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2011-12 Catalog
2011-2012
Catalog
CLOVER PARK
TECHNICAL
COLLEGE
cptc.edu/catalog
253-589-5800, www.cptc.edu
Redefine Education
CLOVER PARK
TECHNICAL
Excellence.
COLLEGE
Experience.
Em ployment.
2011-2012
Catalog
Redefine Education at Clover Park
Clover Park Technical College students get a time-honored style of hands-on
learning experience taught by experts in a large variety of practical career fields.
From aviation to health care, from computers to design, from cooking to welding,
you can trust that you are learning the theory, the basics, the art and the best
practice for a profession that’s fulfilling and in demand today. At Clover Park
Technical College, we focus on excellence, experience, and employment.
Redefine education. See what Clover Park has for you.
INSIDE THIS CATALOG
Welcome to Clover Park Technical College page 2
Becoming a Student page 7
Programs and Courses page 25
Policies and Procedures page 133
Clover Park Technical College People page 151
2
2011-2012 Catalog
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Welcome to
Clover Park Technical College
On behalf of our faculty, staff, and Board of Trustees, I would like to welcome you to Clover Park
Technical College.
Welcome to Clover Park Technical College, a leading technical education and career training
institution in the Tacoma-Pierce County region. Our caring and expertly-trained instructors and
dedicated staff are here to assist you in ensuring your success as you pursue your educational goals.
Creating nationally-recognized programs, building strong partnerships with local businesses and
industry, and taking aggressive steps to ensure all students receive expert quality training demanded
by employers are important components of our mission and are what you can expect when you walk
through our doors. And vets coming onto the CPTC campus will be pleased to learn Clover Park
Technical College has been designated a Military-Friendly College.
WELCOME
You will also have an opportunity to experience
some of the new technologies utilized in today’s
world: the hassle-free ability to register for
classes online from our online catalog, WiFi
access, your personal MyCC email account
where you will receive important notices such
as your personalized financial aid information
or important college information texted to you.
Have fun with our college’s Facebook page, the
college blog, and up-to-the-minute tweets about
everything CPTC. These high tech options
complement your intellectual development,
personal growth, and a college experience
that is enriching, fun, and as comfortable and
welcoming as we can make it.
President John Walstrum
The college’s unique learn by doing educational philosophy provides exceptional
opportunities for students to receive hands-on training that can be applied directly to
the needs of our growing economy. And because of our attention to the current needs of
employers, you will find, as you enter the workforce, that Clover Park Technical College
graduates are highly regarded by business and industry.
Thank you for choosing Clover Park Technical College. I wish you every success as you
begin your studies with us, and I am confident your experience will be a positive one.
John W. Walstrum, Ph.D.
President
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
3
OUR VISION, MISSION AND GOALS..................... 4
BOARD OF TRUSTEES............................................ 6
GETTING STARTED................................................ 8
PROGRAM ADMISSION........................................ 9
WHEN TO REGISTER........................................... 10
2011-2012 FINANCIAL AID DUE DATES............... 10
CONTINUING EDUCATION.................................. 11
DUAL CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS....... 11
ADULT HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION.................... 12
RUNNING START................................................ 12
VETERANS.......................................................... 12
WORKFIRST........................................................ 12
GETTING SUPPORT............................................. 14
CAREER CENTER................................................. 14
COUNSELING/ADVISING CENTER....................... 14
DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS....................... 14
TUITION AND FEES............................................. 16
REFUND POLICY................................................. 16
FINANCIAL AID.................................................. 17
ELIGIBILITY.......................................................... 17
HOW TO APPLY/APPLICATION DEADLINES.......... 18
RIGHTS & RESPONSIBILITIES................................ 20
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS................................ 21
CAMPUS LIFE & SERVICES................................... 22
STUDENT CENTER............................................... 23
BOOKSTORE...................................................... 23
PARKING & TRANSPORTATION........................... 23
LIBRARY & COMPUTER LABS............................... 24
SECURITY........................................................... 24
ON-CAMPUS CHILD CARE................................... 24
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS.................................. 26
Accounting................................................................... 27
Bookkeeping Clerk................................................... 27
Architectural Engineering Design..................................... 27
Architectural: CAD Drafting....................................... 28
Automotive Collision Technician...................................... 28
Automotive Collision Refinishing Technician................. 28
Automotive Collision Structure Repair Technician.......... 28
Automotive Restoration & Customization - Finishing........... 29
Assessment & Research............................................. 29
Automotive Technician................................................... 29
Automotive Technician................................................... 30
Ford Maintenance & Light Repair Technician................ 30
Hybrid & Alternative Fuel Vehicle Technician................ 30
Hybrid & Alternative Fuel Vehicle Maintenance............ 31
Drive Train Technician............................................... 31
Electrical, Electronics & AC/Heating Technician........... 31
Engine Repair & Engine Performance Technician.......... 31
Front End & Brakes................................................... 32
Aerospace Composite Technician.................................... 32
Aviation Maintenance Technician.................................... 32
Airframe Maintenance Technician.............................. 33
Powerplant Technician.............................................. 33
Central Service/Sterile Processing................................... 34
Computer Information Technology................................... 34
Computer Programmer.............................................. 36
.Net Developer........................................................ 36
Web Developer........................................................ 37
Computer Networking & Information Systems Security....... 37
Cisco Network Design & Security............................... 38
Computer & Communications Security......................... 38
Microsoft Network Admin & Security.......................... 39
Cosmetology................................................................ 40
Culinary Arts................................................................ 40
Basic Cooking Skills................................................. 41
Restaurant Management............................................ 41
Pastry Arts............................................................... 41
Dental Assistant............................................................ 42
Dental Administrative Specialist...................................... 44
Early Care & Education................................................. 44
Childhood Foundation.............................................. 45
Early Care & Education................................................. 46
Childhood Leadership............................................... 46
Childhood Specialist................................................. 46
Creating a Green Classroom..................................... 46
School-Age Out-of-School Program............................. 47
Special Needs......................................................... 47
Sustaining a Green Program...................................... 47
Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security............................... 47
Environmental Sciences & Technology.............................. 48
Esthetic Sciences........................................................... 49
Esthetics.................................................................. 49
Medical Esthetics...................................................... 50
Graphic Technologies.................................................... 50
Graphic Design....................................................... 51
Prepress Operations................................................. 51
Health Unit Coordinator................................................. 52
Heating & Air Conditioning/
Refrigeration Service Technician...................................... 52
Basic HVAC/Refrigeration Service Technician.............. 53
Hemodialysis Technician................................................ 53
Human Services............................................................ 54
Human Services: Chemical Dependency.......................... 54
Chemical Dependency Specialist................................ 55
Gang Intervention Specialist...................................... 56
Interior Design.............................................................. 56
Kitchen & Bath......................................................... 57
Green Design.......................................................... 57
Manufacturing Technologies........................................... 57
Machinist Apprentice................................................ 58
Machinist Helper...................................................... 58
Massage Studies........................................................... 58
Clinical Massage Practitioner..................................... 59
Swedish Practitioner................................................. 59
Material Science........................................................... 60
Composites............................................................. 60
Nondestructive Testing.............................................. 60
Eddy Current Testing................................................. 61
Magnetic Particle & Liquid Penetrant Testing................ 61
Radiographic Testing................................................ 61
Ultrasonic Testing..................................................... 62
Media Design & Production............................................ 62
Web Design & Open Source Web Development........... 63
Medical Assistant.......................................................... 63
Medical Histology Technician......................................... 64
Medical Laboratory Technician....................................... 65
Nursing....................................................................... 66
Nursing Assistant..................................................... 66
Nursing Assistant (I-BEST).......................................... 66
Practical Nursing...................................................... 67
RN Option.............................................................. 68
Pharmacy Technician..................................................... 69
Professional Pilot........................................................... 70
Commercial Pilot...................................................... 71
Flight Instructor......................................................... 72
Instrument Pilot......................................................... 72
Private Pilot............................................................. 72
Surgical Technology...................................................... 73
Sustainable Building Science.......................................... 73
Residential Construction............................................ 74
Welding Technology...................................................... 74
SHORT-TERM TRAINING PROGRAMS................... 75
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS...................................... 77
Accounting................................................................... 77
Adult Basic Education.................................................... 78
Architectural Engineering Design..................................... 79
American Sign Language............................................... 80
Art.............................................................................. 80
Automotive Collision Technician...................................... 80
Automotive Restoration & Customization-Finishing............. 81
Automotive Technician................................................... 82
Automotive Upholstery & Glass Technician....................... 84
Aviation Maintenance Technician.................................... 84
Aerospace Composite Technician.................................... 86
Biology........................................................................ 86
Business....................................................................... 87
Central Service/Sterile Processing................................... 87
Chemistry..................................................................... 87
College Success............................................................ 88
Computer Applications.................................................. 88
Computer Information Technology................................... 88
Computer Networking
& Information Systems Security (CNISS)........................... 91
Construction Residential................................................ 93
Core Allied Health........................................................ 93
Cosmetology................................................................ 94
Culinary Arts................................................................ 95
Dental Assistant............................................................ 96
Dental Administrative Specialist...................................... 97
Early Care & Education................................................. 97
Economics.................................................................. 100
Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security............................. 100
English....................................................................... 101
English as a Second Language..................................... 102
Environmental Sciences & Technology............................ 103
Esthetic Sciences......................................................... 104
Geology.................................................................... 106
Geography................................................................ 106
Graphic Technologies.................................................. 106
Health Unit Coordinator............................................... 107
Heating & Air Conditioning Service Technician (HVAC)..... 107
Hemodialysis.............................................................. 109
Human Services/Chemical Dependency........................ 109
Interior Design............................................................ 112
Manufacturing Technologies......................................... 114
Massage Studies......................................................... 114
Material Science......................................................... 116
Mathematics............................................................... 118
Media Design & Production.......................................... 119
Medical Assistant........................................................ 121
Medical Histology Technician....................................... 122
Medical Laboratory Technician..................................... 122
Music........................................................................ 123
Nursing..................................................................... 123
Pastry Arts.................................................................. 127
Pharmacy Technician................................................... 128
Physics....................................................................... 128
Professional Pilot......................................................... 128
Psychology................................................................. 130
Sociology................................................................... 130
Surgical Technology.................................................... 130
Sustainable Building Science........................................ 131
Welding..................................................................... 132
ACADEMIC STANDARDS.................................... 134
STUDENT ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITIES............. 134
ATTENDANCE POLICY....................................... 134
GRADES........................................................... 134
GENERAL EDUCATION...................................... 136
TRANSFERRING CREDITS................................... 136
ACADEMIC HONORS........................................ 140
STUDENT PROGRESS POLICY............................. 140
ACADEMIC PROGRESS...................................... 141
GRADUATION.................................................. 142
STUDENT RECORDS.......................................... 143
TRANSCRIPTS................................................... 143
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT.......................... 144
CAMPUS POLICIES............................................ 148
DRUG FREE ENVIRONMENT.............................. 149
NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY......................... 149
SMOKING POLICY............................................ 149
2011-2012 CALENDAR..................................... 150
FULL-TIME FACULTY & ADMINISTRATION............ 152
INDEX.............................................................. 156
WELCOME
Table of Contents
4
2011-2012 Catalog
Who, Where and What We Are
As a vital member of the state’s higher education system
Clover Park Technical College offers more than 50 programs
in business, computer technology, allied health, manufacturing,
media, communications, and more.
Clover Park Technical College offers courses on-line and on
campus for students getting ready for their first career, their next
step within their career, and new careers. Clover Park Technical
College is here to help students redefine education to meet their
needs. The college’s rich history of professional and technical
education dates back to the 1940s when the Clover Park School
District established a War Production Program training civilians
as auto mechanics for the Mt. Rainier Ordinance Depot;
aircraft service mechanics for McChord Field and the Fort
Lewis Army Post; and shipfitters, welders, and blueprint readers
for Tacoma shipyards during World War II.
WELCOME
After the war, the popular aircraft service mechanic program
was the first in the Northwest to offer Civil Aeronautics
Administration certification. With the addition of other
programs, including an electronics training course, the fledgling
Clover Park Vocational Technical Institute was on its way to
becoming a regional training facility.
In 1991, Clover Park Vocational Technical Institute became
Clover Park Technical College and began to offer degree and
transferable programs, so today’s students could prepare for
great jobs and great futures. Our main campus is in Lakewood,
Washington, about eight miles southwest of downtown Tacoma,
the state’s second-largest city. Lakewood has a population of
63,000 and is near McChord Air Force Base and Fort Lewis.
The college also offers classes at its South Hill Campus.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Our Vision,
Mission and Goals
Missions and Goals the help you succeed.
More than ten years ago, in 1997, Clover Park Technical
College adopted what was then a new, forward-looking mission
and goals. After nearly ten years, the college re-examined the
important work we do and, on November 14, 2007, the board
of trustees approved the following:
VISION
Excellence in education that empowers individuals to succeed
in the community and in the global economy.
MISSION
We provide students with the knowledge, skills, and values
necessary to succeed in the workforce of today and tomorrow.
VALUES
Clover Park Technical College values:
Exceptional customer service
Diversity
Dignity
Courtesy
Respect
Integrity
Economic well-being of our community
Professional growth
Creativity
Collaboration
Excellence
STRATEGIC GOALS
Reframe technical education for the 21st century
Develop and continuously improve programs
Develop a sense of community and organizational identity
Cultivate a workplace that promotes innovation
Create opportunities for student achievement
and personal success
2011-2012 Catalog
Accreditation
Advisory Committees
Clover Park Technical College is accredited by the Northwest
Commission on Colleges and Universities.
Each career program at CPTC is guided by an advisory
committee composed of employers and employees in the
field. These committees meet at least three times each year
to provide recommendations about methods, procedures,
equipment, curriculum, and to ensure that each program meets
or exceeds the industry standards of that particular occupation.
The Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities
(NWCCU) is an independent, non-profit organization
recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and the
Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). It is
the regional authority on educational quality and institutional
effectiveness of higher education institutions in the seven-state
Northwest region of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon,
Utah, and Washington. It fulfills its mission by establishing
accreditation criteria and evaluation procedures by which
institutions are reviewed. Clover Park Technical College first
received accreditation through NWCCU in December 1999.
Program Accreditations and Certifications
Accreditation and certification has been granted to specific
programs at Clover Park Technical College by:
American Dental Association;
Commission on the Accreditation of Allied
Health Education Programs;
EPA Refrigerant Recovery Certification;
National Accrediting Agency
for Clinical Laboratory Sciences;
American Association of Medical Assistants;
Rooms Division Management/American
Hotel-Motel Association;
Associated Landscape Contractors of America;
National Automotive Technicians
Educational Foundation;
Washington Association of Building Officials;
NATEF.
5
Clover Park Technical College Foundation
The Clover Park Technical College Foundation was founded in
1992. The Foundation is a public, non-profit corporation and is
recognized by the Internal Revenue Code. Consequently, gifts
made to the Foundation are tax-deductable.
Clover Park Technical College and its Foundation have assisted
thousands of individuals to successfully obtain their educational
and career goals. The Foundation was established in 1993 and
has assisted the college in becoming the destination for training
people for today’s work place. Our programs focus on emerging
industry needs and our students are preparing for a place in
today’s green economy.
Clover Park Technical College aspires to produce graduates
who seek to positively affect the way communities are built
and governed, the way children are inspired through teaching,
the way health care is advanced and delivered, and the way
information and technology are used to improve the quality
of life for people around the globe. We are changing lives and
building futures each day. Our student’s stories of triumph over
challenge are the example of ways in which we transform lives at
Clover Park Technical College.
WELCOME
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
6
2011-2012 Catalog
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Board of Trustees
The Clover Park Technical College Board of Trustees is comprised of five community college district
residents who are appointed by the governor to a five-year term. The board sets policy for the institution
and delegates administrative authority to the president of the college.
Dr. Robert Lenigan, Chair
Bruce Lachney, Vice Chair
Mark Martinez
Mary Moss
Shauna Weatherby
Clover Park Technical College Foundation
Board of Directors
The Clover Park Technical College Board of Trustees is Comprised of local business and community leaders who volunteer
their time and donate their talents and resources to raise friends and funds for the College. The funds raised through their
efforts support the College and students through student scholarships and emergency grants, acquisition of state-of-the-art
equipment and technology, and faculty and staff professional development awards.
Officers
WELCOME
Steven Crosby, president
Joyce Oubré, vice president
Michael Block, past president
Mary Green, treasurer
Matt Lane, secretary
David Harkness, director-at-large
Ty Cordova, director-at-large
Directors
Mike Stevenson
Steve Brewer
Harley Moberg
Coy Anglin
Sheila Winston
Ex Officio Directors
John Walstrum, college president
Debbie Ranniger, executive director for resource development
College Advisory Council
The College Advisory Council (CAC) provides advice and approves the college’s annual Worker Retraining Plan.
It serves as a liaison between Clover Park Technical College and the business community, government, public
agencies, organized labor, military installations, community-based organizations, other educational institutions,
and advocates on behalf of the college. They also make recommendations to the President to strengthen the
effectiveness in providing quality educational opportunities and services for the community.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
7
Aerospace Composite Technician Certificate.
BECOMING A STUDENT
Becoming a Student
For more info www.cptc.edu/catalog or call 253-589-5800.
Getting Started 8 Paying for College 16
How to Register 10 Financial Aid 17
Getting Support 14 International Students 21
Campus Life and Services 22
Child Care/Early Care and 24
Education/Parent Programs
8
2011-2012 Catalog
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Getting Started
Our staff is here to help you succeed at Clover Park Technical College.
Step 1 PAYING FOR COLLEGE /
APPLY FOR FINANCIAL AID
Create a financial plan on how to pay for college,
and apply early for possible financial aid, including
scholarships, grants and loans.
• Apply for financial aid
• Financial Aid Information & Deadlines
www.cptc.edu/money and www.fafsa.ed.gov
Step 2 LEARN ENROLLMENT PROCESS /
SELECT A PROGRAM OF STUDY
• Review career training programs at www.cptc.edu/careers
• Schedule a free career interest assessment.
Call (253) 583-8765
• Attend a New Student Advising Workshop
Every Wednesday at 2:00 p.m., Lakewood Campus
Questions? Call (253) 589-5548
• Attend a Program Information Session
Most 2nd & 4th Wednesdays of each month at 3:00 p.m.
in the facility or classroom of where the programs are taught.
For more info www.cptc.edu/advising
GETTING STARTED
Step 3 ESTABLISH COLLEGE PLACEMENT
• New to College? Take the college placement
COMPASS assessment. Cost $19.00.
Go to www.cptc.edu/compass or call (253) 589-5800
for more information
• Have College Transcripts? Submit Official Transcripts
to Student Records:
Attention: Transcript Evaluator
Clover Park Technical College
4500 Steilacoom Blvd SW
Lakewood, WA 98499
Fax: (253) 589-5852
Step 4 MEET WITH A COUNSELOR /
ADVISOR FOR AN EDUCATION PLAN
• Come prepared, bring:
Official COMPASS scores taken in the past two years, or
College transcripts from any Washington State college, or
Transfer Report from CPTC Transcript Evaluator
for out-of-state transcripts
• Schedule an appointment with Counseling & Advising,
(253) 589-5548.
• Advising & Counseling Office Hours:
M, T, Th 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
W 8:00 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.
F 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Step 5 APPLY FOR ADMISSION
• Submit completed Admission Form to
Student Records/Registration, Building 17
• Pay the $50.00 admission fee.
Step 6
REGISTER FOR CLASSES / PAY TUITION
• Obtain the Quarterly Course Schedule online at
www.cptc.edu/register
• Students with a Student ID number and PIN can
register Online -or-
• Register for classes in person at Registration & Records
in the lobby of Building 17
• Student Kiosk Services Available Online:
Schedule planning: www.cptc.edu/schedule
Registration: www.cptc.edu/register
Student Schedule: www.cptc.edu/myschedule
View Waiting List: www.cptc.edu/waitlist
Pay Fees: www.cptc.edu/pay
• Purchase Books & Supplies for your Courses at
bookstore building 23.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
9
Assessment
COMPASS (Computerized-Adaptive Placement Assessment and
Support System) is un-timed but generally takes approximately
two hours to complete. There is a non-refundable testing fee
of $19.00. Assessment results are used to place students in the
appropriate English, Math, and Psychology courses.
Assessment testing is not required prior to being admitted to
the College unless the technical program selected requires
that a minimum level score be obtained for admission. Do not
delay. Allow ample time for assessment, educational planning,
and registration in general education prior to the beginning of
a quarter.
COMPASS testing is conducted on a drop-in basis. No
appointment is necessary. Pay the testing fee in the cashier’s
office located in Building 17, Room 102, and then present the
receipt and picture I.D. to the Assessment Center staff on the
second floor in room 210. To obtain a testing schedule go to:
www.cptc.edu/assessment or visit the College’s main campus.
If an assessment test has been taken within the past 24 months
at another college or special agency, the test results can be
placed on file in the Assessment Center and evaluated by
Advising/Counseling. Students without a High School diploma
or GED are required to complete the entire assessment in one
sitting, and must wait 90 days prior to retesting.
Advisors and Counselors are available in Building 17,
Room 150, to evaluate assessment results by appointment
or on a walk-in basis.
Program Admission
Program admissions applications are available at program
information sessions, in the Counseling/Advising office,
and in Student Records.
The program admissions fee is:
a. non-refundable
b. non-transferable
c. good for one career program only
d. good for one year from the first target start date
available at the time of payment.
Some programs have mandatory advising prior to
admissions as well as additional entrance requirements
and fees, which can be found in the program description
section of this catalog.
All members of the community are eligible for program
admission to Clover Park Technical College if they:
1. Are competent to profit from the curricular
offerings of the College; and
2. Are eighteen years of age or older; or
3. Are a high school graduate (diploma or GED
certificate); or
4. Have applied for program admission under the
provisions of Running Start, Elective High School,
or other local enrollment option programs.
Exceptions: Those students aged 16 and over who meet the
provision of Title III-Adult Education Programs may enroll in
certain adult basic education classes. Individuals admitted into
such classes will be allowed to continue as long as they are able
to demonstrate, through measurable academic progress, an
ability to benefit.
Persons not meeting the eligibility criteria for program
admission may appeal for special program admission on a
course-by-course basis. Criteria for granting an appeal are:
competency at an appropriate academic level and/or artistic or
technical skill level, as well as ability to participate in an adult
learning environment. The College does not desire to replace or
duplicate the functions of the local public schools. Appeals may
be filed with the vice president for instruction or designee.
GETTING STARTED
Students entering technical programs that have general
education classes are required to take the COMPASS test.
10
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
When To Register
Registration/Student Records: (253) 589-5666. Located in the lobby of Building 17.
Hours of Operation: Mon, Tues, Thurs 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Wed 7:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. and Fri 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
2011-2012 Quarterly Registration Dates
Summer 2011
Fall 2011
Winter 2012
Spring 2012
N/A
Aug 3 - 5
Nov 9 - 10
Feb 8 - 10
N/A
Continuing Students Registration
May 9 - 13
Aug 8 - 12
Nov 14 - 18
Feb 13 - 17
May 14 - 18
Admitted Student Registration
May 16 - 20
Aug 15 - 18
Nov 21 - 23
Feb 21 - 23
May 21 - 24
Nov 28 - Jan 4
Feb 24 - March 29
May 25 – July 3
Running Start, Elective HS &
Adult High School Advising
Open Registration May 23 - June 29 Aug 19 - Sept 27
Summer 2012
Students can go online to register, pay fees, withdraw, print unofficial transcript, view automated waiting lists, check their class
schedule and more. Go to the CPTC web site at www.cptc.edu and select Current Students then use your CPTC Student ID number
and Student PIN to log in. Note: Student PIN numbers are typically your six digit birth date in this format: (MMDDYY).
HOW TO REGISTER
2011-2012 Tuition and Fee Payment Due Dates
Summer 2011
Fall 2011
Winter 2012
Spring 2012
*TUITION & FEES DUE DATES
May 26
Aug 25
Dec 1
March 1
May 31
Last day to withdraw with 100% refund
June 27
Sept 25
Jan 2
March 27
June 30
FIRST DAY OF THE QUARTER
June 28
Sept 26
Jan 3
March 28
July 2
Last day to withdraw with 80% refund
July 5
Sept 30
Jan 9
April 3
July 9
Last day to withdraw with 40% refund
July 18
Oct 14
Jan 23
April 16
July 23
Graduation Appication due date
July 26
Oct 24
Jan 31
April 25
July 30
Last day to withdraw with W grade
Aug 16
Nov 15
Feb 22
May 15
Aug 17
LAST DAY OF THE QUARTER
Aug 30
Dec 15
March 21
June 14
Aug 31
Sept 2
Dec 20
March 24
June 19
Sept 6
Quarterly grades available online
Summer 2012
*Tuition & Fees Payment Due Dates: All students with unpaid charges after the fee due date for the quarter will be automatically
dropped from courses and open registration will continue with fees due at the time of registration.
Student Registration Dates are Scheduled on The Basis of Their Enrollment/Admission Status
Continuing Student Registration: Currently enrolled students are given priority for their next quarter online.
Admitted Student Registration: Students admitted with a targeted start date in their program for the next quarter register online.
Open Registration: Students that have completed the appropriate admission/educational planning process who are:
•on standby status seaking to register for technical career program courses to attempt to fill any openings or be put on the
automatic waitlist for courses for that quarter, or
•seeking to register for General Education courses (English, Math, Social Science, etc.) for the first time, or
•Nursing Assistant - Certified (NA-C) Students register during open registration for each quarter.
Continuing Education Courses: Students may register for Continuing Education courses as soon as the quarterly class schedule is
available. For questions about specific Continuing Education courses, contact Continuing Education Department (253) 589-5575.
2011-2012 Financial Aid Due Dates
CPTC Financial Aid Application
Process Due Dates
Summer 2011
Fall 2011
Winter 2012
Spring 2012
May 6
August 19
Dec 2
Feb 24
Summer 2012
TBA
Students must complete the CPTC 5-step Financial Aid application process by the due dates listed above. The Financial Aid
application process information is available online at: www.cptc.edu/financialaid.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Agency Funded Students
Dual Credit for High School Students
Persons who qualify for assistance from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation of the State of Washington or neighboring states, the Department of Labor and Industries, the
Washington State Department of Social and Health Services,
Work Source or the Employment Security Department may
attend programs at Clover Park Technical College. Enrollment
qualifications for training will be determined by the College.
Funded students must have their agency contract approved
and mailed or faxed to the cashiering office at the College
before starting class. If an agency is paying the assessment
fee and/or the program admission fee, the student should
take their contract to cashiering prior to testing. The student
accounts representative is available to answer your questions
from 7:30 to 4:30 Monday through Friday in the cashier’s
office in Building 17 or may be reached at (253) 589-5663.
Dual credit may be accepted for high school learning
experience where formal articulation agreements are in place.
Contact Student Records at (253) 589-6003 or Pierce County
Careers Connection at (253) 692-4796. Courses that have
Dual Credit Articulation agreements with the Pierce County
Careers Connection are marked with an asterisk (*) in both
program and course description.
Clover Park Technical College offers a wide variety of credit
and non-credit classes through Continuing Education in the
following areas:
• Business Workshops and Seminars
• Computer and Technology Training classes
• Distance Education online classes
• Health & Wellness
• Community Education
• Short-term job training classes
• 50+ classes
• Skill Development classes
Skill development classes are offered in various technical
areas including telecommunications, HVAC, environmental,
medical, and computer software skills. Courses are frequently
changed as they are offered based upon local industry and
employment needs.
The majority of the classes are offered on a part-time basis,
scheduled in the evening or on weekends. For a copy of
the latest class schedule, please call (253) 589-5575 or find
Continuing Education at www.cptc.edu/ContinuingEd.
Northwest Career
& Technical High School
(253) 589-5770
Northwest Career and Technical High School is a school of
choice on the Clover Park Technical College campus that
provides a rigorous educational program combined with career
guidance and high quality career and technical education.
Students:
• Earn a high school diploma from Northwest Career
and Technical High School.
• Earn a certificate of initial competencies in their
chosen career path.
