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2008-2009 Academic Year
Environmental Engineering (EVEN) Degree Guidelines
Academic Year 2008-2009
College of Engineering and Applied Science
University of Colorado at Boulder
Environmental Engineering Program
428 UCB (U.S. Mail)
1111 Engineering Drive, Engineering Center OT 518 (street address)
University of Colorado
Boulder, Colorado 80309-0428
phone: 303 735 0253
fax: 303 735 7317
web: http://www.colorado.edu/engineering/even/
Environmental Engineering Program Staff
Director: Professor Angela Bielefeldt, ECOT 516, 303 492 8433, [email protected]
Program Coordinator: Laurels Sessler, ECOT 518, 303 735 0253, [email protected]
Version: August 2008
Contents
1. Introduction to Environmental Engineering
1.1. Overview of Environmental Engineering ......................................................................................3
1.2. History of the Environmental Engineering Program .....................................................................3
1.3. Mission and Educational Objectives .............................................................................................4
1.4. List of Program Objectives ...........................................................................................................4
2. Environmental Engineering Degree Programs
2.1. Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering (EVEN BS) ......................................................6
2.2. Dual Degrees ............................................................................................................................10
2.3. Concurrent Bachelor of Science/Master of Science Degree (EVEN BS/CVEN MS) ........................10
3. Advising
3.1. Advising Process .......................................................................................................................12
3.2. Program Contact with Students (Email) .....................................................................................12
3.3. Academic Records.....................................................................................................................13
3.4. Additional Advising Resources ...................................................................................................13
3.5. Faculty Advisor Assignments .....................................................................................................13
4. Academic Policies
4.1. Prerequisite and Co-Requisite Courses ......................................................................................14
4.2. Transfer Credit ..........................................................................................................................14
4.3. Humanities and Social Sciences Electives ..................................................................................16
4.4. Technical Electives ....................................................................................................................18
4.5. Air or Earth Sciences Laboratory or Field Course........................................................................19
4.6. Independent Study....................................................................................................................19
4.7. Petitions ...................................................................................................................................20
4.8. Academic Honesty ....................................................................................................................21
5. Graduation Requirements
5.1. Requirements for EVEN BS Degree ............................................................................................22
5.2. Fundamentals of Engineering Examination ................................................................................23
5.3. Requirements for Dual Degrees ................................................................................................23
6. Society of Environmental Engineers (SEVEN) ............................................................................23
7. Faculty Directory ............................................................................................................................24
Forms and Appendices
Special Option Course Selection Proposal .........................................................................................27
Advising Evaluation Form .................................................................................................................28
Independent Study Proposal ............................................................................................................29
Degree Requirements Worksheet for EVEN BS Degree .....................................................................30
Technical Electives Suggestions........................................................................................................32
Table of Prerequisites and Co-requisites for Required Courses..........................................................36
Useful Websites ...............................................................................................................................37
2
1. Introduction to Environmental Engineering
The Environmental Engineering (EVEN) Degree Guidelines provide an outline of the curriculum and policies of the
Environmental Engineering (EVEN) degrees offered by the College of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of
Colorado at Boulder. These guidelines are written primarily for the Environmental Engineering students and faculty
advisors. The current version of these Guidelines and versions dating back to the beginning of the Program in 1998 are
kept on the Program’s web site (http://www.colorado.edu/engineering/even/evenbs.htm).
General curriculum and policy information for students is also available from the Office of Student Services in the Dean’s
Office of the College of Engineering and Applied Science
(http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/students/advising.htm). Similar information on academic support programs,
advising, and registration is available on the web at the College’s Undergraduate Student Services web page
(http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/students/undergraduate.htm).
Information on courses offered each semester is available in the Course Listings and the University of Colorado at
Boulder Catalog published by the University of Colorado. Course scheduling information for the coming semester and the
past two or three semesters is available on University’s Schedule Planner web page (http://plus.colorado.edu/planner/)
and through CUConnect (https://cuconnect.colorado.edu). A .pdf file of course listings, alphabetical by college, can be
found on the registrar’s website: http://registrar.colorado.edu/ (This document is not updated past its
“publication date”, however, so check the Schedule Planner for the most recent information.) Course
descriptions are available in the University’s Course Catalog (http://www.colorado.edu/catalog/catalog08-09/).
1.1. Overview of Environmental Engineering
Environmental engineers play a vital role in maintaining
the quality of both human environmental systems and
the natural environment. Environmental engineering
encompasses the scientific assessment and
development of engineering solutions to environmental
problems impacting the biosphere, land, water, and air
quality. Environmental issues affect almost all
commercial and industrial sectors, and are a central
concern for the public, for all levels of government, and
in international relations. These issues include safe
drinking water, wastewater processing, solid and
hazardous waste disposal, outdoor air pollution, indoor
air pollution and transfer of infectious diseases, human
health and ecological risk management, prevention of
pollution through product or process design, and
renewable and sustainable energy sources.
To address these challenges, environmental engineers
The Engineering Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder
often encounter challenging problems that must be
solved in data-poor situations as members of
multidisciplinary teams. Environmental problems require creative solutions blended with contributions from scientists,
lawyers, business people, and the public. Good communication skills, as well as technical proficiency, are essential for
success in this arena. In addition, technology designed to address environmental problems is marketed globally, opening
up increasing opportunities for international work in the environmental engineering field.
1.2. History of the Environmental Engineering Program
The Environmental Engineering Program at the University of Colorado at Boulder originated with a college-wide faculty
committee that met during the 1993-1994 academic year to develop a multi-disciplinary curriculum for a Bachelor of
Science degree in Environmental Engineering. The committee was headed by Prof. John Daily of Mechanical Engineering.
The degree program was intended to supplement environmental engineering options that were offered through the
Departments of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering (the
Department of Mechanical Engineering now offers an environmental engineering option as well).
The initiative to develop the EVEN BS degree and the Environmental Engineering Program to administer the degree was
motivated by recognition that (1) environmental engineering had matured into a full-fledged discipline of its own and
(2) environmental engineering intersected with the traditional disciplines of chemical, civil, and mechanical engineering,
but was not adequately covered by any single discipline. The faculty committee decided that students intending to
work in environmental engineering would benefit from a curriculum that focused on environmental engineering and
3
related courses regardless of which department offered those courses. At the same time, the existing environmental
engineering options could be retained in the departments for students who were interested in environmental
engineering but wanted to pursue traditional
chemical, civil or mechanical engineering degrees.
The proposed EVEN BS degree program was
approved by the faculty of the College of
Engineering and Applied Science in the spring of
1994. The faculty committee then prepared a full
proposal for the new degree program for the
Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE),
and the new EVEN BS degree program was
approved in the spring of 1998. The first Director of
the Environmental Engineering Program was Prof.
Jana Milford of Mechanical Engineering. Students
began entering the program in the fall of 1998. The
first degree was awarded in December 1999 (to a
student who transferred into the program as a
third-year student).
In approving the new degree, CCHE relied on the
EVEN students on a field trip for the CVEN 3434 Introduction to Applied Ecology
College's intent to deliver the EVEN BS degree using
course with Professor Diane McKnight.
existing courses and faculty. To this end, the
program is administered by the College, and operates through the participation of affiliated faculty from Aerospace
Engineering Sciences, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, and
Mechanical Engineering. The College provides support for a faculty Director (currently Prof. Angela Bielefeldt of Civil,
Environmental, and Architectural Engineering), a Program Coordinator, and teaching support for courses to supplement
the EVEN curriculum. The four departments that participate in the program are committed to regularly offering the
courses that comprise the EVEN curriculum, coordinating to avoid scheduling conflicts, and sharing academic advising and
other faculty service requirements.
During the 2002-2003 academic year, the Environmental Engineering Program applied for accreditation of the EVEN BS
degree with the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET). The application consisted of a detailed SelfStudy Report and a visit by three ABET examiners. The ABET examiners were thoroughly satisfied with the EVEN BS
degree and ABET granted accreditation to the degree in September 2003. The Environmental Engineering Program
completed the first major revision of the EVEN curriculum for the 2004-2005 academic year. Another ABET accreditation
review in 2005 resulted in a few curriculum revisions, including the addition of a laboratory or field course related to air
or land, as required by the ABET Program Criteria.
1.3. Mission and Educational Objectives
The EVEN faculty, its Professional Advisory Board (representing prospective employers of our graduates), and EVEN
alumni and current students have contributed to the creation of the Program’s mission and the educational objectives of
the EVEN BS degree.
The mission of the Environmental Engineering Program is to provide a multidisciplinary undergraduate environmental
engineering education that emphasizes mastery of principles and practices, inspires service for the global public good,
endows a desire for life-long learning, and prepares students for broad and dynamic career paths in environmental
engineering.
The educational objectives of the EVEN BS degree are to produce students who reach the following achievements
three to five years after graduation:
1. EVEN graduates have become established in professional careers and earned advanced degrees;
2. EVEN graduates have applied multidisciplinary approaches to manage the unique challenges and balance the
competing social, political, economic, and technical goals of environmental problems and solutions; and
3. EVEN graduates have served the needs of our society and protected the future of our planet in an ethical manner.
1.4. List of Program Outcomes
A list of program outcomes for EVEN graduates was developed which satisfies the requirements of ABET in the Criteria for
Accrediting Engineering Programs for general engineering programs (ABET Criterion 3) and for environmental engineering
programs (Criterion 8) as developed by the American Academy of Environmental Engineers (AAEE). As defined by ABET,
outcomes are “statements that describe what students are expected to know and are able to do by the time of
graduation” (ABET, 2004).
4
The Environmental Engineering Program demonstrates that
i.
EVEN graduates have sufficient knowledge of engineering, mathematics, and science
fundamentals to succeed in environmental engineering practice or advanced degrees;
ii.
EVEN graduates have sufficient knowledge of advanced environmental engineering
applications and complementary natural sciences to succeed in environmental
engineering practice or advanced degrees;
iii. EVEN graduates have sufficient knowledge of engineering approaches to problem
solving (hypothesis, design, testing; team work) to succeed in environmental
engineering practice or advanced degrees;
v.
EVEN graduates have adequate writing and oral presentation skills to succeed in
environmental engineering practice or advanced degrees;
Outcomes
iv. EVEN graduates have sufficient knowledge of basic engineering skills and tools
(computer, laboratory, and field) to succeed in environmental engineering practice or
advanced degrees;
vi. EVEN graduates have adequate understanding of the social, economic, political, and
ethical context of environmental problems and solutions;
vii. EVEN graduates have adequate opportunity to include service at the local, state,
national, or global levels as an important part of their environmental engineering
education; and
viii. EVEN graduates will recognize the importance of life-long learning by seeking
advanced degrees and pursuing continuing education.
The curriculum that has been developed and the content of those courses help to ensure that the Environmental
Engineering Program satisfies these outcome goals. Extracurricular activities, internships, co-ops and participation in
research also contribute to satisfying these goals. Evaluation of courses, graduating seniors, and alumni via written
surveys helps us to document that the EVEN Program successfully achieves these outcomes. Student performance on the
Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam also documents our success. Review of course syllabi and student work by
faculty and the Advisory Board ensures on-going evaluation and improvement of our curriculum to best serve our
students and the Environmental Engineering profession.
5
2. Environmental Engineering Degree Programs
2.1. Bachelor of Science Degree in Environmental Engineering
2.1.1. Overview of EVEN BS Degree
The Bachelors of Science degree in Environmental Engineering (EVEN) at the University of Colorado provides preparation
for professional proficiency or graduate training in environmental engineering in a four-year curriculum.
The curriculum includes courses in engineering fundamentals and applications, advanced mathematics, chemistry,
physics, biology, geology, and the arts and humanities. Courses specific to environmental engineering practice include
water chemistry, microbiology, and air pollution control. In addition, environmental engineering requires hands-on
laboratory experiences, up-to-date skills in the use of computers for modeling and data analysis, and experience in the
design of environmental engineering systems. Many of the required engineering courses in the Bachelor of Science
curriculum are culled from Aerospace Engineering Sciences, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Civil, Environmental,
and Architectural Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. The curriculum also includes three Option courses and four
technical elective courses. The three Option courses represent an area of specialization in environmental engineering
selected by the student beginning in the third year. The curriculum includes six sets of prescribed Option courses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Air Quality
Applied Ecology
Chemical Processing
Energy
Environmental Remediation
Water Resources and Treatment
In addition to these prescribed Options, students may also formulate their own sequence of Option courses (referred to
as a “Special Option”) representing an area of specialization not included in the six sets of Option courses listed above.
This selection must be done by petition to the Environmental Engineering Program. Examples of special option topics
include Energy & Industrial Monitoring, Remediation & Ecology, and Engineering for Developing Communities (EDC; see
program website at: http://www.edc-cu.org/).
Students in the program are also encouraged to participate in research through independent study projects, a senior
thesis, the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP), the Discovery Learning Apprenticeship Program (see:
http://engineering.colorado.edu/activelearning/discovery.htm), or as undergraduate research assistants in sponsored
research programs.
2.1.2. Curriculum for EVEN BS Degree
The following section contains the curriculum table for the EVEN BS degree. The curriculum represents a “contract” of
sorts with incoming students – for students entering the program during the current academic year, completion of
this curriculum with a satisfactory grade point average is the requirement for graduation. The curriculum also
represents a guarantee that the courses listed (or acceptable substitutes) will be available in the semesters listed.
The curriculum is somewhat dynamic despite its contractual nature. Minor changes may be made by the Program during
the academic year, and major changes may be made between academic years. To meet graduation requirements,
students are expected to follow the curriculum in effect for the academic year they started the program; therefore,
students should keep a copy of the Environmental Engineering (EVEN) Degree Guidelines for the academic year they start
the program. An archive of the Guidelines is retained on the Program’s web site
(http://www.colorado.edu/engineering/even/evenbs.htm). Students may elect to follow a later curriculum revision with
Program approval; however, students may not elect to follow a curriculum in effect before they started the program.
