacco, snus (pouched smokeless tobacco), and cigars—among Florida
adults from 5.6% (2010) to 4.76%.
4-4
CD4.2.3
By Dec. 31, 2015, reduce current cigarette use among Florida’s youth,
ages 11–17 from 8.3% (2010) to 5.6%.
4-5
CD4.2.4
By Dec. 31, 2015, reduce the use of tobacco products other than cigarettes
by youth, ages 11–17, from 14.1% (2010) to 10.8%. Tobacco products
include: smokeless tobacco, snus, cigars, flavored cigars, bidis, kreteks,
pipe tobacco, flavored tobacco, and hookah.
Strategy 3: Eliminate Floridians’ exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke.
CD-PIP Objective
Number
SHIP Objective
Number
Objective Language
4-6
CD4.3.1
By Dec. 31, 2015, reduce the percentage of Florida adults who were
exposed to secondhand smoke at home during the past 7 days from 8.6%
(2010) to 7.7%.
4-7
CD4.3.2
By Dec. 31, 2015, reduce the percentage of Florida youth, ages 11–17 that
were exposed to secondhand smoke in a room or car during the past 7
days from 50.3% (2010) to 38.9%.
The status of 2012-2013 CD-PIP
objectives is summarized in Appendix E.
Page 9
Monitoring and Evaluation
The Florida Department of Health and its Florida Chronic Disease Prevention Coalition
partners are committed to monitoring activities in the CD-PIP and evaluating their impact
on the SHIP chronic disease prevention goals. The results of a quarterly reporting system
will be posted online to promote collaboration and replication along with chronic disease
prevention success stories contributed by partners. Data sources that may be used for
tracking progress have been identified for all CD-PIP objectives.
Page 10
Appendix A:
Florida Chronic Disease Prevention Coalition - Steering Committee
Bonnie Sorenson, MD, MBA, Chair
Donna M. Parker
Director
Florida Department of Health – Volusia County
Associate Dean, Diversity and Health Equity
UF College of Medicine, Office of Minority Affairs
Michael Gervasi, DO, Vice-Chair
Robin Safley
CEO
Florida Community Health Centers
Director, Food, Nutrition, and Wellness
Florida Department of Agriculture
Debbie Watson, Secretary
Cynthia Seaborn
Vice President
Winter Park Health Foundation
Program Coordinator, Institute of Public Health
FAMU College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Pauline Lowe, Treasurer
M.R. Street, MPH
Director of Programs
American Diabetes Association – Central & Southwest Florida
Program Analyst
Florida Department of Health
Leslie Beitsch
Claudia Tamayo
Associate Dean for Health Affairs
FSU College of Medicine
Program Manager
Florida Disability and Health Program
Uday Deshmukh
Penny Taylor
Senior Medical Director
Florida Blue
Director of Healthy Schools
Florida Department of Education
Rene Garcia
Karen van Caulil, PhD
Senator
Florida Senate
President, CEO
Florida Health Care Coalition
Roderick King
Gregory Upham
Executive Director
Florida Public Health Institute
Pharmacist
Walgreens
Bernadette Overstreet
Program Coordinator
Health Planning Council of Northeast Florida
Page 11
Appendix B:
Florida Chronic Disease Prevention Coalition - Members
(* denotes members who participated in the Florida Chronic Disease Prevention Coalition Summit II,
December 3, 2013, in Orlando, Florida)
*Christine Abarca
*Debbie Bergstrom
Assistant Director
Florida Department of Health in Pasco County
10841 Little Road
New Port Richey, FL 34654
727-861-5250
[email protected]
Division of Food, Nutrition and Wellness
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
[email protected]
*Darcy Abbott, MSW, LCSW
Bureau Chief, Chronic Disease Prevention
Florida Department of Health
4052 Bald Cypress Way
Bin A18
Tallahassee, FL 32399
850-245-4367
[email protected]
*Audrey Alexander
Program Manager
Health Council of East Central Florida
2461 West State Road 426, Suite 2041
Oviedo, FL 32765
407-977-1610 ext. 228
[email protected]
*Ashley Atalie
Florida Hospital Orlando
[email protected]
Rocio Bailey
Philippe Bilger
Dental Executive Director
Florida Department of Health in Palm Beach County
800 Clematis St., Rm 2-235
West Palm Beach, FL 33478
561-837-5560
[email protected]
Linda B. Bobroff
Professor and Extension Nutrition Specialist
University of Florida
3026 McCarty Hall
PO Box 110310
Gainesville, FL 32611
352-273-3521
[email protected]
*Mary Bowers
Program Director
Breast & Cervical Cancer Prevention Program
Florida Department of Health
Tallahassee, FL 32399
850-245-4771
[email protected]
Healthy Pinellas Coordinator
Florida Department of Health in Pinellas County
12420 130th Ave. North
Largo, FL 33774
727-588-4040 ext. 3170
[email protected]
Carol Bryant
Jamie Baker