• Are prepared to articulate into postsecondary
education and training opportunities.
• Students who enroll in the Elective High School
option can earn a certificate or a degree.
HOW TO REGISTER
Continuing Education
11
12
2011-2012 Catalog
Adult High School Completion
Veterans
(253) 589-5770
(253) 589-5581
Adult High School classes are offered for persons 20 years of
age or older, who are not enrolled in a regular high school
and who want to earn an Adult High School diploma. These
classes are academic in nature and meet Washington State
requirements for high school completion. Students enrolled in
a regular high school may take Adult High School classes with
the permission of their high school counselor; however, they
must pay all class costs including full tuition. More information
is available from the Northwest Career and Technical High
School at (253) 589-5770 or stop in Building 14.
Most programs offered by Clover Park Technical College are
fully approved for benefits under the following Veterans Administration regulations: Chapter 31 (Vocational Rehabilitation),
Chapter 30 (GI Bill), Chapter 32 (VEAP), Chapter 33 Post 9/11
(GI Bill), Chapter 35 (Survivors & Dependents) and Chapter
1606/1607 (Reserves) of Title 38, U.S. Code. For questions
regarding eligibility, call the VA at 1-888-442-4551. Contact the
Clover Park Technical College VA clerk at (253) 589-5581 for
questions about your certification with the College.
Running Start
(253) 589-5701
CPTC works closely with area high school counselors to
plan appropriate educational experiences. Running Start is
a statewide community / technical college program that was
developed for academically qualified High School Juniors
and Seniors who wish to enroll in courses that fulfill high
school graduation requirements. If you have chosen a career
direction and can benefit from college instruction, Running
Start at Clover Park Technical College may be right for you.
HOW TO REGISTER
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Please note that Running Start students are held to the
same expectations as all other college students. Attendance,
participation, behaviors and quality of work are to meet
college standards.
The Running Start program is designed for high school
students who are ready for college-level work, want to get a
start on their career training, and want to receive both college
and high school credit while attending high school. High
school students between the ages of 16 and 21 may be eligible
to attend CPTC under the Running Start program.
Qualified students (juniors or seniors enrolled in area high
schools) enroll in tuition-free programs, but are required to
pay a Running Start fee for books, tools, laboratory fees,
consumables, and transportation (subject to revision due to
pending legislation).
High school students who attend during the summer quarter
will pay adult tuition and fees. Interested students must
meet with the Running Start advisor to receive appropriate
paperwork prior to enrolling.
If you meet the following criteria you may be eligible for
Running Start.
•
•
•
•
Be between the age of 16 and 21
Be identified as a Junior or Senior
Meet minimum COMPASS testing scores
Be identified as eligible by your school
Workfirst
(253) 589-5503
WorkFirst participants are parents receiving Temporary
Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) from the Washington
State Department of Social and Health Services. Workfirst
students can participate in job skills training by:
•
•
•
•
GED Prep Courses & High School completion
enrolling in Customized Job Skills Training programs
enrolling in High Wage High Demand career training
Vocational Education training
To get started, call the WorkFirst Office or stop by the
WorkFirst office on the main campus in Building 16, Monday
through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Worksource Affiliate Site
(Career Center)
(253) 589-5548
The Career Center offers a self-service resource room and job
search activities. One-on-one consultation on career interests
as well as the use of computers and other career resources are
available in Building 19, Room 260.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
(253) 589-5548
Worker Retraining (WRT) is funding dispersed by the Washington State Legislature to provide retraining opportunities for
dislocated and unemployed workers in the state of Washington.
The Advising Center determines eligibility and the Financial Aid
Department awards the funds.
Am I eligible?
• I am being laid off from my job and may have a
WARN notice.
• I am currently receiving Washington State
unemployment benefits.
• I exhausted my Washington State unemployment
benefits in the past 24-months.
• I am a displaced homemaker who has been dependent
on the income of another family member, but I am no
longer supported by that income.
• I am a veteran who has separated from the armed
services within the last 24 months and has been
honorably discharged.
• I am a vulnerable worker; underemployed
• I am a self-employed worker
What programs are covered?
Programs listed as Demand Occupation on the Eligible
Training provider list; this list can be found at:
http://www.wilma.org/wdclists/
The 2011/2012 WRT Plan has targeted the programs
below for funding. Programs specifically targeted by
the WRT grant this year are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Residential Construction
Sustainable Building Science
Computer Information Systems
Material Science Technology – Non-destructive Testing
Aerospace Composite Technician
Nursing Assistant – Certified
Hemodialysis Technician
All the above programs also qualify for Opportunity Grant funding.
13
What does the funding cover?
100% of tuition and fees and funding for books and supplies
may be awarded for the first quarter. (The Program Fee List for
the applicable program reflects the 1st Quarter of books with an
asterisk (*).
Funding for subsequent quarters should be directed to the
Advising Center after the student has registered. If approved, an
additional quarter of tuition and funding for books and supplies,
not to exceed the total cost of required books and supplies as
shown on the Program Fee list for that quarter, may be awarded.
How do I apply?
If you are a dislocated worker, transitioning veteran or
vulnerable worker and have registered for classes, you can make
an appointment or walk in to the advising center to complete the
intake process.
If you are receiving Washington State unemployment benefits,
you will need to provide your most recent Unemployment
Insurance stub; if you are a veteran you will need a UI stub
and/or your DD 214. Please contact advising at 253.589.5548 if
you have any questions.
If you are Self-Employed you will need to provide supporting
documentation to the Financial Aid office; W2’s ; current
employment pay stubs. If you have questions please contact
Financial Aid at 253.589.5660
If you are a Displaced Homemaker you will need to provide the
following documentation to the Financial Aid Office; Divorce
decree, or separation agreement, death certificate, and joint tax
returns /W2’s. In the event that you do not have tax returns
or W2’s, you will need to provide a statement about financial
circumstances.
HOW TO REGISTER
Worker Retraining Grant
2011-2012 Catalog
14
2011-2012 Catalog
Getting Support
Disabilities Accommodations
Explore Your Future at the Career Center
Clover Park Technical College wants to help all students
succeed. We are committed to providing reasonable accommodations, including core services, to qualified students with
disabilities. TDD services are available in Human Resources.
(253) 583-8765 or 253-589-5548
The Career Center, a WorkSource Affiliate site, brings a variety
of services to students and potential students. The center offers
valuable resources such as a free CareerScope assessment
to help you choose a program of study, labor market and
occupational information, career-job search tools, job search
assistance, interviewing tips, access to job postings, interest tests
and one-on-one conversation. Staff are available to interpret
assessment results and help you explore career options and
appropriate educational opportunities. Contact the Advising/
Counseling Center on the main campus in Building 17,
(253) 589-5548, for hours of operation.
Counseling/Advising Center
(253) 589-5548
In addition to admissions counseling and academic advising,
brief personal counseling is also available in the Advising &
Counseling Office located at the Lakewood Campus Building
17, room 150. Walk-ins are welcome but to schedule an
appointment call (253) 589-5548.
If you have a mental health emergency and need assistance
please contact the Pierce County Crisis Line at 1-800-576-7764
or the King County Crisis Center at 1-800-244-5767
GETTING SUPPORT
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
New Student Advising Workshop
(253) 589-5548
Workshops held most Wednesdays at 2:00,
Lakewood Campus
Come learn about CPTC and the enrollment process, program
information, campus support services and worker retraining.
Questions? Call (253) 589-5548 for location.
Topics covered at this workshop:
College enrollment/admission process
Career exploration resources
Federal Student Financial Aid application process (FAFSA)
Scholarships & Educational Resources
COMPASS Assessment process
Cost for tuition/fees
(253) 589-5767 or (253) 589-5826 TTY
Appropriate adjustment and reasonable accommodations
will be provided to qualified students with disabilities for
recruitment, the application process, enrollment, registration,
financial aid, course/module work, counseling, programs and
services. A request for accommodations must be made and
medical documentation of disability is required.
To arrange accommodations, students should contact the
Student Disability Specialist at (253) 589-5767. Requests for
accommodations should be received by the College six weeks
prior to the beginning of the program for which the request is
made. Lack of advance notice may delay the availability of an
accommodation. The complete Clover Park Technical College
Policies and Procedures for Reasonable Accommodations
for Students with Disabilities under ADA/504 is available in
Building 17, Room 250.
Multicultural Student Services
(253) 589-5766
The program promotes cultural pluralism throughout
the campus. The Multicultural Student Services program
offers academic advising, educational planning, career and
personal counseling, and financial opportunities to meet the
needs of students of color. The program promotes cultural
pluralism throughout the campus with activities that provide
awareness of the African American, Asian/Pacific Islander,
Hispanic, Native American and the cultures of international
communities. The program is in Building 17, Room 200.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Adult Basic Skills
GED Testing
(253) 589-5760/5702
For accommodated testing or
questions about GED Testing, (253) 589-6045
To schedule a test, (253) 589-5760 or (253) 589-6045
ABE/ESL students must take the CASAS Test and are
asked to complete a writing sample before enrolling in GED
preparation and ABE classes. Testing sessions are scheduled
throughout the quarter and serve students on a first come,
first served basis. There is no fee for testing. More information
is available in Building 37 or call (253) 589-5702 for more
information. There is a $25.00 program fee for each student
enrolled in the ABE, GED and ESL classes per quarter.
Tutoring Services
(253) 589-5744/5702
The College offers free tutoring to help students be more
successful in their pre-college and college-level academic
courses. The Tutoring Center is located in Building 15 (close
to the Library). It’s open Monday through Friday with some
extended evening and Saturday hours. No appointment is
needed. For tutoring assistance, go directly to the Center or
send a message to [email protected] CPTC students
also have access to eTutoring’s free 24/7 online tutoring services
in a variety of subject areas. Go to www.etutoring.org or enter
through CPTC’s home page. For maximum benefit, students are
encouraged to seek tutoring help early in the quarter.
GED Preparation Classes
What do I need to do to enroll in
GED preparation classes?
Call or stop by to sign up for Tools for Success, the orientation
class for new students. This 4-day class allows students to
become familiar with the learning environment as well as to
complete the assessments necessary to enroll into the program.
New students must complete all four days to be eligible for
registration. Day and evening sessions are available.
Adult Basic Education, Building 37
253.589.5760 or 253.589.5702
GED Testing is administered on a set schedule several times
each month. The exam consists of five tests: Writing (including an essay: suggested length of 200-250 words), Reading, Social Studies, Science, and Math (through Algebra and Geometry). At least three sessions are necessary to complete all tests.
There is a fee for the GED exam. Examinees must present
approved photo ID and be 19 years of age or older (or have
the appropriate release form if between 16 and 18 years old).
GED Orientation/Pre-Registration is mandatory for all
new examinees. No appointment required for orientation.
Appointment is REQUIRED for GED testing.
Bring a valid picture ID:
Driver’s License, State ID, Military ID, Passport
GED Tests
Test
Time
Language Arts, Reading
Language Arts, Writing I & II
Mathematics I & II
Science
Social Studies
1 hour, 5 min
2 hours
1 hour, 30 min
1 hour, 20 min
1 hour, 10 min
GETTING SUPPORT
The Adult Basic Skills program offers classes in Adult Basic
Education (ABE), English as a Second Language (ESL) and
GED preparation. Goals include offering basic skills and
literacy programs that enhance career, educational and
personal opportunities for individuals. The program offers
math, reading, and writing skills development for a GED,
college admission, and/or career changes. The curriculum is
based on the Washington State Learning Standards, and works
within the framework of Equipped for the Future (EFF).
15
16
2011-2012 Catalog
Paying for College
Washington State &
the Cost of Education
The State of Washington contributes approximately 62
percent of the cost of students’ education through an
allocation to the College. Students are responsible for the
remaining 38 percent. Eligible students may also receive
state-supported financial aid. Certain targeted programs
mentioned above also help students pay for college and job
training. Furthermore, federal, state, and foundation support is
available. Please see Financial Aid, below.
Tuition and Fees
TUITION FOR THE 2011-2012 ACADEMIC YEAR
FOR STATE-SUPPORTED COURSES
1-10 credits
11-18 credits
19-25 credits
26 credits and up
$89.08 per credit
$63.73 per credit
no tuition charge for these credits
$65.45 per credit
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION TUITION
FINANCIAL AID
1-10 credits
11-18 credits
19-25 credits
26 credits and up
$188.18 per credit
$186.06 per credit
no tuition charge for these credits
$187.71 per credit
ONE-TIME FEES
Program admission fee:
Assessment fee:
Graduation Award fee:
$50.00 non-refundable
$19.00 non-refundable
$20.00 non-refundable
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
ADDITIONAL FEES
Additional fees may be charged for a specific class and are
listed at the end of the course descriptions in the Quarterly
Class Schedule.
Students under age 21 who enroll under the provisions of
Running Start or Elective High School do not pay tuition or
an admission fee. Qualifying students are expected to pay the
Assessment Fee and a quarterly Laboratory/Supply Fee of
$63.43 in addition to paying for consumables, books, tools
and transportation costs required for the program (subject to
revision due to pending legislation). The College may require
students to pay a refundable deposit for tools loaned to them.
Once a student graduates from high school, he or she is no
longer eligible for these programs and will be required to pay
the full tuition and fees.
Self Support Classes are 100 percent funded through student
fees and information on offerings is available in the quarterly
class schedule. Fees vary by course.
A current fee list for each career program is available on
Clover Park Technical College’s website, www.cptc.edu, or by
calling (253) 589-5548. Students should obtain all tuition and
fee information prior to registration.
Acceptable payment methods are check, cash, money order,
Visa or MasterCard. If an agency or scholarship is paying a
student’s tuition, the payment authorization must be on file
at Clover Park Technical College in order to complete the
registration process. Failure to meet financial obligations to
the College will result in withdrawal from classes as well as the
withholding of degrees and transcripts.
Tuition rates are set by the College in accordance with state
law, and are subject to change for all enrolled students at the
time of the change.
COLLECTION FEES
QUARTERLY FEES
Student activities fee: $5.50 per credit to a maximum
$66.00 per quarter
Parking fee:
83 cents per credit to a maximum
of $10.00 per quarter
ASG building fee:
$3.75 per credit to a maximum
of $45.00 per quarter
State building fee:
$4.57 for credits 1-10 per quarter
$3.79 for credits 11-18 per quarter
Students are responsible for all collection fees, attorney
fees and court fees in accordance with RCW 28B.10.293
and RCW 19.16.500 should they default on any financial
obligations to CPTC.
Refund Policy
1. The Assessment Test Fee is non-refundable.
2. All program admission fees are non-refundable.
3. For State-funded classes, the tuition and laboratory/
supply/computer use fee will be refunded for a
payment period upon official withdrawal according
to the following schedule:
100% Prior to the first day of instruction.
80% First through fifth day of instruction.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
0% Twenty-first calendar day through the end of
the payment period.
Financial aid recipients are subject to the Title IV Return of
Funds policy stated in this catalog.
4. For Self-Support classes, the following schedule
will apply:
100% If the College cancels the class.
100% When you withdraw from the class on or before
one business day prior to the first day of class. To officially
withdraw from the class, you may come to the college in
person, call registration at 253-589-5666, fax your request
to be withdrawn to 253-589-5852, or withdraw online at
www.cptc.edu/drop. The college must receive the fax on
or before one business day prior to the first day of class.
0% When you register but do not attend the class.
No refunds are available after the class has started.
Self-support classes are indicated in the quarterly class
schedule by an SS at the end of the class title, just above
the description.
5. Programs cancelled by the College will be refunded
at 100 % of the fees paid but unused as of the
cancellation date.
6. Refunds will not be granted for students withdrawn
for disciplinary reasons.
7. Students called for military active duty will be
granted a refund of tuition and laboratory/supply/
computer use fees paid for the current payment
period, subject to the rules and regulations of their
respective funding sources and payment methods.
Presentation of written confirmation is required.
8. Students who do not attend the first two class
sessions and/or comply with the established
attendance policy for the class or program may
forfeit the right to continue and may be subject to
administrative withdrawal without refund.
9. The graduation fee is non-refundable.
10. Upon official withdrawal, refunds will be made by
mail to the student or his or her respective funding
agencies.
Refund Exception
Exceptions to the refund policy must be requested in writing
to the Director of Enrollment Services before the last day of
the quarter in which payment was made. A Petition for Refund
Exception form is available in the Student Records Office.
Eligible requests will have detailed information and supporting
documentation attached at the time of submission.
17
Financial Aid
Clover Park Technical College believes that every individual
should have the opportunity to achieve his or her educational
goals. The Financial Aid Office provides financial assistance to
students who would otherwise not be able to attend school.
Financial assistance may be available to you from various
sources in the form of grants, scholarships, loans and
employment. Aid is awarded according to federal, state and
institutional guidelines. No student will be denied aid on the
basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation,
disability or age.
All prospective students are encouraged to apply for aid.
Financial aid staff will discuss opportunities with you and
help you with the application process. Eligibility is determined
through a careful assessment of your financial situation, taking
into account your and/or your family’s income, assets, debts,
number of dependents, and the estimated cost of attending
Clover Park Technical College.
Eligibility
The following programs are NOT eligible for traditional
financial aid: Adult Basic Education (ABE), general education
classes below 80 (example Math 60 and Engl 79), GED
prep, Quick Start programs, personal enrichment continuing
education, Running Start or high school completion.
To qualify for financial aid, a student must:
• be enrolled or accepted for enrollment in an eligible
degree or certificate program
• have a high school diploma, GED, or demonstrate the
ability to benefit through the assessment process.
• be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen.
• be registered with the Selective Service
(if required to do so).
• not owe any repayments on previous Title IV
assistance and not be in default on any federal
student loans.
• demonstrate a need for financial assistance.
Financial aid is normally awarded based on full-time enrollment (12 credits or more). If you plan to enroll in fewer than
12 credits for any quarter, you must give the financial aid office
advance notification to allow for your award to be revised.
FINANCIAL AID
40% On or after the sixth day of instruction
through the twentieth calendar day following the
beginning of instruction.
2011-2012 Catalog
18
2011-2012 Catalog
How to Apply/Application Deadlines
We strongly recommend that you submit your FAFSA
to the Federal Processor 3 MONTHS PRIOR TO OUR
DEADLINE DATES or at a minimum, 2 weeks before
the deadline dates below.
To apply for all available federal, state, and institutional financial
assistance, you must complete steps 1- 5 of Clover Park’s financial
aid application process. Read the instructions carefully. Students
who complete the application process prior to the deadline for a
quarter will have their applications reviewed prior to the start of
the quarter. The 5 step application instructions are available at
the Financial Aid Office and at www.cptc.edu/financialaid.
1. New students must apply for Admission to a specific degree
or certificate program.
2. Apply for a federal PIN number at www.pin.ed.gov.
A federal PIN number allows you to sign your FAFSA on the
Web or Renewal FAFSA on the Web (see Step 3) electronically.
If you are required to put your parents’ information on your
FAFSA, one of your parents will need to apply for a PIN also.
3. Complete one of the following and submit it to the
Federal Processor:
2011-2012 FAFSA on the Web www.fafsa.ed.gov or
2011-2012 Renewal FAFSA on the Web www.fafsa.ed.gov or
FINANCIAL AID
2011-2012 Paper FAFSA (call 1-800-4FED-AID to request a
paper FAFSA) **not recommended**
(You do not need to wait to file a tax return to complete the
FAFSA, income estimator is available)
After your FAFSA is processed, the Federal Processor will
send you either a paper Student Aid Report (SAR), an
electronic SAR, or a SAR Information Acknowledgement,
depending on how you submitted your FAFSA and whether
or not you provided a valid e-mail address on your FAFSA.
If you do not receive your SAR within 2 weeks of submitting
your application, call the Federal Processor at 1-800-4FEDAID to check on the status of your application.
4. Continuing and new students must submit all additional
required documents by the deadline.
After the Federal Processor sends the Financial Aid Office a
copy of your processed FAFSA data, we will send you a letter
explaining what additional documents we need to complete
your file and/or what actions you must take. (i.e. CPTC Data
sheet, 2010 Income Tax Return, Verification Worksheets). If
you don’t receive notification from our office within 2 weeks of
having your FAFSA processed by the Federal Processor, come
to the Financial Aid Office. Please make sure to update your
mailing address with both Registration and Financial Aid.
Submit all additional required documents/take care of
all required actions as instructed by the following deadline dates to ensure your application is reviewed prior to
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
the start of the quarter you begin classes. If all required
documentation is not submitted by the deadline dates below,
this may result in a delay of financial aid and you will be
required to pay your tuition, fees, books and supplies until
the next quarter.:
Summer Quarter 2011
Fall Quarter 2011
Winter Quarter 2012
Spring Quarter 2012
May 6, 2011
August 19, 2011
December 2, 2011
February 24, 2012
5. Complete Direct Stafford Loan application online (Required
for LPN and RN pre-requisites).
Continuing students must re-new the Master Promissory
Note every new academic year starting with summer
quarter. If you would like to be considered for student loans,
you must complete the loan application process (Entrance
Counseling and Master Promissory Note) on-line from
the college’s website www.cptc.edu/financialaid. Click
read more under the “Federal Direct Stafford Loan” link.
Continuing students must renew master promissory note
every academic year, starting summer quarter.
Students taking nursing (LPN or RN) academic prerequisites who want financial assistance must apply for a
student loan as they do not qualify for grant assistance.
They qualify for student loans only, and only for a period of
12 consecutive months. (Nursing Assistant program is not
eligible for federal student loans.)
Financial Aid Office: 4500 Steilacoom Blvd. SW
Lakewood, WA 98499-4098
(253) 589-5660, Fax: (253) 589-5618
School code: 015984
Cost of Attending College
The following budget figures have been approved by the
Washington Financial Aid Association and Clover Park
Technical College. They are provided as a guide to estimate
what it would cost to attend Clover Park Technical College
for nine-months (three quarters.)
RESIDENT
DEPENDENT
INDEPENDENT
Living with
Parent/Relative
Living
Independently
$4,341
$4,341
$4,341
$972
$972
$972
Room & Board
$3,006
$7,014
$9,000
Transportation
$1,272
$1,488
$1,224
Personal
$1,530
$1,830
$1,704
TOTAL
$11,121
$15,645
$17,241
Living with
Parent/Relative
Tuition & Fees
Books & Supplies
Determining Financial Need
The amount of assistance students receive is based on their
demonstrated need.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Cost of attending college – Expected family contribution = Need
SCHOLARSHIPS
Financial need is defined as the difference between educational
expenses (tuition, fees, books, tools, supplies, room and board,
personal and transportation) and the amount the student and
his/her family can afford to pay as determined by the information on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
Many businesses, service, and professional organizations, as well
as individuals in the community, contribute funds to be used as
grants (awards based on need) or as scholarships (awards based
on merit, need or other criteria). Applications are accepted
at various times throughout the year. Eligibility criteria and
application procedures are posted on the Scholarship Board
located outside of the Financial Aid Office in Building 17 or
www.washboard.org, www.fastweb.com.
Students must apply for financial aid once every year. For financial
aid purposes, the year starts in summer and ends in spring. The
FAFSA application is available every January 1st for the following
academic year.
Description of Aid Programs
FEDERAL AND STATE GRANTS
Clover Park offers both federal grants (Pell Grant,
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, and Academic
Competitiveness Grant) and state grants (Washington State
Need Grant). Grants are considered a form of gift aid because
they do not have to be repaid provided students attend their
classes, do not reduce their enrollment on or before the 5th
business day of the quarter, do not make a 100% withdrawal,
do not stop attending their classes, and do not complete zero
credits for a quarter.
WORK-STUDY
Federal and State work-study programs offer students the
opportunity to gain valuable work experience while earning
money for college. Both on-campus and off-campus positions
are available.
Students receive their work-study funds in the form of a
paycheck from their employer based on their hourly wage
and the number of hours they have worked in any given pay
period. Because work-study funds must be earned, they are
not available at the beginning of the quarter to help students
pay their tuition and fees or purchase their books.
STUDENT LOANS
Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans are
need-based loans. The term subsidized means the federal
government pays interest on the loan on the student’s behalf
until the student enters repayment.
Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are
non-need based loans. The term unsubsidized means the
federal government does not pay interest on the loan until
the student enters repayment. Students are responsible for
paying all accrued interest. Interest can be paid while the
student is in school, or it can be deferred until the student
enters repayment. If deferred, the unpaid interest that accrues
is added to the loan amount the student borrowed, a process
known as capitalization.
Scholarships are also available from the Clover Park
Technical College Foundation. For more information,
visit the Foundation website at http://foundation.cptc.edu.
AGENCY FUNDING
Persons who qualify for assistance from the Division of
Vocational Rehabilitation of the State of Washington or
neighboring states, the Department of Labor and Industries,
WorkSource, the Washington State Department of Social and
Health Services, or the Employment Security Department
should contact and work with their funding agencies before
and throughout the enrollment process.
OPPORTUNITY GRANT
(253) 589-5957
The Opportunity Grant allows low-income students to
earn up to 45 credits in a job training program that is high
wage and high demand with money to help cover tuition,
books, and some additional financial support depending on
need. Students also participate in personal and professional
development workshops. Contact the Opportunity Grant
Coordinator in Building 17, Room 130.
The career pathways covered under the Opportunity Grant are:
Accounting
Aviation Maintenance
Computer Networking & Information System Security
Early Care & Education
Environmental Science
Dental Administrative Specialist
Dental Assistant
Health Unit Coordinator
Hemodialysis
Human Services
IBEST Chemical Dependency Specialist
Histology Technician
Landscape Management/Horticulture
Licensed Practical Nurse
Material Science Nondestructive Testing
Material Science Composites
Medical Assistant
CAD I-BEST
Nursing Assistant Certification/IBEST NAC
Registered Nurse
Residential Construction
Surgical Technician
Sustainable Building Science
FINANCIAL AID
Timelines
19
20
2011-2012 Catalog
WORKER RETRAINING
Worker Retraining is a Washington State program that targets
dislocated/unemployed workers, displaced homemakers, or
vulnerable workers and veterans honorably discharged within
the last 24 months.
WORKFIRST
WorkfFirst is a program that provides funding and support to
students receiving Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF).
The WorkFirst office is located in building 16. Please call
(253) 589-5503 for assistance getting started.
Notification
Students awarded Financial Aid will receive a Financial Aid
award letter that will indicate the amount and the type of
aid offered.
5. To repay any financial aid received when students
were not eligible.
6 To continue receiving financial aid, students must
reapply each academic year.
Satisfactory Academic Progress
Federal and state financial aid regulations require schools
to set minimum standards for satisfactory academic
progress and to hold students accountable for meeting the
standards. Satisfactory Academic Progress is checked prior
to awarding aid, even if students did not receive financial
aid in past quarters. It is also checked at the end of every
quarter aid is received.
The Satisfactory Academic Progress policy includes the
following:
1. Credit completion requirement
Rights & Responsibilities
2. Cumulative Grade Point Average requirement of
2.00 or greater
As a financial aid recipient, students have the following rights:
3. Credit limit requirement.
1 Access to accurate and timely information on
financial aid deadlines and procedures.
2. Access to personal financial aid records
and information as defined by the Buckley
Amendment of 1974.
FINANCIAL AID
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
The credit completion requirement is different for State Need
Grant (SNG) than for other types of aid.
3 The choice of accepting all or only part of the
assistance offered.
Copies of the complete Satisfactory Academic Progress
policy are sent to students with their financial aid award
letters, are available on the Financial Aid Office web site at
www.cptc.edu/financialaid, and are available at the Financial
Aid Office front counter.
4. Access to a review of the award package should the
student’s financial situation change. Included in this
right is the opportunity to appeal.
Withdrawal & Repayment Policies
Along with these rights students have the following
responsibilities:
1 To provide accurate information to be used in
the aid process. Misrepresenting information is a
violation of the law and could result in indictment
under the U.S. Criminal Code.
2. To inform the Financial Aid Office of any
significant changes to a student’s financial situation
(scholarships, gifts, earnings, funding, etc.) in excess
of $200 that were not listed in the application, or any
other change in circumstances such as a change in
student status, or marital status which may influence
the award. Failure to report these changes can result
in federal legal action to recover aid funds.
