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Agenda Report
President’s Cabinet
Meeting Agenda
Monday, March 9, 2015
8:30-10:00 a.m.
Building 11, Radio Station Conference Room
Attending: Randall, Clark, Schoonmaker, Broussard, Kelly, Erwin, Taylor, Kruse,
Coyner, Korschinowski, Edmonds, Dotson
New College Orientation Concept
Dean Kelly
Dean presented an overview of possible changes to the college orientation process
being considered by an ATD committee (see attached outline). He also gathered
feedback on a potential transition. Dean will continue to meet with groups on campus for
more feedback.
Cabinet Agenda Items
Ted Broussard
Ted encouraged President’s Cabinet members to submit agenda items early in order to
have the agenda completed with time to prepare for Monday.
Strategies for Retention Update
Ted Broussard
Ted gave an overview of the Board of Trustees presentation he provided last week. He
shared some of the best practices from Noel-Levitz and encouraged everyone to
continue to consider what they do to contribute to student retention at CPTC.
Importantly, he also pointed out that the presentation was just a precursor to continued
work and effort to improve our retention process through the formulation of a retention
committee.
Fact Sheet
Tawny Dotson
Teresa Greene
Members considered an updated version of the 13-14 AY Fact Sheet. After
consideration, the group was fine with the updates.
Keeping Connected
Tawny Dotson
Tawny gave a brief overview of the agenda items for the March 17 Keeping Connected
meeting. She encouraged President’s Cabinet Members to consider announcements for
the beginning of the agenda and recognition of their employees for the “Good Work,
Good People” section of the agenda.
Supervisor Training
Tabled until next meeting.
Shelby Fritz
Strategic Planning Committee Report/Discussion
Cal Erwin
Next Meeting:
Monday, March 23, 2015
8:30-10:00 a.m.
Cal discussed the most recent meeting of the President’s Cabinet Strategic Planning
Committee. The Committee asked the Direct Reports for some guidance on the
priorities moving forward. Tawny will facilitate the feedback to the committee.
Facilities Committee
Greg Randall
Greg presented the idea for a potential facilities committee for CPTC that would oversee
space use requests and ensure efficiency in facility moves. Greg will bring the idea back
to the Cabinet for consideration again at a future meeting when members have had an
opportunity to further consider the opportunity.
Meeting adjourned: 9:44 a.m.
Next Meeting:
Monday, March 23, 2015
8:30-10:00 a.m.
Achieving the Dream- Subcommittee on Orientation
Subcommittee members: Kathi Medcalf, Elaine Holster, Kristen Martindale, Ron Wright, Pat
Lange, and Kevin Kildun, and Dean Kelly
Purpose: To re-envision orientation to make it more welcoming to future students and to assist
with retention efforts.
Need: The current orientation is poorly attended, has limited reach, and involves only certain
offices across campus.
Research efforts: The subcommittee read several articles on “best practices” for orientation, as
well as reached out to several community and technical colleges. Research highlights include:

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
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



Offering options for students (online vs in-person)
Just in time information
Broad overview of campus resources
Interactive
Provide an incentive or compelling reason to attend
Consider mandatory orientation
Introduce to cohorts or learning communities
Address growth mindset/stereotype threat issues
New model concept: In our proposed new model the following concepts were important:





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A festive/welcoming atmosphere
Students have a chance to visit program faculty and facilities
Students get a broad overview of campus
Orientation will be mandatory for all students. Completion of orientation will be required
for 1st quarter registration
Students will have option of in-person or online orientation
Students will receive education plan and register for classes.
Potential order of events (example):
1:00-1:45
Welcome to CPTC (Students and Student Life staff)
-
1:45-2:15
Breakout into program areas
-
2:15-3:00
Interactive/Fun icebreaker activities
Broad overview of campus
Growth mindset
Campus Tour
Visit program areas
-
Faculty overview
Tour of facility
Overview of 1st day/week
3:00-3:30
Advising overview/Education plan
3:30-4:00
Registration
Questions





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What is the best time/day to do this? (Joyce’s idea)
How do we involve all areas of campus?
How do we create the best welcoming environment?
How do we make orientation meaningful and prepare students for success?
How do we make this happen logistically?
Next steps?
Strategies for Retention
March 4, 2015, BoT Meeting
I.
II.
III.