*Ericka Burroughs-Girardi
Director of Healthcare Initiatives
West Central Florida Area Agency on Aging
5905 Breckenridge Parkway, Suite F
Tampa, FL 33610
813-740-3888
[email protected]
Health Equity Coordinator
Florida Department of Health in Orange County
6101 Lake Ellenor Dr
Orlando, FL 32809
[email protected]
Marion Banzhaf
Manager of Health Centers and Volunteer Programs
Shepherd’s Hope
600 North Hwy 17-92
Suite 122
Longwood, FL 32750
407-876-8897 ext 237
[email protected]
Policy, Environment and Systems Change Program Director
Florida Department of Health
4052 Bald Cypress Way
Bin A18
Tallahassee, FL 32399
850-245-4444 ext. 2847
[email protected]
*Katherine Beltran
YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program Coordinator
YMCA of Central Florida
2005 Mizell Ave.
Winter Park, FL 32792
407-644-3606
[email protected]
Director of the Florida Prevention Research Center
University of South Florida
4017 W Inman Avenue
Tampa, FL 33609
[email protected]
*Kathie Bynum
Olveen Carrasquillo, MD, MPH
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
1120 NW 14th Street
Suite 968
Miami, FL 33136
305-243-5505
[email protected]
Page 12
*John Cardone
*Janiece Davis
Vice President of Health Strategies
YMCA of Central Florida
433 Mills Avenue
Orlando, FL 32803
[email protected]
Health Policy Program Coordinator
Florida Department of Health in Palm Beach County
800 Clematis Street
Room 3301
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
561-671-4094
[email protected]
*Henry Carretta
Assistant Professor
Florida State University College of Medicine
1115 W Call St
Suite 3200-C
PO Box 3064300
Tallahassee, FL 323064300
850-645-6897
[email protected]
*Sarah Cawthon
Health Systems Program Manager
Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention
Florida Department of Heatlh
4052 Bald Cypress Way
Bin A-18
Tallahassee, FL 32399
850-245-4391
[email protected]
*Sharon Dorfman
President
SPECTRA
1436 Sunningdale Lane
Ormond Beach, FL 32174-2494
386.671.6410
[email protected]
Nicole Cook
*Uday Deshmukh
Senior Medical Director
Florida Blue
4800 Deerwood Campus Parkway Building 900
5th Floor
Jacksonville, FL 32246
904-905-5677
[email protected]
*Rita Victoria Diaz-Kennedy
Chronic Disease Nutrition Consultant
Crescent Community Clinic
15437 Deer Path Dr.
5244 Commercial Way
Brooksville, FL 34604
813-892-4306
[email protected]
*Brittany Dixson
Medical Fitness Coordinator
Peggy & Phillip B. Crosby YMCA/ Florida Hospital
2005 Mizell Ave
Winter Park, FL 32792
919-720-6575
[email protected]
Summer Dodge
Assistant Professor
Nova Southeastern University
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33328
954-262-1505
[email protected]
Diabetes Prevention Program Direction
YMCA
4550 Village Center Dr
Palm Harbor, FL 34685
727-772-9622
[email protected]
*Laura Corbin
Julie Dudley
Statewide Youth Advocacy Coordinator
Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida
9 South Hardee Circle
Rockledge, FL 32955
321-403-0926
[email protected]
*David Cristin
Medical Student – 3rd Year
Florida State University College of Medicine
Seminole County Health Department
8 S. Osceola Ave, Apt 2309
Orlando, FL 32801
786-375-1461
[email protected]
*Janice Daly
Program Manager
Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention
Florida Department of Health
4052 Bald Cypress Way
Bin A 18
Tallahassee, FL 32399
850-245-4370
[email protected]
Asthma Program Manager
Florida Department of Health
4052 Bald Cypress Way
Tallahassee, FL 32399
850-245-4444 x2869
[email protected]
LuAnn Duncan
Extension Agent
UF IFAS Extension, Orange County
6021 South Conway Road
Orlando, FL 32812
407-254-9207
[email protected]
Pascale D. Edouard
Florida Department of Health in Sarasota County
7015 46th Ave West
Apt 159
Bradenton, FL 34210
786-376-0678
[email protected]
Page 13
Kimberly Eisenbise
*Kelly Giber
Admin., Insurance Communications & Health Promotion
Orange County Public Schools
445 W. Amelia Street
Orlando, FL 32801
407-317-3200
[email protected]
BayCare Health System
(Mease Dunedin Hospital)
727-734-6573
[email protected]
*Dr. Chet Evans
Chair
Florida Diabetes Advisory Council
17556 Deer Isle Circle
Winter Garden, FL 34787
305-753-9713
[email protected]
Jamie Forrest
Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Evaluation Administrator
Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention
Florida Dept. Of Health
4052 Bald Cypress Way
Bin A-18
Tallahassee, FL 32399
850-245-4444 x2998
[email protected]
*Lainie Fox-Ackerman
Director of Community Benefit
Orlando Health
[email protected]
*Kathy Franzen
Health Educator