3 To understand the loan obligation. With a loan
as part of the student’s package, future earnings
are pledged to pay present school costs. Loan
conditions should be read carefully; ask questions.
4. To maintain satisfactory progress and toward the
completion of degree/certificate program.
Students who either withdraw from all classes, stop attending
all classes, or a combination of both before completing 60%
of the quarter (measured in calendar days), or students who
complete zero credits, may be required to repay a portion of
the financial aid they received for that quarter. This applies to
grant funds as well as student loans. Repayments are computed
in accordance with federal and state regulations. Repayments
can be owed to the college, the U.S. Department of Education,
and/or the State Higher Education Coordinating Board.
Students who owe a repayment are notified in writing. The
complete repayment policy can be found on the Financial Aid
Office web site at www.cptc.edu/financialaid.
The first day that students can drop to zero (either withdraw
from all classes, stop attending all classes, or a combination of
both) without owing a repayment as a result are:
Summer 2011
Fall 2011
Winter 2012
Spring 2012
8/5/2011
11/13/2011
2/18/2012
5/14/2012
International Students
We welcome students from many countries to Clover Park
Technical College. We offer airport pick-up, free internet access
and free tutoring to our international students.
Our international website, www.cptc.edu/international, has
detailed information in English, Japanese, Korean, Chinese,
Thai, Turkish, and Vietnamese.
Admissions
To start your application process, please contact us and take
the first step towards a bright future. Join other American and
international students who have discovered the outstanding
programs at Clover Park Technical College.
You can become an international student at Clover Park
Technical College by following these easy steps:
1. Fill out the Admissions Application and the
Financial Responsibility forms:
a. Available online at www.cptc.edu/international, or
b. Request an application by mail at:
International Education Programs
4500 Steilacoom Blvd SW
Lakewood WA USA 98499
c. Email us at [email protected] and we will
send digital copies of the documents.
2011-2012 Catalog
Transfer of Clover Park
Technical College Credits
Credits earned at Clover Park Technical College may transfer
to other two-year colleges, and to some four-year colleges and
universities. Please discuss your educational goals with the
International Office staff.
Dates to Remember
*Fall Quarter begins September 26, 2011
Winter Quarter begins January 3, 2012
*Spring Quarter begins March 28, 2012
Summer Quarter begins June 27, 2012
Graduation is Saturday, June 16, 2012
*Please note that some programs have fall and spring start dates only.
Plan to arrive a few days before the quarter begins to rest and
recuperate. For Winter quarter, plan to arrive after Christmas
day (December 26-28).
Cost of Tuition & Fees
2011-2012 fees coming soon. Fees do not change until Fall
quarter 2011.
1-10 credits
11-18 credits
19-25 credits
26 credits and up
$188.18 per credit
$186.06 per credit
no tuition charge for these credits
$187.71 per credit
d. Request an application by fax at: (253) 589-6054
2 Send the Admission Application and the Financial
Responsibility forms, along with other required
documents, by mail with your $50.00 non-refundable
application fee, payable by personal check, money
order (in U.S. dollars), or credit card.
3. Attach a passport-size color photo to the top right
corner of the application.
English Language Requirement: No TOEFL is required for
admission, if you study ESL at Clover Park Technical College.
Completion of an approved English Language Program would
waive the ESL requirement. Please contact us regarding our
English Language Requirement.
Once we receive the above items and you meet all the
admissions criteria, we will mail your I-20 Form to you. Take
the I-20 Form with you to the U.S. Consulate in your country
and apply for a student visa. If you have questions about
the application process, please contact our office at: Email:
[email protected] or Tel: (253) 589-6089.
21
•International Student Health Insurance is $258.75 per
quarter (3 months) — subject to change.
•Computer Use Fee of $4.55 per credit to a maximum
of $54.60 per quarter (depending on the program).
•Additional fees may be charged for a specific class and
are listed at the end of the course descriptions in the
Quarterly Class Schedule.
Tuition and fees may change based upon State of Washington
legislative guidelines.
•Parking fee of 83 cents per credit to a maximum of
$10.00 per quarter (if driving a car to college).
•Housing and other College fees are not inclusive.
•Non-refundable Clover Park Technical College
admissions application fee is $50.00.
•Books and supplies vary by program.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
22
2011-2012 Catalog
Intensive English Programs for
International Students & Professionals
Independent Living in Apartments Near
the College
Clover Park Technical College offers Intensive English courses
for international students and professionals who are interested
in learning English for academic, business purposes, or for
leisure and fun.
Cost: One bedroom apartments average $500.00 per month
and two bedrooms average at $600.00 per month, plus food
and utilities, depending on location, size and amenities.
• Small classes for students preparing for academic
and professional technical programs at college
• Study English 20 hours per week for ten weeks
• Use of the computer lab with software for self-paced,
hands-on English learning
Cost of Tuition & Fees
for Intensive English (I-ESL)
• Tuition per quarter is $3,123.50, at time of catalog
printing. The course is ten weeks longs and includes
cultural and career-related field trips and activities.
Check with the International Office for the most
recent tuition amount for I-ESL.
Housing Services
CAMPUS LIFE & SERVICES
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Clover Park Technical College works with Abode Homestay as
its housing manager. For details or further information, contact
Abode Homestay at www.abodehomestay.com.
American Host Family
You may live with an American family who will provide you
with a private room and three meals a day. They will also pick
you up from the airport, help you with your initial settling-in
needs (banking, ID, orientation to community, etc.)
There is a $250.00 placement fee (payable to ABODE), and
a $100.00 deposit (applied toward 1st month’s Homestay fee.
Costs, as determined by Abode Homestay at the time
this catalog was printed, are:
Option A: Traditional Homestay - $550.00 a month
for 3 meals / 7 days a week.
Option B: Bed & Breakfast Homestay - $425.00 a month
for 1 meals / 7 days a week and
3 meals / weekends.
Verify expenses with Abode Homestay when
requesting a U.S. host family.
Housing placements are managed through Abode Homestay.
Contact them at www.abodehomestay.com for the most recent
fees and policies. Fees are subject to change.
• Housing and other College fees are not inclusive.
The students who need assistance in finding
apartments need to pay a $100.00 housing
application fee payable to CPTC.
Costs are subject to change based on the local housing market.
For Additional International Information
Contact the International Education Office at:
Tel: (253) 589-6089
Fax (253) 589-6054
Email: [email protected]
Mail:
Clover Park Technical College
International Education Programs
4500 Steilacoom Blvd SW
Lakewood WA USA 98499
Website: www.cptc.edu/international
Campus Life & Services
Associated Student Government
(253) 589-5644
Associated Student Government (ASG) is the official governing
organization for students at Clover Park Technical College.
Serving on ASG gives student the opportunity to maximize
their involvement and participation in the college. The ASG is
organized as follows:
STUDENT COUNCIL
This council is composed of students who are selected by their
peers to represent the entire student body in the positions of
President, Vice President, Secretary and Student Activities
Chair. Council meetings, which are open to the public, are
held on a regular basis while CPTC is in session.
PROGRAMMING BOARD
The programming board primary function is to provide
students with programs and activities that enhance their
learning outside of the classroom. These programs include
but are not limited to student involvement days, diversity and
cultural events, lectures and workshops, concerts, welcome
days, movie nights and more.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
The ASG coordinates the management of student clubs,
which operate specifically to promote individual programs with
respective industries and related professional organizations
within the community.
For more information about Student Programs, call or stop
by the Student Center, Building 23, Room 207. Students can
meet with their student officers in Building 23, Room 209 or
take a break in the game or TV areas in Rooms 214 or 215.
Student Center
(253) 589-5644
The Sharon McGavick Student Center is where students and
the campus community connect via student services such
entertaining and educational programs and services that
both enhance the quality of college life and complement the
educational experience at CPTC. Students can enjoy open
access to a game room; TV room; microwaves; study spaces;
food service and coffee shop; retail shops; meeting and event
spaces; and student leadership and involvement opportunities.
Bookstore
(253) 589-5614
In addition to textbooks, the Bookstore carries supplies, tools,
and many other needed items for training. The bookstore also
carries logo clothing and gift items, backpacks and rolling
book bags, snack items and assorted beverages. The Bookstore
also carries a selection of lunch items such as sandwiches,
lunchables, microwaveable burritos, pizza, hot sandwich items
and soups. The Bookstore is in the Student Center, Building
23, has extended hours at the beginning of each quarter and
may run on a reduced schedule during all College breaks.
Food Services
Breakfast, lunch and snacks are served daily on campus when
the College is in session at the Cascade Café and the Clover Perk
Bistro in Building 23. The Clover Park Technical College Culinary
Arts students offer lunch in the Rainier room in Building 31,
Wednesday through Friday, from 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.
(offered periodically during the quarter).
Health Services
The Advising and Counseling Office is home to the wellness
committee that promotes safety and health issues. There
are no health services on the campus. Referrals are made to
local clinics.
23
Identification
(253) 589-5557
Student photo identification cards are available and can be
purchased from Security (Building 23, Room 211) on Tuesdays
and Thursdays from 2 to 4 p.m. The cost for a student
identification card is $5.00. Replacement cards cost $5.00.
Pay in advance at the Cashiers Office, Building 17, Room
102. Bring your receipt and completed application to Building
23, Room 211. You must have a picture ID and your Student
ID number to be issued a Clover Park Technical College
identification card.
Insurance
Clover Park Technical College provides information regarding
accident and health insurance to interested students. Contact
your program faculty or the Advising/Counseling Office in
Building 17 for a brochure.
Parking & Transportation
(253) 589-5557
Pierce Transit Buses 202 and 3 stop at the College on a
regular basis.
Students who park on College property must register
their vehicle and display a current decal, which is issued
annually and is valid from September to September.
Parking applications are available from the Security Office,
Building 22, Room 127; Cashiering, Building 17, Room
102; and at Student Registration, Building 17, Lobby. Decals
are available in Building 23, Room 211. Bring picture
identification, student identification number and proof of class
registration. Hours of operation are: Tuesday and Thursday,
2-4 p.m.. Your first decal is included in your tuition expense,
there is a $7 charge for additional decals. If you are driving a
temporary vehicle please come to the Security Office between
7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. to receive a temporary parking slip.
The white striped areas are designated for student parking.
Yellow striped areas are restricted to the following: carpool,
disabled, authorized staff, and visitors. The campus speed
limit is 10 miles per hour, unless otherwise posted. Vehicles
improperly parked on campus are subject to a $15 fine for
each offense and/or towed at the owner’s expense. Students
are also subject to a $15 fine for each offense for nonregistered vehicles, parking in unauthorized areas, blocking or
obstructing traffic, parking in fire lanes and tow-away zones.
Parking in a designated handicapped space without a stateissued handicapped parking permit carries a campus fine of
$75 or $280 if cited by the Lakewood Police Department.
Students who violate driving or parking rules may be required
to leave their vehicles off campus. Clover Park Technical
College is not responsible for damage or loss to vehicles parked
on the campus.
CAMPUS LIFE & SERVICES
CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS
2011-2012 Catalog
24
2011-2012 Catalog
Library & Computer Labs
(253) 589-5544 for hours
(253) 589-5628 or (253) 589-6067 for Library Skills
classes and individual orientations to library resources
The Clover Park Technical College Library and Hayes
Computer Lab is located in the F.V. Miner Resource Center,
Building 15. The library/computer lab is open from 7:00 a.m.
to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. on Fridays, and 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Saturdays.
The library provides a variety of print, audiovisual and online
resources to students, faculty, and staff. The general collection
of books, reference materials, magazines and multi-media
resources support Clover Park Technical College’s instructional
programs. In addition, the library/computer lab has a
collection of electronic resources including online reference
databases, electronic journals, computer applications, Internet
access, and a variety of assistive technologies.
Other services include a coin-operated copy machine,
fee-based fax machine, and study areas. For after-hours
convenience, there is an outside book return on the east end of
Building 15. Library/computer labs staff are available to give
individual assistance.
CHILD CARE
All currently enrolled students are eligible to use the library/
computer labs for College-related activities. A variety of
software and hardware is available to help students with
assignments and to accommodate students with special needs.
Security
(253) 589-5682
Security personnel are on campus to assure your safety. They
will deal with emergency situations and will assist with some
vehicle problems, such as a dead battery.
Early Care & Education
Affiliated Child Care Center Program
(253) 589-4516
Early Care and Education offers on-site instruction and
customized courses focusing on Early Childhood Education to
affiliated child care centers.
Staff at child care centers are eligible to combine on-site
training, attendance at on-campus classes, workshops and
courses to earn college credit or meet STARS continuing
education requirements. These services are currently provided
to more than 50 child care centers.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Clover Park Technical College is authorized by the Council
For Early Childhood Professional Recognition to provide
instruction for the Child Development Associate (CDA)
Professional Preparatory Program and Direct Assessment
Program. Students interested in the process for earning a CDA
from the National Credentialing Program can call the council
at 1-800-424-4310.
On-Campus Child Care
(253) 589-5531 or 589-5511
Hayes Child Development Center is located in Building 20.
Daytime Care Provides services for ages 12 months to 12
years old Hours of operation are 6:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. A full
time schedule is required. There is a discounted rate available
for students and staff of Clover Park Technical College. The
center is also available to community members not enrolled or
working at the college. We do accept D.S.H.S payments.
We are proud to be a N.A.E.Y.C accredited facility.
If you have question about Hayes Child Development Center
please call 253-589-5531 or email [email protected]
Project Head Start
(253) 589-5721
CPTC offers a full-day Head Start program to eligible
families with children three and four years old.
The four major components of this locally administered
program are education, health, parent involvement, and
social services.
Parents are involved in parent education and program
planning/operating activities. They also may serve as members
of the policy council and committees. Project Head Start has
played a major role in focusing the attention of the nation on
the importance of early childhood development, especially in
the first five years of life. Since 1965, Head Start has sought
to provide comprehensive developmental services for children
from low-income families. Registration information is available
from the head start family advocate.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
25
Everything I am doing at UW Tacoma I started at Clover Park.
Programs
&
Courses
Jerremmy Miller, Environmental Sciences & Technology program graduate,
University of Washington, Tacoma Senior
Degree and Certificate Programs 26
Short-Term Programs 75
Course Descriptions 77
26
2011-2012 Catalog
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Program Descriptions
Prerequisites: Some programs have unique Prerequisites.
If Prerequisites are required, they are listed with each
program in the pages that follow and are in addition to
college entrance requirements.
A core of academic classes is an integral part of all CPTC
preparatory programs. Students may waive classes below the
100 level by meeting the Prerequisite COMPASS or SLEP
score. For course descriptions, see page 77.
Accounting
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
Prepares students for careers in Accounting with starting positions such
as a junior-level accountant, entry-level accounting supervisor, full
charge bookkeeper, fiscal technician, accounting assistant, or various
other entry-level accounting clerks. Participate in realistic training
through a student-operated accounting office and internships. Technical
course curriculum is based on current industry standards.
ACCOUNTING
This program is approximately six quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
All courses must be completed with a minimum C grade to graduate.
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T
(AAS-T). The different requirements for each degree are listed below.
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82, and successful completion of MAT 91 during first
quarter.
Credits listed for each program are college quarter credit
hour equivalents.
Program completion is dependent on satisfactory progress
and successful achievement of all course requirements and
student outcomes with an overall GPA of 2.0 or greater.
It should be recognized that the number of quarters and
hours identified for each program on the following pages is
approximate; some students may need additional quarters to
meet graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Recommended Fall and Spring quarters or by
Instructor permission. Course delivery varies between live, hybrid, and
online methods. Students with prior learning or experience should
contact the Instructor prior to enrolling for individual start dates, class
schedule, and options.
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
ACTG 110*
Bookkeeping I............................................................................. 4
ACTG 115*
Bookkeeping II............................................................................ 4
ACTG 120*
Electronic Business Math............................................................... 2
ACTG 135
Accounting Spreadsheets I............................................................ 5
ACTG 141
Quickbooks I.............................................................................. 2
ACTG 143
Quickbooks II.............................................................................. 3
ACTG 160
Payroll & Business Taxes................................................................ 5
ACCT& 201
Principles of Accounting I.............................................................. 5
BUS& 201
Business Law............................................................................... 5
ACCT& 202
Principles of Accounting II.............................................................. 5
ACTG 222
Fundamentals of Individual Income Tax Accounting............................ 4
ACCT& 203
Principles of Accounting III............................................................. 5
ACTG 224
Fundamentals of Governmental/Nonprofit Accounting........................ 5
ACTG 211
Principles of Accounting I Lab......................................................... 2
ACTG 212
Principles of Accounting II Lab........................................................ 3
ACTG 213
Principles of Accounting III Lab....................................................... 3
ACTG 235
Accounting Spreadsheets II............................................................ 4
ACTG 241
Quickbooks III............................................................................. 4
ACTG 260
Business Office I.......................................................................... 5
CAP
ACTG 262
Business Office II......................................................................... 5
ACTG 271
Internship I.................................................................................. 5
CAS 120
MS Word I................................................................................. 2
CAS 140
MS PowerPoint............................................................................ 2
CAS 150
MS Access................................................................................. 2
Plus one option (Below)...................................................................................... 10
Technical Course Requirements (Total).............................................................101
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE...............................116
* Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)................................................101
General Education Requirements (See listing above).......................................... 20
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE........................... 121
Option 1
ACTG 291 Individual Income Tax Accounting....................................................... 5
ACTG 293 Individual Income Tax Accounting Lab.................................................. 5
ACTG 295 Individual Income Tax Preparation....................................................... 5
Option 2
ACTG 281 Specialized Accounting I................................................................... 5
ACTG 283 Specialized Accounting I Lab............................................................. 5
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
Bookkeeping Clerk
Certificate
(253) 589-5621 or (253) 589-5691
Prepares students for employment as accounts receivable, accounts
payable, payroll clerks, or other bookkeeping clerk positions. Introduces
bookkeeping and accounting theory complimented with Microsoft
Office applications and automated accounting software. Enhances the
skills of an office clerk. Technical course curriculum is based on current
industry standards.
This program is approximately three quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements. All courses must be completed with a minimum C grade
to graduate.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82, and successful completion of MAT 82.
Admission Dates: Recommended Fall and Spring quarters or by
Instructor permission. Course delivery varies between live, hybrid, and
online methods. Students with prior learning or experience should
contact the Instructor prior to enrolling for individual start dates.
Credits
ACTG 110* Bookkeeping I................................................................................. 4
ACTG 115* Bookkeeping II................................................................................ 4
ACTG 120* Electronic Business Math .................................................................. 2
ACTG 135 Accounting Spreadsheets I................................................................. 5
ACTG 141 Quickbooks I................................................................................... 2
ACTG 143 Quickbooks II.................................................................................. 3
ACTG 160 Payroll & Business Taxes ................................................................ 5
ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I ................................................................ 5
ACTG 211 Principles of Accounting I Lab .......................................................... 2
ACTG 235 Accounting Spreadsheets II ............................................................ 4
CAS 120CL MS Word I..................................................................................... 2
CAS 140 MS PowerPoint................................................................................ 2
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................40
Architectural Engineering Design
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate of Applied Science - T Degree
Prepares students for employment in the field of residential design or a
related technical field such as drawing for product manufacturers,
engineering, or design firms.
Prior graduates have entered engineering technician positions in
computer-aided drafting and design (CAD), project management assisting,
residential design and site planning and developing, assisting with GIS
mapping, and performing structural calculations and computations for
engineering of wood beams and joints. Students participate in realistic
training activities as a part of their educational experience.
This program is approximately seven quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements. A full-time evening degree is also available.
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T
(AAS-T). The different requirements for each degree are listed below.
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters for day program; Winter
and Summer quarters for evening program
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ARC 121
ARC 123
ARC 125
ARC 141
ARC 143
ARC 145
ARC 152
ARC 153
ARC 162
ARC 163
ARC 171
ARC 173
ARC 181
ARC 191
ARC 221
ARC 223
ARC 225CAP
ARC 227
ARC 229 ARC 231
ARC 233
ARC 236
ARC 238
ARC 251
ARC 253
ARC 261
ARC 281
ARC 284*CL
ARC 293
GEO 210
GEO 215
Credits
Architectural Drafting & Design ......................................................... 5
Civil Engineering Site Design . .......................................................... 5
Residential Design & Drafting............................................................. 5
Architectural Reporting .................................................................... 3
Architectural Reporting II................................................................... 2
Architectural Reporting III.................................................................. 2
Construction Material Research.......................................................... 2
Construction Materials Research II ..................................................... 1
Sketching I..................................................................................... 3
Sketching II ................................................................................... 2
Drafting Technologies I..................................................................... 5
Drafting Technologies II.................................................................... 5
Introduction to AutoCAD................................................................... 5
Engineering Mechanics of Materials .................................................. 5
Detailing & Light Commercial ........................................................... 5
Design Project I .............................................................................. 5
Design Project II.............................................................................. 5
Special Intern Project OR
Special Design Project..................................................................... 5
Cost Estimating I ............................................................................ 3
Cost Estimating II . .......................................................................... 2
Energy Analysis I ............................................................................ 1
Energy Analysis II ........................................................................... 1
Construction Materials Research III .................................................... 1
Employment Research ..................................................................... 2
Sketching III . ................................................................................. 1
Intermediate AutoCAD .................................................................... 5
Applied AutoCAD........................................................................... 5
Engineering Statics ......................................................................... 5
Introduction to [email protected]......... 2
GPS Technologies........................................................................... 2
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Total).............................................................100
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE...............................115
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)................................................100
General Education Requirements (See listing above).......................................... 20
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE........................... 120
Additional required lab time arranged with Instructor.
ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING
Accounting
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
27
2011-2012 Catalog
28
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Architectural Engineering Design
Architectural: CAD Drafting
Certificate
Prepares students for entry-level careers in computer-aided drafting
within the architectural field. Students will learn to create drawings and
plans that show the technical details of an architectural structure from
all angles.
CAD drafters use information provided by engineers, architects, and
clients to develop technical drawings that visually present the project and
included essential details.
This 3-quarter certificate is specifically developed to provide students
with assistance in gaining the skills they will need to be successful in the
industry. In addition to the technical courses listed below, this program
offers a basic skills component to help prepare students for success. The
certificate is a pathway to the Architectural Engineering Design associate
degree program.
Prerequisite: Student must be screened using CASAS assessment to
meet eligibility requirements. Call (253) 589-5524 for more information.
Admission Dates: Summer and Winter quarters.
ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ARC 121
ARC 141
ARC 143
ARC 152
ARC 162
ARC 171
ARC 173
ARC 181
ARC 231
ARC 281
ARC 253
Credits
Architectural Drafting & Design.............................................................. 5
Architectural Reporting I....................................................................... 3
Architectural Reporting II...................................................................... 2
Construction Materials Research I.......................................................... 2
Sketching I......................................................................................... 3
Drafting Technologies I........................................................................ 5
Drafting Technologies II....................................................................... 5
Introduction to AutoCAD...................................................................... 5
Cost Estimating................................................................................... 3
Intermediate AutoCAD......................................................................... 5
Employment Research.......................................................................... 2
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................40
Automotive Collision Technician
Skilled automotive collision technicians may be employed in new car
dealerships, independent auto collision shops, and industrial and
government agency motor pools. Graduates of this program may enter
the trade with considerable practical skills gained through actual handson repair experience throughout the program.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge
and abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal
development enhanced.
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
ACT 102
ACT 106
ACT 110
ACT 115
ACT 120*
ACT 125
ACT 132
ACT 133
Auto Collision Major Repairs.............................................................. 5
Auto Systems Repair (Winter quarter only)............................................. 4
Collision Estimating........................................................................... 5
Refinish Equipment Preparation............................................................ 6
Topcoat Refinishing........................................................................... 8
Pre-Prime Preparation........................................................................ 5
Post-Prime Preparation....................................................................... 5
Surface Imperfections/Exterior Trim..................................................... 5
Plastic Refinishing............................................................................. 5
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).............. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................97
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
Automotive Collision
Refinishing Technician
Certificate
Skilled automotive collision refinishing technicians may be employed in
new car dealerships, independent auto collision shops, as well as industrial
and government agency motor pools.
Graduates of this program will enter the trade with considerable practical
skills gained through hands-on repair experience throughout the
program.
This program is approximately two quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ACT 140
ACT 145
ACT 151
ACT 154
ACT 156
ACT 157
ACT 166
ACT 171
Credits
Auto Systems Repair (Winter quarter only)............................................... 4
Collision Estimating............................................................................. 5
Refinish Equipment Preparation.............................................................. 6
Topcoat Refinishing............................................................................. 8
Pre-Prime Preparation........................................................................... 5
Post-Prime Preparation.......................................................................... 5
Surface Imperfections/Exterior Trim........................................................ 5
Plastic Refinishing................................................................................ 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................43
Certificate
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ACT 134
ACT 140
ACT 145
ACT 151
ACT 154
ACT 156
ACT 157
ACT 166
ACT 171
ENG& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Automotive Collision
Structure Repair Technician
Certificate
Skilled automotive collision structure technicians may be employed in
new car dealerships, independent auto collision shops, and industrial and
government agency motor pools. Graduates of this program will enter
the trade with considerable practical skills gained through actual handson repair experience throughout the program.
This program is approximately two quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
Credits
Fundamentals of Collision Repair........................................................... 3
Body Shop Equipment......................................................................... 3
Welding, Heat, & Cutting.................................................................... 4
Plastic/SMC Repair............................................................................ 4
Glass, Trim, & Hardware..................................................................... 5
Introduction to Metal Straightening......................................................... 3
Panel Replacement.............................................................................. 6
Panel Repair.................................................................................... 6
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ACT 102
ACT 106
ACT 110
ACT 115
ACT 120*
ACT 125
ACT 132
Credits
Fundamentals of Collision Repair........................................................... 3
Body Shop Equipment......................................................................... 3
Welding, Heat, & Cutting.................................................................... 4
Plastic/SMC Repair............................................................................ 4
Glass, Trim, & Hardware..................................................................... 5
Introduction to Metal Straightening......................................................... 5
Panel Replacement.............................................................................. 6
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
ACT 133 Panel Repair...................................................................................... 6
ACT 134 Auto Collision Major Repairs................................................................ 5
ACT 140 Auto Systems Repair (Winter quarter only)............................................... 4
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................43
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
29
2011-2012 Catalog
Automotive Restoration
& Customization - Finishing
Assessment & Research
Certificate
Automotive Restoration
& Customization - Finishing
Designed to provide knowledge and entry-level skills necessary for
preservation of automobiles. Targets assessment, maintenance, and
development of a plan for restoration and preservation of vintage vehicles
using historical information found on Internet and other sources.
Focuses on exterior repair and restoration, customization, preparation
for paint, stock, and/or custom finishing, and stock and/or custom
interior carpet, upholstery, and trim. Designed to provide entry-level
knowledge and skills necessary to restore and/or customize vehicles.
Students will participate in realistic training activities as part of their
educational experience. This program is one quarter in length.
Students will participate in realistic training activities as part of their
educational experience and/or will work on their own projects.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This program is approximately four to six quarters in length, after
meeting prerequisite, depending on the time students need to satisfactorily
complete all graduation requirements and prerequisites and master the
skills and techniques covered and finish a capstone project.