The curriculum below shows the recommended sequence of courses. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are offered
only in the semester shown. Other courses are offered in both semesters. For example, the required course in
Environmental Microbiology (third-year spring in the EVEN BS curriculum) may be taken in another semester (provided
that all prerequisite and co-requisite course requirements are met) because Environmental Microbiology is not required by
a course following it in the curriculum schedule. The air or earth sciences lab or field course (fourth year spring in the
curriculum) may be taken in any semester.
Many of the required courses in the EVEN BS curriculum (Solid Mechanics, Engineering Economics, Fluid Mechanics,
Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, Probability and Statistics) may be satisfied by courses from different engineering
departments. Students may choose a course from any of the approved options for each requirement; however, students
6
should evaluate these choices carefully depending on their major interest in environmental engineering. For example, a
student interested in the Air Quality Option might want to take the Mechanical Engineering courses for Solid Mechanics,
Fluid Mechanics, Thermodynamics, and Heat Transfer. A student interested in the Chemical Processing Option would do
best to choose Chemical Engineering courses (in fact, CHEN 3320 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics is required for
some of the Chemical Processing Option courses).
For certain courses in the EVEN BS degree curriculum, students may encounter problems and concerns about
prerequisite and co-requisite course requirements not being met. There is no need for concern; the Environmental
Engineering Program has consulted in detail with the departments and faculty offering these courses and has gained
assurance that the sequence of courses in the EVEN curriculum is appropriate for engineering students.
Guidance on selection of Option courses, Humanities and Social Science (H&SS) courses, and technical elective courses is
offered in Section 4.
A settling pond for the treatment of acid mine drainage.
7
EVEN BS Degree, 2008-2009 Academic Year
Fall, First Year
Spring, First Year
APPM 1350 Calculus 1 for Engineers
4
APPM 1360 Calculus 2 for Engineers
4
CHEN 1211 General Chemistry for Engineers
3
GEEN 1400 Engineering Projects
3
CHEM 1221 General Chemistry Laboratory
EVEN 1000 Introduction to Environmental Engineering (*)
2
1
PHYS 1110 General Physics 1
1
Technical Elective I
4
3
GEEN 1300 Introduction to Engineering Computing
3
H&SS Elective II
3
H&SS Elective I
2
2
3
16
17
Fall, Second Year
Spring, Second Year
APPM 2350 Calculus 3 for Engineers
4
APPM 2360 Intro Differential Eqns with Linear Algebra
CVEN 3414 Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering (*)
3
CHEM 4521 Physical Chemistry for Engineers (*)
3
PHYS 1120 General Physics 2
4
CHEN 2120 Material and Energy Balances
3
PHYS 1140 Experimental Physics 1
1
Solid Mechanics
3
3
15
H&SS Elective IV
2
H&SS Elective III
3
2
4
3
16
Fall, Third Year
Spring, Third Year
CVEN 3454 Water Chemistry(*)
4
CVEN 4424 Environmental Organic Chemistry (*)
3
Fluid Mechanics
3
CVEN 4484 Introduction to Environmental Microbiology (*)
3
4
Thermodynamics
5
Engineering Economics
6
Required Communication Course
8
3
MCEN 4131 Air Pollution Control (*)
3
3
Heat Transfer
3
3
16
Fall, Fourth Year
7
Probability and Statistics
9
or Option Course I
10
3
15
Spring, Fourth Year
CVEN 4444 (5834) Environmental Engineering Processes (*)
3
CVEN 4333 Engineering Hydrology (*)
3
H&SS Elective V
3
CVEN 4434 Environmental Engineering Design (*)
3
3
Air or Earth Science Laboratory/Field Course
3
3
Option Course III
3
Technical Elective IV /Senior Thesis
Option Course I
2
10
Option Course II
or Probability and Statistics
9
10
Technical Elective II
1
1
Technical Elective III /Senior Thesis
12
10
1
3
18
12
11
3
3
15
* Only offered in the semester shown (not including summer offerings).
Total Credit Hours 128
11
A total of 12 credit hours of technical electives is required, from engineering, mathematics or sciences. Three TE credits may be lower division (1000-,
2000-level); remaining TE credits must be upper division (3000+). Three TE credits must be in the earth sciences, either lower or upper division. An
independent study/senior thesis (EVEN 4840) may be completed as technical electives for up to 6 credits.
2
A total of 18 credit hours of humanities and social sciences (H&SS) electives is required. At least nine hours must be at the upper division level. Three
hours must be a Required Communication Course8 at the 3000-level or above.
3
Solid Mechanics options: CVEN 2121 Analytical Mechanics (F,S), GEEN 3851 Statics for Engineers (Sum), or MCEN 2023 Statics and Structures (F).
4
Fluid Mechanics options: CHEN 3200 Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics (S), CVEN 3313 Theoretical Fluid Mechanics (S), GEEN 3853 Fluid
Mechanics for Engineers (Sum), or MCEN 3021 Fluid Mechanics (F).
5
Thermodynamics options: AREN 2110 Thermodynamics (F), CHEN 3320 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (F; required for Chemical Processing
Option), GEEN 3852 Thermodynamics for Engineers (Sum), or MCEN 3012 Thermodynamics (F, required for Air Quality Option).
6
Engineering Economics options: EMEN 4100 Business Methods and Economics for Engineers (F), CVEN 4147 Engineering Economy and System
Design, or EVEN 4830 Technoeconomic Analysis for Environmental Engineering.
7
Heat Transfer options: CHEN 3210 Chemical Engineering Heat Transfer (F) or MCEN 3022 Heat Transfer (S).
8
Communications: WRTG 3030 Writing on Science and Society (F,S), WRTG 3035 Technical Communication and Design (F, S), GEEN 3000 Professional
Communications for Engineers, HUEN 3100 Humanities for Engineers 1 (F,S), or PHYS 3050 Writing in Physics: Problem Solving and Rhetoric (F).
9
Probability and Statistics options: APPM 4570 Statistical Methods (F,S), CHEN 3010 Applied Data Analysis (F), CVEN 3227 Probability, Statistics, and
Decision. (S)
10
Option courses are specified on the following page.
11
Air or Earth Science Lab/Field Course: A 3 credit hour course with a significant laboratory or field component related to air quality or earth science. If
course is less than 3 credits, the difference is required as an upper division technical elective. Options: ATOC1070 Weather and the Atmosphere Lab,
CVEN3708 Geotechnical Engineering, EVEN4100 Environ. Sampling & Analysis, GEOG4411 Methods of Soil Analysis (every other F), GEOL1030 Intro to
Geology 1 Lab, GEOL2700 Intro to Field Geology, GEOL3010 Intro to Mineralogy (F), GEOL4716 Environmental Field Geochemistry (S)
12
Senior Thesis: a senior thesis can be completed with faculty approval if Technical Electives III and IV are taken as independent studies on a single
research topic.
8
Beginning in the spring of their third year, students must select an Option, an area of specialization in environmental
engineering. For each option, a total of 9 credit hours of option courses is required. Students may choose from the lists of
possible Option courses listed below. Note that not all of the courses listed are offered every year, denoted by I*.
Air Quality Option
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ATOC 3500 Air Chemistry and Pollution (3 credit hours, F; prerequisite: two semesters chemistry)
ATOC 4720 Introduction to Atmospheric Physics and Dynamics (3 credit hours, I*; prereq: APPM 1350, PHYS 1110)
CHEM 4541 Physical Chemistry Lab (2 credit hours, I*; prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 4521 or CHEM 4531)
MCEN 4042 Thermal Systems Design (3 credit hours, S; prerequisite: MCEN 3022 Heat Transfer or equivalent)
MCEN 4141 Indoor Air Pollution (3 credit hours, I*; prerequisites: MCEN 3021 Fluids and 3022 Heat Transfer, or equivalents)
MCEN 4152 Introduction to Combustion (3 credit hours, I*; prerequisite: MCEN 3012, recommended: MCEN 3021-3022)
MCEN 4162 Energy Conversion (3 credit hours, contact Mechanical Engineering Department; prerequisite: MCEN 3012)
MCEN 4228 Environmental Modeling (3 credit hours, F; prerequisites: chemistry, fluid mechanics, computer programming)
Applied Ecology Option
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CVEN 3434 Intro to Applied Ecology (required for this option, 3 credit hours, S; prerequisites: CHEN 1211-1221 or CHEM
1111)
EBIO 2040 Principles of Ecology (4 credit hours; prerequisites: CVEN 3434 with instructor consent or EBIO 1040 & 1050 or
EBIO 1240)
†
EBIO 3270 Ecosystem Ecology (3 credit hours, S; prerequisites: CVEN 3434 or EBIO 1240, EBIO 2040 or EBIO 3020 )
†
EBIO 4020 Stream Biology (3 credit hours, F; prerequisites: CVEN 3434 or EBIO 1240, EBIO 2040 )
†
EBIO 4030 Limnology (3 credit hours, S; prerequisites: CVEN 3434 or EBIO 1240, EBIO 2040 )
EBIO/GEOL/ENVS 4160 Introduction to Biogeochemistry (3 credit hours; prerequisite: CHEM 1011 or higher, EBIO 3270 or
GEOL 3320)
GEOG 4311 Watershed Biogeochemistry (2 credit hours, S; prerequisite: GEOG 1011, GEOG 3511)
Chemical Processing Option
•
•
•
•
•
•
CHEM 3311 Organic Chemistry 1 (4 credit hours; prerequisite: CHEN 1211 or equiv.; co-requisite: CHEM 3321 or 3361)
CHEM 3331 Organic Chemistry 2 (4 credit hours; prerequisite CHEM 3311 or 3351; co-requisite CHEM 3341 or 3381)
CHEN 3220 Chemical Engineering Separations and Mass Transfer (required for this option, 3 credit hours, S; prerequisites:
CHEN 3200, CHEN 3320; co-requisite: CHEN 3210 or MCEN 3022; or equivalents)
CHEN 4330 Chemical Engineering Reaction Kinetics (required for this option, 3 credit hours, S; prerequisites: CHEN 3320,
CHEN 3210 or MCEN 3022)
CHEN 4670 Environmental Separations (3 credit hours, every other S; prerequisite: CHEN 2120, senior or graduate)
CHEN 4680 Environmental Process Engineering (3 credit hours; senior or graduate standing)
Energy Option
•
Specific courses to be determined.
Environmental Remediation Option
•
•
•
•
•
CVEN 4353 Groundwater Engineering (3 credit hours, F; prerequisite: CVEN 3313 or equivalent fluid mechanics course)
CVEN 4474 Hazardous and Industrial Waste Management (3 credit hours, F; prerequisite: CVEN 3414)
EVEN 4100 Environmental Sampling and Analysis (3 credit hours, I*; prerequisites: CVEN 3454, CVEN 4424 or equiv)
GEOL 3030 Introduction to Hydrogeology (3 credit hours, F; prerequisites: GEOL 1010 or 1060, APPM 1350 or instr consent)
†
GEOL 4716 Environmental Field Geochemistry (2 credit hours, S; prerequisites: GEOL 2700, CHEN 1211 )
Water Resources and Treatment Option
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CVEN 3323 Hydraulic Engineering (3 credit hours, F; prerequisite: CVEN 3313 or equivalent fluid mechanics course)
CVEN 3424 Water and Wastewater Treatment (3 credit hours, S; prerequisite: CVEN 3414)
CVEN 4323 Water Resource Engineering Design (3 credit hours, I*; prerequisite: statistics, engineering economics)
CVEN 4343 Open Channel Hydraulics (3 credit hours; prerequisite: CVEN 3313 or equivalent fluid mechanics course)
CVEN 4353 Groundwater Engineering (3 credit hours, F; prerequisite: CVEN 3313 or equivalent fluid mechanics course)
CVEN 4474 Hazardous and Industrial Waste Management (3 credit hours, F; prerequisite: CVEN 3414)
CVEN 5393/ECON 6555 Water Resources Development and Management (3 credit hours, F; prerequisite: senior or graduate)
GEOG 4501 Water Resources and Water Management of the Western U.S. (3 credit hours)
MCEN 4228 Environmental Modeling (3 credit hours, F; prerequisites: chemistry, fluid mechanics, computer programming)
*I Offered intermittently
† or by instructor’s consent as arranged by the Environmental Engineering Program
Special Option
Students with unique educational goals may formulate a personalized sequence of three courses (9 credit hours) as the Option
sequence. To do so, students must present their Option plan to their faculty advisor and submit a petition to the Environmental
Engineering Program for approval. A special option must have a specific, well-thought-out purpose related to your education or
career goals (i.e., “scheduling conflict” is not an acceptable reason for a special option.) The “Special Option” petition may be
found in the Forms Appendix.
9
2.2. Dual Degrees
Students in the College of Engineering and Applied Science may obtain Bachelor of Science degrees in two engineering
disciplines or one degree in engineering and a second degree from a department in another college or school of the
University. Students must satisfy the curricula for both programs and complete a minimum of 30 additional credit hours
above and beyond the larger minimum credit hour requirement. If the requirements of both curricula can be satisfied
with fewer than 30 credit hours, the difference can be made up with elective courses.
Of the 30 additional credit hours, dual degree students must complete 24 semester credit hours in courses offered by
the secondary academic department or in courses approved in advance by the department as substitutes. Transfer
students pursuing double degrees must complete a minimum of 75 semester credit hours as a degree student in the
College of Engineering and Applied Science and must satisfy all other stipulations regarding total hours required and
approval of all coursework by both departments concerned.
Colorado residents should be aware that the College Opportunity Fund (COF) may not cover all tuition costs associated
with a double degree program (those beyond 145 semester credit hours).
Erik Jorgensen, an EVEN 2005 graduate, working on a solar pond evaporation
control system for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.