Health Planning Council of NE Florida
100 N Laura Street
Suite 801
Jacksonville, FL 32202
904-301-3678
[email protected]
Kieran Gabel
YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program Director
YMCA of Greater St. Petersburg
600 1st Avenue North
Suite 201
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
727-895-9622
[email protected]
Tori Gabriel
Director of Education & Prevention
Florida Heart Research Institute
4770 Biscayne Blvd.
Suite 500
Miami, FL 33137
305-604-3252
[email protected]
*Michael F. Gervasi, DO
CEO
Florida Community Health Centers, Inc.
4450 S. Tiffany Drive
West Palm Beach, FL 33407
561-844-9443 ext. 335
[email protected]
Donna Goodwin
Program Coordinator/Health Educator
Florida Department of Health in Martin County
3441 SE Willoughby Blvd.
Stuart, FL 33455
772-221-4000
[email protected]
Cheryl Graham
Minority Health Liaison/Event Coordinator
Florida Department of Health, Office of Minority Health
4025 Esplanade Way, Suite 105G
Tallahassee, FL 32305
850-245-4265
[email protected]
*Melodie Griffin
Florida State Coordinator
Action For Healthy Kids
2280 Spring Lake Circle
Saint Cloud, FL 34771
407-493-9703
[email protected]
Paula Grisales
PhD Public Health/Epidemiology Student
Walden University
1312 Bob Cat Ct
Apopka, FL 32712
[email protected]
*Clarence Gyden
Human Services Program Analyst
Florida Department of Health in Hillsborough County
2313 E. 28th Avenue
Tampa, FL 33605
813-307-8082
[email protected]
Allyson Hall
Associate Professor
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32608
[email protected]
*Jennifer Harris
Statewide Tobacco Policy Manager
Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida
6861 NW Hogate Circle
Port Saint Lucie, FL 34983
772-871-7258
[email protected]
Sharon Hatch
Director of Quality Improvement
UnitedHealthcare
13621 NW 12th Street
Suite 300
Sunrise, FL 33323
954-858-4297
[email protected]
Page 14
Jennie Hefelfinger
*Laura Jones
PHC Director
FL Alliance of YMCAs
9031 Foxwood Drive North
Tallahassee, FL 32309
850-545-9019
[email protected]
Associate Exectuive Director
Crosby YMCA Wellnes Center
2005 Mizell Ave
Winter Park, FL 32792
407-491-5994
[email protected]
T. Lucas Hollar
*Shawna Kelsch
Assistant Professor of Public Health
Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine
3200 South University Drive
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33328
954-262-1498
[email protected]
Chair
Brevard Healthcare Forum
3490 Titanic Circle
Indialantic, FL 32903
321-537-5591
[email protected]
*Catherine Howard
Catherine Kershaw
Coordinator, Healthiest Weight Florida
Florida Department of Health
4052 Bald Cypress Way
Bin A-13
Tallahassee, FL 32399
850-245-4444 ext. 3800
[email protected]
Wellness Program Coordinator
Bethune-Cookman University
Odessa Chambliss Center for Health Equity
640 Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune Blvd
Daytona Beach, FL 32114
386-290-5139
[email protected]
Dr. Swannie Jett
Lori Kessler
Health Officer
Florida Dept of Health in Seminole County
400 W. Airport Blvd
Sanford, FL 32771
407-665-3200
[email protected]
Director Disease Management
Broward Health
1608 SE 3rd Ave.
Suite 108
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316
954-767-5623
[email protected]
Bev Johnson
Executive Vice President of Health Strategy
Volusia Flagler Family YMCA
761 E International Speedway Boulevard
Deland, FL 32724
386-738-9622, ext. 313
[email protected]
*Karen Johnson
Government Operations Consultant III-SES
Florida Department of Health in Orange County
6101 Lake Ellenor Drive
Orlando, FL 32809
(407) 858-1456
[email protected]
Tammie M. Johnson
Assistant Professor
University of North Florida
1 UNF Drive Bldg. 39 / 4033
Jacksonville, FL 32224
904-620-1831
[email protected]
*David Jones
President
Florida Disabled Outdoors Association
2475 Apalachee Parkway suite 205
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-201-2944
[email protected]
*Joanne Kitson, MD
Harvest Time International Medical Care Center, Shepherd’s Hope
Casselberry, FL 32707
[email protected]
*Karen Koch
Vice President
Florida Council for Community Mental Health
316 E. Park Avenue
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-224-6048
[email protected]
Deanna Krautner
Health Education Program Manager
Florida Department of Health in Pasco County
10841 Little Road
New Port Richey, FL 34654
727-861-5250
[email protected]
*Beth Labasky
Director Government Relations
COPD Foundation
731 Duval Station Rd
Suite 107-410
Jacksonville, FL 32218
850-322-7335
[email protected]
Page 15
*Diana Lee