Prerequisites: AUG 103-111, Introduction to Automotive Upholstery
& Glass and Bench Seats I and II, and ACT 102-125, Automotive
Collision Technician, or equivalent.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters, by
Instructor permission only
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ARCF 103
ARCF 109
ARCF 114
ARCF 119
ARCF 124
ARCF 129
ARCF 134
ARCF 141
ARCF 149
ARCF 154
ARCF 156
ARCF 161
ARCF 164
ARCF 166
ARCF 167
ARCF 168
ENG& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Fundamentals & Shop Equipment........................................................ 3
Welding & Metal Skills..................................................................... 4
Basic Repairs & Assembly.................................................................. 8
Custom Fabrication........................................................................... 6
Refinishing Equipment........................................................................ 4
Refinish Preparation.......................................................................... 7
Custom Refinishing............................................................................ 6
Surface Imperfections/Show & Shine................................................... 4
Custom Seat Upholstery.................................................................... 7
Automotive Restoration & Customization Finishing Lab............................. 9
Custom Headliner & Side Panel Upholstery........................................... 5
Custom Carpet Fabrication & Installation.............................................. 5
Custom Glass Patterning & Installation.................................................. 4
Custom Upholstery Design & Installation............................................... 3
Custom Paint Application................................................................... 3
Applied Metal Skills.......................................................................... 3
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).............. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 96
Recommended Electives
ARCF 130
ARCF 133
ARCF 159
ARCF 160
ARCF 162
ARCF 163
ARCF 165
ARCF 169
ARCF 170
Advanced Paint Applications............................................................4-6
Fiberglass Composites Techniques.....................................................4-6
Metal Straightening & Shaping.........................................................4-6
Custom Upholstering – Advanced Panels............................................4-6
Custom Upholstering – Advanced Bench Seats....................................4-6
Custom Upholstering – Advanced Bucket Seats...................................4-6
Custom Upholstering – Convertible Tops.............................................4-6
Custom Upholstering – Vinyl Tops......................................................4-6
Custom Refinishing – Special Projects.................................................4-6
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
Credits
ARCF 200 Vehicle Assessment........................................................................... 7
ARCF 210 Vehicle Research Techniques.............................................................. 7
ARCF 220 Vehicle Maintenance........................................................................ 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 19
Automotive Technician
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
This ASE-certified program prepares students for entry-level positions as
automotive technicians. Students participate in realistic training
experiences that prepare them for pre-apprenticeship training and ASE
certification. Cooperative work experience is available with Instructor
permission. Credits will depend on time spent in co-op.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This program is approximately six quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Must have required tools and textbooks.
Students pursuing an AAT degree must complete all college degree
requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet the
capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters, or Summer and Winter
quarters with Instructor permission
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
AUT 120
AUT 132
AUT 147**
AUT 149**
AUT 156**
AUT 174**
AUT 175**
AUT 178**
AUT 203**
AUT 209**
AUT 217**
AUT 223**
AUT 236**CAP
AUT 239
AUT 243
AUT 246
AUT 247
AUT 250
Credits
Automotive Basics....................................................................... 2
Automotive Welding.................................................................... 4
Automotive Brakes....................................................................... 6
Automotive Brakes, Suspension, Steering, & Wheel Alignment............. 7
Automotive Brakes, Suspension, Steering, & Wheel Alignment, Lab...... 5
Engine Minor Mechanical Repair................................................... 6
Engine Major Mechanical Repair................................................... 7
Engine Mechanical Lab................................................................ 3
Electrical Systems.......................................................................11
Electonic Systems........................................................................ 7
Automotive Ignition Systems........................................................... 7
Automotive Fuel Systems............................................................... 7
Automotive Emissions Systems........................................................ 7
Clutches & Manual Transmissions................................................... 9
Automotive Axles, Drivelines, Differentials, & Transfer Cases................ 6
Manual Drive Trains & Axles Lab.................................................... 4
Automatic Transmissions................................................................ 7
Automatic Transaxles.................................................................... 7
continues on next page
AUTOMOTIVE
Certificate
30
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
continued from previous page
AUT 251CAP
AUT 255***
ENG& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Automatic Transmission / Transaxle Lab............................................... 4
Air-Conditioning, Heating, & Ventilation.............................................. 6
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher)............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class)............. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 137
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
**These courses must be taken in consecutive order.
***Must take AUT 203 and AUT 209 prior to AUT 255
Optional
AUT 295
On-the-Job Training/Work-Based Learning........................................ 1-12
Optional Electives
Students may also choose to take any course in the following programs as
an optional elective for this program: Auto Collision, Auto Restoration
and Customization, and Auto Upholstery.
Ford Maintenance
& Light Repair Technician
Certificate
AUTOMOTIVE
Designed by Ford Motor Company to prepare the student with the basic
skills needed to gain employment as maintenance and light repair
technician. In addition to Ford training, students receive hands-on
experience working with Ford vehicles and using the latest Ford
diagnostic tools.
Also, the program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions
as Automotive Technicians. Students participate in realistic training
experiences that prepare them for pre-apprenticeship training and ASE
certification.
This program is approximately three quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements. Students transferring to the degree program may need to
withdraw for one or two quarters to finish their program of study.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring quarters
AUT 120
AUT 144
**AUT 147*
**AUT 149*
**AUT 156*
AUT 172
AUT 179
AUT 185
AUT 203
AUT 209
AUT 255
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate of Applied Science - T Degree
This ASE-certified program prepares students for entry-level positions as
automotive technicians. This degree builds upon the Automotive
Technician program by providing an additional quarter of study focused
specifically on hybrid and alternative fuel vehicles. Students participate
in a realistic training experience that prepares them for employment and
ASE certification.
This program is approximately seven quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements. Must have required tools and textbooks.
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required for
the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH& 141,
MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social science,
humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC& 100, PSYC&
200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100, MUS& 105, ASL&
121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM& 121, CHEM& 110,
GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201 or ECON& 202.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters, or Summer and Winter
quarters with Instructor permission. Hybrid courses are taught Summer
Quarter only.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Automotive Basics........................................................................... 2
Ford Basic Electrical System Diagnosis & Testing................................... 6
Automotive Brakes........................................................................... 6
Automotive Brakes, Suspension, Steering, & Wheel Alignment................. 7
Automotive Brakes, Suspension, Steering, Wheel Alignment, Lab............. 5
Ford Base Steering, Suspension, & Align............................................. 7
Automotive General Maintenance & Tires............................................ 7
Ford Brake Systems Diagnosis............................................................ 2
Electrical Systems...........................................................................11
Electronic Systems........................................................................... 7
Air-Conditioning, Heating, & Ventilation.............................................. 7
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher)............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course)........... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 81
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
**These courses must be taken in consecutive order
Hybrid & Alternative Fuel
Vehicle Technician
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
Automotive Technician
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Automotive Technician
Credits
AUT 120
Automotive Basics........................................................................... 2
AUT 132
Automotive Welding........................................................................ 4
AUT 147** Automotive Brakes........................................................................... 6
AUT 149** Automotive Brakes, Suspension, Steering, & Wheel Alignment................. 7
AUT 156** Automotive Brakes, Suspension, Steering, & Wheel Alignment, Lab.......... 5
AUT 174** Engine Minor Mechanical Repair....................................................... 6
AUT 175** Engine Major Mechanical Repair....................................................... 7
AUT 178** Engine Mechanical Lab.................................................................... 3
AUT 203** Electrical Systems...........................................................................11
AUT 209** Electonic Systems............................................................................ 7
AUT 217** Automotive Ignition Systems............................................................... 7
AUT 223** Automotive Fuel Systems................................................................... 7
AUT 236**CAPAutomotive Emissions Systems............................................................ 7
AUT 239
Clutches & Manual Transmissions....................................................... 9
AUT 243
Automotive Axles, Drivelines, Differentials, & Transfer Cases.................... 6
AUT 246
Manual Drive Trains & Axles Lab........................................................ 4
AUT 247
Automatic Transmissions.................................................................... 7
AUT 250
Automatic Transaxles........................................................................ 7
AUT 251CAP Automatic Transmission / Transaxle Lab............................................... 4
AUT 255*** Air-Conditioning, Heating, & Ventilation.............................................. 6
AUTH 105 Hybrid/Alternate Fuel Introduction & Safety......................................... 2
AUTH 110 Alternate Fuel Vehicle Systems........................................................... 2
AUTH 115 Toyota Hybrid System Overview........................................................ 2
AUTH 120 Toyota Pruis Hybrid System............................................................... 2
AUTH 125 Honda Hybrid System Overview........................................................ 2
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
AUTH 130
AUTH 135
AUTH 140
AUTH 145
Honda Civic IMA Hybrid System....................................................... 2
Ford Escape/Mercury Mariner Hybrid System Overview........................ 2
General Motors & Other Hybrid System Overview................................ 2
Advanced Lab & Final Exam.............................................................. 2
Technical Course Requirements (Total).............................................................140
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Technical Course Requirements (Total).............................................................140
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE.............................. 155
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)................................................140
General Education Requirements (See listing above).......................................... 20
Total Credits for Completion of AAS-T Degree..................................................160
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
**These courses must be taken in consecutive order.
***Must take AUT 203 and AUT 209 prior to AUT 255
Optional Electives
Students may also choose to take any course in the following programs as
an optional elective for this program: Auto Collision, Auto Restoration
and Customization, and Auto Upholstery.
31
2011-2012 Catalog
Automotive Technician
Drive Train Technician
Certificate
This ASE-certified program is designed to prepare students for entrylevel positions as automotive technicians.Students participate in realistic
training experiences that prepare them for pre-apprenticeship training
and ASE certification. This program is approximately two quarters in
length, depending on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all
graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
AUT 239
AUT 243
AUT 246
AUT 247
AUT 250
AUT 251CAP
Credits
Clutches & Manual Transmissions....................................................... 9
Automotive Axles, Drivelines, Differentials, & Transfer Cases................... 6
Manual Drive Trains & Axles Lab....................................................... 4
Automatic Transmissions................................................................... 7
Automatic Transaxles....................................................................... 7
Automatic Transmission / Transaxle Lab.............................................. 4
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 37
Automotive Technician
Automotive Technician
Electrical, Electronics
& AC/Heating Technician
Hybrid & Alternative Fuel
Vehicle Maintenance
Certificate
This ASE-certified program prepares students for entry-level positions as
automotive technicians. History and evolution of hybrid, electric and
alternate fuel vehicles will be covered as well as general safety precautions
and procedures and required and recommended tools for servicing. It is
designed to give students the theory and hands-on experience needed to
safely and confidently service this growing vehicle population.
This program is approximately two quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Must have required tools and textbooks.
Prerequisites: Graduation from an ASE/NATEF certified program or
two years’ industry experience with instructor’s permission. Must have
approved safety glasses, coveralls, and high voltage gloves.
Admission Dates: Hybrid courses are taught summer quarter only.
Quarterly admission to the Automotive Technician program.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
AUTH 105 Hybrid/Alternate Fuel Introduction & Safety.......................................... 2
AUTH 110 Alternate Fuel Vehicle Systems............................................................ 2
AUTH 115 Toyota Hybrid System Overview......................................................... 2
AUTH 120 Toyota Pruis Hybrid System................................................................ 2
AUTH 125 Honda Hybrid System Overview......................................................... 2
AUTH 130 Honda Civic IMA Hybrid System........................................................ 2
AUTH 135 Ford Escape/Mercury Mariner Hybrid System Overview......................... 2
AUTH 140 General Motors & Other Hybrid System Overview................................. 2
AUTH 145 Advanced Lab & Final Exam.............................................................. 2
Students will take a minimum of 18 credits of
Automotive Technician courses..............................................................................18
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................36
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
This ASE-certified program is designed to prepare students for entrylevel positions as automotive technicians. Students participate in realistic
training experiences that prepare them for pre-apprenticeship training
and ASE certification.
This program is approximately one quarter in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
AUT 203 Electrical Systems...............................................................................11
AUT 209 Electronic Systems............................................................................... 7
AUT 255 Air-Conditioning, Heating, & Ventilation.................................................. 6
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................24
Automotive Technician
Engine Repair & Engine
Performance Technician
Certificate
This ASE-certified program is designed to prepare students for entrylevel positions as automotive technicians. Students participate in realistic
training experiences that prepare them for pre-apprenticeship training
and ASE certification.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
continues on next page
AUTOMOTIVE
Certificate
32
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
continued from previous page
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
This program is approximately three quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Admission Dates: By Instructor approval.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
AUT 174**
AUT 175**
AUT 178**
AUT 203**
AUT 209**
AUT 217**
AUT 223**
AUT 236**CAP
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Engine Minor Mechanical Repair.................................................... 6
Engine Major Mechanical Repair................................................... 7
Engine Mechanical Lab................................................................ 3
Electrical Systems........................................................................11
Electronic Systems........................................................................ 7
Automotive Ignition Systems........................................................... 7
Automotive Fuel Systems................................................................ 7
Automotive Emissions Systems......................................................... 7
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220................................ 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).......................................... 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course)........ 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 70
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
**These courses must be taken in consecutive order
Automotive Technician
Front End & Brakes
Certificate
AVIATION MAINTENANCE
This ASE-certified program is designed to prepare students for entrylevel positions as automotive technicians. Students participate in realistic
training experiences that prepare them for pre-apprenticeship training
and ASE certification.
This program is approximately one quarter in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
AUT 120
**AUT 147*
**AUT 149*
**AUT 156*
Credits
Automotive Basics........................................................................... 2
Automotive Brakes........................................................................... 6
Automotive Brakes, Suspension, Steering, & Wheel Alignment................. 7
Automotive Brakes, Suspension, Steering, & Wheel Alignment Lab........... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................20
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
**These courses must be taken in consecutive order.
Aerospace Composite Technician
Certificate
[email protected] or [email protected]
The Aerospace Composite Technician certificate is a two-quarter
program designed to prepare students to fabricate, assemble, and repair
composite materials on aircraft.
The knowledge and skills gained through this program are those required
for entry-level positions as composite technicians. The certificate also
provides an opportunity for existing aircraft mechanics and service
technicians to expand their education in the field of composite assembly
and repair.
This certificate is offered from 4:00 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. Monday through
Friday at the South Hill Campus in Puyallup. Courses in this certificate
are not FAA approved.
ACM 120
ACM 125
ACM 130
ACM 145
AMT 104 AMT 119 AMT 137 Credits
Composite Fabrication...................................................................... 4
Composite Assembly........................................................................ 4
Composite Repair............................................................................. 4
Special Projects............................................................................... 3
Basic Mathematics, Basic Physics, & Weight & Balance......................... 5
Materials & Processes....................................................................... 5
Non-metalic Structures....................................................................... 4
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................29
Aviation Maintenance Technician
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
This FAA-approved program is designed to prepare students for entrylevel positions in the aircraft maintenance industry. Graduates will meet
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements for the issuance of
Airframe and Powerplant certificates. Aviation maintenance technicians
are qualified to perform service or make repairs on all types and sizes of
private and commercial aircraft, including airplanes, helicopters, and
their propulsion systems. Related fields include aircraft and component
manufacturing. Students are eligible for FAA certification upon
completion of required technical credits.
Future employment may include major and regional airlines, aircraft
and rotorcraft repair and maintenance facilities, airline and corporate jet
refurbishing repair stations, and aircraft and component manufacturing.
This program is approximately eight quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements. Courses are offered at the South Hill Campus in Puyallup.
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T
(AAS-T) the different requirements for each degree are listed below:
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Note: AMT 142, AMT 239, and the general education courses are
required by the college for completion of the Associate of Applied
Technology degree, but are not subject to approval by the FAA.
Graduates must meet FAA literacy requirements and complete technical
credits for FAA certification.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
33
2011-2012 Catalog
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
AMT 104 Basic Mathematics, Basic Physics, & Weight & Balance............................ 5
AMT 109 Basic Electricity.................................................................................. 4
AMT 116 Aircraft Drawings, Cleaning & Corrosion Control,
Ground Operations & Servicing, & Fluid Lines & Fittings............................. 5
AMT 119 Materials & Processes......................................................................... 5
AMT 125 Advanced Electricity............................................................................ 4
AMT 127 Maintenance Forms & Records, Publications, & Mechanics,
Privileges & Limitations......................................................................... 4
AMT 131 Wood Structures, Coverings, & Aircraft Finishes....................................... 3
AMT 133 Aircraft Fuel Systems, Ice & Rain Control Systems,
& Fire Protection Systems........................................................................4
AMT 135
Sheet Metal Structures...................................................................... 4
AMT 136
Welding, Position & Warning Systems................................................ 3
AMT 137
Non-metallic Structures..................................................................... 4
AMT 138
Aircraft Inspections.......................................................................... 4
AMT 139
Assembly & Rigging......................................................................... 4
AMT 140
Aircraft Landing Gear...................................................................... 3
AMT 141
Hydraulic & Pneumatic Power Systems................................................. 3
AMT 142
Hangar Operations & Maintenance................................................... 3
AMT 143
Airframe Electrical Systems................................................................ 5
AMT 144
Engine Electrical Systems.................................................................. 5
AMT 145
Cabin Atmosphere Control Systems.................................................... 3
AMT 146
Aircraft Instrument, Communication, & Navigation Systems..................... 3
AMT 208
Helicopter Operations & Maintenance Practices................................... 4
AMT 210
Basic Rotor Systems Maintenance & Repair.......................................... 4
AMT 212
Advanced Rotor Systems Maintenance & Repair................................... 4
AMT 215
Helicopter Systems.......................................................................... 4
AMT 217
FAA Testing & Turbine Engines........................................................... 7
AMT 219
Engine Lubrication Systems................................................................ 4
AMT 221
Engine Instrument Systems................................................................. 4
AMT 224
Powerplant Reciprocating Engine Theory............................................. 6
AMT 225
Powerplant Maintenance & Operation................................................ 6
AMT 226
Engine Fuel System & Fire Protection................................................... 1
AMT 228
Engine Fuel Metering Systems............................................................ 5
AMT 229CAP Propellers & FAA Final Testing............................................................ 4
AMT 231
Engine Inspection............................................................................ 4
AMT 233
Engine Ignition & Starting Systems...................................................... 4
AMT 235
Induction, Airflow, Cooling, & Exhaust Systems..................................... 3
AMT 239
Advanced Hangar Operations & Maintenance.................................... 3
This program is approximately five quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Note: Graduates must meet FAA literacy requirements and complete
technical credits for FAA certification.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
AMT 104
AMT 109
AMT 116
AMT 119
AMT 125
AMT 127
AMT 131
AMT 133
AMT 135
AMT 136
AMT 137
AMT 138
AMT 139
AMT 140
AMT 141
AMT 142
AMT 143
AMT 145
AMT 146
AMT 208
AMT 210
AMT 212
AMT 215
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Basic Mathematics, Basic Physics, & Weight & Balance......................... 5
Basic Electricity................................................................................ 4
Aircraft Drawings, Cleaning & Corrosion Control,
Ground Operations & Servicing, & Fluid Lines & Fittings.......................... 5
Materials & Processes....................................................................... 5
Advanced Electricity......................................................................... 4
Maintenance Forms & Records, Publications & Mechanics,
Privileges & Limitations....................................................................... 4
Wood Structures, Coverings, & Aircraft Finishes..................................... 3
Aircraft Fuel Systems, Ice & Rain Control Systems, & Fire Protection Systems.4
Sheet Metal Structures....................................................................... 4
Welding & Position & Warning Systems............................................... 3
Non-metallic Structures...................................................................... 4
Aircraft Inspections........................................................................... 4
Assembly & Rigging.......................................................................... 4
Aircraft Landing Gear....................................................................... 3
Hydraulic & Pneumatic Power Systems................................................. 3
Hangar Operations & Maintenance.................................................... 3
Airframe Electrical Systems................................................................. 5
Cabin Atmosphere Control Systems..................................................... 3
Aircraft Instrument, Communication, & Navigation Systems...................... 3
Helicopter Operations & Maintenance Practices.................................... 4
Basic Rotor Systems Maintenance & Repair........................................... 4
Advanced Rotor Systems Maintenance & Repair.................................... 4
Helicopter Systems........................................................................... 4
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course)............ 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 104
Technical Course Requirements (Total).............................................................145
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
Aviation Maintenance Technician
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE.............................. 160
Powerplant Technician
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Certificate
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)................................................145
General Education Requirements (See listing above)........................................ 20
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE........................... 165
Aviation Maintenance Technician
Airframe Maintenance Technician
Certificate
This FAA-approved program is designed to prepare students for entrylevel positions in the aircraft maintenance industry. Graduates will meet
Federal Aviation Administration requirements for the issuance of an
Airframe certificate. Aviation maintenance technicians are qualified to
perform service or make repairs on all types and sizes of private and
commercial aircraft, including airplanes and helicopters. Related fields
include aircraft and component manufacturing. Students are eligible for
FAA certification upon completion of required technical credits.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
This FAA-approved program is designed to prepare students for entrylevel positions in the Aviation Engine maintenance industry. Graduates
will meet Federal Aviation Administration requirements for the issuance
of a Powerplant certificate. Aviation maintenance technicians are
qualified to perform service or make repairs on all types and sizes of
private and commercial aircraft propulsion systems. Related fields
include aircraft and component manufacturing. Students are eligible for
FAA certification upon completion of required technical credits.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This program is approximately five quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Note: Graduates must meet FAA literacy requirements and complete
technical credits for FAA certification.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
continues on next page
AVIATION
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
34
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
continued from previous page
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
AMT 104
AMT 109
AMT 116
AMT 119
AMT 125
AMT 127
AMT 142
AMT 144
AMT 217
AMT 219
AMT 221
AMT 224
AMT 225
AMT 226
AMT 228
AMT 229CAP
AMT 231
AMT 233
AMT 235
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Basic Mathematics, Basic Physics, & Weight & Balance....................... 5
Basic Electricity............................................................................. 4
Aircraft Drawings, Cleaning & Corrosion Control,
Ground Operations & Servicing, & Fluid Lines & Fittings........................ 5
Materials & Processes..................................................................... 5
Advanced Electricity....................................................................... 4
Maintenance Forms & Records, Publications,
& Mechanics Privileges & Limitations................................................. 4
Hangar Operations & Maintenance.................................................. 3
Engine Electrical Systems................................................................. 5
FAA Testing & Turbine Engines.......................................................... 7
Engine Lubrication Systems.............................................................. 4
Engine Instrument Systems................................................................ 4
Powerplant Reciprocating Engine Theory............................................ 6
Powerplant Maintenance & Operation............................................... 6
Engine Fuel System & Fire Protection.................................................. 1
Engine Fuel Metering Systems.......................................................... 5
Propellers & FAA Final Testing.......................................................... 4
Engine Inspection........................................................................... 4
Engine Ignition & Starting Systems..................................................... 4
Induction, Airflow, Cooling, & Exhaust Systems.................................... 3
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................. 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher)............................................ 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course).......... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................98
Note: Transfer students will have their transcripts evaluated by the Aviation Maintenance
staff in accordance with FAR Part 147 to determine their qualification and placement in
any of the Aviation Maintenance Technician programs.
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
Central Service/Sterile Processing
Certificate
Graduates of this program are educated and trained in CS/SP
technology, under the guidelines of the International Association of
Healthcare Central Service Materiel Management and the local
Healthcare Advisory Committee.
The structured curriculum of basic sciences, infection control, and
sterilization, plus human relations and necessary job skills, combines
with clinical internships in area healthcare facilities.
There is a major emphasis on care and preparation of surgical
instruments. Classroom instruction and clinical internship prepare the
student to assume the role of a CS/SP technician in a variety of healthcare
delivery settings.
This program is a combination of classroom, laboratory and clinical
experience, approximately two quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly based insurance for
students may be purchased; further information is available through the
counseling office.
No student will be allowed at clinical site without proof of insurance.
Upon graduation, students are eligible to sit for the International
Association of Central Service/Materiel Management Certification
Exam, which is honored throughout the world.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82. BASIC COMPUTER SKILLS
RECOMMENDED. This occupation requires the ability to lift 50
pounds and be able to work on your feet for up to 8 hours. Students must
be able to meet these physical requirements in order to be assigned to a
clinical rotation and meet employment demands.
In order to participate in the clinical aspect of the program, students
must receive a No Record On File report from the Washington State
Patrol (there are some exceptions; contact instructor for details), and
students must have current immunizations or laboratory verification of
immune status. This could include, but may not be limited to, Hepatitis
B series, Tetanus/Diphtheria, 2-Step Tuberculosis test, Measles/
Mumps/Rubella, Varicella, and seasonal flu shot as required by contracts
with clinical facilities.
Must be a high school graduate or have a GED. Must complete CPR for
Healthcare Professionals (Adult, Child, Infant and AED).
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters. (Summer clinical
internship will extend 10 days beyond the end of the quarter to obtain
required hours for certification.)
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
MMN 103
MMN 108
MMN 113
MMN 124
MMN 126
MMN 129
MMN 131
MMN 213
MMN 215
MMN 216
Credits
Introduction to the Program and Health Care......................................... 3
Anatomy & Physiology/Medical Terminology........................................ 3
Microbiology/Infection Control.......................................................... 3
Surgical Instrumentation..................................................................... 4
Principles & Methods of Cleaning and Disinfecting................................. 6
Principles & Practices of Sterilization.................................................... 6
Materiel Management, Central Service Applications.............................. 4
Clinical Internship I........................................................................... 6
Clinical Internship II........................................................................... 6
Job Skills......................................................................................... 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................44
Computer Information Technology
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
(253) 589-5580 or (253) 589-5712
This program is designed to prepare students for Computer Information
Technology positions with concentrations in web programming, database
programming, or application programming. The coursework prepares
individuals for positions such as web administrators, web programmers,
application programmers, programmers/analysts, computer consultants,
and application system & database designers and implementers, as well
as other related information technology positions. Employers may
include business and industrial firms, banks and other financial
institutions, government agencies, consulting firms, software developers,
and internet service providers.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and enhance personal
development. Students must take all the academic and programming
core courses and complete an area of specialization. They also have the
option of selecting a couple of elective classes to make up the required
number of credit hours, furthering their specialization, or perhaps
completing an internship to develop professional work experience.
Classes will be offered with sufficient frequency that with reasonable
schedule planning, this program may be completed in six quarters of fulltime effort. It may take longer, depending on the student’s prior
educational preparation, and the time it takes to satisfactorily complete
all graduation requirements.
Program prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68, Writing 33, Algebra
32 basic competencies with personal computers and Windows-based
word processing and spreadsheet software. Touch typing proficiency of
35 words per minute is recommended.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer quarters.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Credits
Academic Core Courses
Computer Information Technology
ENGL& 101 English Composition (or higher)........................................................... 5
MAT 141 PreCalculus - I (or higher).................................................................. 5
PSYC& 100 or other social science or humanities class .......................................... 5
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
(253) 589-5580 or (253) 589-5712
ACADEMIC CORE CREDITS TOTAL............................................................ 15
This program is designed to prepare students planning to continue their
education at a college or university offering a Bachelor degree in
Computer Science, Information Systems Management, or Computing &
Software Systems. Institutions currently accepting this degree are:
University of Washington-Tacoma, The Evergreen State University,
Embry-Riddle University, and University of Phoenix.
Programming Core Courses
CIT 101
CIT 105*
CIT 142 CIT 150 CIT 161
CIT 151
Programming Fundamentals ................................................................ 5
Fundamentals of Information Technology................................................ 5
Java Object-Oriented Programming I..................................................... 5
Principles of Relational Databases......................................................... 5
HTML & CSS..................................................................................... 5
MySql.............................................................................................. 5
Programming Core Credits Total................................................................30
Choose one of the following two specialization sections and 25 credits
from other specializations or interest electives:
Web Programming
CIT 163
CIT 164
CIT 167
CIT 265
CIT 250 CIT 298
Client-side Web Programming............................................................... 5
Server-side Web Programming............................................................. 5
XML & Web Services ......................................................................... 5
ASP.Net...........................................................................
5
User Interface Design......................................................................... 5
Special Projects . .............................................................................. 5
Specialization Credits Total.......................................................................30
.Net Programming
CIT 153 CIT 248
CIT 224 CIT 234 CIT 265 CIT 298 Sql Server........................................................................................ 5
Visual Basic.Net................................................................................. 5
C++.Net.......................................................................................... 5
C#.Net............................................................................................ 5
ASP.Net .......................................................................................... 5
Special Projects . .............................................................................. 5
Specialization Credits Total.......................................................................30
Interest Electives
CIT 180 CIT 185 CIT 143 CIT 205 CIT 245 CIT 252
CIT 297 CIT 298 CIT 299 Introduction to Game Programming ...................................................... 5
Introduction to Robotics . .................................................................... 5
Java Object-Oriented Programming II ................................................... 5
Object-Oriented Analysis & Design . .................................................... 5
Data and Logic Structures.................................................................... 5
Phone Programming............................................................................ 5
Special Topics ................................................................................. 5
Special Projects . .............................................................................. 5
Internship......................................................................................... 5
Elective Courses (see below) ......................................................................5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 100
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
** Students may also choose to take one course outside the Computer Information
Technology program by instructor permission and space availability.