2.3. Concurrent Bachelor of Science/Master of Science Degree
The Environmental Engineering Program is cooperating with the Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering
Department to offer concurrent EVEN BS/CVEN MS degrees in a five-year curriculum (currently, this is the only concurrent
BS/MS degree that includes the EVEN BS degree). To fit the BS and MS degrees in only five years, students are allowed
to count two courses (6 credit hours) taken at the graduate level for both the EVEN BS and CVEN MS degrees. Students
must first complete the four-year Environmental Engineering Bachelor of Science curriculum (Section 2.1); they then
complete the requirements of the CVEN MS degree in the graduate programs of either Environmental Engineering or
Water Resources Engineering.
The purpose of the concurrent EVEN BS/CVEN MS degrees is to allow capable students to gain greater depth of
knowledge in environmental engineering by jointly pursuing BS and MS degrees. The concurrent degree program offers
students greater flexibility in scheduling technical electives and graduate courses and enables them to obtain BS and MS
degrees in five years.
Students seeking to pursue the concurrent EVEN BS/CVEN MS degrees must have a minimum grade point average of 3.25
when they submit an application for admission to the program. Students are expected to submit an application during the
sixth or seventh semester of their undergraduate program in EVEN (75 to 110 credit hours). Applications are made to the
Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering Department. The following items are needed to complete an
application:
• Concurrent EVEN BS/CVEN MS Degrees application form (no application fee)
• Four letters of recommendation
10
•
•
•
University of Colorado Application for Graduate Admission form, Part II only
Certification by the EVEN Program that the required number of coursework hours have been completed
Copy of internal transcript
The application deadlines are April 30 for admission to the program for the following fall and October 30 for admission for
the following spring semester.
To continue in the program, students must maintain full-time
status with a cumulative GPA of 3.25 to remain in the
program. In addition, to count the two graduate courses (6
credit hours) for both the EVEN BS and CVEN MS degrees, the
student must achieve a grade point average of at least 3.5 in
the 24 credit hours taken immediately after admission to the
program. For the CVEN MS, students may complete the
requirements for either the Plan I (thesis) or Plan II (course
work only) Master of Science degrees.
Students admitted to the concurrent EVEN BS/CVEN MS
degrees program who do not meet the requirements for
completing the concurrent degrees or who elect not to
complete the concurrent degrees may count appropriate
graduate courses toward the technical elective (up to 9 credit
hours) and option course (up to 9 credit hours) requirements
for the EVEN BS.
Sabre Duren, an EVEN 2002 graduate, measuring stream flow
with a pygmy meter for an independent study project.
11
3. Advising
3.1. Advising Process
Just prior to the registration period for each semester and summer session, students are required to meet with their
faculty advisors for academic counseling. In the Environmental Engineering Program, members of the faculty engage in
academic counseling to promote greater student-faculty interaction. An advising stop remains on each student’s record
until faculty advising has occurred. Faculty advisors are also available for academic and career counseling beyond the
required meetings each semester at the student’s request.
A few weeks before each advising period, the Program Coordinator will announce to students and faculty advisors by
email the advising period schedule. With this email, an updated version of these Environmental Engineering (EVEN)
Degree Guidelines and other advising information will be sent.
Students must make an appointment with their faculty advisors during the advising period. Faculty advisors will give
meetings with advisees high priority during this time. In preparation for the meeting, students should assemble a
proposed course plan for the following semester using these Environmental Engineering (EVEN) Degree Guidelines and
the course schedule for the following semester, which is available in the Schedule Planner
(http://plus.colorado.edu/planner/) or through CUConnect (https://cuconnect.colorado.edu).
During the advising meeting, students must discuss their proposed course plan with their faculty advisors. Faculty
advisors will record course selections on the Degree Requirements Worksheet (see Forms Appendix). Faculty advisors will
also be available to counsel the students on academic performance, long-term course plans, graduation requirements,
career planning, and any other personal issues that affect the student’s education. At the conclusion of the meeting, the
faculty advisor will sign the student’s academic file certifying that advising has been done.
After the advising meeting, students are required to fill out an Advising Evaluation Form (see the Forms Appendix) to
provide feedback on the advising process. These forms must be submitted to the Program Coordinator.
Once the Coordinator has received a student’s academic file with the signature of the faculty advisor (from the faculty
advisor) and the Advising Evaluation Form (from the student), the Coordinator will remove the advising stop to allow the
student to register.
Many academic advising questions pertain to the “logistics” of course scheduling and registration. Most of these questions
should be directed to the Program Coordinator (see the cover sheet for contact information) instead of the faculty
advisors. The Coordinator will provide assistance on procedural questions involving registration, degree plans, graduation
requirements, and the petition process. In addition, the Coordinator will help students determine whether a particular
situation should be discussed with their faculty advisors.
3.2. Program Contact with Students (Email)
Official notices to students concerning Environmental Engineering Program advising, curriculum, registration, graduation
requirements, and policies will be made by e-mail. By default, official notices will be sent to your University e-mail
address as listed on the student directory on the web (http://www.colorado.edu/search/). You may arrange to receive
official notices also at a non-CU e-mail address of your choice by notifying the Program Coordinator; however, the
coordinator will provide this service only as convenience to you. The coordinator will not be responsible for information
sent to abandoned e-mail addresses. If you do not think you are receiving official EVEN e-mail correspondence (you
should be receiving messages from the program coordinator or program director at least every couple of weeks,
probably more often), please contact the program coordinator to ensure that you are on the e-mail list. To reiterate,
the Program is required to notify you only at your CU e-mail address.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science will also send official notices to your CU e-mail address. The college has
developed a series of “code words” for the beginning of the subject line to alert you to the content of the message, and
the EVEN program tries to use these codes as well:
Career - includes opportunities that will help advance a student’s career, e.g. resumé reviews, mock interviewing,
meetings with employers, Career Fair, etc.
Job - includes job opportunities for students still in school such as internships, co-ops, and on-campus jobs, as well as
information on permanent positions.
Scholarship - includes information on scholarships, grants, other sources of funding, and application deadlines.
Academic Advising or Advising - includes advising information, curricular options, registration, academic issues,
course information, missing pre-requisites, degree progress, etc.
Graduation - includes information for graduating seniors such as FE exam, senior checkout, senior exit processes,
senior survey, etc.
12
Event - includes upcoming meetings, programs, events, trips, and opportunities for volunteers to participate in various
functions
Extracurricular Opportunity - includes information on student societies, clubs, etc.
Deadline - includes anything with a looming deadline to which you should pay special attention
Urgent - this will be used sparingly and will indicate a critical communication
3.3. Academic Records
An official Environmental Engineering Program academic file will be maintained for each student by the Program
Coordinator. This file will contain copies of official documentation related to academic history and progress.
The Environmental Engineering Program Coordinator and faculty advisors will strive to provide you with complete, timely,
and accurate academic advising; but ultimately, the responsibility of meeting graduation requirements is yours.
Consequently, you should ensure that all copies of relevant paperwork are present in your academic file and that you
keep your own copies of critical information.
3.4. Additional Advising Resources
The College of Engineering and Applied Science’s advising website contains much useful information, including Advising
Guides, policies and forms for specific situations: http://engineering.colorado.edu/students/advising.htm.
Students may also be referred to various College of Engineering and Applied Science and University of Colorado
counselors for certain issues. Many of the College’s student support services are listed on the College web page
(http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/students/undergraduate.htm). At the University level, students may consult with
the following groups:
• Career Services – provides services for resume and interview skills improvement, internship and job postings, and
career fairs (http://www.colorado.edu/careerservices/, 34 Willard Hall, 303 492 6541)
• Counseling and Psychological Services: A Multicultural Center -- provides a variety of programs and assistance to
address general academic or personal issues. (http://www.colorado.edu/sacs/counseling/, 134 Willard Hall, 303
492 6766)
3.5. Faculty Advisor Assignments
All students in the Environmental Engineering Program will be assigned a faculty advisor. Incoming first-year, change-ofmajor and transfer students will initially be advised by the Program Director. At the first advising meeting for change-ofmajor and transfer students, transfer credits will be evaluated and a complete course plan to meet graduation
requirements will be formulated. After the initial advising, an attempt will be made to direct students to a faculty advisor
whose area of expertise is in line with the student’s own interests or option track. Students who have not decided focus
areas or options will be assigned to a faculty advisor according to the number of credit hours they have completed toward
the EVEN degree. Students may also choose their own advisor from the list below, and may also confer with the program
coordinator.
Table 3. Faculty advisor assignments
first-year: 32 hours
second-year: 32< hours64
third-year: (64< hours96
fourth-year: >96 hours
option/class
faculty advisor
office
phone
email
first-year, change of major and
transfers
Angela Bielefeldt
ECOT 516
492 8433
[email protected]
energy
Mike Hannigan
ECME 218
735 5045
[email protected]
water resources, remediation and
second-third year
Mark Hernandez
ECOT 515
492 5991
[email protected]
ecology
Diane McKnight
ECOT 543
492 7573 or
492 4687
[email protected]
Shelly Miller
ECME 222
492 0587
[email protected]
Jana Milford
ECME 214
492 5542
[email protected]
water resources, remediation and
fourth-year
Joseph Ryan
ECOT 517
492 0772
[email protected]
water resources and first-year
Scott Summers
ECOT 540
492 1024
[email protected]
air quality and
second-year
air quality and
third-year
13
4. Academic Policies
4.1. Prerequisite and Co-Requisite Courses
Most of the courses in the Environmental Engineering curriculum have prerequisite and/or co-requisite requirements
(see tables on p.8 and the Appendix). The purpose of these requirements is to ascertain that you are adequately
prepared for subsequent courses.
Students must successfully complete all prerequisite courses before enrolling for a required course in the Environmental
Engineering curriculum. Students must also simultaneously enroll in and complete satisfactorily all co-requisite courses.
Successful completion means receiving a grade of C- or better. Grades of D+, D, D-, F, IF, IW, P or NC do not satisfy
this requirement. If you don’t receive a C- or better in a pre-requisite course, you must retake it. A student may repeat
through the Course Repetition Policy a maximum of 10 hours of course credit. The original earned grade shall remain
permanently on the student’s transcript, but will be replaced in the cumulative grade point average (GPA) calculation by
the new grade. You must apply to participate in the Course Repetition program; applications are available on-line via
CUConnect. For more details, see: http://registrar.colorado.edu/students/registration/course_repetition.html.
Successful completion of prerequisite and co-requisite courses will be monitored for all required courses in the
Environmental Engineering curriculum by the Program Coordinator. Students who do not successfully complete (grade
below C-) prerequisite and co-requisite courses must retake those courses before advancing in the curriculum. If a
student registers for a course without satisfactorily completing prerequisite courses, the Program Coordinator will notify
the student that that course must be dropped and, if necessary, will drop the student from the course. Students
required to retake courses are strongly urged to consult their faculty advisors before retaking courses to evaluate areas
in which successful academic performance can be achieved.
The prerequisite and co-requisite policy applies only to required and option courses in the curriculum. If a student has
not satisfied all of the prerequisite and co-requisite requirements for an elective course (technical, humanities & social
sciences, chemistry), that elective course may be taken with the approval of the instructor.
Courses not listed in the curriculum may be used to satisfy prerequisite and co-requisite requirements if transfer credit
has been approved or a petition to the Environmental Engineering Program has been approved. Generic College of
Engineering and Applied Science petition forms for this purpose may be obtained from the Program Coordinator.
4.2. Transfer Credit
Five different kinds of students transfer into the Environmental
Engineering program:
• students changing majors from the College’s Open Option major
to EVEN
• students changing majors from another of the College’s
engineering degrees to EVEN
• students changing majors from another College or School in the
University of Colorado at Boulder to EVEN
• students changing majors from another campus of the University
of Colorado to EVEN
• students transferring from another institution
Susan Bautts, a 2003 EVEN graduate, collects samples of
For all transfer students, the College of Engineering and Applied
the benthic macroinvertebrate population in an acid mine
Science requires that the last 45 credit hours used to fulfill degree
drainage-affected stream.
requirements must be taken as a regular degree student in the
College of Engineering and Applied Science in the University of Colorado at Boulder. More details about the College of
Engineering and Applied Science transfer credit policies are available in the Dean’s office or online at the following URL on
the College of Engineering and Applied Science web page
(http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/prospective/transfer_students.htm).
4.2.1. Change of Major: From the College’s Open Option to EVEN
The EVEN program accepts the College of Engineering and Applied Science Open Option curriculum as a substitute for its
own first-year curriculum. Grades of C- or better must have been achieved for all courses counting for required courses in
the EVEN curriculum. Students changing from Open Option to EVEN must complete a change-of-major form for the
College. A description of the College’s Open Option is available online on the College web page
(http://engineering.colorado.edu/students/advising.htm).
14
4.2.2. Change of Major: From a College of Engineering Degree to EVEN
Evaluation of the credit hours earned in another engineering degree curriculum in the College of Engineering and Applied
Science for credit in EVEN will be done at the first advising meeting with the EVEN Program Director. Grades of C- or
better must have been achieved for all courses counting for required courses in the EVEN curriculum. Because EVEN is a
multi-department program, most students coming into EVEN from other engineering degree programs in the College are
able to transfer most of their basic courses for credit toward the EVEN BS degree. Students changing from another
engineering degree to EVEN must complete a change-of-major form for the College.
4.2.3. Change of Major: From Another College or School to EVEN
Students transferring into EVEN from another of the University of Colorado at Boulder’s Colleges and Schools (e.g.,
College of Arts and Sciences, School of Business) must first complete an Intra-University Transfer (IUT) application to
the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences (details are available in the Dean’s Office or at
http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/prospective/transfer_cu-boulder.htm). Once the application is approved, credit
hours from the non-engineering degree will be evaluated for EVEN credit at the first advising meeting with the EVEN
Program Director. Students changing majors to EVEN from non-engineering degrees must complete the mathematics,
chemistry, and physics requirements of the first year of the College’s Open Option curriculum to apply for IUT; therefore,
they will typically start EVEN with credit for most of the first year of the EVEN curriculum.