*Patrick Murray
Doctor
Bethune-Cookman University
640 Dr Mary Mcleod Bethune Blvd.
Daytona Beach, FL 32114
386-481-2838
[email protected]
FSU College of Medicine
Florida Department of Health in Seminole County
[email protected]
*Lucila Lopez
Community Health Coordinator
Florida Hospital
7727 Lake Underhill Rd.
Orlando, FL 32822
407-303-6495 option 3
[email protected]
*Pauline Lowe
Program Director
American Diabetes Association
2290 Lucien Way
Suite 230
Maitland, FL 32751
407-660-1926, ext. 3026
[email protected]
*Mayela Lutz
Pcan Navigator and CD educator
PCAN/Cuidate
10000 West Colonial Drive
Case Management Department
Ocoee, FL 34761
407-296-1000 ext. 8183
[email protected]
Nurez Madhany
Gabriela Murza
Extension Faculty - FCS/4-H
University of Florida/IFAS Extension - Osceola County
1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane
Kissimmee, FL 34744
321-697-3000
[email protected]
Grisel Negron
Extension Agent
University of Florida IFAS/Extension
1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane
Kissimmee, FL 34744
321-697-3000
[email protected]
*Verbelee Nielsen-Swanson
Vice President
Community Impact & Community Benefit,
Florida Hospital
[email protected]
*Lori North
Senior Managment Analyst
Florida Department of Health in Charlotte County
1100 Loveland Blvd.
Port Charlotte, FL 33980
941-624-7259
[email protected]
Primary Care Systems Account Representative
American Cancer Society
1601 West Colonial Drive
Orlando, FL 32804
407-581-2518
[email protected]
Alexandra “Xan” Nowakowski
*Jennifer Martin
Director of Advocacy
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids
1400 I Street NW
Suite 1200
Washington, DC, 20005
646-919-0469
[email protected]
Director of Corporate Wellness
YMCA of Florida’s First Coast
12735 Gran Bay Parkway
Suite 250
Jacksonville, FL 32258
904-625-8340
[email protected]
Eugenia Millender
Director
FAU Diabetes Education and Research Center
5205 Greenwood Avenue
Suite 110
West Palm Beach, FL 33407
561-803-8880
[email protected]
Heather Murphy
State Advocacy Organizer
Safe Routes to School National Partnership
Tallahassee, FL 32309
850-228-0028
[email protected]
Research Associate
Florida State University College of Medicine
Tallahassee, FL 32306
[email protected]
*Kevin O’Flaherty
*Megan O’Meara Diehl
Healthy Schools Program Manager
Alliance for a Healthier Generation
175 27th Ave N
St. Petersburg, FL 33704
[email protected]
*Bernadette Overstreet
Disease Manager
Health Planning Council of NE Florida
100 N Laura Street
Suite 801
Jacksonville, FL 32202
904-301-3678
[email protected]
Page 16
*Lisa Peabody
*Gloria Rivadeneyra
Director of Chronic Disease Prevention
YMCA of Florida’s First Coast
12735 Gran Bay Parkway
Suite 250
Jacksonville, FL 32258
904-525-5022
[email protected]
School Health Program Mgr.
Florida Department of Health in Seminole County
Sanford, FL 32773
[email protected]
*Kenneth Peach
*Barbara Roberts
Florida Department of Health in Hillsborough County
[email protected]
Executive Director
Health Council of East Central Florida
2461 W SR 426
Suite 2041
Oviedo, FL 32765
407-977-1610 ext. 222
[email protected]
Talitha Robinson
Martha Pelaez
*Christinne Rudd
Director Healthy Aging Regional Collaborative
Health Foundation of South Florida
Miami, FL 33139
[email protected]
*Lisa J. Portelli
Program Director
Winter Park Health Foundation
220 Edinburgh Drive
Winter Park, FL 32792
407-644-2300
[email protected]
*Kelly Prather
YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program Director
YMCA of Central Florida
2005 Mizell Avenue
Winter Park, FL 32792
407 644 3606
[email protected]
Celeste Putnam
Director of Behavioral Health Care
Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association
2868 Mahan Drive, Suite 1
Tallahassee, GA 32308
[email protected]
Health Educator Consultant
Florida Department of Health in Franklin County
139 12th Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
850-653-2111 ext. 102
[email protected]
Independent
470 Little Rock Street
Ocoee, FL 34761
407-697-1297
[email protected]
*Jaime Sagona
Disability Advocate
Community Advocates Network
603 Cedar Bend Cir #203
Orlando, FL 32825
407-319-3049
[email protected]
*Kim Sandmaier
Wellness Coordinator
The School District of Palm Beach County, FL
Risk & Benefits Management- Employee Wellness
3370 Forest Hill Blvd, A103
West Palm Beach, FL 33406
561-434-8044
[email protected]
*Deborah Saulsbury
*Cristina Quinn
Public Health Consultant
721 E. Dorchester Drive
St. Johns, FL 32259
402-689-9281
[email protected]
Bethune-Cookman University
chris[email protected]