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T
(AAS-T) the different requirements for each degree are listed below.
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202.
Students pursuing an AAST degree for transfer to the University of
Washington Tacoma are required to take additional core academic
classes that may or may not be offered at Clover Park Technical College.
Please see your instructor for the latest articulation requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68, Writing 33, Algebra 32. Basic
competencies with personal computers and Windows- based word
processing and spreadsheet software. Touch typing proficiency of 35
words per minute is recommended.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer quarters.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Academic Core Credits
ASL& 121
American Sign Language.................................................................. 5
ENGL& 101 English Composition ...................................................................... 5
ENGL& 235 Technical Writing .......................................................................... 5
MATH& 141 Pre-Calculus I.................................................................................. 5
MATH& 142 Pre-Calculus II ............................................................................... 5
MATH& 146 Introduction to Statistics................................................................... 5
MUSC& 105 Introduction to Music
or ART& 100 Introduction to Art....................................................... 5
PHY 121 or Any Lab based Science................................................................ 5
PSYC& 100 General Psychology........................................................................ 5
Academic Core Credits.............................................................................45
continues on next page
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
35
2011-2012 Catalog
36
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
continued from previous page
Programming Core Courses
Programming Transfer Courses
CIT 142
CIT 143
Java Object-Oriented Programming I...................................................... 5
Java Object-Oriented Programming II..................................................... 5
Programming Transfer Credits................................................................... 10
Programming Vocational/Technical Courses
CIT 101 CIT 105*
CIT 153 CIT 161 CIT 167 CIT 205
CIT 245 CIT 224 CIT 248 Programming Fundamentals ................................................................. 5
Fundamentals of Information Technology................................................. 5
Sql Server......................................................................................... 5
HTML & CSS ................................................................................... 5
XML & Web Services......................................................................... 5
Object-Oriented Analysis & Design........................................................ 5
Data and Logic Structures..................................................................... 5
C++.Net.......................................................................................... 5
Visual Basic.Net ............................................................................... 5
Programming Vocational/Technical Credits................................................45
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 100
Programming Core Credits........................................................................60
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 75
Computer Information Technology
.Net Developer
(253) 589-5580 or (253) 589-5712
Computer Programmer
Certificate
(253) 589-5580 or (253) 589-5712
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
Programming Fundamentals ................................................................ 5
Fundamentals of Information Technology................................................ 5
C#.Net............................................................................................. 5
MySQL............................................................................................ 5
Java Object-Oriented Programming I .................................................... 5
Java Object-Oriented Programming I..................................................... 5
Principles of Relational Databases.......................................................... 5
SQL Server........................................................................................ 5
HTML & CSS.................................................................................... 5
Object-Oriented Analysis & Design . ..................................................... 5
Data and Logic Structures.................................................................... 5
Visual Basic.Net................................................................................. 5
Certificate
Computer Information Technology
This certificate program prepares students for positions as junior
computer programmers, computer consultants, PC applications support
specialists as well as other related entry-level information technology
positions. Employers may include business and industrial firms, banks
and other financial institutions, government agencies, consulting firms,
software developers, and internet service providers.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and enhance personal
development. Students must take all the academic core courses and the
programming core courses to receive a certificate.
Classes will be offered with sufficient frequency, that with reasonable
schedule planning, this program may be completed in five quarters of
full-time effort. It may take longer, depending on the student’s prior
educational preparation, and the time it takes to satisfactorily complete
all graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68, Writing 33, Intermediate
Algebra 32. Basic competencies with personal computers and Windowsbased word processing and spreadsheet software. Touch typing
proficiency of 35 words per minute is recommended.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer quarters..
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
CIT 101
CIT 105*
CIT 234
CIT 151
CIT 142 CIT 143 CIT 150 CIT 153 CIT 161 CIT 205 CIT 245 CIT 248
Credits
Academic Core Courses
ENG& 101 English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220 ................................. 5
MAT 141 or higher........................................................................................ 5
PSYC& 100 or other social science or humanities class .......................................... 5
Academic Core Credits............................................................................. 15
This certificate program prepares students with professional
programming experience or prior training in computer programming
for positions as .Net Developers. It is directed towards enabling them to
refresh and extend their job skills to advance their career or to qualify for
new employment opportunities. Employers may include business and
industrial firms, banks and other financial institutions, government
agencies, consulting firms, software developers, and internet service
providers.
Classes will be offered with sufficient frequency, that with reasonable
schedule planning, this program may be completed in three quarters of
full-time effort. It may take longer, depending on the student’s prior
educational and professional experience, and the time it takes to
satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
CIT 150 CIT 153 CIT 161 CIT 248
CIT 224 CIT 234 CIT 265 CIT 298 Credits
Principles of Relational Databases ....................................................... 5
SQL Server . .................................................................................... 5
HTML & CSS ................................................................................... 5
Visual Basic.Net .............................................................................. . 5
C++.Net . ....................................................................................... 5
C#.Net . ......................................................................................... 5
ASP.Net ........................................................................................... 5
Special Projects . .............................................................................. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................40
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
37
Employers include business and industrial firms, financial institutions,
government agencies, consulting firms, software developers, health
providers, and Internet service providers. Innovations in computer
technology continue to rapidly change and expand the computer security
field. Therefore, the following courses of study may be subject to change
in order to offer students training based on current industry standards.
Web Developer
Certificate
(253) 589-5580
This certificate program prepares students with professional programming
experience or prior training in computer programming for positions as
web developers. It is directed towards enabling them to refresh and extend
their job skills to advance their career or to qualify for new employment
opportunities. Employers may include business and industrial firms,
banks and other financial institutions, government agencies, consulting
firms, software developers, and internet service providers.
Classes will be offered with sufficient frequency, that with reasonable
schedule planning, this program may be completed in two quarters of
full-time effort. It may take longer, depending on the student’s prior
education and professional experience, and the time it takes to
satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer quarters.
Credits
CIT 151 MySQL ........................................................................................... 5
CIT 161 HTML & CSS ................................................................................... 5
CIT 163 Client-side Web Programming.............................................................. 5
CIT 164 Server-side Web Programming ............................................................. 5
CIT 167 XML & Web Services ........................................................................ 5
CIT 264 JSP & Servlets.................................................................................... 5
CIT 298CAP Special Projects . .............................................................................. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................35
Computer Networking
& Information Systems Security
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
Prepares students for careers involving the protection of information on
computers and networks against unauthorized access or modification of
information, and against the denial of service to authorized users.
Includes those security measures, both physical and virtual, necessary to
detect, document, and counter such threats. Curriculum content includes
basic and advanced computer and networking skills, physical and virtual
security processes and procedures, and introduction to security
management, planning, and recovery.
The CNISS program is certified for cyber-security skills education
through the National Security Agencies (NSA), Committee on National
Systems Security. The program has been awarded CNSS 4011 National
Training Standards for Information Systems Security Professionals and
is currently working on the CNSS 4013 National Training Standard for
System Administrators in Information Systems Security.
This program is approximately six quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Program hours are from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science-T
(AAS-T). The different requirements for each degree are listed below:
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82. Prior to completion of first quarter, student must
provide documentation of a background check with the Washington
State Patrol.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
The AAT or AAS-T degree is earned by completing technical core
requirements, general education requirements, and choosing one
specialty option (Option 1: Cisco Network Design & Security; or Option
2: Computer & Communications Security; or Option 3: Microsoft
Network Administration & Security).
The program includes preparing students for the CompTIA A+,
Network+, Server+, Security+ and Linux+; Cisco CCENT and CCNA;
and Microsoft MCTS & MCITP certification examinations and
internship work experience.
continues on next page
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
Computer Information Technology
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
2011-2012 Catalog
38
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
continued from previous page
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
NSS 101*
NSS 105*CL
NSS 110*
NSS 115
NSS 120
NSS 125
NSS 130
NSS 135
NSS 140
NSS 150
NSS 155
NSS 160
NSS 165
NSS 170
NSS 201
NSS 211
Credits
IT Essential I.................................................................................... 5
IT Essential II.................................................................................... 4
Networking Fundamentals I................................................................ 4
Law & Ethics in the Workplace........................................................... 4
MS Desktop Support I....................................................................... 5
MS Desktop Support II...................................................................... 4
Server Fundamentals......................................................................... 4
Implementing System Security............................................................. 4
Introduction to Data Analysis.............................................................. 5
Internet Basics.................................................................................. 4
Computer Security Concepts.............................................................. 4
Introduction to Linux.......................................................................... 5
Contingency Planning....................................................................... 4
Telecom Security.............................................................................. 5
Advanced Linux............................................................................... 4
Server Administration........................................................................ 5
Total Technical Course Requirements.......................................................... 70
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
Program Option 1, 2, or 3 (See listing below)...............................................28-33
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE.........................113-118
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)..................................................70
General Education Requirements (See listing above).......................................... 20
Program Option (See listing below)..............................................................28-33
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE..................... 118-123
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
For an AAT or AAS-T degree, students must complete one of the
specialty options listed below. These options may also be taken as a
stand-alone certificate for those not pursing a degree.
Option 1: Cisco Network Design & Security
NSS 180CAP
NSS 250CAP
NSSC 200*
NSSC 201*
NSSC 203*
NSSC 205*
Internship I.................................................................................... 2
Internship II.................................................................................... 2
Cisco Networking I........................................................................ 5
Cisco Networking II........................................................................ 5
Cisco Networking III....................................................................... 5
Cisco Networking IV...................................................................... 5
Subtotal...................................................................................................24
Computer Networking
& Information Systems Security
Cisco Network Design & Security
Certificate
Designed to provide foundational networking knowledge, practical
experience, opportunities for career exploration, and soft skills development
to help students prepare for entry-level careers in IT and networking. Learn
the technical skills needed to succeed in networking professions such as
network installer, help desk technician, pre-sales support technician, or
network technician. In addition, the certificate prepares students for two
different Cisco industry recognized certification exams, CCENT and
CCNA. The Cisco CCENT certifies that students have developed the
practical skills required for entry-level networking support positions and is
the first step toward earning the Cisco CCNA certification, which is the
foundational IT certification for networking careers.
This certificate program is approximately two quarters in length,
depending on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all
requirements. The Cisco Networking Academy curriculum (Cisco I, II,
III, and IV) is used and two additional lab courses prepare student for the
CCENT and CCNA industry certification exams. All the courses in this
certificate count toward the Computer Networking & Information
Systems Security (CNISS) AAT or AAS-T degree program.
Prerequisites: Students who enroll in the Cisco Network Design &
Security certificate program are not expected to have any previous
technical skills or knowledge, aside from basic PC skills.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
NSSC 200*Cisco Networking I.......................................................................... 5
NSSC 201* Cisco Networking II......................................................................... 5
NSSC 203* Cisco Networking III......................................................................... 5
NSSC 205* Cisco Networking IV........................................................................ 5
NSSC 207 Cisco Learning Lab I......................................................................... 3
NSSC 210 Cisco Learning Lab I I........................................................................ 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 26
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
Option 2: Computer & Communications Security
NSS 180CAP
NSS 250CAP
NSSB 201
NSSB 215
NSSB 225
NSSB 231
NSSB 238
NSSB 245
Internship I.................................................................................... 2
Internship II................................................................................... 2
Overview of Hacking, Phreaking, & Cracking..................................... 5
Computer Forensics........................................................................ 4
Communications Best Practices......................................................... 5
Web Security................................................................................ 5
Viruses, Worms, & Hazardous Software............................................ 5
Scripting...................................................................................... 5
Subtotal...................................................................................................33
Option 3: Microsoft Network Administration & Security
NSS 180CAP
NSS 250CAP
NSSD 251 NSSD 254 NSSD 257 NSSD 260 Internship I.................................................................................... 2
Internship II.................................................................................... 2
Securing Network Infrastructure......................................................... 6
Active Directory Configuration.......................................................... 6
Implementing Application Services.................................................... 6
Mail Server Administration............................................................... 6
Subtotal...................................................................................................28
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
Computer Networking
& Information Systems Security
Computer & Communications Security
Certificate
Introduces Computer and Communications Security in an every
changing environment where viruses, worms, and hazardous software
that compromise data integrity and create multiple issues with today’s
computer and network systems. Analysis and understanding of security
risks involved in operating a web site and developing appropriate levels of
security will be covered. Additionally, students will be introduced to
common techniques used to commit communications fraud, and be
introduced to the history of hacking and its various forms.
This program is approximately two quarters long, depending on the time
students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Program hours are from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., Monday through Friday.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
NSSB 201
NSSB 215
NSSB 225
NSSB 231
NSSB 238
NSSB 245
Credits
Overview of Hacking, Phreaking, & Cracking....................................... 5
Computer Forensics.......................................................................... 4
Communications Best Practices........................................................... 5
Web Security.................................................................................. 5
Virus, Worms, & Hazardous Software.................................................. 5
Scripting......................................................................................... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................29
Computer Networking
& Information Systems Security
Computer Networking & Information
System Security Professional
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
NSS 101*
NSS 105*CL
NSS 110*
NSS 115
NSS 120
NSS 125
NSS 130
NSS 135
NSS 140
NSS 150
NSS 155
NSS 160
NSS 165
NSS 170
NSS 201
NSS 211
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
IT Essential I................................................................................... 5
IT Essential II................................................................................... 4
Networking Fundamentals I............................................................... 4
Law & Ethics in the Workplace.......................................................... 4
MS Desktop Support I...................................................................... 5
MS Desktop Support II..................................................................... 4
Server Fundamentals........................................................................ 4
Implementing System Security............................................................ 4
Introduction to Data Analysis............................................................. 5
Internet Basics................................................................................. 4
Computer Security Concepts............................................................. 4
Introduction to Linux......................................................................... 5
Contingency Planning...................................................................... 4
Telecom Security............................................................................. 5
Advanced Linux.............................................................................. 4
Server Administration....................................................................... 5
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professionals (or higher)........................................... 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course)........... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................85
Computer Networking
& Information Systems Security
Microsoft Network Admin & Security
Certificate
Certificate
This certificate is designed to prepare students for entry-level careers
involving the protection of computers, networks, and information systems
against unauthorized access or modification of information, and against
the denial of service to authorized users. Includes those security measures,
both physical and virtual, necessary to detect, document, and counter
such threats. Curriculum content includes basic computer and networking
skills, physical and virtual security processes and procedures, and
introduction to security management, planning, and recovery.
Develop the knowledge and skills necessary to deploy and support
Windows desktop and server operating systems in a variety of standalone and network operating system environments. Discuss, analyze, and
develop the skills to support a secure Windows networking environment.
This certificate program is approximately two quarters in length,
depending on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all
certificate requirements. Program hours are from 8 to 11 a.m. or 12 p.m.
to 3 p.m. All the courses in this certificate count toward the Computer
Networking & Information Systems Security (CNISS) AAT or AAS-T
degree program.
The program includes preparing students for the A+, Network+, Server+,
Security+, and Linux+ certification examinations and cooperative work
experience. Employers include business and industrial firms, financial
institutions, government agencies, consulting firms, software developers,
health providers, and Internet service providers.
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82. Prior to completion of first quarter, student must
provide documentation of a background check with Washington State
Patrol.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer quarters
Prerequisites: Students are required to have completed A+ and Net+
certification course, have obtained A+ and Net+ certification, or
Instructor permission. Prior to completion of first quarter, student must
provide documentation of a background check with the Washington
State Patrol.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
NSSD 251
NSSD 254
NSSD 257
NSSD 260 Credits
Securing Network Infrastructure.......................................................... 6
Active Directory Configuration............................................................ 6
Implementing Application Services...................................................... 6
Mail Server Administration................................................................. 6
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................24
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
Prerequisites: Students are required to have completed NSS 101, 105,
110 or its equivalent, or have obtained A+ and Net+ certifications. A
meeting with the program instructor prior to enrollment is necessary for
assessment purposes. Prior to completion, students must provide
documentation of a background check with the Washington State Patrol.
All the courses in this certificate count towards the Computer Networking
& Information Systems Security (CNISS) AAT or AAS-T degree program.
39
2011-2012 Catalog
40
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Cosmetology
Culinary Arts
Certificate
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
Trains students in all elements of professional cosmetology. Successful
graduates are prepared for the Washington State Department of
Licensing Cosmetology examination, and upon licensing will be qualified
for positions as cosmetologists. Students will participate in realistic
training in the student-operated salon.
As an authorized member school of Pivot Point International, Clover
Park Technical College utilizes an interactive DVD module system of
training to support student learning. Pivot Point*, considered a world
leader in beauty education, provides innovative, high-quality educational
systems that promote excellence in the hair and beauty industry. A new
addition to our training… an “Exclusive Online” Learning Experience
only available to Pivot Point Member Schools.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication
(English composition, speech), quantitative reasoning (math) and social
sciences (psychology, sociology) that provide knowledge and abilities
upon which technical skills are built and personal development enhanced.
This program is approximately five and one–half quarters in length,
depending on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all
graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
Evening class: Fall and Winter quarters
A mandatory orientation is required before admission to the program.
COSMETOLOGY
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
COSMO 111
COSMO 113
COSMO 119
COSMO 126
COSMO 134
COSMO 143
COSMO 156
COSMO 161
COSMO 166
COSMO 170
COSMO 178
COSMO 179
COSMO 186
COSMO 224
COSMO 228
COSMO 230
COSMO 235
COSMO 242
COSMO 247
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Salon Ecology.............................................................................. 3
Trichology................................................................................... 6
Design Decisions.......................................................................... 3
Hair Design................................................................................. 9
Hair Sculpting.............................................................................13
Chemical Texturizing..................................................................... 5
Hair Coloring............................................................................... 6
Lab Clinic I.................................................................................. 6
Lab Clinic II.................................................................................. 7
Lab Clinic III................................................................................. 9
Artificial Hair................................................................................ 2
Study of Nails.............................................................................. 3
Study of Skin................................................................................ 3
Advanced Hair Coloring.............................................................. 10
State Board Practical Preparation..................................................... 3
Lab Clinic IV................................................................................ 9
State Board Written Test Review...................................................... 4
Clover Park Practical Boards........................................................... 6
Design Forum............................................................................... 1
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220................................. 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher)........................................... 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class)........... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 123
To qualify for a Cosmetologist license from the Washington State
Department of Licensing, a student must successfully complete the
technical courses offered in the program, complete 1600 hours of
technical instruction, and pass both the written and practical exams for
the Department of Licensing.
Students who have not met the 1600 hour technical instruction
requirement will take one of the following internship courses:
COSMO 248
COSMO 250
COSMO 252
COSMO 254
COSMO 256
Industry Internship I........................................................................ 1
Industry Internship II....................................................................... 2
Industry Internship III...................................................................... 3
Industry Internship IV...................................................................... 4
Industry Internship V....................................................................... 5
*Pivot Point is a registered service mark and trademark owned by
Pivot Point International, Inc.
Graduates are prepared to enter the fast-paced and exciting culinary
field as entry-level cooks, lead cooks, or kitchen station supervisors.
Emphasizes fine dining food production skills combined with professional
service training and food management techniques. Food production
course emphasize quality food preparation.
Potential employers include fine dining establishments, hotels, resorts,
catering kitchens, clubs, and executive dining services. In combination
with additional study and experience, this degree can place graduates on
a career ladder that could lead to positions such as restaurant manager,
catering/banquet manager, sous-chef, and executive chef.
Students train in aspects of culinary arts food service operations and
management. The program emphasizes preparation of food for healthy
lifestyles and is designed to exceed the standards set by the American
Culinary Federation and the National Restaurant Association’s
Professional Management Development Program. The program
combines classroom study and work site learning in college restaurant
operations.
This program is approximately five quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain.
The two degree options in this program are the Associate of Applied
Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T (AAS-T) the
different requirements for each degree are listed below.
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
CUL 104
CUL 107
CUL 109
CUL 111
CUL 113
CUL 117
CUL 119
CUL 123
CUL 127
CUL 132
CUL 135
CUL 139
CUL 241
REST 107
REST 109
REST 112
REST 115
REST 103
REST 119
REST 122
REST 126
REST 131
REST 133
Credits
Sanitation in Food Service Operations.................................................... 3
Professional Cooking I......................................................................... 7
Cooking Methods I............................................................................. 7
Food Preparation I.............................................................................. 3
Introduction to Baking.......................................................................... 3
Professional Cooking II........................................................................ 7
Food Preparation II............................................................................. 3
Cooking Methods II............................................................................ 7
Professional Cooking III........................................................................ 7
American Regional Cuisine................................................................... 3
Food Preparation III............................................................................. 3
Cooking Methods III........................................................................... 7
Advanced Restaurant Baking................................................................ 3
Kitchen and Dining Management.......................................................... 3
Marketing/Public Relations................................................................... 3
Restaurant Dining................................................................................ 7
Catering Production............................................................................ 3
Food & Beverage Cost Control............................................................. 4
Operations Management..................................................................... 4
Food Service Nutrition......................................................................... 4
Finance and Accounting...................................................................... 4
Business Plan Development................................................................... 4
Beverage Service Management............................................................ 4
Culinary Arts
Restaurant Management
Certificate
Prepares student for management careers within the food and beverage
industry. Coursework is based on the professional management
development program endorsed by the National Restaurant Association.
This program is approximately two quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer quarters, based on
seat availability
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE...............................118
REST 103
REST 107
REST 109
REST 112
REST 115
REST 119
REST 122
REST 126
REST 131
REST 133
REST 137
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................44
Technical Course Requirements (Total).............................................................103
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)................................................103
General Education Requirements (See listing above).......................................... 20
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE........................... 123
Culinary Arts
Certificate
Designed to train students in basic cooking skills, this certificate program
includes portions of the Culinary Arts degree program.
This program is approximately three quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements. Included in this program are academic courses in
communication, quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide
knowledge and abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal
development enhanced.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
CUL 104
CUL 107
CUL 109
CUL 111
CUL 113
CUL 117
CUL 119
CUL 123
CUL 127
CUL 132
CUL 135
CUL 139
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Culinary Arts
Pastry Arts
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
Basic Cooking Skills
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Food and Beverage Cost Control.......................................................... 4
Kitchen and Dining Management.......................................................... 3
Marketing/Public Relations................................................................... 3
Restaurant Dining................................................................................ 7
Catering Production............................................................................ 3
Operations Management..................................................................... 4
Food Service Nutrition......................................................................... 4
Finance and Accounting...................................................................... 4
Business Plan Development................................................................... 4
Beverage Service Management............................................................ 4
Hospitality Law.................................................................................. 4
Credits
Sanitation in Food Service Operations................................................. 3
Professional Cooking I....................................................................... 7
Cooking Methods I.......................................................................... 7
Food Preparation I............................................................................ 3
Introduction to Baking....................................................................... 3
Professional Cooking II...................................................................... 7
Food Preparation II........................................................................... 3
Cooking Methods II.......................................................................... 7
Professional Cooking III..................................................................... 7
American Regional Cuisine................................................................ 3
Food Preparation III.......................................................................... 3
Cooking Methods III......................................................................... 7
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course)............ 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 75
The Pastry Arts program at Clover Park Technical College offers a fivequarter Associate of Applied Science degree, as well as a three-quarter
certificate program for students seeking entry into or career advancement
in the pastry arts job market, specifically as a Pastry Arts Chef.
Prepares students for careers in areas such as baker, pastry chef, and
other pastry art positions. Students already working in the culinary arts
field can select a study path that will expand their skills and further their
employment potential. The Pastry Arts degree is designed to provide
hands-on training that will prepare students for careers in pastry arts.
The two degree options in this program are the Associate of Applied
Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T (AAS-T), and
the different requirements for each degree are listed below.
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required for
the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH& 141,
MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social science,
humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC& 100,
PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100, MUS& 105,
ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM& 121, CHEM&
110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201 or ECON& 202.
continues on next page
CULINARY ARTS
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
41
2011-2012 Catalog
42
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
continued from previous page
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
CUL 104
BAKE 105
BAKE 108
BAKE 111
BAKE 112
BAKE 114
BAKE 117
BAKE 120
BAKE 125
BAKE 130
BAKE 134
BAKE 140
BAKE 153
BAKE 156
BAKE 160
BAKE 210
REST 103
REST 107
REST 109
REST 115
REST 119
REST 122
REST 126
REST 131
REST 133
REST 137
Credits
Sanitation in Food Service Operations................................................. 3
Chocolate I (Confections).................................................................. 5
Chocolate II.................................................................................... 4
Decorating...................................................................................... 3
Cakes I (Fillings and Icings)................................................................ 7
Dessert Alternatives (Sugar Free, Gluten Free, Vegan)............................. 3
Frozen Desserts................................................................................ 3
Yeast Breads................................................................................... 7
Baking Techniques and Ingredients...................................................... 3
Pies, Tarts, Custards, and Fillings......................................................... 5
Quick Breads, Cookies, Brownies....................................................... 3
Restaurant (Individual) Desserts and Petit Fours....................................... 5
Sugar Work.................................................................................... 3
Wedding Cakes.............................................................................. 7
Retail and Customer Service............................................................... 4
Cakes II.......................................................................................... 3
Food and Beverage Cost Control........................................................ 4
Kitchen & Dining Management........................................................... 3
Marketing/Public Relations................................................................ 3
Catering Production ......................................................................... 3
Operations Management.................................................................. 4
Food Service Nutrition...................................................................... 4
Finance & Accounting....................................................................... 4
Business Plan Development................................................................ 4
Beverage Service............................................................................. 4
Hospitality Law................................................................................ 4
Technical Course Requirements.......................................................................105
PASTRY ARTS
AAT REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Technical Course Requirements.......................................................................105
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE.............................. 120
AAS-T REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Technical Course Requirements.......................................................................105
General Education Requirements (See listing above).......................................... 20
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE........................... 125
Culinary Arts
Pastry Arts
Certificate
This program prepares students with the basic skills and knowledge
required for entry-level positions in the baking and pastry industry.
Students gain hands-on experience and theoretical training as they
produce quality bakery products from scratch.
The program is approximately three quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
CUL 104
BAKE 105
BAKE 108
BAKE 111
BAKE 112
BAKE 114
BAKE 117
BAKE 120
BAKE 125
BAKE 130
BAKE 134
BAKE 140
BAKE 153
BAKE 156
BAKE 210
ENGL& 101
MAT 110
PSYC& 100
Credits
Sanitation in Food Service Operations................................................. 3
Chocolate I (Confections).................................................................. 5
Chocolate II.................................................................................... 4
Decorating...................................................................................... 3
Cakes I (Fillings and Icings)................................................................ 7
Dessert Alternatives (Sugar Free, Gluten Free, Vegan)............................. 3
Frozen Desserts................................................................................ 3
Yeast Breads................................................................................... 7
Baking Techniques and Ingredients...................................................... 3
Pies, Tarts, Custards, and Fillings......................................................... 5
Quick Breads, Cookies, Brownies....................................................... 3
Restaurant (Individual) Desserts and Petit Fours....................................... 5
Sugar Work.................................................................................... 3
Wedding Cakes.............................................................................. 7
Cakes II.......................................................................................... 3
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Non-science Majors............................................................. 5
General Psychology......................................................................... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 79
Dental Assistant
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Designed to prepare students for positions in the dental field, including
both front office and dental assistant career tracks. Graduates of the
program will have a foundation of knowledge of dental sciences, dental
assisting skills, dental materials, dental laboratory procedures,
radiography, infection control, and dental business office management
skills. Students will develop an understanding of the role of the dental
assistant and dental business office assistant within the dental care team.
Graduates are qualified for entry-level positions as expanded duties
dental assistants and coordinating assistants, as well as dental business
office assistants within a dental office.
This program is accredited through the American Dental Association
(ADA). The last Friday in each of the final three quarters of study,
students will be required to take one of the three components of the
Dental Assistant National Board (DANB) Certification Examination.