4.2.4. Change of Major: From Another Campus of the University of Colorado System
Students transferring into EVEN from another campus of the University of
Colorado system will, in almost all cases, have the same status as transfers
from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Students from other CU campuses
should refer to the three change-of-major sections above. More details on
Intercampus Transfer to the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences are
available in the Dean’s Office or online
(http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/prospective/transfer_other_cu.htm).
4.2.5. Transfer from Another Institution
Students transferring from another university or community college can find
information on the College of Engineering and Applied Science website
(http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/prospective/transfer_students.htm).
An initial and official transfer credit evaluation is performed by the CUBoulder Office of Admissions using the transcript from the previous
institution(s). Courses in which the student received a grade lower than a Cwill not be accepted by the admissions office.
Once the Office of Admissions has completed its evaluation, the student will
meet with the EVEN Director for evaluation of transfer credits for the EVEN
curriculum. Note that acceptance of transfer credits by the admissions office
does not mean that the transfer credits will count toward the EVEN BS
degree; courses taken at another institution must match the course
requirements for the EVEN curriculum. In most cases, identification of
courses is straightforward; however, for some courses, the EVEN Director
may request documentation of course content (catalog descriptions, course
syllabi).
EVEN 2001 graduate Durelle Scott (the headless
rider) drives an ATV in a flooded road near a
creek to simulate the generation of suspended
sediment by off-highway vehicle recreation.
4.2.6. Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Credit
Advanced Placement (AP) credit may be approved on the basis of College Entrance Examination Board's Advanced
Placement tests. International Baccalaureate (IB) credit may be granted to students who have participated in IB diploma
or certificate programs. For students who have taken AP or IB courses in high school and who achieve the required
score, AP/IB credit will be granted by the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences as part of the admission process.
AP and IB credits must also be evaluated for credit toward the EVEN curriculum by the student’s faculty advisor or the
EVEN Director. If a student later takes a course for which AP or IB credit was granted, the credit for the course taken at
the University of Colorado will replace the AP/IB credit.
For a listing of CU course equivalents for typical AP and IB credit, see the College of Engineering and Applied Science
“Advanced Placement, IB and MAPS” Advising Guide (available in the dean’s office or online at
http://engineering.colorado.edu/students/advising.htm).
College courses taken while in high school (e.g., through the “CU Succeed” Program) will be evaluated as transfer credits
according to the applicable section above.
15
4.2.7. Continuing Education Courses
Courses may be taken for EVEN degree credit through programs offered by the University of Colorado’s Division of
Continuing Education (see a full description at http://www.colorado.edu/ContEd/):
• Maymester
• Summer Session
• Available Credit for Eligible Special Students (ACCESS)
• Center for Advanced Engineering and Technology Education (CAETE)
• Boulder Evening Credit
• Independent Learning
• Concurrent High School
A maximum of 16 credit hours taken through Continuing Education programs other than Maymester and Summer
Session can be applied to the EVEN BS degree (Maymester and Summer Session courses are equivalent to courses
offered during the regular academic year). A maximum of 8 of the 16 credit hours can be taken as Humanities and Social
Sciences courses. According to the College of Engineering and Applied Science, students must secure advance approval
of the Environmental Engineering Program and the Dean's Office prior to registering for Continuing Education courses. A
credit registration form may be obtained at http://www.colorado.edu/ContEd/register.htm.
4.3. Humanities and Social Sciences Electives
4.3.1. Importance of Humanities and Social Sciences to Environmental Engineers
The purpose of humanities and social sciences
(H&SS) electives is to broaden the engineering
education. In environmental engineering,
appreciation and knowledge of the social, historical,
political, and economic context of environmental
problems is critically important. The EVEN BS
degree requires 18 credit hours of H&SS courses.
One H&SS course is required – a communications
course (see section 4.3.2) – to improve writing and
oral presentation skills. For the remaining 15 credit
hours of the H&SS requirements, the EVEN faculty
recommends that you select a sequence of courses
that complement and broaden your education in
environmental engineering and that you avoid
random selection of unrelated introductory courses.
See below for some specific courses that may
interest environmental engineering students.
4.3.2. Humanities and Social Sciences
Requirements
Prof. Joe Ryan (third from left) examines waste rock from a mine in St. Kevin
Gulch near Leadville with students from the EVEN 4830 Multidisciplinary
Approaches to Abandoned Mine Remediation course in Spring 2003.
The Environmental Engineering Program follows the College of Engineering and Applied Science H&SS requirements
(http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/Advising_Guides/HSS.pdf). A total of 18 credit hours of H&SS electives is
required for graduation. At least nine of the required credit hours must be at the upper division level (3000- or 4000-level
courses). A course on writing and oral presentations is required, which provides three credit hours of upper division
H&SS credit. The remaining courses must be selected from the College’s approved H&SS course lists
(http://engineering.colorado.edu/homer/Fall2007.htm). Instructor’s consent must be obtained on a petition form
if prerequisites are not met. Permission must be obtained from the relevant department if courses have other
restrictions.
Courses on the approved lists that might be of interest to environmental engineers include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ATLS 2000 The meaning of Technology
ATLS 3519 Building Interactive Technology
ATOC 4800 Policy Implications of Climate Controversy
BAKR 1500 Colorado: History, Ecology, and Environment
ECON 3535 Natural Resources Economics (prerequisite: ECON 1000 or 2010, restricted to nonmajors)
ECON 3545 Environmental Economics (prerequisite: ECON 1000 or 2010, restricted to nonmajors)
ENVS 4800 Critical Thinking in Environmental Studies
CVEN 4700/5700 Sustainability in the Built Environment
GEEN 1100 Social Impact of Technology
16
•
•
•
•
GEEN 1510 Self Management and Leadership
GEEN 3300 Sustainability Ethics and Practice
GEOG 4430 Seminar: Conservation Trends (restricted to junior/senior GEOG/ENVS majors)
GEOG 4742 Environments and Peoples (recommended prerequisites: GEOG 1982, 1992, 2002 or 2412; restricted to
•
GEOG 4812 Environment and Development in South America (recommended prerequisites: GEOG 1982, 1992, 2002,
juniors/seniors)
3812,3422, ANTH 3110 or PSCI 3032)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
GEOG 4822 Environment and Development in China (recommended prereqs: GEOG 1982, 1992, 2002 or HIST 1608)
GEOL 4080 Societal Problems and Earth Sciences (prereq: 1 year calculus, 1 year natural science or equiv, or instructor consent)
GEOL 4500 Critical Thinking in Earth Sciences (prerequisite: 1000-level science sequence)
GRMN/HUMN 1701 Nature and Environment in German Literature and Thought
HIST 4324 History of Modern Science (prerequisite: HIST 1020)
INVS 1000 Responding to Social and Environmental Problems Through Service Learning
PHIL 3140 Environmental Ethics (prerequisite: PHIL 1100, 1200, 2200, 3100 or 3200, or sophomore standing)
PSCI 3064 Environmental Political Theory (
SEWL 2000 America, the Environment, and the Global Economy
•
HUEN or EHON courses, offered by the Herbst Program in the Humanities, and designed especially for engineers.
A list of current offerings can be found at http://engineering.colorado.edu/herbst/courses.asp.
Students may petition the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences for approval of an H&SS course not on the
previously approved lists. It is strongly suggested that the petition be approved before enrolling in the course. The
college encourages meaningful groupings of courses in related subjects and thus may approve courses that are not on
the list if they form a coherent plan of study. (Prior approval has already been granted for groups of four courses that
would count toward a minor in certain fields, listed at http://engineering.colorado.edu/homer/Fall2007.htm.) Students
may petition for approval of other meaningful groupings of courses. The following courses may be of interest to
environmental engineers and might be approved for inclusion in such a grouping (you must petition for
approval!):
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ANTH 4150 Human Ecology (prerequisite: ANTH 2010 and 2020, or EBIO 1210 and 1220)
ENVS 3003/ETHN 3011 Race, Class, and Pollution Politics (restricted to junior/senior ENVS or ETHN majors)
ENVS 3020 Advanced Writing in Environmental Studies (restricted to junior/senior ENVS majors)
ENVS 4100 Topics in Environmental Policy
GEOG 2002 Geographies of Global Change
GEOG 2412 Environment and Culture
GEOG 3412 Conservation Practice and Resource Management (restricted to GEOG and ENVS majors)
GEOG 3422 Conservation Thought
HIST 4417 Environmental History of North America (prerequisite: HIST 1015, 1025, 1035 or 1045; restricted to
•
•
•
•
•
MCDB 1030 Plagues, People, and Microorganisms (for nonmajors)
PHIL 2140 Environmental Justice
PSCI 3201 Environment and Public Policy (prerequisite: PSCI 1101)
SOCY 2077 Environment and Society
additional courses from the required and recommended curricula for the Environmental Studies program in the
College of Arts and Sciences (http://www.colorado.edu/envirostudies/)
sophomores/juniors/seniors)
The writing requirement may be fulfilled by one of the following courses:
•
•
GEEN 3000 Professional Communications for Engineers
PHYS 3050 Writing in Physics: Problem-Solving and Rhetoric (prereq: PHYS 2130 or 2170 and lower-division core writing
•
•
HUEN 3100 Humanities for Engineers 1 (prerequisite: junior standing & program approval)
WRTG 3030 Writing on Science and Society (restricted to junior/senior engineering/physical and biological science
•
WRTG 3035 Technical Communication and Design (restricted to junior/senior majors in engineering, architecture &
requirement)
majors)
planning, physical, earth and life sciences)
Students who entered the college prior to fall 2007 may choose to follow the old policy, found at
http://engineering.colorado.edu/homer/Prefall2006.htm. Students may not, however, choose a mixture of elements from
both policies.
17
4.3.3. Some Specific Inclusions and Exclusions for the H&SS List
Some foreign language courses will satisfy the humanities and social
science requirements.
Generally, courses in performance and fine arts production,
mathematics, and natural sciences are not acceptable as H&SS
electives. Some courses in the history of art, music, theatre, dance
or film are acceptable. The following courses are specifically
excluded as satisfying H&SS requirements:
• courses in painting, sculpture, photography, film and other fine
arts production
• courses in musical instruments, band, choir, and other
performance courses
• courses in accounting, finance, personnel administration, and
other business practices
• critical thinking courses in ASTR, CHEM, EBIO, MATH, MCDB,
PHYS.
4.3.4. Advice on Humanities and Social Sciences
Course Selection
EVEN 2004 graduates Richard Comstock, Ian Crocker, and
Robbie Rebel in the CVEN 3454 Water Chemistry laboratory.
Guidance in the H&SS course selection process is available through the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences (see
the online guide HOMER, http://engineering.colorado.edu/homer/).
4.4. Technical Electives
4.4.1. Overview of Technical Electives
Technical electives provide an opportunity for students to explore a range of engineering, mathematical, and natural
sciences topics to provide increased breadth or to focus on a specific technical area to develop in-depth understanding. In
addition, one technical elective must be used to meet a requirement for a course in earth sciences prescribed by the
American Academy of Environmental Engineers (AAEE; http://www.aaee.net/) for environmental engineering curricula.
Students should consult their faculty advisors to plan their technical elective program.
4.4.2. Technical Elective Requirements
The EVEN BS curriculum requires twelve credit hours of technical electives. Technical elective credit may be met by
courses in the following categories:
• most engineering, physics, biology (both EBIO and MCDB), chemistry, geology, physical geography, atmospheric and
oceanic sciences, and mathematics (both APPM and MATH) courses that are substantially different from required
EVEN courses;
• many courses taught by Computer Science and Engineering Management;
• quantitatively rigorous in social sciences (economics, psychology, human geography); and
• independent study courses with appropriate quantitative analysis.
One of the technical elective courses (3 credit hours) may be a lower division (1000-, 2000-level) course. The remaining
technical elective courses must be taken at the 3000-level or above. Both undergraduate and graduate courses (5000
level and above) may be taken as technical electives; admission to graduate courses requires the consent of the
instructor.
One of the technical elective courses (3 credit hours) must be an earth science course at either the lower division or
upper division level. See the list of recommended earth science courses in the Appendix.
All technical elective course selections should be approved by your advisor.
Technical electives counted toward the graduation requirements for the EVEN BS degree may not be taken
pass/fail.
Exceptions to these rules will be considered by petition to the Environmental Engineering faculty.
4.4.3. Specific Inclusions and Exclusions for Technical Electives
A list of selected courses that will meet this requirement appears in the Appendix. If a course is not on this list, check
with your advisor or the program coordinator; you may need to petition to have the course approved as a technical
elective.
18
Independent study (see Section 4.6) is accepted as
technical elective credit up to a maximum of 6
credit hours.
A maximum of 3 credit hours of some Reserve
Office Training Corps (ROTC) courses may be used
as technical electives upon commissioning.
4.4.4. Advice on Technical Electives
Courses that meet the earth sciences requirement
are typically found in the Departments of Geological
Sciences, Geography, Atmospheric and Oceanic
Sciences, and some engineering departments. See
the Appendix for a specific list. Some courses (e.g.,
ATOC 1050, GEOL 1010) have associated optional
labs that will satisfy the air or earth science lab or
field requirement.
EVEN/CHEN 2004 graduate Lily Isenhart perches precariously for a precious
Many students have found that a course devoted to
water sample from the Snake River in Summit County.
the use of computer software for engineering
drawing (e.g., AutoCAD ) or geographic information science (GIS) and mapping (e.g. ARCview ) can open up job
opportunities. The following courses are available on the Boulder campus:
• AREN 1017 Engineering Drawing
• GEOG 3053 Cartography: Visualization and Information Design (restricted to junior/senior GEOG/ENVS majors)
• GEOG 3093 Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photographs (restricted to junior/senior GEOG/ENVS majors)
• GEOG 4043 Cartography 2: Interactive and Multimedia Mapping (prerequisite: GEOG 3053)
• GEOG 4083 Mapping from Remotely Sensed Imagery (prerequisite: 3093, 4093 or equiv; restr to JR/SR GEOG/ENVS majors)
• GEOG 4093 Remote Sensing of the Environment
• GEOG 4103/4203/4303 Geographic Information Science (prerequisite: GEOG 2053 or 3053; restricted to junior/senior
®
®
GEOG/ENVS majors)
Many students are interested in energy-related courses. Some of these courses can be found in the Appendix. It is also
suggested that students check each semester for courses in individual departments’ special topics classes for energyrelated courses, as well as other topics of interest.