What research says:
1. Most effective strategies and tactics to increase student retention and college
completion rates in two year public schools per Noel-Levitz 2013 report. (check marks
indicate strategies we currently employ)
 Tutoring
 Academic support program or services
 Honors program for academically advanced students
 Mandatory advising by professional staff, one-on-one
 Giving students practical work experiences in their intended major to apply their
learning
 Programs designed specifically for students of color
 Programs designed specifically for first-year students
 Advising by professional staff, one-on-one
 Mandatory faculty advising one-on-one
 Programs designed specifically for veterans
What we’re doing now:
1. Currently, CPTC is now providing 7 out of 10 of the strategies across divisions.
2. Additionally, we are currently engaged in the following:
 Early Alert pilot project for Spring 2015
 Dedicated planning to change advising model to focus more on retention
strategies (phased in approach over 3 years)
 ATD strategies: Linked classes, enhanced College 101, competency based
math, accelerated learning program (English 94/101)
 Developed an inventory of current retention strategies Winter 2014
o Stop-Out/Drop-Out CRM Email Campaign to encourage students who left
without completing to return to CPTC.
o Emergency Grant for financial assistance with rent, utilities, bus passes
and other emergencies.
o Retention Specialist in Health programs to support students in overcoming
challenges that could interfere with retention.
o Family Advocate in Hayes Child Development Center providing resources
and support to help student-parents stay in school.
o Completion Campaign to identify and remove barriers that stop students
from completing their degree or certificate.
In the future . . .
1. Creation of Retention Committee to develop and implement comprehensive retention
plan with supporting diagnostic and survey tools per Noel-Levitz recommendation.
 To be co-chaired by new Dean of Instruction and current Director of Advising and
Counseling. Spring 2015.
 Will establish baselines, define problem, identify strategies, and assess
outcomes for continuous improvement.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE
BY
THE
NUMBERS
Source: Of fice of Institutional Research
ACADEMIC YEAR 2013-2014
ENROLLMENT
S T U D E N T
Headcount
Total FTE
Credit Students
Non-Credit
7,304
4,509
7,279
25
FEMALE
C H A R A C T E R I S T I C S
DEGREE/CERTIFICATE
SEEKING
FIRST TIME
IN COLLEGE
INTERNATIONAL
36%
14%
<1%
TOP ENROLLING PROGRAMS*
273
NURSING
259
COMP. NETWORK/INFO. SYSTEMS SECURITY
217
AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
NURSING ASSISTANT - CERTIFIED
RETAIL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Count
Count
Count
Count
4,617
2,654
1,002
42
Count%
White
3,777 52%
African American
1,120 15%
Other/Not Reported 818
11%
192
COSMETOLOGY
64%
182
168
*Total students served for AY 13-14
E D U C AT I O N A L
COMPLETION
AWARDS
(TOTAL DEGREES & CERTIFICATES: 1,339)
Associate of Applied Technology/
Associate of Applied Science-Transfer Degree
448 (33%)
Certificate > 44 Credits
184 (14%)
1,851
641
503
840
Health Sciences &
Human Services
714
600
275
10%
8%
4%
I N T E N T *
Aerospace & Advanced
Manufacturing
Exploring/
Undeclared
Science, Technology
& Engineering
Basic
Skills
Transportation
& Trades
Business & Hospitality
Count%
Asian
Hispanic
Multi-racial
Community
Support/Others
Northwest Career &
Technical High School
407
364
747
1,951
204
Certificate < 45 Credits
623 (47%)
*Unduplicated by intent priority; students may actually enroll in multiple areas.
High School Equivalency
84 (6%)
FINANCIAL AID
FINANCES
Total Operating Budget (FY 14)..................... $30,315,326
Federal Grants.................. $7,292,745
State Grants..................... $3,043,454
Loans.............................. $9,107,334
Scholarships..................... $123,903
Work Study...................... $173,927
60%
of professional technical
students were awarded
need-based financial aid.
Resident Required Tuition and Fees for 12 credits...$1,206.28
FA C U LT Y / S TA F F D E M O G R A P H I C S
MISCELLANEOUS
22:1 13 30 71%
(graduates from 2011-12)
Student-to-Faculty
Ratio
Average
Class Size
Median
Age
Employment Rate,
Professional Technical
Programs
FULL-TIME FACULTY: 45
PART-TIME FACULTY: 51
FULL-TIME FACULTY: 50
PART-TIME FACULTY: 80
FULL-TIME STAFF: 60
PART-TIME STAFF: 1
FULL-TIME STAFF: 127
PART-TIME STAFF: 5
FACULTY: 226 STAFF: 193 FEMALE: 63% PEOPLE OF COLOR: 17%
Clover Park Technical College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, sexual orientation/gender identity, veterans status, religion, or age in its program and activities. The following
office has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of Human Resources, 4500 Steilacoom Boulevard S.W., Lakewood, WA 98499. Telephone 253-589-5533. 13-01-12 1/26/15
Strategic Planning Committee – Report & Discussion to President’s Cabinet
March 9, 2015
Strategic Planning Committee from the By-Laws of the President’s Cabinet
1. Interfacing with the College Assembly, ensure forward progress in accomplishing recommendation from the CPTC Strategic Plan.