Completion of the appropriate component of the exam will be a
prerequisite for continuation into the third and fourth quarters of study
in the Dental Office Specialist program.
In addition, successful completion of the first component (Infection
Control), completed at the end of the second quarter of study, is a
prerequisite to entering the fourth quarter, clinical experience. The third
component of the exam is a requirement for graduation from the program
and when successfully completed, will result in the student receiving his
or her national certification from DANB entitling him or her to use the
title of Certified Dental Assistant.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication
(English composition, speech), quantitative reasoning (math) and social
sciences (psychology, sociology) that provide knowledge and abilities
upon which technical skills are built and enhance personal development.
Each student is strongly encouraged to carry personal health/medical
insurance throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly based insurance
for students may be purchased; further information is available through
the counseling office.
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
In order to participate in the program, students must have current
immunizations or laboratory verification of immune status. This
includes, but is not limited to, Hepatitis B series including a positive titer,
Tetanus/ Diphtheria, Tuberculosis Test, Measles/ Mumps/Rubella, and
Varicella as required by contracts with clinical facilities and CDC
recommendations.
To enter the program, a student must be eligible to take Math 91 during
the first quarter of the program, the prerequisite for college-level English,
and psychology or another social science or humanities course.
Admission Dates: Fall, Spring, Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
DAS 103
DAS 101
DAS 109
DAS 111
DAS 210
DAS 212
DAS 214
DAS 240CAP
DAS 245CAP
DBOA 104
DBOA 111
DBOA 118
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
In fact, successful completion of the first component (Infection Control),
completed at the end of the first quarter of study, is a prerequisite to
entering the third quarter clinical experience. The third component of
the exam is a requirement for graduation from the program, and when
successfully completed, will result in students receiving their national
certification from DANB, entitling them to use the title of Certified
Dental Assistant.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication
(English Composition, Speech), quantitative reasoning (Math) and social
sciences (Psychology, Sociology) that provide knowledge and abilities
upon which technical skills are built and personal development enhanced.
Each student is strongly encouraged to carry personal health/medical
insurance throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly-based insurance
for students may be purchased; further information is available through
the Advising and Counseling Office.
This program is approximately three quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements.
General Studies............................................................................. 2
Biomedical Sciences...................................................................... 5
Dental Sciences I........................................................................... 7
Dental Assisting Skills I.................................................................... 7
Dental Sciences II.......................................................................... 5
Dental Specialties.......................................................................... 8
Dental Assisting Skills II................................................................. 10
Clinical Experience I..................................................................... 10
Clinical Experience II...................................................................... 7
Dental Terminology & Procedures...................................................... 5
Dental Charting, Scheduling and Recall Management.......................... 5
Dental Correspondence and Employment Skills................................... 9
Students will take a minimum of 4 credits of computer skills
courses Recommended Electives below............................................. 4
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................. 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher)............................................ 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course).......... 5
Prerequisites: Students must be 18 years of age and have a high school
diploma or GED (per ADA standards). Students must have a current
Basic Life Support (CPR) card for healthcare providers and a First Aid
card. Students must have current immunizations or laboratory
verification of immune status. This includes, but is not limited to,
Hepatitis B series, including a positive titer, Tetanus/ Diphtheria,
Tuberculosis Test, Measles/ Mumps/Rubella, and Varicella, as required
by contracts with clinical facilities and CDC recommendations. To enter
the program, a student must be eligible to take Math 91, college level
English and psychology or another social science or humanities course
during the first quarter of the program.
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................99
To enter the program, a student must be eligible to take Math 91 during
the first quarter of the program, the prerequisite for college-level English,
and psychology or another social science or humanities course.
Recommended Electives
CAH 105
CAS 105
CAS 115
CAS 120
CAS 125
CAS 130
CAS 135
CAS 140CL
CAS 145
Computer Applications...................................................................... 3
Keyboarding................................................................................... 3
Introduction to Computing.................................................................. 3
Word I........................................................................................... 2
Word II.......................................................................................... 3
Excel I............................................................................................ 3
Excel II........................................................................................... 3
Powerpoint...................................................................................... 2
Publisher......................................................................................... 5
Dental Assistant
Certificate
Designed to prepare students for positions in the dental assistant field.
Provides a foundation of knowledge of dental sciences, dental assisting
skills, dental materials, dental laboratory procedures, radiography,
infection control, and office management skills. Students will develop an
understanding of the role of the dental assistant within the dental care
team. Graduates are qualified for entry-level positions, expanded-duties
dental assistants, and coordinating assistants in the dental office.
This program is accredited through the American Dental Association
(ADA). The last Friday in each of the three quarters of study, dental
assistant students will be required to take one of the three components of
the Dental Assistant National Board (DANB) Certification Examination.
Completion of the appropriate component of the exam will be a
prerequisite for continuation into the second and third quarters of study
in the Dental Assistant program.
In order to participate in the externship, students must receive a No
Record on File report from the Washington State Patrol, related to
Crimes Against Persons.
Admission Dates: Fall, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
DAS 103
DAS 101
DAS 109
DAS 111
DAS 210
DAS 212
DAS 214
DAS 240CAP
DAS 245CAP
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
General Studies............................................................................. 2
Biomedical Sciences...................................................................... 5
Dental Sciences I........................................................................... 7
Dental Assisting Skills I.................................................................... 7
Dental Sciences II.......................................................................... 5
Dental Specialties.......................................................................... 8
Dental Assisting Skills II................................................................. 10
Clinical Experience I..................................................................... 10
Clinical Experience II...................................................................... 7
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................. 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher)............................................ 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course).......... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 76
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Prerequisites: In order to participate in the externship, students must
receive a No Record On File report from the Washington State Patrol,
related to Crimes Against Persons. Students must be at least 18 years of
age and have a high school diploma or GED (per ADA standards).
Students must have a current Basic Life Support (CPR) card for health
care providers and a First Aid card.
43
2011-2012 Catalog
44
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Dental Administrative Specialist
Early Care & Education
Certificate
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
Designed to prepare students for entry-level positions in dental office
administration. These positions may include receptionists, treatment
coordinators, financial coordinators, or dental office managers. Students
will receive online instruction and a community-based internship
experience with a local dental office or clinic.
Receive training in administration, including greeting and scheduling
patients, handling billing and insurance claims, collecting payments,
arranging treatment plans, and managing business documents.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This program is approximately three quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements. The courses in this program are offered in an online
format.
Prerequisites: Students must receive a No Record on File report from
the Washington State Patrol related to Crimes Against Persons.
Basic keyboarding skills, general computer fundamentals training, and
efficiency in using the Microsoft word processing program is
recommended.
DENTAL ASSISTANT
All courses are taught online; students need to have an up-to-date
computer with internet access. To be fully self sustaining at home you
will also need a printer with fax, copy and scan abilities. The CPTC
library has these technologies available for student usage during open
business hours.
To enter the program, a student must be eligible to take Math 91 during
the first quarter of the program, the prerequisite for college-level English,
and psychology or another social science or humanities course.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
ACTG 110 Bookkeeping I................................................................................. 4
ACTG 141 QuickBooks I................................................................................... 2
DBOA 104 Dental Terminology & Procedures........................................................ 5
DBOA 111 Dental Charting, Scheduling and Recall Management............................ 5
DBOA 118 Dental Correspondence and Employment Skills...................................... 9
DBOA 120 Dental Insurance.............................................................................. 6
DBOA 121 Fiscal Management.......................................................................... 6
DBOA 126 Professional Communications.............................................................. 4
DBOA 128 Dental Law & Ethics.......................................................................... 5
DBOA 132 Work-Based Learning Experience........................................................ 6
Students will take a minimum of 4 credits of computer skills courses.
Recommended Electives below........................................................... 4
ENGL& 101 English Composition (or higher)........................................................... 5
MAT 107 Business Math (or higher)................................................................... 5
PSY 100 or SOC 100 General Psychology (or higher).............................................. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 71
Recommended Electives
CAH 105
CAS 105
CAS 115
CAS 120
CAS 125
CAS 130
CAS 135
CAS 140CL
CAS 145
Computer Applications...................................................................... 3
Keyboarding................................................................................... 3
Introduction to Computing.................................................................. 3
Word I........................................................................................... 2
Word II.......................................................................................... 3
Excel I............................................................................................ 3
Excel II........................................................................................... 3
Powerpoint...................................................................................... 2
Publisher......................................................................................... 5
Prepares students for careers in the Early Care & Education field as child
care directors, teachers, leads, and assistant child care providers.
To obtain the degree, a student will complete the required courses and
elective credits. Students participate in practicum experiences at the campus Child Development Center or in an approved local child care center.
Students will complete four practicum experiences. The fourth practicum
will be in an area of the student’s choice: Leadership in ECE, Child
Development -- Infant/Toddler, Child Development -- Preschool, Child
Development -- School Age, Family Childcare Professional, or Special
Needs. Degree candidates may petition for credits based on possession of
a current CDA credential.
Students are required to develop a program portfolio to be completed
and presented prior to graduation.
This program is approximately eight to ten quarters in length, depending
on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements and hours of enrollment. All courses must be completed
with a minimum of C grade to graduate. The Foundation Certificate and
Specialist Certificate are embedded in the degree program so the student
may earn stepping stone credentials on their way to completing an
Associate degree.
Proficiency in reading, writing, and an understanding of the English
language is required. ENGL& 101 must be completed by the end of the
fourth quarter. Students are required to take the COMPASS test before
entry into the program and meet with an ECE faculty advisor. All degree
students must fulfill portfolio requirements, which are to be completed by
the time of graduation from the program.
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T
(AAS-T). The different requirements for each degree are listed below.
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer quarters
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
ECE 120
ECE 141
ECE 142
ECE 175
ECE 235
ECE 240
ECE 245
ECS 102*
ECS 106
ECS 107
ECS 110CL
ECS 146
ECS 150
ECS 156
ECS 160
ECS 181
ECS 182
ECS 183
ECS 235
ECS 264
ECS 277
ECS 292
ECS 284
ECS 279
Credits
Interpersonal Skills for the ECE Professional........................................... 2
ECE Curriculum: Math....................................................................... 2
ECE Curriculum: Science and Technology............................................ 2
Curriculum & Environment for Infant/Toddler.......................................... 2
Creating A Quality Environment.......................................................... 3
Literacy in Early Childhood Education.................................................. 5
Diversity Awareness and Curriculum Development.................................. 3
Basic Child Care Training (STARS)....................................................... 2
Overview of Early Childhood Education I............................................. 3
Overview of Early Childhood Education II............................................ 3
Computer Essentials for the ECE Professional......................................... 4
Child Development Infant/Toddler....................................................... 2
Child Development Ages 3-12 years.................................................... 3
ECE Curriculum: Health/Nutrition....................................................... 3
ECE Curriculum: Music/Movement/Creativity....................................... 5
ECE Practicum I................................................................................ 5
ECE Practicum II............................................................................... 5
ECE Practicum III.............................................................................. 5
Issues & Trends................................................................................ 2
Partnerships with Families................................................................... 3
Professionalism & Ethics..................................................................... 2
Theories of Child Development........................................................... 3
Guiding Young Children.................................................................... 3
Observations & Applications in ECE.................................................... 2
Subtotal Credits for Completion.........................................................................74
Students must choose one of the following Practicum IV Courses:
ECS 217
ECS 230
ECS 286
ECS 287
ECS 288
ECS 297
ECS 190
ECS 194
ECS 198
ECE Practicum IV Infant/Toddler......................................................... 3
ECE Practicum IV School-Age............................................................. 3
ECE Practicum IV Leadership.............................................................. 3
ECE Practicum IV Child Development................................................... 3
ECE Practicum IV Family Child Care.................................................... 3
ECE Practicum IV Special Needs........................................................ 3
ECE Practicum IV Green.................................................................... 3
ECE Practicum IV The Emotionally Intelligent Child.................................. 3
ECE Practicum IV Working with Families............................................... 3
Subtotal Credits for Completion........................................................................ 77
Students must complete a minimum of 6 elective credits:
ECE 102
ECE 125
ECE 132
ECE 133
ECE 135
ECE 136
ECE 156
ECE 230
ECE 290
ECS 266
ECS 270
ECS 290
ECS 206
ECS 202
ECS 220
ECS 225
ECS 260
ECS 295
ECE 126
ECE 143
ECE 157
ECE 149
Introduction to Apprenticeship............................................................. 1
Just for the Fun of it: Preschool............................................................. 1
Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child................................................. 1
Emotionally Intelligent Parenting........................................................... 1
School Age Math, Science, and Technology........................................ 3
Raising a Physically and Nutritionally Intelligent Child.............................. 1
From Seed to Table: Gardening with Children....................................... 2
Inclusion in ECE............................................................................... 3
Portfolio Adventure........................................................................... 2
Leadership in ECE............................................................................ 4
Introduction to Early Childhood Management........................................ 3
Mentoring in ECE............................................................................. 1
Signing with Infant & Toddler.............................................................. 2
Preschool Activities........................................................................... 2
Curriculum for School Age................................................................. 2
School Age Environment.................................................................... 2
Curriculum for Family Child Care......................................................... 2
DAP-Special Needs.......................................................................... 2
Nature & the Outdoor Classroom........................................................ 2
Just for the Green of It....................................................................... 1
Just Recycle It................................................................................... 1
ECE Curriculum – Health, Safety, Nutrition, & Cooking Lab..................... 4
PARA Electives (can be taken for ECE elective credit)
PARA 105
PARA 133
PARA 140
PARA 124
PARA 201
Intro to Education............................................................................. 5
Augmented & Alternative Communication............................................. 4
Strategies for Teaching Reading.......................................................... 4
Intro to Exceptional Children............................................................... 5
Core Competencies Portfolio.............................................................. 5
Subtotal Technical Course Requirements............................................................83
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE................................98
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)..................................................83
General Education Requirements (See listing above).......................................... 20
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE........................... 103
Early Care & Education
Childhood Foundation
Certificate
This program is offered only to CPTC-affiliated centers in the
community. It prepares students for entry-level positions in the Early
Care & Education field. Students participate in experiential learning in
an approved local child care center. ECS 102 provides students with the
basic 20-hour S.T.A.R.S. certification. ECS 111-117 prepare students for
the CDA assessment. The program is designed for students to earn a
certificate while working in the field.
This program is approximately two quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements
and depending on hours of enrollment.
Prerequisites: Proficiency in reading, writing, and understanding the
English language is required. Students are required to take the
COMPASS test before entry into the program.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ECE 120
ECS 102*
ECS 111
ECS 112
ECS 113
ECS 114
ECS 115
ECS 116
ECS 117
ECS 181
ECS 182
Credits
Interpersonal Skills for the ECE Professional........................................... 2
Basic Child Care Training (STARS)....................................................... 2
Introduction to Early Childhood Profession............................................. 2
Ways Children Grow & Learn............................................................ 2
Safe & Healthy Environment (dual credit).............................................. 2
Children’s Social/Emotional Development............................................. 2
Physical/Intellectual Competence........................................................ 2
Family Relationships.......................................................................... 2
Early Childhood Professional.............................................................. 2
ECE Practicum I................................................................................ 5
ECE Practicum II............................................................................... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................28
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment Classes
EARLY CARE & EDUCATION
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
45
2011-2012 Catalog
46
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Early Care & Education
Childhood Leadership
Certificate
Designed for experienced early care and education teachers who are
seeking leadership positions in their career field. Classes are offered in
the evenings with an arranged practicum experience.
This program is approximately two to four quarters in length, depending
on the starting quarter and on the time students need to satisfactorily
complete all graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ECS 235
ECS 264
ECS 266
ECS 270
ECS 277
ECS 286
ECS 290
Credits
Issues & Trends................................................................................ 2
Partnerships with Families................................................................... 3
Leadership in ECE............................................................................ 4
Introduction to Early Childhood Management........................................ 3
Professionalism & Ethics..................................................................... 2
ECE Practicum IV—Leadership............................................................ 3
Mentoring in ECE............................................................................. 1
EARLY CARE & EDUCATION
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 18
ECE 120
ECS 102*
ECS 106
ECS 107
ECS 110
ECE 141
ECE 142
ECS 146
ECS 150
ECS 156*
ECS 160
ECS 181
ECS 182
ECS 183
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Interpersonal Skills for the ECE Professional........................................... 2
Basic Child Care Training (STARS)....................................................... 2
Overview of Early Childhood Education I............................................. 3
Overview of Early Childhood Education II............................................ 3
Computer Essentials for the EC Professional........................................... 4
ECE Curriculum: Math....................................................................... 2
ECE Curriculum: Science and Technology............................................ 2
Child Development Infant/Toddler....................................................... 2
Child Development: 3-12 years........................................................... 3
ECE Curriculum: Health, Safety & Nutrition........................................... 3
ECE Curriculum—Music, Movement & Dramatics................................... 5
ECE Practicum I................................................................................ 5
ECE Practicum II............................................................................... 5
ECE Practicum III.............................................................................. 5
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course)............ 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 61
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
Early Care & Education
Creating a Green Classroom
Certificate
Early Care & Education
Designed for beginning and experienced Early Care and Education
teachers who are eager to increase their skill in creating and maintaining
sustainable (green) practices in their work with children of all abilities.
Childhood Specialist
Classes are offered in the evenings with an arranged practicum
experience.
Certificate
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete graduation requirements.
All courses must be completed with a minimum of C grade to graduate.
Prepares students for careers in the Early Care & Education field as lead
and assistant childcare providers. Students participate in experiential
learning at the Hayes Child Development Center or in approved local
child care centers. ECS 102 provides students with the basic 20-hour
S.T.A.R.S. certification. The program is designed for students to earn a
certificate while working in the field.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and enhance personal
development.
This program is approximately four to six quarters in length, depending
on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements and depending on hours of enrollment. All courses must
be completed with a minimum of C grade to graduate.
Prerequisites: Proficiency in reading, writing, and understanding the
English language is required. Students are required to take the
COMPASS test before entry into the program. COMPASS Reading 68
and Writing 33, or successful completion of ENG 82.
Admission Dates: Quarterly start dates
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer quarters.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ECE 126
ECE 134
ECE 142
ECE 143
ECS 149
ECE 156
ECE 157
ECE 235
Credits
Nature and the Outdoor Classroom....................................................... 2
Issues & Trends Green......................................................................... 2
ECE Curriculum: Science & Technology.................................................. 3
Just for the Green of it!......................................................................... 1
ECE Curriculum: Health, Safety, & Nutrition + Cooking Lab....................... 4
From Seed to Table............................................................................. 2
Just Recycle it!.................................................................................... 1
Creating a Quality Environment for Children............................................ 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 18
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
47
2011-2012 Catalog
Early Care & Education
Early Care & Education
School-Age Out-of-School Program
Sustaining a Green Program
Certificate
Certificate
Designed for staff/teachers of school-age children who are seeking a
certificate for quality out-of-school programs.
Designed for beginning and experienced Early Care and Education
teachers who are seeking or are in leadership positions in the field.
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Classes are designed to promote awareness and increase skill in creating
and maintaining sustainable (green) practices in teachers’ programs.
(Note this certificate can be taken on its own or as a follow-up to the
Creating a Green Classroom Certificate.)
Prerequisites: COMPASS, Reading 68, and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
ECS 150
ECS 220
ECS 225
ECS 230
ECS 264
ECS 279
ECS 284
ECS 292
ECE 135
Credits
Child Development – Ages 3 to 12 years................................................ 3
Curriculum for School-Age.................................................................... 2
School-Age Environment....................................................................... 2
Practicum IV School-Age...................................................................... 3
Partnerships with Families..................................................................... 3
Observation & Application in ECE......................................................... 2
Guiding Young Children...................................................................... 3
Theories of Child Development.............................................................. 3
School Age Math, Science, and Technology........................................... 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................24
Early Care & Education
Special Needs
Designed for experienced Early Care and Education teachers who are
eager to increase their skill in working with children of all abilities.
Explores the many facets of leadership positions, how to lead staff, and
advocate for the needs of young children.
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete graduation requirements.
All courses must be completed with a minimum of C grade to graduate.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82. Students are required to take the COMPASS test
before entry into the program.
Note general education requirement: ASL& 121 American Sign
Language requires a student to be at college-level English to enter that
course.
Admission: Classes are offered in the evenings with an arranged
practicum experience.
ECE 120
ECE 230
ECS 146
ECS 150
ECS 206
ECS 235
ECS 264
ECS 277
ECS 279
ECS 284
ECS 295
ECS 297
ASL& 121
Admission Dates: Classes are offered in the evenings with an arranged
practicum experience.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ECE 126
ECE 134
ECE 190
ECE 235
ECS 149
ECS 270
ECS 277
Credits
Nature and the Outdoor Classroom....................................................... 2
Issues & Trends Green......................................................................... 2
Practicum 4: Green............................................................................. 3
Creating a Quality Environment for Children............................................ 3
ECE Curriculum: Health, Safety, & Nutrition + Cooking Lab....................... 4
Intro to ECE Management.................................................................... 3
Professionalism & Ethics in ECE............................................................. 2
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 19
Certificate
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82.
Credits
Interpersonal Skills for the ECE Professional........................................... 2
Inclusion in ECE............................................................................... 3
Child Development: Infant/Toddler...................................................... 2
Child Development: 3-12 years........................................................... 3
Signing with Infants and Toddlers........................................................ 2
Issues & Trends in ECE...................................................................... 2
Partnerships with Families................................................................... 3
Professionalism & Ethics in ECE........................................................... 2
Observations & Applications in ECE.................................................... 2
Guiding Young Children.................................................................... 3
DAP Special Needs.......................................................................... 2
Practicum 4: Special Needs............................................................... 3
American Sign Language 1................................................................ 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................34
Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Prepares students for positions as Low Voltage Electrician apprentices,
service technicians, or installers in the Electronic Fire/Security Industry.
Participate in hands-on training with advanced equipment, techniques,
and programming related to burglar alarms, fire alarms, card access,
and closed-circuit TV to prepare for careers as alarm system installers
and service technicians.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication
(English Composition, Speech), quantitative reasoning (Math), and
social sciences (Psychology, Sociology), that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This program is approximately five quarters in length depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
The Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security Degree Program is approved
as a Limited Energy (06) specialty electrical training program in the
State of Washington. Upon successful completion of the program,
graduates applying to become a Limited Energy (06) specialty electrician
can be credited with 1,815 hours of work experience.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: Successfully completion of the Electrician Low Voltage
Fire Security certificate, or by Instructor permission.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
continues on next page
EARLY CARE & EDUCATION
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete graduation requirements.
All courses must be completed with a minimum of C grade to graduate.
48
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
continued from previous page
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
EFS 105
EFS 106
EFS 107
EFS 108
EFS 109
EFS 110
EFS 118
EFS 119
EFS 121
EFS 124
EFS 207
EFS 211
EFS 216
EFS 221
EFS 226
EFS 231
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
AC/DC Electricity: Basic Theory, Fractions, & Ohms Law........................ 7
AC/DC Electricity: Series, Parallel, & Combination Circuits...................... 7
AC/DC Electricity: Electrical Power & Power Application........................ 7
National Electrical Code Print Reading................................................ 7
National Alarm InstallerTraining Program.............................................. 7
CCTV Application & Design............................................................... 7
National Electrical Codes.................................................................. 6
National Fire Codes......................................................................... 6
CCTV Field Service & Installation........................................................ 7
Washington Administrative Codes....................................................... 2
Addressable Fire SLC Systems/Design................................................. 7
Biometrics Access............................................................................. 7
Advanced Voice Evacuation Fire Systems.............................................. 7
Fire Codes, NICET, NFPA.................................................................. 7
High Security Structured Cabling........................................................ 7
CCTV Digital Network Solutions......................................................... 7
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).............. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 120
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
Provides the necessary skills for a wide range of positions in the
Environmental Science Field. Students have the opportunity to perform
hands-on water quality monitoring; soil, water, and air sampling;
mineral identification; wetland delineation and restoration; geographic
information system mapping; and simulated hazardous waste site
cleanup operations.
Careers are available in both natural resource conservation and urban/
remediation fields. This program will assist students in preparing for a
position with public or private sector employers. Potential job titles:
environmental technician, natural resource technician, remediation
worker, hazardous material handler, fisheries technician, and storm
water remediation operator.
This program is approximately six quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduations requirements.
Certificate
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T
(AAS-T) the different requirements for each degree are listed below.
Prepares students for positions as Low Voltage Electrician apprentices
specializing in the Electronic Fire/Security Industry as alarm system
installers and service technicians. Students participate in realistic handson training in the classroom on burglar alarms, fire alarms, card access,
and closed circuit TV.
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security
Included in this program are academic courses in communication
(English composition, speech), quantitative reasoning (math), and social
sciences (psychology, sociology) that provide knowledge and abilities
upon which technical skills are built and personal development enhanced.
ELECTRICIAN
Environmental Sciences & Technology
This certificate program is approximately three quarters in length,
depending on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all
graduation requirements.
The Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security Certificate Program is
approved as a Limited Energy (06) specialty electrical training program
in the State of Washington.
Upon successful completion of the program, graduates applying to
become a Limited Energy (06) specialty electrician can be credited with
1,089 hours of work experience.
Admissions dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
EFS 105
EFS 106
EFS 107
EFS 108
EFS 109
EFS 110
EFS 118
EFS 119
EFS 121
EFS 124
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
AC/DC Electricity: Basic Theory, Fractions, & Ohm’s Law....................... 7
AC/DC Electricity: Series, Parallel & Combination Circuits....................... 7
AC/DC Electricity: Electrical Power & Power Application........................ 7
National Electrical Code Print Reading................................................ 7
National Alarm Installer Training Program............................................. 7
CCTV Application & Design............................................................... 7
National Electrical Codes.................................................................. 6
National Fire Codes......................................................................... 6
CCTV Field Service & Installation........................................................ 7
Washington Administrative Codes....................................................... 2
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).............. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 78
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ENV 109
ENV 134
ENV 141
ENV 152
ENV 153
ENV 157
ENV 161
ENV 162
ENV 163
ENV 230
ENV 231
ENV 240CAP
ENV 245CL
ENV 246
Credits
Introduction to Ecology.................................................................... 4
Hazardous Waste Site Operations.................................................... 7
Orientation to Environmental Science................................................. 4
Mapping & Surveying..................................................................... 2
Environmental Sampling Methods...................................................... 2
Environmental Site Assessment.......................................................... 4
Environmental Law I........................................................................ 5
General Chemistry......................................................................... 6
Environmental Chemistry.................................................................. 6
Rural Technologies.......................................................................... 4
Issues in the Urban Environment........................................................ 5
Internship.................................................................................... 10
Environmental Law II........................................................................ 5
Environmental Science Capstone....................................................... 2
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Hydrology.................................................................................... 6
Introduction to Air Pollution............................................................... 3
Environmental Critical Areas............................................................. 7
Introduction to Soils........................................................................ 5
Watershed Analysis........................................................................ 4
Hazardous Materials Transportation.................................................. 3
Environmental Geology................................................................... 5
GPS Technologies.......................................................................... 2
Technical Course Requirements (Total).............................................................101
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.........................................................116
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)................................................101
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE............................116
Note: 5 Credits of Social Science required (PSYC& 100 OR SOC& 101). CHEM& 121,
CHEM& 110 and GEOL& 110 fulfill an AAS-T science requirement; therefore, only 15
additional credits of general education courses are required for the AAS-T degree.
Esthetic Sciences
Esthetics
Prepares the student for entry-level positions as an esthetician at a salon,
day spa, or at a destination spa.
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
The program prepares students for entry-level positions in salons, day
spas or medical settings such as medi-spas, dermatologist, or plastic
surgery centers. Future employment may include esthetician, esthetic
instructor, sales representative for product lines, or make-up artists.
Students participate in realistic training through the student-operated
clinic on campus. Students perform services on live models. Services
performed include facials, temporary hair removal, makeup, body wrap
techniques, chemical peels, electricity therapies, and microdermabrasion.
Curriculum includes all related first aid, safety, and sanitation procedures.