Instructor’s consent must be obtained on a petition form if prerequisites are not met. Permission must be
obtained from the relevant department if courses have other restrictions.
4.5. Air or Earth Science Laboratory or Field Course
Students are required to take one 3-credit course with a significant lab or field component focusing on air quality or earth
science. If the course chosen is less than three credits, upper division technical electives must complete the remaining
credits. The following courses will fulfill the lab/field requirement:
• ATOC 1070 Weather and the Atmosphere Lab (1) (prereq or co-req: ATOC 1050 or instructor consent)
• CVEN 3708 Geotechnical Engineering 1 (3) (prerequisite: CVEN 3161)
• EVEN 4100 Environmental Sampling and Analysis (3) (prerequisites: CVEN 3454 & 4424 or equivalent)
• GEOG 4411 Methods of Soil Analysis (3) (prerequisites: GEOG 1001 or 1011; prereq/co-req: GEOG 4401)
• GEOL 1030 Introduction to Geology Lab (1) (prior or current registration in 1000-level GEOL recommended)
• GEOL 2700 Introduction to Field Geology (2) (prerequisites: GEOL 1010 & 1020 or GEOL 1060 & 1070 or GEOG 1001 & 1011)
• GEOL 3010 Introduction to Mineralogy (3) (prerequisites: CHEM 1111/CHEN 1211, MATH 1300/APPM 1350)
• GEOL 4716 Environmental Field Geochemistry (2) (prerequisites: GEOL 2700 and chemistry sequence)
4.6. Independent Study
4.6.1. Introduction to Independent Study
An independent study is a collaboration between a student and a faculty member on a special project that provides
the student with a learning experience. An independent study may also fill an academic need of importance to the
student that cannot be filled by the regular course offerings. Independent studies are opportunities for students to
earn credit for learning outside the normal lecture and laboratory class structure.
In the EVEN BS curriculum, independent studies may be counted as technical electives (up to a maximum of six credit
hours). Independent studies may be conducted in any increment of credit hours up to a maximum of 3 credit hours per
semester, with one credit hour representing 25 hours of actual work on the task or project. The Environmental
Engineering Program encourages students to consider independent study to engage in a long-term research project
with a faculty member.
19
4.6.2. Independent Study Requirements
The following rules apply to independent studies:
• A maximum of 6 credit hours of independent study may be applied to EVEN BS degree requirements as technical
electives.
• Independent studies may not be applied as required courses or option courses.
• A maximum of 3 credit hours of independent study may be taken per semester.
• Independent studies may be supervised by any appropriate University of Colorado faculty member.
• A proposal for an independent study must be made by filling out the Independent Study Agreement Form and
submitting the form to the EVEN Program Coordinator.
• The EVEN director must approve the proposed independent study.
• A final product of the independent study must be submitted to the Environmental Engineering Program before a
grade will be sent to the registrar’s office for posting.
• Approval of a second independent study is contingent on successful completion of the requirements for the first
independent study. A copy of the Independent Study Agreement Form for the previous independent study must
accompany the second application.
• Independent studies may not be arranged retroactively.
• Independent study credit is not allowed for internship experiences, work-study, or work done for pay, following
University rules.
4.6.3. Independent Study Procedures
To propose an independent study, students must first
determine with a collaborating faculty member the topic,
goals, number of credit hours (up to 3 per semester), work
plan, and required product for the independent study. This
information must be recorded on an Independent Study
Agreement Form (see the Forms Appendix) and submitted
to the EVEN Program Coordinator before the drop/add
deadline of the semester in which the independent study
will be conducted.
The independent study proposal will be reviewed by the
EVEN Director and approved, returned for amendment, or
disapproved owing to some deficiency in the proposal. The
student will conduct the independent study under the
EVEN 2004 graduates Venessa Sanchez and Adam Musulin sample
guidance of the faculty advisor. At the end of the
water at the Coors plant in Golden, Colorado.
independent study, the student must submit to the
Environmental Engineering Program a copy of the final product (a report, a computer code, etc.) in addition to any
required products due to the collaborating faculty.
4.6.4. Senior Thesis
Students completing two independent studies for a total of six credit hours during the fall and spring semesters of their
fourth year may write a senior thesis. A senior thesis shows that a student can complete scientific and engineering
research independently and can communicate results.
A senior thesis must be supervised and graded by a member of the Environmental Engineering faculty and defended
before a committee of three faculty members, two of whom must be affiliated with the Environmental Engineering
Program. The completed thesis must be submitted to the Environmental Engineering Program coordinator by the final
day of the semester during which the second independent study is completed.
4.7. Petitions
4.7.1. Petition Rules and Guidelines
Any exceptions or waivers of the rules and regulations of the Environmental Engineering Program or the College of
Engineering and Applied Science must have prior approval by petition. The petition must be completed and submitted
to the Environmental Engineering Program for approval; the petition will then be forwarded to the Dean's Office. It is
the student's responsibility to follow up on the petition's progress. Petition forms may be obtained from the Program
Coordinator, the dean’s office, or from http://engineering.colorado.edu/students/advising.htm.
20
The following list provides some examples of situations for which a petition is required:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
enrolling in less than 12 or more than 19 credit hours per semester
enrolling in a course when prerequisites have not been satisfied
substituting for or waiving a required course
dropping or adding a course after deadlines
requesting the pass/fail or no credit (NC) grade option for a course
when more than half of a semester’s credit hours do not meet degree requirements
to ensure that courses taken elsewhere will count toward degree requirements
to request approval of humanities and social sciences classes or groups of classes that are not on the approved
list
Follow these guidelines when completing the petition:
•
•
•
•
review the rules and policies of the College of Engineering and Applied Science as published in the University of
Colorado Course Catalog and EVEN Degree Guidelines during the year of your admission to the College and the
current edition(s) of the appropriate Advising Guide(s) to establish your need to petition and the specific rule or
policy you wish to waive.
consult with the Program Coordinator and faculty advisor for clarification of Program rules and policies.
write the petition clearly (and neatly!).
provide complete information in the petition, including the number and title of all courses and pertinent data such
as course syllabi.
If properly completed, the petition process will normally take one to two weeks.
4.7.2. One-Time Forgiveness Policy
The College of Engineering offers a one-time forgiveness policy to allow correction of a significant registration error
resulting in an unanticipated grade. As indicated by the title, the forgiveness policy can be used only once. Forgiveness
may be requested in a petition describing the registration error. Students on academic probation or suspension may not
use this policy. See also http://www.colorado.edu/policies/courserepetition.html for information on the Boulder campus
Course Repetition Policy.
4.8. Academic Honesty
The Environmental Engineering Program adheres to the policies of the University of Colorado at Boulder and the
College of Engineering and Applied Science on academic honesty, which state:
"As members of the academic community, students have a responsibility to conduct themselves with the highest standards
of honesty and integrity. These qualities are also vital to the profession of engineering. Violations of academic ethics
tarnish the reputation of all students and will be treated with the utmost seriousness."
Be forewarned and discourage your fellow students from participating in any unethical activities. The following are
examples of some, but certainly not all, acts that violate academic ethics:
•
•
•
•
•
•
plagiarizing
cheating on assignments and exams (including text messaging during exams, quizzes, etc.)
possessing or observing of exams or solutions to examinations prior to the exam
altering, forging, or falsifying official records
performing work or taking an exam for another student
providing material of your own or of others to a fellow student
The College of Engineering and Applied Science procedures for handling academic ethics violations are available in the
Dean’s Office and on the College of Engineering and Applied Science web site
(http://engineering.colorado.edu/students/honor_code.htm). University academic honesty policies are available at the
Honor Code web site (http://www.colorado.edu/academics/honorcode/).
21
5. Graduation Requirements
5.1. Requirements for EVEN BS Degree
5.1.1. General Requirements
To graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Engineering from the College of Engineering and Applied
Science at the Boulder campus, students must meet the following minimum requirements:
1. Satisfactory completion of the required and elective courses in the Environmental Engineering Bachelor of Science
curriculum (see Section 2.1). Students must satisfactorily complete 128 credit hours, of which the last 45 credit
hours shall be earned after admission to the College of Engineering and Applied Science as a degree student.
2. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.000 for all courses attempted and for all courses that count
toward graduation requirements, excluding "P" grades for courses taken Pass/Fail.
3. A minimum cumulative major grade point average of 2.000. This major grade point average includes only course
work in engineering courses.
4. Successful completion of the Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) requirement of the College of
Engineering and Applied Science.
5. Completion of the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination during the final academic year.
6. Notification to the EVEN program coordinator of intent to graduate.
7. Submission of a completed Diploma Card (available in the EVEN or dean's office) to the dean’s office.
Graduation will be postponed by failure to complete these requirements. Any exceptions to these requirements will
require approval of the Environmental Engineering Program Director and the Dean's office by petition.
To be sure that all requirements are met, students can consult with the Environmental Engineering Program Coordinator,
Director, and their faculty advisors. Students must be aware that meeting graduation requirements is ultimately their own
responsibility.
5.1.2. Grading Policy
Students are evaluated by their performances in the courses that make up the Environmental Engineering curriculum
following the standard procedures implemented by the College of Engineering and Applied Science
(http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/Advising_Guides/grading.pdf). Student performance is determined by course
instructors. Instructors award grades following the University of Colorado standardized grading system (Table 1).
Grade point averages of students are determined only for “quality credit hours.” Quality credit hours are those earned
in courses taken for standard grades at the University of Colorado. “Earned credit hours” include quality credit hours
plus credit hours earned in courses taken pass/fail and credit hours transferred from other institutions; thus, grades in
pass/fail courses and courses from other institutions do not count in the University of Colorado grade point average.
Other grades appearing on
student transcripts include
Table 1. Standardized grading system of the University of Colorado at Boulder.
Incomplete (IF), No Credit (NC),
letter grade
credit points
quality of performance
and Pass (P). A grade of IF
indicates that course requirements
A
4.0
superior/excellent
were not completed owing to
A3.7
documented reasons beyond the
B+
3.3
control of the student. Grades of
B
3.0
good/better than average
IF require completion of an “IF
B2.7
Grade Record” by the instructor
C+
2.3
and student stating the work that
C
2.0
competent/average
must be completed to award a
C1.7
(minimum passing grade in prerequisite course)
final grade. All work required for
D+
1.3
the final grade must be completed
D
1.0
within one year or the IF grade is
D0.7 (minimum passing grade in non-prerequisite course)
changed to F. A grade of NC
F
0.0
indicates that the course taken
IF
incomplete
cannot be used to fulfill
NC
no credit
graduation requirements and
P
pass in a pass/fail course
cannot be repeated for a standard
grade. A grade of P in a course
taken pass/fail indicates that the student achieved the minimum passing grade of D- or better.
22
5.1.3. Pass/Fail Grading
Pass/Fail grading is permitted only for courses used as H&SS electives or for courses above and beyond degree
requirements. The primary purpose for offering the opportunity for students to enroll in a course for a grade of P or F
instead of a standard letter grade is to encourage students to broaden their educational experience by selecting
challenging courses without serious risk to the cumulative grade point average. Students on academic probation may not
elect the P/F grade option.
The College allows a maximum of six pass/fail credit hours per semester. Pass/fail hours counting toward graduation shall
not exceed a cumulative total of 16. Transfer students are allowed one credit hour Pass/Fail for every nine credit hours
completed under the Standard Grading System.
Students are required to submit a petition requesting approval to register for a course with the pass/fail option.
5.2. Fundamentals of Engineering Exam
One of the requirements for graduation with the EVEN BS degree is that students must take the Fundamentals of
Engineering (FE) Exam. This test serves two purposes: (1) it provides students with the opportunity to complete the
first step toward Professional Engineer (PE) status and (2) it provides the Environmental Engineering Program with a
useful assessment of engineering proficiency attained by EVEN graduates. Students usually take the FE Exam during
their final semester. You must be within 32 credits of graduation to be allowed to take the FE exam.
The Fundamentals of Engineering Examination is the first step toward achieving licensure as a Professional Engineer (PE),
a particularly important credential for engineers working as consultants. The FE Exam is administered by the National
Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES; http://www.ncees.org). The FE Exam is offered
semiannually, in April and October. Registration notices will be distributed by the EVEN Program Coordinator, and
students must coordinate their registrations with the EVEN office.
The exam consists of two parts, the morning and afternoon “specifications.” The morning specification covers
engineering, science, and mathematics fundamentals. The afternoon specification is discipline-specific. Environmental
Engineering is offered as an afternoon specification. Students may also take one of the other specifications, such as
Chemical Engineering or General Engineering. The NCEES offers general information, study materials, and sample
questions for the FE Exam, and a copy of the current FE Reference Handbook can be downloaded from the NCEES
website. Numerous review books for the FE Exam are also readily available at web booksellers. Check with the program
coordinator about possible review sessions held by engineering departments.
5.3. Requirements for Dual Degrees
Students may choose to pursue a second Bachelor of Science degree simultaneously with the EVEN BS degree. The
second BS degree may be pursued in a College or School at the University of Colorado at Boulder. To do this, they must
(1) satisfy the requirements of both BS degree curriculum and (2) take a minimum of 30 credit hours beyond the credit
hour requirement for the degree with the higher credit hour requirement. If the requirements of both curricula can be
satisfied with fewer than 30 credit hours, the difference can be made up with elective courses. To complete a dual
degree, the student should find an academic advisor in the other program to ensure that its course requirements are
satisfied.