*Rebecca Sayago
Susan Redmon
Program Manager, Disability and Health Program
Florida Department of Health
4052 Bald Cypress Way, Bin A-18
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1744
850-245-4444 ext. 2961
[email protected]
*Barbara E. Richardson
PhD, Program Director
University of Florida AHEC
2750 NW 43rd Street
Suite 102
Gainesville, FL 32606
352-273-8530
[email protected]
Vice President of Clinical Operations
Shepherd’s Hope, Inc.
4851 S. Apopka Vineland Road
Orlando, FL 32819
407-876-6699 ext. 226
[email protected]
Karla Shelnutt
Assistant Professor
University of Florida
3038 McCarty Hall D
Gainesville, FL 32611
[email protected]
Page 17
*Dr. Mary Simmons
*Claudia Tamayo
Associate Professor
Florida A&M University
334 Palmer Ave. West
Lewis-Beck Allied Health Building, Room 335
Tallahassee, FL 32307
850-599-3589
[email protected]
Subcontract Program Manager
Florida Disability and Health Program
101 S Newell Drive
PO Box 100195
Gainesville, FL 32610
352-273-5279
[email protected]
*Bonita Sorensen, MD, MBA
*Penny Taylor
Director, Florida Department of Health, Volusia County
Florida Department of Health in Volusia County
1845 Holsonback Drive
Daytona Beach, FL 32117
386-274-0799
[email protected]
Director, Healthy Schools
Florida Department of Education
325 West Gaines Street
Suite 444
Tallahassee, FL 32317
850-245-9522
[email protected]
Islara Souto
Regional Director
American Heart Association
4000 Hollywood Blvd.
Suite 170N
Hollywood, FL 33021
305-905-4468
[email protected]
*Sarita Taylor
Marni Stahlman
*Maureen Tills
President
Shepherd’s Hope
4681 S. Apopka Vineland Road
Orlando, FL 32819
407-876-6699 ext. 229
[email protected]
Community Benefit Senior Project Specialist
Health First
3542 N. Harbor City Blvd.
Melbourne, FL 32935
321-434-4327
[email protected]
*Eric Stern
Jennifer Tucker-Mogensen
Physical, Health, and Driver Education Administrator
High School Graduation
Palm Beach County School District
Past President-Florida Alliance for Health, Physical Education,
Recreation, Dance and Sports (FAHPERDS)
Palm Beach County School District
[email protected]
Director of Health Innvoation
South County Family YMCA
701 Center Rd
Venice, FL 34285
941-504-1905
[email protected]
*M.R. Street, MPH
Walgreens
3053 S.W. Martin Downs Blvd
Palm City, FL 34990
954-400-8033
[email protected]
Program Analyst
Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention
Florida Department of Health
4052 Bald Cypress Way
Bin A-18
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1744
850.245.4444 ext. 2842
[email protected]
*Swain Strickland
Director Community Health
Department of Health in Volusia County
1845 Holsonback Drive
Bin #170
Daytona Beach, FL 32117
386-274-0624
[email protected]
Linda Sutherland
Executive Director
Healthy Start Coalition of Orange County
600 Courtland Street, Suite 565
Orlando, FL 32804
407.741.5240
[email protected]
Safe Routes to School Coordinator
Florida Department of Transportation
605 Suwannee Street
Tallahassee, FL 32302
850-414-4098
[email protected]
*Gregory Upham, RPh, CDE
*Karen Van Caulil, PhD
President/CEO
Florida Health Care Coalition
5703 Red Bug Lake Rd #118
Winter Springs, FL 32708
407-425-9500
[email protected]
Kristi Van Sickle, PsyD
Executive Director
Brevard Healthcare Forum
FL Tech School of Psychology
150 West University Boulevard
Melbourne, FL 32937
321.622.4908
[email protected]
Page 18
*Gloria Velez
Nichole Wilder
Parrish Medical Cancer
951 North Washington
Titusville, FL 32796
321.268.6257
[email protected]
Assistant Director, Healthy Schools
Florida Department of Education
325 West Gaines Street
Suite 444
Tallahassee, FL 32399
850-245-0813
[email protected]
*Carol Vickers
Coordinated School Health Manager
Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention
Florida Department of Health
4052 Bald Cypress Way
Bin A-18
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1744
850-245-4444 ext. 2794
[email protected]
*Debbie Watson
Vice President
Winter Park Health Foundation
220 Edinburgh Drive
Winter Park, FL 32792
407-644-2300
[email protected]
*Kathy Welch
Manager of Program Administration
Alpha-1 Foundation
2937 SW 27th Ave
Suite 302
Miami, FL 33133
877.228.7321
[email protected]
Ann-Karen Weller
*Kandy Woods
Assistant Professor
Florida A&M University
334 Palmer Ave. West
Lewis-Beck Allied Health Sciences Building
Room 328
Tallahassee, FL 32307
850-599-3310
[email protected]
Justin Yelken
Program Manager
American Lung Association
851 Outer Road
Orlando, FL 32814
407-425-5052
[email protected]
*John Zerega
Administrator for Health Services