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisite: High School Diploma or GED required
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
ES 103
ES 106
ES 112
ES 115
ES 117
ES 121
ES 129
ES 109
ES 122
ES 124
ES 127
ES 131
ES 147
ES 199
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 108
Certificate
Esthetic Sciences
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ES 201
Pharmacology for Estheticians............................................................. 3
ES 205
Introduction to Esthetic Medical Office Procedures................................. 4
ES 211
Infection Control for Medical Estheticians.............................................. 1
ES 216
Camouflage Makeup........................................................................ 2
ES 221
Medical Esthetics Procedures.............................................................. 6
ES 227
Medical Esthetic Machinery............................................................... 4
ES 230
Patient Education.............................................................................. 1
ES 236
Independent Research Project for Medical Esthetics................................ 2
ES 240
Business Skills & Professional Development for Medical Esthetics............... 5
ES 242
Laser Theory.................................................................................... 4
ES 252
Advanced Cosmetic Chemistry........................................................... 2
ES 256CAP Clinical Laboratory for Medical Esthetics............................................ 10
CMST& 220 Public Speaking............................................................................... 5
MAT 105 Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
PSYC& 100 General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).............. 5
BIOL 118
Human Anatomy & Physiology for Non-Science Majors.......................... 5
Credits
Skin Physiology & Histology I............................................................. 4
Facial Procedures I........................................................................... 4
Temporary Hair Removal I.................................................................. 3
Makeup Application Techniques I........................................................ 2
Skin Care & Body Wraps I................................................................ 3
Skin Physiology & Histology II............................................................. 4
Makeup Application Techniques II....................................................... 2
Machine Facials, Electricity, & Light Therapy......................................... 4
Salon Management & State Laws I...................................................... 2
Facial Procedures II........................................................................... 4
Temporary Hair Removal II................................................................. 4
Skin Care & Body Wraps II................................................................ 3
Salon Management & State Laws II..................................................... 2
Chemistry for Esthetics....................................................................... 3
Successful graduates are prepared to take the Washington State Esthetics
Licensing Examination. Students participate in realistic training through
the student-operated clinic on campus.
Students perform 25 percent of services on live models as indicated by
state law. Services performed include facials, temporary hair removal,
makeup, and body wrap techniques. Curriculum includes all related first
aid and safety and sanitation procedures.
This program is approximately two quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
The foundation knowledge of our basic program provides students with
excellent academic and practical preparation for the Medical Esthetics
curriculum.
Prerequisite: High School Diploma or GED required.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ES 103
ES 106
ES 112
ES 115
ES 117
ES 121
ES 129
ES 109
ES 122
ES 124
ES 127
ES 131
ES 147
ES 199
Credits
Skin Physiology & Histology I................................................................ 4
Facial Procedures I.............................................................................. 4
Temporary Hair Removal I.................................................................... 3
Makeup Application Techniques I.......................................................... 2
Skin Care & Body Wraps I................................................................... 3
Skin Physiology & Histology II............................................................... 4
Makeup Application Techniques II......................................................... 2
Machine Facials, Electricity & Light Therapy............................................. 4
Salon Management & State Laws I........................................................ 2
Facial Procedures II............................................................................. 4
Temporary Hair Removal II................................................................... 4
Skin Care & Body Wraps II.................................................................. 3
Salon Management & State Laws II....................................................... 2
Chemistry for Esthetics......................................................................... 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................44
Note: Students in the Esthetics program over a summer quarter will receive 600 hours of
instruction during their two-quarter certificate program.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
ENV 248
ENV 250
ENV 251
ENV 260
ENV 261
ENV 270
GEOL& 110
GEO 215
49
2011-2012 Catalog
50
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Esthetic Sciences
Medical Esthetics
Certificate
Prepares for entry-level positions as a medical esthetician in medical
offices, plastic surgery centers, as well as dermatology offices. Participate
in realistic training through the student-operated clinic on campus.
Perform services on live models. Services performed include chemical
peels, micro-current, and micro-dermabrasion. Curriculum includes all
related first aid, safety, and sanitation procedures. Lectures on laser
physics and contraindications to services are included.
This program is approximately two quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Prerequisite: Current Esthetics license issued by Washington State
Department of Licensing - High School Diploma or GED required
Admission Dates: Summer and Winter quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ES 201
ES 205
ES 211
ES 216
ES 221
ES 227
ES 230
ES 236
ES 240
ES 242
ES 252
ES 256
Credits
Pharmacology for Estheticians............................................................... 3
Introduction to Esthetic Medical Office Procedures.................................... 4
Infection Control for Medical Estheticians................................................ 1
Camouflage Makeup.......................................................................... 2
Medical Esthetics Procedures................................................................ 6
Medical Esthetic Machinery................................................................. 4
Patient Education................................................................................ 1
Independent Research Project for Medical Esthetics.................................. 2
Business Skills & Professional Development for Medical Esthetics................. 5
Laser Theory...................................................................................... 4
Advanced Cosmetic Chemistry............................................................. 2
Clinical Laboratory for Medical Esthetics............................................... 10
ESTHETIC SCIENCES
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................44
Graphic Technologies
Associate of Applied Technology Degree - AAT
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree - AAS-T
Prepares students for careers with commercial printing companies, prepress imaging companies, quick print and copy shops, in-plant shops,
specialty printing companies, advertising agencies, and newspaper and
magazine offices. Participate in work-based learning activities.
Innovations in computer technology continue to rapidly change and
expand the field of graphic technologies. Therefore, the following courses
of study may be subject to change in order to offer training based on
current industry standards.
This program is approximately five quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T
(AAS-T). The different requirements for each degree are listed below:
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
GTC 110
GTC 123CL
GTC 130
GTC 143
GTC 149
GTC 164
GTC 169
GTC 174
GTC 203
GTC 209
GTC 210
GTC 223
GTC 233
GTC 254CAP
GTC 264
GTC 276
Credits
Art, Design, & Visual Thinking........................................................... 5
Macintosh Operations & Image Acquisition......................................... 5
Digital Imaging I: Photoshop............................................................. 5
Electronic Publishing & Layout........................................................... 5
Digital Imaging II: Photoshop............................................................ 5
Prepress I...................................................................................... 5
Intro to Vector-Based Illustration Software............................................ 5
InDesign I..................................................................................... 5
Preflight........................................................................................ 5
Advanced Vector Digital Illustration.................................................... 5
Digital Imaging III: Photoshop........................................................... 5
Prepress II..................................................................................... 5
QuarkXPress.................................................................................. 5
Capstone Class............................................................................. 5
Paper, Pricing, & Estimating.............................................................. 5
InDesign II..................................................................................... 5
Subtotal.......................................................................................................... 80
Select at least 20 credits from the following approved elective course list
to fulfill degree requirements.
Elective Courses
MDP 103 Fundamentals of Drawing.................................................................. 5
MDP 119 Digital Photography.......................................................................... 5
MDP 133 Introduction to Dreamweaver I............................................................ 5
MDP 231 Independent Study Project................................................................. 5
MDP 239 Internship........................................................................................ 5
MDPW 111 Web Development Languages I - XHTML & CSS.................................... 5
MDPW 123 Web Design Principles...................................................................... 5
MDPW 134 Web Animation I - Flash.................................................................... 5
MDPW 211 Web Animation II - Flash................................................................... 5
MDPW 216 Open Source Development Tools - PHP I.............................................. 5
MDPW 231 Databases for the Web – MySQL....................................................... 5
MDPW 265 Emerging Technologies – Search Engine Optimization............................ 5
MDPW 271 Graphic Design for the Web – Dreamweaver II..................................... 5
Technical Course Requirements........................................................................ 80
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
Elective Credits................................................................................................ 20
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE...............................115
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)................................................. 80
General Education Requirements (See listing above).......................................... 20
Elective credits................................................................................................ 20
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE........................... 120
* Course assignments for summer are adjusted to accommodate a 9-week quarter.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
51
2011-2012 Catalog
Graphic Technologies
Graphic Technologies
Graphic Design
Prepress Operations
Certificate
Certificate
Provides instruction in areas of graphic design and digital layout to
prepare for entry-level positions as graphic designers or related positions
in commercial printing companies.
Provides instruction in all areas of prepress operations to prepare students
for entry-level positions in commercial printing companies, prepress
imaging companies, quick print and copy shops, in-plant shops, specialty
printing companies, advertising agencies, and newspaper and magazine
offices.
Innovations in computer technology continue to rapidly change and
expand the field of graphic technologies. Therefore, the following courses
of study may be subject to change in order to offer training based on
current industry standards.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
GTC 110
Art, Design, & Visual Thinking............................................................ 5
GTC 123CL Macintosh Operations & Image Acquisition......................................... 5
GTC 130
Digital Imaging I: Photoshop............................................................. 5
GTC 143
Electronic Publishing & Layout............................................................ 5
GTC 149
Digital Imaging II: Photoshop............................................................. 5
GTC 164
Prepress I....................................................................................... 5
GTC 169
Intro to Vector-Based Illustration Software............................................. 5
GTC 174
InDesign I...................................................................................... 5
GTC 203
Preflight......................................................................................... 5
GTC 210
Digital Imaging III: Photoshop............................................................ 5
GTC 233
QuarkXPress................................................................................... 5
GTC 264
Paper, Pricing, & Estimating............................................................... 5
GTC 276
InDesign II...................................................................................... 5
MDPW 123 Web Design Principles..................................................................... 5
*MDPW 134Web Animation I – Flash.................................................................. 5
ENGL& 101 English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220................................... 5
MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher)............................................. 5
PSYC& 100 General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course)........... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 95
* Course assignments for summer are adjusted to accommodate a 9-week quarter.
* Elective courses may be taken or substituted for select program requirements of
equal credits with the approval of the Instructor.
Elective Courses
MDP 103 Fundamentals of Drawing.................................................................. 5
MDP 119 Digital Photography.......................................................................... 5
MDPW 271 Graphic Design for the Web – Dreamweaver II..................................... 5
MDPW 111 Web Development Languages I - XHTML & CSS.................................... 5
MDPW 211 Web Animation II - Flash................................................................... 5
MDPW 216 Open Source Development Tools - PHP I.............................................. 5
MDPW 231 Databases for the Web – MySQL....................................................... 5
MDPW 265 Emerging Technologies – Search Engine Optimization............................ 5
Upon completion of required core courses, students may enroll in
advanced courses in the specialization area.
Innovations in computer technology continue to rapidly change and
expand the field of graphic technologies. Therefore, the following courses
of study may be subject to change in order to offer training based on
current industry standards.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This certificate is approximately four quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
GTC 110
GTC 123CL
GTC 130
GTC 143
GTC 149
GTC 164
GTC 169
GTC 174
GTC 203
GTC 209
GTC 210
GTC 223
GTC 233
GTC 254CAP
GTC 264
GTC 276
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Art, Design, & Visual Thinking........................................................... 5
Macintosh Operations & Image Acquisition......................................... 5
Digital Imaging I: Photoshop............................................................. 5
Electronic Publishing & Layout........................................................... 5
Digital Imaging II: Photoshop............................................................ 5
Prepress I...................................................................................... 5
Advanced Vector Digital Illustration.................................................... 5
InDesign I..................................................................................... 5
Preflight........................................................................................ 5
Advanced Vector Digital Illustration.................................................... 5
Digital Imaging III: Photoshop........................................................... 5
Prepress II..................................................................................... 5
QuarkXPress.................................................................................. 5
Capstone Class............................................................................. 5
Paper, Pricing, & Estimating.............................................................. 5
InDesign II..................................................................................... 5
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................. 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher)............................................ 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course).......... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 95
* Course assignments for summer are adjusted to accommodate a 9-week quarter.
GRAPHIC TECHNOLOGIES
Prepares the student for a career with prepress imaging companies, quick
print and copy shops, in-plant shops, specialty printing companies,
advertising agencies, and newspaper and magazine offices.
52
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Health Unit Coordinator
Heating & Air Conditioning/
Refrigeration Service Technician
Certificate
Prepares the student for a position as a coordinator of activities at the
nursing unit desk.
Program objectives to achieve this goal give the student the competencies
needed in communications, human relations, anatomy and physiology,
medical terminology, health unit coordinator tasks, and unit
management. As the communicator for the hospital unit, it is essential
that the student has the ability to read, write, understand and speak
English.
The student will participate in realistic training in the classroom and
clinical settings in practicing the responsibilities of the health unit
coordinator. Skills include transcription of physician’s orders, scheduling
diagnostic studies and appointments for follow-up care, ordering and
maintaining supplies, and maintaining clerical and patient records.
Prepares students for positions in the heating, air conditioning, and
refrigeration industry. Graduates will be prepared for entry-level
positions as service technicians, building maintenance technicians,
equipment assemblers, and start-up residential and light commercial
installers. Students will participate in work-based training through
realistic training activities on campus.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Successful graduates are eligible to take the certification exam by the
National Association of Health Unit Coordinators.
This program is approved as an HVAC/Refrigeration (06A) specialty
electrical training program in the State of Washington.
This program is approximately two quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Upon successful completion of the program, graduates applying to
become an HVAC/Refrigeration (06A) specialty electrician and can be
credited with an estimated 1,178 hours of work experience. This program
is not applicable to any other electrical specialty or sub-category.
Prerequisites: Students must obtain a current CPR card for healthcare
providers. In order to participate in the clinical aspect of the program,
students must receive, during HUC 104 course, a No Record On File
report from the Washington State Patrol, related to Crimes Against
Persons, and students must have current immunizations or laboratory
verification of immune status. Immunizations could include, but not
limited to, Hepatitis B series, Tetanus/ Diphtheria, Tuberculosis Test,
Measles/ Mumps/Rubella, and Varicella and yearly flu as required by
contracts with clinical facilities and CDC recommendations.
HEALTH UNIT COORDINATOR
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout the program and their clinical rotations. Quarterly based
insurance for students may be purchased; further information is available
through the counseling office. No student will be allowed at clinical site without proof of insurance.
Proof of immunizations should be submitted the first week of class unless
arrangements have been made with instructor. Some hospitals may
require a drug screen test before the student is permitted to practice in
the hospital. Most clinical sites enforce a No Smoking Policy. Smoking at
a clinical site may hinder completion of the program.
Must be a High School graduate or have a GED by completion of
program. Students must be at least 17½ years of age to begin the
program.
Admission Dates:
Fall and Spring quarters - Lakewood campus Day Program
Winter and Summer quarters - Lakewood campus Evening Program
Check with the Advising and Counseling Office for specific information.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
CAH 105
HUC 104
HUC 106
HUC 109
HUC 112
HUC 115
HUC 120
HUC 122
HUC 126
HUC 132
HUC 204
Credits
Computer Applications........................................................................ 2
Orientation/Introduction to Health Unit Coordinating/
Introduction to Automation.................................................................... 5
Anatomy & Physiology for Health Unit Coordinator................................... 3
Unit Coordinator Task & Procedures I..................................................... 8
Unit Coordinator Task & Procedures II..................................................... 4
Communications Application in the Health Unit Coordinator Role................ 3
Unit Management I............................................................................. 3
Unit Management II............................................................................ 3
Legal/Ethical Aspects of Unit Coordinating............................................. 2
Clinical Experience............................................................................. 7
ECG Monitor Technician...................................................................... 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................43
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
*HAC 102
*HAC 105
*HAC 120
*HAC 160
*HAC 162
*HAC 164
HAC 167
HAC 170
HAC 175
HAC 181
HAC 183
HAC 201
HAC 230
HAC 237
HAC 242
HAC 246
HAC 249
HAC 255
HAC 256
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Basic Electricity................................................................................ 5
Electrical Circuits.............................................................................. 4
Advanced Controls & Troubleshooting.................................................. 4
Siemens Controls............................................................................. 2
Electric Motors & Their Applications..................................................... 4
Electric Motors & Troubleshooting Motors............................................. 3
Green Awareness............................................................................ 3
Heating I........................................................................................ 7
Heating Lab I.................................................................................. 5
Heating II....................................................................................... 6
Heating Lab II.................................................................................. 4
Advanced Refrigeration Systems........................................................ 10
EPA Refrigerant Recovery Certification.................................................. 1
Basic Refrigeration I.......................................................................... 7
Basic Refrigeration Lab I.................................................................... 5
Basic Refrigeration II......................................................................... 6
Job Readiness.................................................................................. 5
Basic Refrigeration Lab II.................................................................... 3
Commercial Heat Pumps................................................................... 7
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).............. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 106
*Prerequisites for Heating & Refrigeration
Highly Recommended Class
(class could be taken while waiting to start the program.)
CAS 105
Keyboarding (or Orientation to Computers and MS Office)..................... 3
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
53
2011-2012 Catalog
Heating & Air Conditioning/
Refrigeration Service Technician
Hemodialysis Technician
Basic HVAC/Refrigeration
Service Technician
Prepares the successful graduate for employment as a hemodialysis
technician in outpatient settings such as a hospital or dialysis center.
Focuses on the hemodialysis technician’s role of providing basic renal
care for clients under the supervision of a registered nurse or physician.
Certificate
Students participate in theoretical and practical preparation in the duties
and responsibilities of a hemodialysis technician. A practicum in a
dialysis facility is included in the program to provide students an
opportunity to develop and practice the skills of the hemodialysis
technician and participate as a team.
Certificate
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This program is approximately three quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
*HAC 102
*HAC 105
*HAC 120
*HAC 162
*HAC 164
*HAC 160
HAC 167
HAC 170
HAC 175
HAC 181
HAC 183
HAC 230
HAC 237
HAC 242
HAC 246
HAC 255
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Basic Electricity................................................................................ 5
Electrical Circuits.............................................................................. 4
Advanced Controls & Troubleshooting.................................................. 4
Electric Motors & their Applications..................................................... 4
Electric Motors & Troubleshooting Motors............................................. 3
Siemens Controls............................................................................. 2
Green Awareness............................................................................ 3
Heating I........................................................................................ 7
Heating Lab I.................................................................................. 5
Heating II....................................................................................... 6
Heating Lab II.................................................................................. 4
EPA Refrigerant Recovery Certification.................................................. 1
Basic Refrigeration I.......................................................................... 7
Basic Refrigeration Lab I.................................................................... 5
Basic Refrigeration II......................................................................... 6
Basic Refrigeration Lab II.................................................................... 3
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course)............ 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................84
*Prerequisites for Heating & Refrigeration
Clinical hours vary, depending on the facility assigned; students may be
assigned to day or evening shifts.
This program is approximately two quarters in length depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: Provide documentation of negative blood test for active
Hepatitis B and negative two-step tuberculosis test (TB). Immunization
requirements may change based on CDC guidelines and/or clinical
facility policies. Proof of Hepatitis B and TB tests will be submitted to the
Instructor the first day of class unless prior arrangements have been
made.
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly-based insurance for
students may be purchased; further information is available through the
Advising/Counseling Office. No student will be allowed at clinical site
without proof of insurance.
Must have a high school diploma or GED certificate. COMPASS
Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful completion of ENG 82.
Compass score for Pre-Algebra 37.
In order to participate in the clinical aspects of the program, the student
must receive a No Record on File report from the Washington State
Patrol, related to Crimes Against Persons.
Physical Activity: This occupation requires medium physical activity
and lifting/handling objects weighing 10-25 pounds (occasionally up to
50 pounds). Technicians are often standing for long periods of time. For
safety and protection of patients, the student technician must be able to
perform basic cardiac life support, including CPR, and function in
stressful and/or emergency situations. Must be able to safely assist a
patient in moving from bed to a chair, commode, or cart.
Admission Date: Fall and Spring quarters.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
HDT 105
HDT 113
HDT 116
HDT 122
HDT 125
HDT 131
HDT 138
HDT 141
HDT 149
HDT 151
HDT 161
HDT 163
MAT 072
Credits
Law & Ethics for the Hemodialysis Technician........................................... 3
Phlebotomy Fundamentals.................................................................... 4
Computer Applications/Keyboarding..................................................... 2
Hemodialysis Terms/Anatomy/Physiology............................................... 6
First Aid/CPR/HIV.............................................................................. 1
Hemodialysis Principles & Procedures..................................................... 4
Machine Setup/Maintenance............................................................... 4
Water Treatment................................................................................. 3
Vascular Access................................................................................. 3
Professional Interaction........................................................................ 3
Clinical Practicum............................................................................... 6
Field Study........................................................................................ 1
Medical Math.................................................................................... 4
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................44
HVAC
Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary for entry-level
employment in HVAC service and maintenance.
54
2011-2012 Catalog
Human Services
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
Prepares students for a variety of mid-level positions within the field of
human services that are focused on helping others gain the skills to help
themselves. Students will participate in both classroom instruction and a
community-based internship experience with a local human services
provider. Students interning at these agencies serve a variety of
populations, including mentally ill and/or developmentally disabled,
seniors, persons living with HIV/AIDS, homeless, corrections, juveniles
at risk, foster families, persons with substance abuse issues, and numerous
other specialty areas.
Students are responsible for choosing their own internship placement
and are primarily eligible for employment in the area in which they
choose and complete their internship experience.
This accelerated associate degree program can be completed in as few as
four quarters.
Students attend courses on the main campus in Lakewood as well as at
community-based internship sites throughout the program. Students
receiving a C- or below must repeat the class in order to satisfy the
Human Services program requirements for graduation.
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T
(AAS-T). The different requirements for each degree are listed below:
HUMAN SERVICES
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (20 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition and CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT
107 Business Mathematics. PSYC& 100 General Psychology.
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (25 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202. CMST& 220 Public Speaking.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: Students must attend a mandatory orientation/advising
meeting with the Instructors. Must be a High School graduate or have a
GED to enter the program. Students must consent to and receive a No
Record on File report related to Crimes Against Persons. Students must
have an internship site secured no later than the third day of the quarter
for the Internship I, II and III courses.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
CMST& 220 Public Speaking............................................................................... 5
CAH 105CL Computer Applications for Allied Health............................................... 3
HS 115
Therapeutic Communication Skills........................................................ 5
HS 123
HIV/AIDS & Blood-Bourne Pathogens.................................................. 1
HS 127
Introduction to Human Services........................................................... 5
HS 151
Internship I...................................................................................... 5
HS 220
Theories of Counseling...................................................................... 5
HS 221
Family Systems................................................................................. 3
HS 224
Dynamics of Violence....................................................................... 5
HS 225
Survey of Community Resources.......................................................... 3
HS 226
Mental Health Assessment & Evaluation............................................... 5
HS 227
Behavioral Health & Wellness............................................................ 5
HS 229
Introduction to Gang Culture.............................................................. 3
HS 230
Case Management.......................................................................... 5
HS 235DIV Culturally Competent Practice............................................................. 5
HS 237
Law & Ethics for Human Services........................................................ 3
HS 244
Internship II...................................................................................... 5
HS 246
Group Process................................................................................. 3
HS 258CAP Internship III..................................................................................... 5
ENGL& 101 English Composition......................................................................... 5
MAT 107 Math 107 (or higher)........................................................................ 5
PSYC& 100 General Psychology......................................................................... 5
Total Core Credits............................................................................................94
Students will take a minimum of 8 credits of electives from the options
below:
SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology................................................................... 5
PSYC& 220 Abnormal Psychology....................................................................... 5
PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology.......................................................................... 5
ASL& 121 Sign Language................................................................................ 5
HS 238
Special Projects.............................................................................3-5
HS 239
Selected Topics.............................................................................3-5
HS 130
Family Development.......................................................................... 3
HS 132
Culturally Responsive Case Management............................................. 3
HS 134
Counseling Techniques for Gang Involved Youth & Families..................... 3
HS 136
Prevention, Early Intervention, & Assessment.......................................... 4
LEADR 100 Leadership I...................................................................................1-6
LEADR 101 Leadership II..................................................................................1-6
LEADR 102 Leadership III.................................................................................1-6
LEADR 103 Leadership IV.................................................................................1-6
Any Biology course............................................................................................. 5
Any HSCD course............................................................................................... 5
Total Elective Credits.......................................................................................... 8
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 102
Human Services: Chemical Dependency
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
Prepares students for a variety of mid-level positions within the human
services chemical dependency field. As the demand for Chemical
Dependency Professionals has grown in the human services profession;
we have tailored this program’s hours for the working professional. This
option is for those students who have extensive work experience and/or
credits in chemical dependency or already have a degree. It is ideally
suited for the working human services professional. For those students
who do not have a degree or extensive work experience, they should
choose the Human Services Generalist Degree and add on the Chemical
Dependency Certificate.
Students are introduced to basic concepts related to chemical dependency
prevention and treatment.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
This accelerated associates degree program can be completed in as few
as four quarters, but may take up to eight quarters in length, depending
on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements. Students attend courses on the main campus in Lakewood
as well as at community-based internship sites throughout the program.
The Human Services Chemical Dependency courses are offered
Wednesday evenings from 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. and online. A grade
of C- or below means the student must repeat the class in order to satisfy
the Human Services program requirements for graduation.
The required degree coursework covers most of the content areas
required for the chemical dependency professional credential issued by
the Washington State Department of Health (See RCW 246.811
Washington Administrative Code [WAC] Chapter 246-811).
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T
(AAS-T) the different requirements for each degree are listed below:
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (20 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition and CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT
107 Business Mathematics. PSYC& 100 General Psychology.
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (25 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202. CMST& 220 Public Speaking.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: Students must attend a mandatory orientation/advising
meeting with the Instructors. Must be a High School graduate or have a
GED to enter the program.
Students must consent to and receive a No Record on File related to
Crimes Against Persons.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
ENGL& 101 English Composition......................................................................... 5
CMST& 220 Public Speaking............................................................................... 5
MAT 110
Math for Non-science Majors ( or higher)............................................. 5
PSYC& 100 General Psychology......................................................................... 5
HSCD 135 Introduction to Chemical Dependency.................................................. 3
HSCD 140 Ethics for Chemical Dependency......................................................... 2
HSCD 145 Physiological Actions of Alcohol & Drugs.............................................. 3
HSCD 155 Chemical Dependency & Counseling I: Individuals & Groups................... 5
HSCD 215 Case Management & Recordkeeping for the CDP.................................. 5
HSCD 226 Chemical Dependency Assessment & Evaluation.................................... 2
HSCD 228 Chemical Dependency & the Law....................................................... 2
HSCD 249 Chemical Dependency & Counseling II: Adolescents & Family................. 5
HSCD 251 Relapse Prevention............................................................................ 3
HS 123
HIV/AIDS & Blood-Bourne Pathogens.................................................. 1
HS 237
HS 225
Any CAS
HS 220
HS 150CAP
HS 227
HS 229
HS 235DIV
HS 224
PSYC& 220
PSYC 200
55
Law & Ethics for Human Services........................................................ 3
Survey of Community Resources.......................................................... 3
Computer Applications Elective........................................................... 2
Theories of Counseling...................................................................... 5
Internship I...................................................................................... 5
Behavioral Health & Wellness............................................................ 5
Introduction to Gang Culture.............................................................. 3
Culturally Competent Practice............................................................. 5
Dynamics of Violence....................................................................... 5
Abnormal Psychology....................................................................... 5
Lifespan Psychology.......................................................................... 5
Total Core Credits............................................................................................94
Students will take a mimimum of 5 credits of electives from the options
below:
Any Human Services course not listed above........................................................... 5
LEADR 100 Leadership I..................................................................................... 5
LEADR 101 Leadership II.................................................................................... 5
LEADR 102 Leadership III................................................................................... 5
LEADR 103 Leadership IV................................................................................... 5
HSCD 256 Selected Projects............................................................................3-5
HSCD 259 Special Topics...............................................................................3-5
HS 130
Family Development.......................................................................... 3
HS 132
Culturally Responsive Case Management............................................. 3
HS 134
Counseling Techniques for Gang Involved Youth & Families..................... 3
HS 136
Prevention, Early Intervention, & Assessment.......................................... 4
Total Elective Credits.......................................................................................... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................99
Human Services
Chemical Dependency Specialist
Certificate
Introduces students to basic concepts related to chemical dependency
prevention and treatment.