6. Society of Environmental Engineers (SEVEN)
The Society of Environmental Engineers (SEVEN) is a student society which engages in a combination of educational,
service and social activities. It is open to students in all majors who are interested in environmental issues and
sustainable solutions. See http://www.colorado.edu/engineering/EnvEng/SEVEN.htm for more information about
meetings and activities, and to contact the current officers.
23
7. Faculty Directory
More than twenty College of Engineering and Applied Science faculty mambers are affiliated with the Environmental Engineering
Program. These faculty members are rostered in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Civil,
Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering departments.
Rajagopalan Balaji, Associate Professor, Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Water Resources.
Education: B.Tech, Regional Eng. College Kurukshetra, India (1989), M.Tech Indian Statistical Institute Calcutta, India (1991), Ph.D.
Utah State University (1995)
Teaching: CVEN 4333/5333 Engineering Hydrology
Research: Stochastic Hydrology and Hydroclimatology, Nonparametric functional estimation techniques
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492-5968, office: ECOT 541
Angela Bielefeldt, Associate Professor, Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering; EVEN Director
Education: B.S., Iowa State University (1992), M.S., Ph.D., University of Washington (1994, 1996)
Teaching: CVEN 4434 Environmental Engineering Design, CVEN 4474 Hazardous Waste Management
Research: Biological Treatment of Hazardous Organic Compounds, Subsurface Bioremediation
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 8433, office: ECOT 516
Melvyn Branch, Professor Emeritus, Mechanical Engineering
Education: B.S.E., Princeton U. (1966), M.S., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1968, 1971)
Teaching: MCEN 4152 Introduction to Combustion, MCEN 4162 Energy Conversion
Research: Combustion-Generated Air Pollution, Hazardous Waste Destruction, Combustion Chemistry
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 3578; office: ECME 210
David Clough, Professor, Chemical and Biological Engineering
Education: B.S., Case Institute of Technology (1968), M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder (1969, 1975)
Teaching: GEEN 1300 Introduction to Engineering Computing, CHEN 3010 Applied Data Analysis
Research: Improved Control of Industrial Processes, Optimization and Control of Natural Resources Distribution
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 6638, office: ECCH 126
John Crimaldi, Associate Professor, Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering
Education: B.S.E. Princeton University (1987), Ph.D. Stanford University (1998)
Teaching: CVEN 3313 Theoretical Fluid Mechanics, CVEN 5313 Environmental Fluid Mechanics, CVEN 5343 Transport and Dispersion in
Surface Water, CVEN 6833 Advanced Environmental Fluid Mechanics
Research: Interaction of fluid mechanics with biological or ecological systems, Scalar transport; structure of passive chemical plumes,
Turbulent processes in benthic boundary layers
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 735 2162, office: ECOT 511
John Daily, Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Education: B.S., M.S., U. Michigan (1969, 1970), Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University (1975)
Research: Hazardous Waste Destruction, Combustion, Propulsion
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 7110, office: ECME 224
William Emery, Professor, Aerospace Engineering Science
Education: B.S., Brigham Young U. (1971), Ph.D., U. Hawaii (1975)
Teaching: EVEN 4830 Environmental Satellite Remote Sensing
Research: Satellite Remote Sensing of Oceans, Vegetation and Urban Studies
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 8591, office: ECME 220
Michael Hannigan, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Education: B.S., Southern Methodist University (1990), M.S., Ph.D., California Institute of Technology (1991, 1997)
Teaching: MCEN 4228 Sustainable Energy
Research: Characterization and Abatement of Air Pollution
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 735 5045, office: ECME 218
Mark Hernandez, Associate Professor, Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering
Education: B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1986, 1988, 1994)
Teaching: CVEN 3414 Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering, CVEN 4484 Introduction to Environmental Microbiology, AREN 2110
Thermodynamics
Research: Biological Waste Treatment Processes, Microbiology of Aerosols, Microbially induced corrosion
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 5991, office: ECOT 515
Jean Hertzberg, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Education: B.S., U. Michigan (1981), M.S., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1983, 1986)
Teaching: MCEN 3012 Thermodynamics, MCEN 4030 Computational Methods
Research: Combustion Fluid Mechanics, Hazardous Waste Destruction
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 5092; office: ECME 220
Karl Linden, Professor, Liebman Faculty Fellow, Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering
Education: BS, Science, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Cornell University, (1989), MS, Civil and Environmental Engineering,
University of California (1993), Ph.D., Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California (1997)
24
Teaching: CVEN 5834 Special Topics: UV treatment; CVEN 3414 Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering
Research: Water Treatment, Wastewater Treatment, Disinfection, Advanced Oxidation
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 4798, office: ECOT 542
Diane McKnight, Professor, Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering
Education: B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1975, 1978, 1979)
Teaching: CVEN 3434 Applied Ecology
Research: Aquatic Ecology, Aquatic Chemistry
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 4687 or 492 7573, office: ECOT 543 or RL-1, 118
Jana Milford, Professor, Mechanical Engineering; former EVEN Director
Education: B.S., Iowa State University (1983), M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University (1985, 1988), J.D., University of Colorado School
of Law (2004)
Teaching: MCEN 4131 Air Pollution Control
Research: Air Quality Modeling, Atmospheric Chemistry
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 5542, office: ECME 214
Shelly Miller, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Education: B.S., Harvey Mudd College (1986), M.S., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley (1991, 1996)
Teaching: MCEN 4131 Air Pollution Control, MCEN 4141 Indoor Air Pollution
Research: Indoor Air Quality, Bioaerosols
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 0587; office: ECME 222
Roseanna Neupauer, Assistant Professor, Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering
Education: B.S., Carnegie Mellon University (1989); S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1991); M.S., Ph.D, New Mexico Tech
(1999, 2000)
Teaching: CVEN 4353/5353 Groundwater Engineering; CVEN 3323 Hydraulics
Research: groundwater flow and transport modeling, porous media heterogeneity, contaminant source characterization
Email: [email protected]; phone: 303 492 6274; office: ECOT 513
John Pellegrino, Research Professor; Mechanical Engineering
Education: B.ChE. City College of New York (1973), M.S., Ph.D., (ChE) University of Colorado at Boulder (1979, 1983)
Teaching: Fluid Mechanics, Membranes, Energy, Separations, Engineering Economics
Research: Water, Energy, Membranes
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 735 2631, office:
Hari Rajaram, Professor, Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering
Education: B.Tech., IIT, Madras (1985), M.S., U. Iowa (1987), Sc.D., M.I.T. (1991)
Teaching: CVEN 4353 Groundwater Engineering; CVEN 3313 Fluid Mechanics
Research: Groundwater and Contaminant Hydrology, Stochastic Modeling of Transport Processes
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 6604, office: ECOT 514
Joseph Ryan, Professor, Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering; former EVEN Director
Education: B.S., Princeton U. (1983), M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1988, 1992)
Teaching: CVEN 3414 Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering, CVEN 3454 Water Chemistry, CVEN 4424 Environmental Organic
Chemistry
Research: Contaminant Fate and Transport in Natural Waters, Surface and Colloid Chemistry
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 0772, office: ECOT 517
JoAnn Silverstein, Professor and Chair, Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering
Education: B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of California at Davis (1978, 1980, 1982)
Teaching: AREN 2110 Thermodynamics; CVEN 4830 Senior Design Projects
Research: Biological Treatment of Contaminants in Water and Wastes, Water Reuse
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 7211, office: ECOT 444
Scott Summers, Professor, Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering
Education: B.S., M.S., University of Cincinnati (1980, 1982), Ph.D., Stanford University (1986)
Teaching: CVEN 3424 Water and Wastewater Treatment
Research: Drinking Water Quality and Treatment, Disinfection By-Products, Natural Organic Matter
Email: [email protected], phone: 303 492 6644, office: ECOT 540
25
Forms and Appendices
The forms listed below are available on the following pages:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Special Option Selection Proposal
Advising Evaluation Form
Independent Study Agreement Form
Degree Requirements Worksheet
Technical Elective Suggestions
Table of Prerequisites and co-requisite courses for required courses in the EVEN BS curriculum
Useful Websites
26
Environmental Engineering Program
College of Engineering and Applied Science
University of Colorado at Boulder
Special Option Selection Proposal
Student Name: __________________________________________ Student number: __________________
Class standing (circle): First-year
Degree Program (circle):
Second-year
EVEN BS
Third-year
Fourth-year
Fifth-year
EVEN BS/CVEN MS
Faculty Advisor Name: ____________________________________
Title for Area of Specialization for Special Option:
Proposed Courses for Special Option (total of 9 credit hours):
Course Number and Name
Credits
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Explanation of Need for Special Courses (i.e., difference from regular Options; importance for an Environmental
Engineering education):
Student Signature
Date
Faculty Advisor Signature
Date
Received by Program Coordinator
Director Approval:
Approved
Date
Returned for Amendment
Disapproved
Comments:
Director Signature
27
Date
EN VI R ON M ENTA L ENGINEERING P R O G R A M
COL LEGE OF ENGINEERING AND A PPLIED
SCIENCE
UNIVE R SITY OF C OL O R A D O AT B OU LDE R
Advising Evaluation
EVEN Students: We are conducting this survey to get your opinions about EVEN academic advising. We will use
your opinions to improve academic advising in the Environmental Engineering Program. We need your participation
in this process; therefore, you must return this survey to get your registration flag lifted. Return the completed
survey to the Program Coordinator (ECOT 518).
Advisor’s Name: _____________________________________________ Date: ________________
How was your advising experience? (Rate from 1 to 5 with 1 being poor and 5 being excellent.)
1
2
3
4
5
Poor
Excellent
Please explain your numeric evaluation:
How could we improve the advising process?
Did you have any problem scheduling courses that you need to graduate? If so, which courses?
Is your advisor knowledgeable about your career interests or option track in Environmental
Engineering? If not, have you sought out other EVEN faculty for advice?
Please circle or highlight your status and degree program:
First-year
EVEN BS
Second-year
Third-year
Fourth-year
Fifth-year
EVEN BS/CVEN MS
Please circle or highlight your option track (third-year students and fourth-year students):
Air Quality
Applied Ecology
Chemical Proc
Energy
Env Remed
28
Water Res/Trtmt
Special
Environmental Engineering Program
College of Engineering and Applied Science
University of Colorado at Boulder
Independent Study Proposal
Student Name: __________________________________________ Student number: __________________
Class standing: First-year
Degree Program:
Option: Air Qual
Second-year
EVEN BS
Appl Ecol
Third-year
Fourth-year
Fifth-year
EVEN BS/CVEN MS
Chem Proc
Energy
Env Remed
Water Res/Trtmt
Special
Previous number of Independent Study hours earned for EVEN degree: ________
Previous number of Independent Study hours earned outside this major: ______
Collaborating Faculty Name: _______________________________
Semester: _________________ Credit hours (1-3): ____________
Independent Study Title: ___________________________________________________________________
Work to be done:
Products required for successful completion:
Student Signature
Collaborating Faculty Signature
Date
Date
Received by Program Coordinator
Date
Director Approval:
Approved
Returned for Amendment
Disapproved
Comments:
Director Signature
Registered by Program Coordinator
Date
_______________ Course Number:
29
_______________ Date
Degree Requirements Worksheet – EVEN BS Degree
2008-2009
Student Name: _________________________________________________ Student#:_____________
Faculty Advisor: ________________________________________________ Catalog year:_________ Major year:________
Required Courses
Engineering (53 hours)
EVEN 1000 Intro to Environmental Engineering
1
GEEN 1300
Intro to Engineering Computing
3
GEEN 1400
Engineering Projects
3
CVEN 3414
Fundamentals of Environmental Engr
3
CHEN 2120
Chem Engr Matl Energy Balances
3
1
Solid Mechanics
3
CVEN 3454
Water Chemistry
4
2
Engineering Economics
3
3
Fluid Mechanics
3
4
Thermodynamics
3
Environmental Organic Chemistry
3
Heat Transfer
3
CVEN 4424
5
CVEN 4484
Intro to Environmental Microbiology
MCEN 4131 Air Pollution Control
6
3
3
Probability and Statistics
3
CVEN 4333
Engineering Hydrology
3
CVEN 4444
Environmental Engineering Processes
3
CVEN 4434
Environmental Engineering Design
3
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
______
______
______
______
____
____
____
____
Engineering Total (53)
Mathematics (16 hours)
APPM 1350 Calculus 1 for Engineers
4
APPM 1360
Calculus 2 for Engineers
4
APPM 2350
Calculus 3 for Engineers
4
APPM 2360
Intro Diff Eqns w Linear Algebra
4
Mathematics Total (16)
Sciences (17 hours)
CHEN 1211
General Chemistry
3
CHEM 1221 General Chemistry Laboratory
2
PHYS 1110
General Physics 1
4
PHYS 1120
General Physics 2
4
PHYS 1140
Experimental Physics 1
1
CHEM 4521 Physical Chemistry for Engineers
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
3
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
______
______
______
______
______
______
____
____
____
____
____
____
Sciences Total (17)
1
2
Solid Mechanics options: CVEN 2121 Analytical Mechanics, GEEN 3851 Statics for Engrs, MCEN 2023 Statics and Structures.
Engineering Economics options: EMEN 4100 Business Methods & Economics for Engineers, CVEN 4147 Engineering Economy & System Design, EVEN
4830 Technoeconomic Analysis for Environmental Engineering
3
Fluid Mechanics options: CHEN 3200 Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics, CVEN 3313 Fluid Mechanics, GEEN 3853 Fluid Mechanics for Engineers,
MCEN 3021 Fluid Mechanics.
4
Thermodynamics options: AREN 2110 Thermodynamics, CHEN 3320 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, GEEN 3852 Thermodynamics for
Engineers, MCEN 3012 Thermodynamics.
5
6
Heat Transfer options: CHEN 3210 Chemical Engineering Heat Transfer, MCEN 3022 Heat Transfer.
Probability & Statistics options: APPM 4570 Statistical Methods, CHEN 3010 Applied Data Analysis, CVEN 3227 Probability, Statistics, & Decisions.