2. Assure integration of strategic and fiscal planning into CPTC’s continuous process, specifically its inclusion in the development of
capital, technology, and educational projects.
3. Systematically assess the effective use of CPTC resources and use the results of the assessments as the basis for making
recommendations to the President.
Strategic Planning Committee Working Principles from the By-Laws of the President’s Cabinet
a) Lead the strategic plan development and implementation process.
b) Ensure that all reasonable channels of communication are available to internal constituencies for planning idea development.
c) Review allocated resources based on established strategic priorities,
d) Ensure a collaborative "top-down, bottom-up" planning process results in coherency among the ideas and strategies that
develop.
Committee Report
• The committee’s charge is to monitor the college’s ability to accomplish the strategic plan.
• Between now and June 2015 we are developing the framework/role of committee.
• We are currently two years into the five year strategic plan, which was approved by the BoT in 2013.
• The committee met last week and determined that our next step was to come to cabinet for direction and input.
• The one-page document includes the 2013-2018 Strategic Plan, Core Themes, Accreditation recommendations, BoT Priorities
and College’s Strategic Priorities. As you can see on Page 2, there are numerous focus areas, goals and objectives that serves
as a mechanism to direct the work of the college. The committee is wrestling with how to best move forward without losing focus
on current initiatives and overwhelming existing committees.
Needs from Cabinet
• Assistance in prioritizing our focus as we review the multiple priorities that are closely associated to our assigned task.
• What does the Cabinet want to see from the committee?
• Where are the gaps?
CORE THEMES
Workforce Preparation
•
•
•
Students complete an educational or industry
credential
Graduates gain industry employment
Graduates are prepared for careers in an evolving
economy
2013-2018 STRATEGIC PLAN
Promote student success
•
•
•
Student Success
•
•
•
•
Basic skills students make progress toward and
complete an educational goal
Pre-college students complete developmental classes
and progress to college-level courses
CPTC closes the achievement gap among demographic
groups on multiple achievement measures
Students experience an environment that supports
student success
Institutional Excellence
•
•
•
•
CPTC builds partnerships to meet the educational
needs of the community
CPTC applies innovative strategies to facilitate
continuous improvements
CPTC meets high standards for our educational
environment, services, and programs
CPTC plans for the future
•
•
•
Continue to develop and update policies and
procedures.
Complete financials as planned and undergo an
external financial audit, in a reasonable timeframe, by
professionally qualified personnel in accordance with
generally accepted auditing standards.
Engage in ongoing systematic collection and analysis of
meaningful, assessable, and verifiable data at the
course, program and institution levels, and regularly
review assessment processes to ensure authentic
results that lead to improvement.
Clearly define authority, roles, and responsibilities
for decision-making structures.
•
•
•
•
Champion equity
•
•
•
Create an understanding of equitable
principles
Identify and implement opportunities for
increasing equity
Identify and address achievement gaps
•
•
•
•
Ensure student learning outcomes are
aligned with current professional standards
Respond to labor market needs and close
workforce gaps
Expand lifelong learning and professional
credentialing opportunities
Strengthen educational transitions between
K-12 and higher education
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Create and improve systems to support a
culture of inquiry and evidence-based
decision making
Review and revise systems and processes
for effectiveness
Judiciously manage the acquisition, use,
and maintenance of goods and materials
Integrate technology across the college
Cultivate relationships and explore options
to find and utilize alternative funding
sources
Maintain and update existing infrastructure
Implement sustainable practices
Document our institutional knowledge
Foster community engagement and
social responsibility
•
•
Enhance Institutional Capacity
•
Upgrade the college’s innovation support
structures
Create a culture where all ideas can be
shared and validated
Develop entrepreneurial attitudes,
behaviors, and skills that can be applied
across the college
Develop collaborative and innovative
partnerships with internal and external
stakeholders.
Create and maintain a sustainable college
community
Build an educated community
ACCREDITATION RECOMMENDATIONS
•
Promote innovation
Provide an environment that supports
student retention, persistence, and
completion
Invest in personal and professional growth
for all employees
Celebrate staff and student achievement,
success, and creativity
•
•
Build and maintain community partnerships
Promote and strengthen internship and
service opportunities
Identify and develop opportunities for
community education and outreach
Promote a welcoming and safe environment
BOARD OF TRUSTEES PRIORITIES
Increase Enrollment
Assess Program Viability –
Retention – Recruitment
Increase Completions/Employment
Increase Completions – Increase Employment
COLLEGE’S STRATEGIC PRIORITIES
Increase Student Success &
Educational Access
Respond to Community and
Business & Industry
Become More
Entrepreneurial
Fly UP