Orange County Public Schools
445 West Amelia Street
Orlando, FL 34734
407-317-3200 ext. 2609
[email protected]
Assistant Community Health Nursing Director
Florida Department of Health in Miami-Dade County
18255 Homestead Avenue
Miami, FL 33157
305-278-3023
[email protected]
Page 19
Appendix C: Florida Chronic Disease
Prevention Coalition Summit – Agenda
Page 20
Page 21
Appendix D:
Florida Chronic Disease Prevention Coalition Summit
Special Acknowledgements
Summit Planning Committee
Summit Facilitator
Sarah Cawthon
Sharon Dorfman
President
SPECTRA
M.R. Street
[email protected]
Claudia Tamayo
Penny Taylor
World Café Facilitators
Karen van Caulil, PhD
Debbie Watson
Laura Corbin
Gregg Smith
Darcy Abbott
Mary Bowers
Sarah Cawthon
Laura Corbin
Coalition Management Team
Health Council of Southeast Florida
Andrea Stephenson
Executive Director
Janice Daly
Jennifer Harris
Catherine Howard
M.R. Street
[email protected]
Julie Graham
Director of Planning
[email protected]
Ale Sarmiento
Health Planner
[email protected]
Samantha Freels
Community Relations Coordinator
[email protected]
LaShaundra Highsmith
Administrative Coordinator
[email protected]
Page 22
Appendix E:
Current Status of 2012-2013 CD-PIP Objectives
The 2012-2012 CD-PIP included 13 objectives which partners selected as their top priorities. The table below shows progress made
through the work of partners around the state on achieving these objectives. Some objectives have been completed; some remain the
same; and others have been revised to reflect progress, methodology changes with the monitoring tools, or new directions.
OBJECTIVE
NUMBER
OBJECTIVE LANGUAGE IN 2012 2013 CD-PIP
STATUS FOR
2014 CD-PIP
CD1.3.1
By June 30, 2013, DOH will identify and disseminate model policies and practices that
increase availability and consumption of healthy foods.
Completed
CD1.3.6
By June 30, 2015, DOH, DOE and DACS will develop model programs & policies that
address the following: Using garden food in school cafeterias. Serving healthy foods
in schools and food kitchens. Supporting edible, rather than ornamental foliage
on public land. Expanding the Healthier U.S. School Challenge program. Adopting
inter-class and inter-school wellness competitions such as Team Wellness Challenge.
Increasing the number of school gardens. Enhancing food and exercise related
curricula such as Agriculture in the Classroom.
Covered under other
objectives
CD2.1.1
By Dec. 31, 2014, implement at least three statewide initiatives that promote healthy
behaviors such as obtaining healthy weight and tobacco cessation.
Completed
CD2.2.1
By Dec. 31, 2013, increase by 5% the availability of employee wellness programs that
address nutrition, weight management and smoking cessation counseling services in
state agencies in Florida.
Revised and
combined with
CD2.2.2
(Objective 2-1)
CD2.2.2
By June 30, 2014, increase by 5% the availability of employee wellness programs that
address nutrition, weight management and smoking cessation counseling services in
workplaces other than state agencies.
Revised and
combined with
CD2.2.1
(Objective 2-1)
CD3.1.1
By Dec. 31, 2015, increase the percentage of adults with diagnosed diabetes that have
ever taken a course or class in how to manage their diabetes from 55.1% to 59%.
Revised due to new
BRFSS methodology
(Objective 3-1)
CD3.1.2
By Dec. 31, 2015, increase the percentage of adults with diagnosed arthritis that have
ever taken an educational course or class to learn how to manage problems related to
arthritis or joint symptoms from 14.4% to 20%.
Deleted due to no
statewide data source
CD3.2.1
By Dec. 30, 2015, increase by 10% the percentage of women who receive a breast
cancer screening based on the most recent clinical guidelines from 61.9% (2010) to
71.9%.
Revised
(Objective 3-4)
CD3.2.2
By Dec. 30, 2015, increase by 10% the percentage of women who receive a cervical
cancer screening based on the most recent clinical guidelines from 57.1% (2010) to
67.1%.
Revised
(Objective 3-5)
CD3.2.3
By Dec. 30, 2015, increase the percentage of adults 50 years of age and older
who receive a colorectal cancer screening (blood stool test in the past year or
sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy in the past five years) from 57% to 80%.
Revised
(Objective 3-6)
CD3.2.5
By Dec. 30, 2015, increase the percentage of adults in Florida that have had a test for
high blood sugar or diabetes within the past three years from 62.6% to 65%.
Revised
(Objective 3-8)
CD3.2.6
By Dec. 30, 2015, increase the percentage of persons whose diabetes has been