30
Degree Requirements Worksheet – EVEN BS Degree
2008-2009
Elective Courses
pg. 2
Humanities & Social Sciences Electives (18 hours, 9 hours upper division)
H&SS (lower or upper division)
H&SS (lower or upper division)
H&SS (lower or upper division)
H&SS (upper division)
7
H&SS (upper division)
Required Communication Course
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
______
______
______
______
______
______
______
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
______
______
______
____
____
____
H&SS Total (18)
Option Courses (9 hours)
8
Option 1
Option 2
Option 3
_____ _______________________
_____ _______________________
_____ _______________________
_____
Option Total (9)
Technical Electives (12 hours, 9 hours upper division, 3 Earth Science)
9
Tech (lower or upper division)
Tech (upper division)
Tech (upper division)
Tech (upper division)
10
Air/Earth Lab/Field Course
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
______
______
______
______
______
____
____
____
____
____
_____
Technical Elective Total (12)
_______________________
______
____
Air/Earth Lab/Field Course (3)
Credit hour Total:
(128)
Grade Point Average:
MAPS Complete:
Date:
FE Exam:
Date:
Preliminary Check:
Date:
Final Check:
Date:
7
Communications course: WRTG 3030 Writing on Science and Society, HUEN 3100 Humanities for Engineers, WRTG 3035 Technical
Communication and Design, GEEN 3000 Professional Communications for Engineers, PHYS 3050 Writing in Physics.
8
Consult Environmental Engineering (EVEN) Degree Guidelines for lists of Option courses.
9
Technical Electives: Three technical elective credits may be lower division (1000-, 2000-level). Three technical elective credits must
be in the earth sciences, either lower or upper division (eligible departments and programs include ATOC, CVEN, GEOL, and GEOG).
Independent studies (EVEN 4840) may be completed as technical electives for up to 6 credits total, 3 credits per semester.
1010
Air/Earth Lab/Field course: a 3(+) credit course with a significant laboratory or field component focusing on air quality or earth science. If less
than 3 credits, the difference is required as a technical elective. Options: ATOC 1070 Weather and the Atmosphere Lab (1), CVEN 3708 Geotechnical
Engineering, EVEN 4100 Environmental Sampling, GEOG 4411 Methods of Soil Analysis, GEOL 1030 Intro to Geology Lab, GEOL 2700 Intro to Field
Geology (2), GEOL 3010 Intro to Mineralogy, GEOL 4716 Environmental Field Geochemistry (2)
31
Technical Elective Suggestions
Any of the courses listed in the options (p. 9) are good technical electives. Other example Technical Elective Courses for
EVEN are listed below. If a course is not on this list, you may request approval on a petition form.
Check for prerequisites in the catalog: http://www.colorado.edu/catalog/catalog08-09.
Some graduate-level classes (5000+) can also be taken as technical electives -- check with your advisor. Note, however,
that prerequisites are not listed in the catalog for graduate courses; instructor’s permission may be required.
Courses marked with an asterisk (*) fulfill the earth sciences technical elective requirement (geology, meteorology or soil
science).
Courses marked with † will fulfill the air/earth sciences lab/field requirement.
Arts & Sciences
APPM 3010 (3) An Introduction to Nonlinear Systems: Chaos
APPM 3050 (3) Scientific Computing in Matlab
APPM 3170 (3) Discrete Applied Mathematics
APPM 3310 (3) Matrix Methods and Applications
APPM 3570 (3) Applied Probability
APPM 4120 (3) Introduction to Operations Research
APPM 4350 (3) Methods in Applied Mathematics: Fourier Series
and Boundary Value Problems
Weather and the Atmosphere Lab * †
Aviation Meteorology *
Analysis of Climate and Weather Observation *
ATOC
ATOC
ATOC
ATOC
ATOC
ATOC
3500
3600
3720
4215
4720
4750
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Air Chemistry and Pollution
Principles of Climate *
Planets and Their Atmospheres
Oceanography
Intro to Atmospheric Physics & Dynamics *
Desert Meteorology and Climate *
Organic Chemistry 1
Lab in Organic Chemistry 1
Organic Chemistry 2
Lab in Organic Chemistry 2
Modern Inorganic Chemistry
Inorganic Laboratory
Instrumental Analysis
Instrumental Analysis Lab with Environ Emphasis
Physical Chemistry w Biochemistry Applications 2
Physical Chemistry 2
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
4541
4581
4591
4611
4621
4711
4731
4751
4761
4791
(2)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(4)
(3)
Physical Chemistry Laboratory for Engineers
Physical Chemistry Lab 1
Physical Chemistry Lab 2
Survey of Biochemistry
Genome Databases: Mining and Management
General Biochemistry 1
General Biochemistry 2
Current Topics in Biochemical Research
Biochemistry Laboratory
Bioorganic Chemistry in Biotechnology
ATOC 1050 (3)
ATOC 1060 (3)
Climate *
ATOC 1070 (1)
ATOC 3180 (3)
ATOC 3300 (3)
Weather and the Atmosphere *
Our Changing Environment: El Nino, Ozone and
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
3311
3321
3331
3341
4011
4021
4171
4181
4431
4531
1210
1220
1230
1240
2010
2040
2070
2500
2590
2670
3040
3080
3110
3170
3175
3180
3190
3240
3270
3520
3530
(4)
(1)
(4)
(1)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(4)
(3)
(3)
APPM 4360 (3) Methods in Applied Mathematics: Complex Variables
and Applications
APPM 4380 (3) Modeling in Applied Mathematics
APPM 4540 (3) Introduction to Time Series
APPM 4560 (3) Markov Processes, Queues, Monte Carlo Sims
APPM 4580 (3) Statistical Applications: Software & Mth
APPM 4650 (3) Intermediate Numerical Analysis 1
APPM 4660 (3) Intermediate Numerical Analysis 2
APPM 4720 (3) Open Topics in Applied Mathematics
(3) General Biology 1
(3) General Biology 2
(1) General Biology Laboratory 1
(1) General Biology Laboratory 2
(1-3) Environmental Issues and Biology
(4) Principles of Ecology
(4) Genetics: Molecules to Populations
(4) Introduction to Horticulture
(2) Plants and Society
(5) Honors Genetics Molecules to Population
(4) Conservation Biology
(4) Evolutionary Biology
(3) Population and Community Ecology
(3-4) Arctic and Alpine Ecology
(1) Arctic and Alpine Ecology Lab
(3) Global Ecology
(3) Tropical Marine Ecology
(4) Animal Behavior
(3) Ecosystem Ecology
(4) Plant Systematics
(4) Functional Plant Biology
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
EBIO
3630
3770
3850
4020
4030
4060
4100
4110
4120
4140
4150
4160
4175
4180
4290
4410
4660
4740
4750
4760
(4) Parasitology
(4) Animal Diversity: Vertebrates
(4) Animal Diversity: Invertibrates
(3) Stream Biology
(3) Limnology
(3) Landscape Ecology
(3) Advanced Ecology
(3) Advanced Ecology
(2-4) Advanced Ecology
(3) Plant Ecology
(1-2) Techniques in Ecology
(3) Introduction to Biogeochemistry
(3) Scientific Basis for Ecosystem Managemt Public Lands
(3) Ecological Perspectives on Global Change
(3) Molecular Systematics and Evolution
(4) Biometry
(4) Insect Biology
(3) Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles
(4) Ornithology
(4) Mammalogy
ENVS/PHYS 3070 (3) Energy and the Environment
GEOG 1001 (4) Environ’l Systems 1- Climate & Vegetation *
GEOG 1011 (4) Environ’l Systems 2 - Landscapes and Water *
32
GEOG 4231 (4) Physical Climatology/Field Methods *
GEOG 4241 (4) Principles of Geomorphology *
GEOG 4251 (4) Fluvial Geomorphology *
GEOG 4291 (3-4) Mountain Geomorphology *
GEOG 4303 (4) Geographic Information Science: Programming
GEOG 4311 (3) Watershed Biogeochemistry
GEOG 4321 (3-4) Snow Hydrology
GEOG 4331 (3-4) Mountain Climatology *
GEOG 4371 (3) Forest Geography: Principles and Dynamics
GEOG 4401 (3) Soils Geography *
GEOG 4411 (3) Methods of Soil Analysis * †
GEOG 4501 (3) Water Resources and Water Management of
Western United States
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
3053
3093
3251
3301
3351
3601
4043
4083
4093
4103
4201
4203
4211
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(3)
(4)
(3)
Catography: Visualization and Information Design
Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photographs
Mountain Geography *
Analysis of Climate and Weather Observation *
Biogeography
Principles of Climate *
Cartography 2: Interactive & Multimedia Mapping
Mapping from Remotely Sensed Imagery
Remote Sensing of the Environment
Introduction to Geographic Information Science
Biometeorology *
Geographic Information Science: Modeling Applic
Physical Climatology - Principles *
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
1010
1020
1030
1040
1060
2100
2110
2700
3010
3020
3030
3040
3050
3070
3120
3300
3320
3410
3430
3500
3520
(3)
(3)
(1)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(4)
(2)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(4)
(3)
(3)
Introduction to Geology 1 *
Introduction to Geology 2 *
Introduction to Geology Laboratory 1 *
Geology of Colorado *
Global Change An Earth Science Perspective *
Environmental Geology *
Physical Science of the Earth System *
Introduction to Field Geology * †
Introduction to Mineralogy * †
Petrology*
Introduction to Hydrogeology *
Global Change: The Recent Geological Record *
Computer Assisted Geologic Techniques *
Introduction to Oceanography
Structural Geology *
Extraterrestrial Life
Introduction to Geochemistry *
Paleobiology *
Sedimentology and Stratigraphy *
Earth Resources and the Environment *
Environmental Issues in Geosciences *
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
3540
3720
3950
4060
4093
4130
4160
4200
4241
4270
4291
4360
4550
4640
4670
4711
4712
4714
4715
4716
4717
(3) Introduction to Hydrocarbon Geology *
(3) Evolution of Life: The Geological Record *
(3) Natural Catastrophes & Geologic Hazards *
(4) Oceanography
(4) Remote Sensing of the Environment *
(3) Principals of Geophysics *
(3) Introduction to Biogeochemistry *
(3) Advanced Mineralogy *
(4) Principles of Geomorphology *
(3) Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry
(3-4) Mountain Geomorphology *
(3) Glacial Geology *
(3) Petroleum Reservoir Characterization & Modeling
(3) Glaciology *
(3) Isotope Geology *
(2) Igneous and Metamorphic Field Geology *
(2) Structural Field Geology *
(2) Field Geophysics *
(2) Field Tech in Surficial Geol & Geohydrol *
(2) Environmental Field Geochemistry * †
(2) Field Seminar in Geology and Tectonics *
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
3060
3130
3410
3415
3420
3430
3435
3450
3460
3470
3480
3500
3660
3730
(4)
(3)
(3)
(2)
(3)
(3)
(2)
(5)
(5)
(3)
(3)
(2)
(3)
(3)
Cell Physiology
Environmental Animal Physiology
Introduction to Human Anatomy
Human Anatomy Laboratory
Nutrition, Health. and Performance
Introduction to Human Physiology
Human Physiology Laboratory
Comparative Animal Physiology
Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
Human Physiology 1
Human Physiology 2
Applied Clinical Research
Dynamics of Motor Learning
Brain and Behavior
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
IPHY
3800
3810
4200
4440
4470
4480
4500
4540
4600
4650
4720
4730
4740
4770
(3) Forensic Biology
(1) Forensic Biology Laboratory
(3) Physiological Genetics and Genomics
(3) Endocrinology
(3) Biology of Human Reproduction
(3) Comparative Reproduction
(4) Histology: Cells and Tissues
(5) Biomechanics
(4) Immunology
(5) Exercise Physiology
(4) Neurophysiology
(3) Motor Control
(3) Theory of Motor Skills Learning
(3-4) Mind-Body Health
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
3170
3210
4000
4120
4140
4230
4310
4320
4330
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Combinatorics 1
Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries
Foundations of Mathematics
Introduction to Operations Research
Abstract Algebra 2
Geometry of Curves and Surfaces
Introduction to Analysis
Multivariable Analysis
Fourier Analysis
PHYS 2130 (3) General Physics 3
PHYS 2210 (3) Classical Mechanics and Math Methods 1
PHYS/ENVS 3070 (3) Energy and the Environment
PHYS 3210 (3) Classical Mechanics and Mathematical Methods 2
PHYS 3220 (3) Quantum Mechanics and Atomic Physics 1
33
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
4440
4450
4470
4510
4520
4540
4650
4660
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Mathematics of Coding and Cryptography
Introduction to Complex Variables
Partial Differential Equations 1
Introduction to Probability Theory
Introduction to Mathematical Statistics
Introduction to Time Series
Intermediate Numerical Analysis 1
Intermediate Numerical Analysis 2
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
3310
3320
3330
3340
4110
(3)
(3)
(2)
(3)
(3)
Principles of Electricity and Magnetism 1
Principles of Electricity and Magnetism 2
Electronics for the Physical Sciences
Introductory Research in Optical Physics
Analytical Techniques for Materials Analysis
PHYS 4340 (3) Introduction to Solid State Physics
PHYS 4410 (3) Quantum Mechanics and Atomic Physics 2
PHYS 4510 (3) Optics
PHYS 4130 (2) Biological Electron Microscopy
PHYS 4150 (3) Plasma Physics
PHYS 4230 (3) Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
College of Engineering and Applied Science
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
2500
3116
4012
4013
4090
4114
4148
4215
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Gateway to Space
Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
Aerospace Materials
Foundations of Propulsion
Global Positioning Systems Applications
Automatic Control Systems
Spacecraft Design
Oceanography
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
ASEN
4216
4218
4238
4248
4337
4338
4426
4436
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Neural Signals & Functional Brain Imaging
Large Space Structures Design
Computer Aided Control System Design
Computer Aided Control System Design 2
Remote Sensing Data Analysis
Computer Analysis of Structures
Neural Systems and Physiological Control
Brains, Minds, Computers
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
1017
1027
2050
3010
3050
3060
3130
3140
3406
3540
4110
(2)
(2)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Engineering Drawing
Descriptive Geometry
Engineering Systems for Buildings
Mechanical Systems for Buildings
Environmental Systems for Buildings 1
Environmental Systems for Buildings 2
Building Energy Laboratory
Illumination Laboratory
Introduction to Building Construction
Illumination 1
HVAC Design 1
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
AREN
4315
4416
4420
4466
4540
4550
4560
4570
4580
4590
(2)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Design of Masonry Structures
Construction Costs and Estimating
Cost Engineering
Construction Planning and Scheduling
Exterior Lighting Systems
Illumination 2
Luminous Radiative Transfer
Building Electrical Systems Design 1
Daylighting
Computer Graphics in Lighting Engineering
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
2810
2820
3130
3220
4130
4330
4440
4450
4460
4520
(3)
(3)
(2)
(3)
(2)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Biology for Engineers
Foundations of Bioengineering
Chemical Engineering Lab 1
Separations and Mass Transfer
Chemical Engineering Lab 2
Reaction Kinetics
Chemical Engineering Materials
Polymer Chemistry
Polymer Engineering
Chemical Process Synthesis.