diagnosed from 10.4% to 12%. (As measured by the percentage of adults in Florida
who have ever been told by a doctor they have diabetes. There are approximately
767,666 adults in Florida living with undiagnosed diabetes. Prevalence will increase
until these adults are identified).
Revised
(Objective 3-9)
CD4.1.1
By Dec. 31, 2015, increase the number of committed never smokers among Florida’s
youth, ages 11–17 from 62.6 % (2010) to 68.9 %.
No change
Page 23
Florida State Health Improvement Plan
Chronic Disease Prevention Strategic Issue
2014 Collaborative Implementation Plan
Graphics and formatting provided by
Page 24
National Association of State Directors
of Pupil Transportation
3rd Annual National Survey:
Illegal Passing of School Buses
Conducted by NASDPTS
Presenter: Charlie Hood (850-245-9924;
[email protected])
“Close Call”
Illegal Pass Video from West Virginia goes here. Available at
http://www.nasdpts.org/StopArm/documents/WVA-StopArmViolationNearHit.wmv
2
Survey History
• Florida was first state to survey illegal passing—
coordinated by FDOE and CUTR in 1995 and 2000
• “Loading zone safety” has been a concern of student
transporters nationally for over 40 years
• Student bus riders are most vulnerable outside the
bus as pedestrians -- 10 to 15 fatalities per year
• NASDPTS identified need for national data on
incidence of illegal passing
• NASDPTS coordinated first national survey in 2011
• One-day “snapshot” by bus drivers, mostly between
March 1st and May 15th each year
RESOLUTION #5
STOP ARM VIOLATION SURVEY
WHEREAS the members of the National Association of State Directors of Pupil Transportation
Services (NASDPTS) believe that any student fatality in the school transportation process is
unacceptable, and
WHEREAS there continue to be student fatalities in the school bus loading zone resulting from
motorists illegally passing school buses at passenger stops, and
WHEREAS several states have conducted counts of stop arm violations and the results have
proved useful in showing the magnitude of the problem to law enforcement, state and federal
agencies and the general public, therefore
BE IT RESOLVED that NASDPTS encourages each state to conduct an annual one-day count
of stop arm violations with a target count date of one school day between March 1 and May 15,
and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the NASDPTS Board of Directors will provide to each
state recommended processes and will publish the results of the annual count by July 15 on the
NASDPTS website and will make the data available to the National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration and American School Bus Council to be used for "Back To School" and other
motorist awareness.
Adopted November 1, 2010
*
W VA Video
National Results (2013)
• 108,436 school bus drivers participated
• Represents about 22% of school buses
nationwide
• 76,685 vehicles passed illegally in 2011
• 77,876 vehicles passed illegally in 2012
• 85,279 vehicles passed illegally in 2013
• Equates to over 15M per 180-day school year
9
Florida Results (2013)
• 11,620 school bus drivers participated
• Represents about 80% of public school buses
in Florida
• 20,040 vehicles passed illegally in 2011
• 21,338 vehicles passed illegally in 2012
• 11,684 vehicles passed illegally in 2013
• Equates to over 2.1M per 180-day school year
National Results (cont’d)
• When motorists passed buses (2013):
Morning Routes
45.4%
(2012 - 49.6%)
Mid Day
4.5%
(2012 – 4.5%%)
Afternoon Routes
(2012 – 45.8%)
50.1%
National Results (cont’d)
• Direction of vehicles passing bus:
From the front
57.5%
2012 – 56.3%
From the rear
2012 – 43.7%
42.5%
National Results (cont’d)
• Side of bus that incident occurred
Left Side
97.9%
2012 – 98.3%
Right Side
2.1%
2012 - 1.7%
Why Data?
“If it’s not written down, it didn’t happen!”
•
•
•
•
•
•
Getting the word out
Press Conferences
Public Awareness
Law Enforcement
Policy changes
Bottom line: improve student safety
Next Steps
• 4th Annual Count – Spring 2014
• Compile results from 2013 survey
summarizing state laws on:
– When motorists must stop
– Consequences for violations
– Admissibility of photo evidence and witness
accounts vs. direct observation by police
• Compile guide on best practices and safety
countermeasures
15
16
17
18
QUESTION AND ANSWER TIME !
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
www.NASDPTS.org
www.FloridaSchoolBusSafety.gov
www.FLDOE.org/Transportation
Melanie Weaver Carr
Office of Policy Planning
Florida Department of Transportation
February 12, 2014
Related Policy Areas:
“Safety and Cultural Change”