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
CHEN
4570
4580
4650
4670
4680
4800
4805
4820
4838
(4)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Instrumentation and Process Control
Numerical Methods for Proc Simulation
Particle Technology
Environmental Separations
Environmental Process Engineering
Bioprocess Engineering
Biomaterials
Biochemical Separations
Sp Top: Energy Fundamentals
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
CVEN
2012
3111
3161
3246
3256
3323
3424
3434
3525
3602
3698
3708
3718
4087
4161
4266
4323
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Introduction to Geomatics
Analytical Mechanics 2
Mechanics of Materials 1
Introduction to Construction
Construction Equipment and Methods
Hydraulic Engineering
Water and Wastewater Treatment
Introduction to Applied Ecology
Structural Analysis
Transportation Systems
Engineering Geology *
Geotechnical Engineering 1 * †
Geotechnical Engineering 2 *
Engineering Contacts
Mechanics of Materials 2
Project Administration
Water Resource Engineering Design
CVEN 4343 (3) Open Channel Hydraulics
CVEN 4353 (3) Groundwater Engineering
CVEN 4474 (3) Hazardous and Industrial Waste Mgmt
CVEN 4511 (3) Intro Finite Elements
CVEN 4525 (3) Analysis of Framed Structures
CVEN 4537 (3) Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering
CVEN 4545 (3) Steel Design
CVEN 4555 (3) Reinforced Concrete Design
CVEN 4565 (2) Timber Design
CVEN 4718 (3) Mechanics and Dynamics of Glaciers
CVEN 4728 (3) Foundation Engineering
CVEN 4822 (3) Geographical Information Systems for Civil and
Environmental Systems
CVEN 4838 (3) Sp Top:Sustainable Community Development 1
CVEN 5020 (3) Building Energy Audits
CVEN 5393 (3) Water Resources Development & Management
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
2270
3202
3287
3308
3656
3702
3753
4113
4202
(4)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(4)
(3)
(3)
Computer Science 2: Data Structures
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Database and Information Systems
Software Engineering Methods and Tools
Principles of Programming Languages
Cognitive Science
Operating Systems
UNIX System Administration
Artificial Intelligence 2
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
CSCI
34
4273
4446
4448
4473
4576
4586
4593
4753
4838
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(4)
(4)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Network Systems
Chaotic Dynamics
Object Oriented Analysis and Design
Network Security
High Performance Scientific Computing 1
High Performance Scientific Computing 2
Computer Organization
Computer Performance Modeling
User Interface Design
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
1400
2060
2120
2250
2260
3030
3100
3170
3250
3300
3320
3400
3410
3810
4021
4106
4109
4120
4138
4167
4242
(3)
(3)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(3)
(5)
(3)
(5)
(5)
(3)
(5)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
Introduction to Digital and Analog Electronics
Sp Top: Renewable Energy
Computers as Components
Circuits/Electronics 1
Circuits/Electronics 2
Electrical/Electronic Circuits Non-Major
Digital Logic
Energy Conservation 1
Circuits/Electronics 3
Linear Systems
Semiconductor Devices
Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
Electromagnetic Waves and transmission
Introduction to Probability Theory
Sp Top: Design Med Device
Photonics
Very Large Scale Integrated System Design
Neural Network Design
Control Systems Analysis
Energy Conservation 2
Communication Theory
4345
4517
4532
4553
4583
4593
4606
4613
4616
4623
4632
4633
4634
4645
4652
4753
4797
4811
4821
4827
4831
(3)
(2)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(2)
(2)
(3)
(2)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Introduction to Solid State
Power Electronics Laboratory
Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Introduction to Complier Construction
Software System Development
Computer Organization
Undergraduate Optics Laboratory
Embedded System Design
Optoelectric System Design
Real Time Embedded Systems
Introduction to Digital Filtering
Hybrid Embedded System
Microwave and RF Laboratory
Introduction to Optical Electronics
Communication Laboratory
Computer Performance Modeling
Introduction to Power Electronics
Neural Signals & Functional Brain Imaging
Neural Systems and Physiological Control
Analog IC Design
Brains, Minds, Computers
EVEN 2840 (1-3) Independent Study
EVEN 4100 (3) Environmental Sampling and Analysis * †
EVEN 4840 (1-3) Independent Study
EMEN 4030 (3) Project Management System
EMEN 4050 (3). Leadership
EMEN 4825 (3). Entrepreneurial Business Plan Preparation
GEEN 3400 (3) Invention and Innovation
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
1025
1208
2024
3017
3030
3043
4026
4042
4043
4120
4122
4124
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
MCEN
(3). Computer-Aided Design and Fabrication
(3) Sp Top: Sustainable Energy
(3) Materials Science
(3) Circuits and Electronics
(3) Computational Methods
(3) Dynamics
(3) Manufacturing Processes and Systems
(3) Thermal Systems Design
(3) System Dynamics
(3) Engineering Statistics
(3) Thermodynamics 2
(3) Mechanical Behavior of Materials
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4134
4141
4152
4162
4173
4228
4228
4228
4228
4228
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Biomechanics
Indoor Air Pollution
Introduction to Combustion
Energy Conversion
Finite Element Analysis
Sp Top: Climate Solutions
Sp Top: Energy Conservation and Storage
Sp Top: Environmental Modeling
Sp Top: Renewable and Sustainable Energy
Sp Top: Wind Energy
Table of Prerequisites and co-requisites for required courses in the EVEN BS curriculum.
course no.
APPM 1350
course name
Calculus 1 for Engineers
APPM 1360
Calculus 2 for Engineers
APPM 2350
APPM 2360
Calculus 3 for Engineers
APPM 4570
Statistical Methods
AREN 2110
Thermodynamics
ATOC 1070
CHEM 1221
Weather and the Atmosphere Laboratory
Intro Diff Eqns with Linear Algebra
prerequisites
2 yrs HS algebra, 1 yr geometry, yr trigonometry
APPM 1350 or MATH 1300
APPM 1360 or MATH 2300
APPM 1360 or MATH 2300 (min. grade C)
APPM 1360 or equiv
PHYS 1110
APPM 1360
ATOC 1050 or instr consent
ATOC 1050
General Chemistry Laboratory
high school chemistry & algebra or CHEM 1001 or 1021
CHEN 1211
Physical Chemistry for Engineers
PHYS 1120
CHEN 1211
General Chemistry for Engineers
CHEN 1211/CHEM 1221 or CHEM 1111-CHEM 1131;
APPM2350; PHYS 1110 or instr consent
high school chemistry & algebra or CHEM 1001 or 1021
CHEN 2120
CHEN 3010
Chem Engr Matl Energy Balances
CHEN 1211, GEEN 1300
CHEM 4521
CHEN 3200
CHEN 3210
CHEN 3320
CVEN 2121
CVEN 3227
CVEN 3313
CVEN 3414
CVEN 3454
CVEN 3708
CVEN 4147
CVEN 4333
CVEN 4424
CVEN 4434
CVEN 4444
CVEN 4484
EMEN 4100
EVEN 1000
EVEN 4100
EVEN 4830
GEEN 1300
GEEN 1400
GEEN 3851
GEEN 3852
GEEN 3853
GEOG 4411
GEOL 2700
GEOL 3010
GEOL 4716
MCEN 2023
MCEN 3012
MCEN 3021
MCEN 3022
MCEN 4131
PHYS 1110
PHYS 1120
PHYS 1140
co-requisites
Applied Data Analysis
Chem Engr Fluid Mechanics
GEEN 1300, APPM 2360
APPM 2350, CHEN 2120 or MCEN 2023
Chem Engr Heat Transfer
Chem Engr Thermodynamics
CHEN 2120, GEEN 1300, Fluid Mechanics
CHEN 2120, CHEM 4521 or 4511
Analytical Mechanics 1
PHYS 1110, APPM 2350
Probability, Statistics & Decisions
APPM 2360, JR standing
Theoretical Fluid Mechanics
CVEN 2121
Fundamentals of Environmental Engr
CHEN 1211, APPM1360
Water Chemistry
CHEN 1211 or CHEM 1111-1131, CVEN 3414
Geotechnical Engineering
CVEN 3161
Engineering Economy and System Design
SR (or JR) standing
Engineering Hydrology
CVEN 3227, CVEN 3323 (or fluid mechanics)
Environmental Organic Chemistry
CHEN1211 or CHEM 1111-1131
Environmental Engineering Design
CVEN 3414
Environmental Engineering Processes
CVEN 3414
Intro to Environmental Microbiology
CHEM 1211, CHEN 1221, APPM 2350
Business Methods and Economics for Engr
JR/SR standing
Intro to Environmental Engineering
none
Environmental Sampling and Analysis
CVEN 3454 & 4424 or equiv.
Technoeconomics Analysis for Env Engr
CHEN 1211, APPM 2360, PHYS 1120 or equivalents
Intro to Engineering Computing
none
Engineering Projects
none
Statics for Engineers
PHYS 1110
Thermodynamics for Engineers
APPM 2350
Fluid Mechanics for Engineers
APPM 2350 or 2360, GEEN 1300 or CSCI 1300
Methods of Soil Analysis
GEOG 1001-1011, GEOG 4401
Intro to Field Geology
GEOL 1010-1020, or GEOL 1060-1070 or GEOG 1001-1011
Intro to Mineralogy
CHEM 1111, MATH 1300 (or CHEN 1211, APPM 1350)
Environmental Field Geochemistry
GEOL 2700, chemistry sequence
Statics and Structures
APPM 1360
Thermodynamics
APPM 2350
Fluid Mechanics
APPM 2360, Solid Mechanics
Heat Transfer
MCEN 3012 & 3021 (or fluid mechanics & thermodynamics)
Air Pollution Control
fluid mechanics
General Physics 1
none
General Physics 2
PHYS 1110
Experimental Physics 1
PHYS 1110 or Phys 1120
*or by instructor’s consent as arranged by the Environmental Engineering Program
For prerequisites for option courses, see p. 8.
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CHEM 1221
APPM 2360
APPM 2350
APPM 1350
recom APPM 2350
GEOG 4401
APPM 1350
APPM 1360, PHYS 1140
PHYS 1120
Useful Websites
Environmental Engineering Program: http://www.colorado.edu/engineering/EnvEng/
College of Engineering and Applied Science: http://engineering.colorado.edu/
Academic Support Programs: http://engineering.colorado.edu/academics/support.htm
Active Learning Program: http://engineering.colorado.edu/activelearning/index.htm
Co-op Program: http://engineering.colorado.edu/activelearning/co-op.htm
Discovery Learning (includes Discovery Learning Apprenticeship Program, Undergraduate Research Opportunities
Program (UROP), Bioscience Undergraduate Research Skills and Training (BURST), Research Experience for
Undergraduate (REU)): http://engineering.colorado.edu/activelearning/aboutdiscovery.htm
Service Learning (includes Earn-Learn Apprenticeship Program, Engineering for Developing Communities, Engineers
Without Borders, etc): http://engineering.colorado.edu/activelearning/service.htm
Professional Learning (includes internships and co-ops):
http://engineering.colorado.edu/activelearning/professional.htm
Advising Guides: http://engineering.colorado.edu/students/advising.htm
Career Services: http://careerservices.colorado.edu
Catalog, University of Colorado at Boulder: http://www.colorado.edu/catalog/catalog08-09/
Course Repetition Policy: http://registrar.colorado.edu/students/registration/course_repetition.html
Engineering Center Maps: http://www.cs.colorado.edu/department/maps/ or
http://www.cs.colorado.edu/department/maps/ec.html
FE Exam: National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying http://www.ncees.org/
State of Colorado Board of Licensure: http://www.dora.state.co.us/aes/index.htm
Forms (for College of Engineering: Petition form, Change of Major Form, etc.):
http://engineering.colorado.edu/students/advising.htm
Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements:
(Fall 2007 and later): http://engineering.colorado.edu/homer/Fall2007.htm
(Pre-summer 2007): http://engineering.colorado.edu/homer/Prefall2006.htm
Minors: http://www.colorado.edu/ArtsSciences/students/undergraduate/academics/minors.html
Office of the Registrar: http://registrar.colorado.edu/
Schedule of Courses: http://plus.colorado.edu/planner/
or through CUConnect: http://cuconnect.colorado.edu
Student Society for Environmental Engineering: http://www.colorado.edu/engineering/EnvEng/SEVEN.htm
Transfer students, information for: http://engineering.colorado.edu/prospective/transfer_students.htm
Transfer Credits: http://engineering.colorado.edu/prospective/transfer_credits.htm
GTPathways curriculum: http://highered.colorado.gov/Academics/Transfers/gtPathways/curriculum.html
Undergraduate Student Services: http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/students/undergraduate.htm
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