Florida’s Bicycle & Pedestrian Laws
 existing language is confusing

FDOT Policy Initiatives and Efforts
 supporting the work of the PBSC

Safe Streets Summit Update
 economic, health and safety impacts of Complete Streets
1
Plain Language
Example of
confusing text
2
Plain Language (continued)
Example of
confusing text
3
Safe Streets Summit Update

Broward MPO Staff Hosted Event
 Attended by ~ 40 elected officials
 Over $100 million in CS projects programmed over next 5 years

Awards: Making Bike Lanes a Big Hit
 Winner: City of Ft. Lauderdale working with FDOT
 Recently adopted multi-modal Connectivity Program

Broward MPO Staff invited for next Council Meeting
 Be thinking of questions for them
4
FDOT Initiatives and Efforts
FDOT Policy Initiatives:

Complete Streets

Roundabouts

Lane Elimination Guidance aka Road Diets

Autonomous Vehicles
5
Questions / Comments
6
MEETING EVALUATION SUMMARY
Florida Bicycle and Pedestrian Partnership Council
12th Council Meeting
Tallahassee, Florida
Proposed Meeting Objectives



Agree
Disagree
CIRCLE ONE
5
4
3
2
1
WERE THE MEETING OBJECTIVES MET?

To receive and update on Council’s previous
recommendations
5
4
3
2
1

To identify and discuss possible framework for developing
BPPC recommendations for the 2013-14 Annual Report
5
4
3
2
1

To review and discuss Pedestrian Safety Action Plans
5
4
3
2
1

To receive updates on related Agency and Other Partner
Plans
5
4
3
2
1

To receive an update on Legislative activities
5
4
3
2
1
MEETING ORGANIZATION

Background and agenda packet were helpful
5
4
3
2
1

Presentations were effective and informative
5
4
3
2
1

Plenary discussion format was effective
5
4
3
2
1

Facilitator guided participant efforts effectively
5
4
3
2
1

Participation was balanced
5
4
3
2
1
What Did You Like Best About the Meeting?
What Could Be Improved?
Other Comments (use the back if necessary)
Fly UP