The certificate will provide students with the academic background to
understand content, models, theories and research relevant to working
with chemically dependent persons and their families and prepare them
for entry level employment. It is ideal for working professionals who
already have a degree but are in need of the specific coursework to obtain
state credentials. The required certificate coursework covers most of the
content areas required for the chemical dependency professional
credential issued by the Washington State Department of Health (See
RCW 246.811 Washington Administrative Code [ WAC] Chapter 246811). This accelerated certificate program is approximately three
quarters in length, depending on the time students need to satisfactorily
complete all graduation requirements.
This certificate has an I-BEST enrollment option. The Integrated Basic
Education and Skills Training (I-BEST) option is designed specifically
for adults at the basic skills level. Initial eligibility is determined by
qualifying CASAS scores of 221 – 255 in Reading and/or Math and a
minimum of 221 in CASAS Listening for English Language Learners.
For detailed information contact the I-BEST Program Specialist
253-589-5524.
Prerequisites: Students must attend a mandatory orientation/advising
meeting with the Instructors. Must be a High School graduate or have a
GED by completion of the program. Students must consent to and
receive a No Record On File report, related to Crimes Against Persons.
Note: PSYC& 100 is a prerequisite to PSYC& 200 and 220.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
continues on next page
HUMAN SERVICES
Students will participate in day, evening, online classroom instruction
and a community-based internship experience with a local chemical
dependency services provider. Students are responsible for choosing their
own internship placement and primarily eligible for employment in the
area in which they choose and complete their internship experience.
2011-2012 Catalog
56
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
continued from previous page
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
PSYC& 220
PSYC& 200
HSCD 135
HSCD 140
HSCD 145
HSCD 155
HSCD 215
HSCD 226
HSCD 228
HSCD 249
HSCD 251
*CAH 105
*COLL 105
Credits
Abnormal Psychology....................................................................... 5
Lifespan Psychology.......................................................................... 5
Introduction to Chemical Dependency.................................................. 3
Ethics for Chemical Dependency......................................................... 2
Physiological Actions of Alcohol & Drugs.............................................. 3
Chemical Dependency & Counseling I: Individuals & Groups................... 5
Case Management & Recordkeeping for the CDP.................................. 5
Chemical Dependency & Assessment.................................................. 2
Chemical Dependency & the Law....................................................... 2
Chemical Dependency & Counseling II: Adolescents & Family................. 5
Relapse Prevention............................................................................ 3
Computer Applications...................................................................... 5
Career Development......................................................................... 2
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.....................................................40-44
*This is a required course for students enrolled in the I-BEST option.
Human Services
Certificate
Students will gain knowledge about gang culture and become skilled at
case management techniques and community service interventions.
Courses are delivered through online instruction for this 16-credit
certificate.
HUMAN SERVICES
This certificate is ideally suited for professionals working in human
services, school systems, criminal justice, and correction fields.
Participants take part in a 55-hour internship within their community.
Prerequisites: Students must take part in a mandatory online
orientation/advising meeting with the Instructors. Must be a High
School graduate or have a GED by completion of the program. Students
must consent to and receive a No Record on File report related to Crimes
Against Persons.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
HS 229
HS 132
HS 134
HS 130
HS 136
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
Prepares students for positions with interior designers, architects, home
furnishing venues, contractors, and builders.
Students will have the opportunity to serve in internship positions in
industry and/or realistic training opportunities through given design
projects and will compile a portfolio of their work in preparation for the
job search process. This program is approximately six quarters in length,
depending on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all
graduation requirements.
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science–T
(AAS-T). The different requirements for each degree are listed below:
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
Gang Intervention Specialist
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Interior Design
Credits
Introduction to Gang Culture................................................................. 3
Culturally Responsive Case Management................................................ 3
Counseling Techniques for Gang Involved Youth & Families........................ 3
Family Development............................................................................ 3
Prevention, Early Intervention, & Assessment............................................. 4
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 16
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202
A Kitchen and Bath option is offered every spring quarter. A Green
Design option is offered every summer quarter. New students or
continuing program students may enroll for either option.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall quarter
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
DSN 105
DSN 119
DSN 121
DSN 123
DSN 124
DSN 132
DSN 136
DSN 140
DSN 145
DSN 152
DSN 153
DSN 158
DSN 159
DSN 204
DSN 216
DSN 225
DSN 227
DSN 231
DSN 236
DSN 239CL
DSN 241
Credits
Drafting I........................................................................................ 6
Interior Design & the Creative Design Process........................................ 4
Drafting II........................................................................................ 5
Materials Methods & Techniques of Interior Design................................ 4
Color Theory................................................................................... 4
Lighting.......................................................................................... 5
Introduction to Drawing and Rendering................................................ 4
Textiles........................................................................................... 4
Residential Planning, Design, & Exterior Spaces..................................... 5
Furniture & Cabinet Design................................................................. 2
Drafting III....................................................................................... 4
History of Interiors............................................................................ 4
Intro to Technology for Interior Designers.............................................. 3
Intro to Commercial Interior Design...................................................... 4
CAD I............................................................................................ 5
Design I.......................................................................................... 5
Commercial Specifications................................................................. 4
20th Century & Current Design Philosophies & Significant Works.............. 3
Design II......................................................................................... 7
CAD II............................................................................................ 5
Business Practices............................................................................. 4
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
DSN 245
Internship or Alternative Study........................................................... 4
DSN 251
Contract Furniture........................................................................... 3
DSN 266CAP Portfolio/Professional Presentation..................................................... 7
Technical Course Requirements (Total).............................................................105
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE.............................. 120
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)................................................105
General Education Requirements (See listing above)........................................ 20
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE.......................... 125
Optional Electives
DSN 202
DSN 206
DSN 208
DSN 211
DSN 214
DSN 219
DSN 221
DSN 223
DSN 265
DSN 270
DSN 275
Elements of Kitchen and Bath Design...................................................... 5
20/20 Drafting.................................................................................. 5
Materials and Estimating...................................................................... 4
Business Procedures and Sales.............................................................. 4
Green Design: An Overview................................................................ 5
A Closer Look at Living Green............................................................... 4
Building the Green Life: Materials and Estimating..................................... 5
Project Green: Developing a Green Design............................................. 5
Independent Study.............................................................................. 3
Independent Study.............................................................................. 4
Independent Study.............................................................................. 5
Interior Design
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
DSN 214
DSN 219
DSN 221
DSN 223
Credits
Green Design: An Overview................................................................ 5
A Closer Look at Living Green............................................................... 4
Building the Green Life: Materials and Estimating..................................... 5
Project Green: Developing a Green Design............................................. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 19
Manufacturing Technologies
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary for employment
in the manufacturing/metalworking industry as a machinist, machinist
apprentice, or machinist helper.
Responsible for setting up and operating conventional machine tools and
CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machine tools.
Advanced students will be proficient in programming, setting up, and
operating CNC machining centers. Students will develop proficiency in
blueprint reading, shop math, precision measuring, CAD/CAM
(Computer-Aided Drawing & Computer-Aided Machining), and CNC
(Computer Numerical Control) turning centers and milling machines.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This program is approximately six quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Kitchen & Bath
Students pursuing an AAT degree must complete all college degree
requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet the
capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Certificate
This certificate program covers the principles and elements of design for
kitchen and bathroom interiors.
Prerequisites: None
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters, or by
Instructor permission
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Admission Dates: Spring quarter
Credits
Prerequisites: None
MCH 101
MCH 105*
MCH 107
MCH 109
MCH 111
MCH 117*
MCH 121*
MCH 122
MCH 125
MCH 126
MCH 129
MCH 133
MCH 202
MCH 211
MCH 216
MCH 219
MCH 223
MCH 229
MCH 231
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Admission Dates: Summer quarter
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 135
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
DSN 202
DSN 206
DSN 208
DSN 211
Credits
Elements of Kitchen and Bath Design...................................................... 5
20/20 Drafting.................................................................................. 5
Materials and Estimating...................................................................... 4
Business Procedures and Sales.............................................................. 4
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 18
Interior Design
Green Design
Certificate
This certificate program covers sustainable design topics of the built
environment with a focus on interiors.
Orientation/Machine Shop Safety...................................................... 2
Shop Math/Blueprint I...................................................................... 6
Shop Math/Blueprint II...................................................................... 6
Shop Math/Blueprint III..................................................................... 6
Shop Machines & Tools.................................................................... 6
Lathes I........................................................................................... 6
Mills I............................................................................................. 6
Lathes & Mills II................................................................................ 8
Lathes & Mills III............................................................................. 10
Lathes & Mills IV............................................................................... 8
Surface Grinding............................................................................. 4
Tool & Cutter Grinding...................................................................... 5
Introduction to CNC......................................................................... 7
Intermediate CNC.......................................................................... 10
Advanced CNC.............................................................................12
Career Opportunities........................................................................ 4
Inspection Techniques....................................................................... 6
Metallurgy & Heat Treatment.............................................................. 4
Manufacturing Resources & Research................................................... 4
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).............. 5
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
Optional Course
MCH 240 Training & Practice........................................................................ 1-10
INTERIOR DESIGN
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
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2011-2012 Catalog
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2011-2012 Catalog
Manufacturing Technologies
Manufacturing Technologies
Machinist Apprentice
Machinist Helper
Certificate
Certificate
Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary for employment
in the manufacturing/metal working industry as a machinist apprentice.
Provides students with the knowledge and necessary skills for employment
in the manufacturing/metalworking industry. Students may enter the
industry as a machinist helper. Responsible for helping set up and operate
conventional machine tools.
Responsible for setting up and operating conventional machine tools and
CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machine tools.
Students will develop proficiency in blueprint reading, shop math,
precision measuring, conventional lathes and mills, surface and tool
cutter grinding, general shop machines, CAD/CAM (Computer-Aided
Drawing & Computer-Aided Machining), and CNC (Computer
Numerical Control) turning centers and milling machines.
Students will develop proficiency in blueprint reading, shop math,
precision measuring, conventional lathes and mills, surface, tool, and
cutter grinding, and general shop machines.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters, or by
Instructor permission
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
MCH 101
MCH 105*
MCH 111
MCH 117*
MCH 121*
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters, or by
Instructor permission
MANUFACTURING TECH
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
MCH 101
MCH 105*
MCH 107
MCH 109
MCH 111
MCH 117*
MCH 121*
MCH 122
MCH 125
MCH 126
MCH 129
MCH 133
MCH 202
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Orientation/Machine Shop Safety...................................................... 2
Shop Math/Blueprint I...................................................................... 6
Shop Math/Blueprint II...................................................................... 6
Shop Math/Blueprint III..................................................................... 6
Shop Machines & Tools.................................................................... 6
Lathes I........................................................................................... 6
Mills I............................................................................................. 6
Lathes & Mills II................................................................................ 8
Lathes & Mills III............................................................................. 10
Lathes & Mills IV............................................................................... 8
Surface Grinding............................................................................. 4
Tool & Cutter Grinding...................................................................... 5
Introduction to CNC......................................................................... 7
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).............. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 95
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
Optional Course
MCH 240 Training & Practice........................................................................ 1-10
This program is approximately one quarter in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Orientation/Machine Shop Safety...................................................... 2
Shop Math/Blueprint I...................................................................... 6
Shop Machines & Tools.................................................................... 6
Lathes I........................................................................................... 6
Mills I............................................................................................. 6
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 26
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
Optional Course
MCH 240 Training & Practice........................................................................ 1-10
Massage Studies
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Prepares successful students for employment and practice in a variety of
workplace settings. Graduates from this program are employed in spas,
clinics, hospitals, and successful private practices. Students develop a
strong foundation in Swedish massage and deep tissue techniques.
Clinical massage students benefit from advanced training in treatment
applications and assessment. Teaching techniques are varied, addressing
a wide variety of learning styles.
All students enrolled in the program are required to participate in the
exchange of applied massage techniques in a supervised and professional
setting. Participation in the student-operated massage clinic allows
students to gain experience in the profession while under supervision of
an Instructor.
Topics covered include, but are not limited to: massage theory and
practice; anatomy; physiology; pathology; kinesiology; orthopedic
assessment; pregnancy massage; sports massage; deep tissue; myofascial
techniques; lymphatic drainage; on-site seated massage; hydrotherapy;
hot stone massage; and mini-spa applications.
Business classes introduce the skills and theories necessary for successful
employment, such as: professional ethics, goal setting, business planning,
insurance billing, networking, and communicating with healthcare
professionals, marketing, job networking, rèsumès, and interviewing.
Included in the Associate Degree program are academic courses in
communication (English composition, speech), quantitative reasoning
(math) and social sciences (psychology, sociology) that provide knowledge
and abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal
development enhanced. These classes are offered at various times outside
the regular Massage program hours.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Upon successful completion of the program, the graduate is eligible to sit
for the National Certification Examination or Federation of State Massage Board Examination and apply for licensure in Washington State.
A Washington State Patrol background check will be conducted to screen
for prior convictions prior to State licensing. Persons with some types of
criminal convictions may not be eligible for licensure.
Prerequisites: A medical statement of health status from a primary
care provider stating the student is able to safely participate in all aspects
of the class is required to enter the program. That statement must be
submitted to the Instructor on the first day of class.
Potential students entering the program must test at college level in
reading on the COMPASS Assessment test or have completed English
94. Documentation of training in standard first aid and CPR and a fourhour HIV/AIDS/Blood-borne pathogens class, and a Washington State
Patrol background check is required to progress to the second quarter.
Some results from the background check may prevent individuals from
participating in certain classes.
Admission Dates:
Fall quarter - Lakewood day class
Spring quarter - Lakewood evening class
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
MASST 110
MASST 111
MASST 114
MASST 115
MASST 116
MASST 117
MASST 123
MASST 126
MASST 130
MASST 131
MASST 133
MASST 134
MASST 136
MASST 137
MASST 139
MASST 143
MASST 144
MASST 145
MASST 146
MASST 147
MASST 149
MASST 151DIV
MASST 153
MASST 155
MASST 157
MASST 158
MASST 159
MASST 160CAP
MASST 162
MASST 163
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Anatomy, Physiology, & Pathology I............................................... 5
Anatomy, Physiology, & Pathology II.............................................. 5
Swedish Massage Theory............................................................ 5
Clinical Massage Techniques....................................................... 4
Complementary Massage Modalities I........................................... 3
Swedish Massage Practice.......................................................... 4
Clinical Application of Massage Therapy....................................... 4
Kinesiology: Upper Extremity........................................................ 2
Kinesiology: Trunk...................................................................... 1
Assessment and Treatment of the Back........................................... 2
Deep Tissue Massage Theory....................................................... 4
Deep Tissue Massage Practice...................................................... 4
Complementary Massage Modalities II.......................................... 2
Kinesiology: Head and Neck....................................................... 1
Clinical Massage Business and Ethics I.......................................... 1
Massage Business and Ethics I...................................................... 2
Massage Business and Ethics II..................................................... 2
Orthopedic Assessment............................................................... 4
Kinesiology: Lower Extremity......................................................... 2
Clinical Massage Anatomy and Physiology I................................... 3
Clinical Massage Theory: Special Populations................................. 5
Clinical Massage Practice: Special Populations............................... 3
Assessment and Treatment: Upper Extremity.................................... 2
Assessment and Treatment: Lower Extremity..................................... 2
Assessment and Treatment: Head and Neck................................... 2
Practicum I................................................................................ 3
Clinical Massage Business and Ethics II.......................................... 1
Practicum II................................................................................ 3
Student Clinic............................................................................ 2
Clinical Massage Anatomy and Physiology II.................................. 3
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220............................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher)........................................ 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class)........ 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 101
Massage Studies
Clinical Massage Practitioner
Certificate
This certificate, approximately two quarters in length (may take longer
to complete), provides advanced study for licensed massage practitioners
and students who have completed the Swedish Practitioner portion of the
Massage Studies program.
Successful students will graduate with a firm understanding of the injury
and disease process, as well as possessing the knowledge and treatment
techniques to assess and effectively treat their clients.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of the Swedish Massage
Practitioner program, completion of a similar program from another
accredited institution, or currently a Washington State licensed massage
practitioner.
Admission Dates:
Lakewood campus - Day Class: Begins each Spring Quarter.
Lakewood campus - Evening Class: Begins each Winter Quarter. Not all
classes are offered in the evening.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
MASST 115
MASST 123
MASST 131
MASST 139
MASST 145
MASST 158
MASST 147
MASST 149
MASST 151DIV
MASST 153
MASST 155
MASST 157
MASST 159
MASST 160CAP
MASST 163
Credits
Clinical Massage Techniques....................................................... 4
Clinical Application of Massage Therapy....................................... 4
Assessment and Treatment of the Back........................................... 2
Clinical Massage Business and Ethics I.......................................... 1
Orthopedic Assessment.............................................................. 4
Practicum I................................................................................ 3
Clinical Massage Anatomy and Physiology I.................................. 3
Clinical Massage Theory: Special Populations................................ 5
Clinical Massage Practice: Special Populations............................... 3
Assessment and Treatment: Upper Extremity.................................... 2
Assessment and Treatment: Lower Extremity.................................... 2
Assessment and Treatment: Head and Neck................................... 2
Clinical Massage Business and Ethics II......................................... 1
Practicum II............................................................................... 3
Clinical Massage Anatomy and Physiology II.................................. 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 42
Massage Studies
Swedish Practitioner
Certificate
The Swedish Practitioner certificate prepares the successful student to
enter the massage profession with the knowledge and skills to perform
full-body Swedish massage and deep tissue massage. Completion of this
certificate satisfies the Washington Department of Health hours and
content requirement, allowing the graduate to take the certification
exam and apply for Washington State licensure.
This certificate can be completed in just over two terms for those students
in our day (full-time) section, or three terms for our evening students. In
addition to massage theory and practice, we will also be covering all the
systems in the body, with emphasis on the muscular system, and successful
business practices.
continues on next page
MASSAGE STUDIES
The Associate Degree program may take two years, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
59
2011-2012 Catalog
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CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Prerequisites: A medical statement of health status from a primary
care provider stating the student is able to safely participate in all aspects
of the class is required to enter the program. That statement must be
submitted to instructor on the first day of class.
Potential students entering the program must test at college level in
reading on the COMPASS Assessment test or have completed English
94. Documentation of training in standard first aid and CPR and a fourhour HIV/AIDS/Blood-borne pathogens class, and a background check
from the Washington State Patrol is required to progress to the second
quarter; some results may prevent individuals from participating in
certain classes.
Admission Dates:
Fall quarter - Lakewood day class
Spring quarter - Lakewood evening class
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
TOTAL CREDITS FOR DEGREE..................................................................110
Credits
MASST 110 Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology I...................................................... 5
MASST 111 Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology II..................................................... 5
MASST 114 Swedish Massage Theory................................................................. 5
MASST 116 Complementary Massage Modalities I................................................. 3
MASST 117 Swedish Massage Practice................................................................ 4
MASST 126 Kinesiology: Upper Extremity.............................................................. 2
MASST 130 Kinesiology: Trunk............................................................................ 1
MASST 133 Deep Tissue Massage Theory............................................................. 4
MASST 134 Deep Tissue Massage Practice........................................................... 4
MASST 136 Complementary Massage Modalities II................................................ 2
MASST 137 Kinesiology: Head and Neck............................................................. 1
MASST 143 Massage Business and Ethics I........................................................... 2
MASST 144 Massage Business and Ethics II........................................................... 2
MASST 146 Kinesiology: Lower Extremity.............................................................. 2
MASST 162 Student Clinic.................................................................................. 2
MATERIAL SCIENCE
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................44
Material Science
Composites
Associate of Applied Science - T
The Material Science – Composites program at Clover Park Technical
College prepares students for careers in composites manufacturing. In
this program, students learn to fabricate, assemble, repair, test, and
troubleshoot composite materials.
This program is approximately eight quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82, and successful completion of MAT 82 by the end
of the first quarter of the program or Instructor approval. Students
pursuing a degree in Material Science: Composites are encouraged to
complete the Aerospace Composite Technician certificate prior to taking
the Material Science degree.
MS 110
MS 115
MS 120
MS 125
MS 130
MS 135
Electives
NDT 250 NDT Internship..............................................................................1-11
NDT 255 NDT Special Projects...................................................................... 1-3
Other Material Science courses as approved by Instructor.
Material Science
Nondestructive Testing
Associate of Applied Science - T
The Material Science – Nondestructive Testing (NDT) program at
Clover Park Technical College provides training in a variety of analysis
techniques used in industry to evaluate the properties of a material or
structure without causing damage. Because NDT does not impair the
usefulness of the object being inspected, it is a valuable process that is
used in fields such as construction, manufacturing, civil engineering, and
transportation. Nondestructive testing techniques are used to examine
structures or vehicles such as aircraft, trains, nuclear reactors, bridges,
dams, and pipelines.
This program prepares graduates to become active and successful
professionals in nondestructive testing in a wide range of industries.
Students will explore and receive hands-on technical training in
blueprint reading, report form writing, codes and specifications,
composite fabrication, assembly and repair, metallurgy, the
manufacturing process as well as magnetic particle and liquid Penetrant,
radiographic testing, ultrasonic and eddy current. Successful graduates
are prepared with technical skills for entry level positions such as quality
control technicians, NDT technicians, engineering technicians, and
NDT equipment representatives.
This program is approximately eight quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82, and successful completion of MAT 82 by the end
of the first quarter of the program or Instructor approval.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
MS 140
Statistics for Material Engineering Technicians....................................... 3
MS 145
Fundamentals of Composites.............................................................. 4
NDT 135 NDI for Composite Structures............................................................. 3
NDT 150 Ultrasonic Testing I............................................................................ 5
NDT 160 Radiographic Testing I....................................................................... 5
NDT 180 Ultrasonic Testing II........................................................................... 5
NDT 190 Radiographic Testing II...................................................................... 5
NDT 220 Ultrasonic Testing III.......................................................................... 5
NDT 230 Radiographic Testing III..................................................................... 5
NDT 240CAP Capstone Project.............................................................................. 3
ENGL& 101 English Composition......................................................................... 5
MAT 110 or MATH& 141 Math for Non-Science Majors or Pre-Calculus I................... 5
PSYC& 100 General Psychology (or other social science course)............................... 5
PHYS& 121 General Physics I............................................................................. 5
Electives
10
Credits
Blueprint Reading and Sketching........................................................... 4
Intro to Report Forms Writing................................................................. 3
Introduction to Codes & Specifications................................................... 2
Fundamentals of Metallurgy.................................................................. 5
Manufacturing Processes...................................................................... 5
Principles of Troubleshooting................................................................. 3
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ACM 120
ACM 125
ACM 130
ACM 135
MS 110
MS 115
MS 120 Credits
Composite Fabrication...................................................................... 4
Composite Assembly........................................................................ 4
Composite Repair............................................................................. 4
Special Projects............................................................................... 3
Blueprint Reading and Sketching......................................................... 4
Intro to Report Forms Writing.............................................................. 3
Introduction to Codes & Specifications ................................................ 2
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
MS 125
Fundamentals of Metallurgy
.5
MS 130
Manufacturing Processes................................................................... 5
MS 135 Principles of Troubleshooting.............................................................. 3
MS 140 Statistics for Material Engineering Technicians....................................... 3
MS 145 Fundamentals of Composites.............................................................. 4
NDT 110
Introduction to NDT.......................................................................... 3
NDT 115 NDT Welding.................................................................................. 3
NDT 120 Visual and Optical Testing................................................................. 5
NDT 125
Magnetic Particle Testing................................................................... 5
NDT 130 Liquid Penetrant Testing...................................................................... 5
NDT 140 Eddy Current Testing I ...................................................................... 5
NDT 150 Ultrasonic Testing I............................................................................ 5
NDT 160 Radiographic Testing I....................................................................... 5
NDT 170 Eddy Current Testing II....................................................................... 5
NDT 180 Ultrasonic Testing II........................................................................... 5
NDT 190 Radiographic Testing II...................................................................... 5
NDT 210
Eddy Current Testing III...................................................................... 5
NDT 220 Ultrasonic Testing III.......................................................................... 5
NDT 230 Radiographic Testing III..................................................................... 5
NDT 240CAP Capstone Project.............................................................................. 3
NDT 250 NDT Internship..............................................................................1-11
NDT 255 NDT Special Projects...................................................................... 1-3
ENGL& 101 English Composition......................................................................... 5
MAT 110 or MATH& 141 Math for Non-Science Majors or Pre-Calculus I................... 5
PSYC& 100 General Psychology (or other social science course)............................... 5
PHYS& 121 General Physics I............................................................................. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR DEGREE..................................................................118
Electives
ACM 120
ACM 125
ACM 130
ACM 135
NDT 250
NDT 255
Composite Fabrication...................................................................... 4
Composite Assembly........................................................................ 4
Composite Repair............................................................................. 4
Special Projects............................................................................... 3
NDT Internship..............................................................................1-11
NDT Special Projects...................................................................... 1-3
61
2011-2012 Catalog
Material Science
Magnetic Particle &
Liquid Penetrant Testing
Certificate
Provides foundational knowledge related to nondestructive testing
(NDT) and offers the opportunity to gain hands-on training in the NDT
methods of magnetic particle inspection, liquid penetrant inspection,
and visual inspection.
The certificate program is two to three quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82, and successful completion of MAT 82 by the end
of the first quarter of the program or Instructor approval.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
MS 115
MS 120
MS 125
MS 130
MS 135
NDT 110
NDT 115
NDT 120
NDT 125
NDT 130
NDT 240
Credits
Intro to Report Forms Writing.............................................................. 3
Introduction to Codes & Specifications................................................. 2
Fundamentals of Metallurgy............................................................... 5
Manufacturing Processes................................................................... 5
Principles of Troubleshooting.............................................................. 3
Introduction to NDT.......................................................................... 3
NDT Welding.................................................................................. 3
Visual and Optical Testing................................................................. 5
Magnetic Particle Testing................................................................... 5
Liquid Penetrant Testing...................................................................... 5
Capstone Project.............................................................................. 3
Material Science
Material Science
Eddy Current Testing
Radiographic Testing
Certificate
This certificate provides students with foundational knowledge related to
nondestructive testing (NDT) and offers the opportunity to gain handson training in the NDT method eddy current inspection. Eddy current
inspection applies electrical currents to an object to create electromagnetic
fields. This type of testing can detect manufacturing defects and corrosion
damage or cracking for many nonmagnetic metals and alloys.
The certificate program is two to three quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82, and successful completion of MAT 82 by the end
of the first quarter of the program or Instructor approval.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
MS 115 MS 120
MS 125
MS 130
MS 135 MS 145
NDT 110
NDT 140 NDT 170 NDT 210
NDT 240
MATERIAL SCIENCE
TOTAL CREDITS FOR CERTIFICATE............................................................. 42
Credits
Intro to Report/Forms Writing................................................................ 3
Introduction to Codes & Specifications................................................... 2
Fundamentals of Metallurgy.................................................................. 5
Manufacturing Processes...................................................................... 5
Principles of Troubleshooting................................................................. 3
Fundamentals of Composites................................................................ 4
Introduction to NDT............................................................................. 3
Eddy Current Testing I.......................................................................... 5
Eddy Current Testing II......................................................................... 5
Eddy Current Testing III........................................................................ 5
Capstone Project................................................................................ 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR CERTIFICATE.............................................................43
Certificate
Provides foundational knowledge related to nondestructive testing
(NDT) and offers the opportunity to gain hands-on training in the NDT
method of radiographic inspection. Radiography uses x-rays or gamma
rays to show defects which might otherwise be invisible. A vast array of
material can be examined in this efficient and reliable way, ranging from
tiny electronic components to 20-foot freestanding concrete slabs.
The certificate program is two to three quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82, and successful completion of MAT 82 by the end
of the first quarter of the program or Instructor approval.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
MS 115 MS 120
MS 125
MS 130
MS 135
MS 145
NDT 110
NDT 160
NDT 190 NDT 230
NDT 240
Credits
Intro to Report Forms Writing.............................................................. 3
Introduction to Codes & Specifications................................................. 2
Fundamentals of Metallurgy............................................................... 5
Manufacturing Processes................................................................... 5
Principles of Troubleshooting.............................................................. 3
Fundamentals of Composites.............................................................. 4
Introduction to NDT.......................................................................... 3
Radiographic Testing I....................................................................... 5
Radiographic Testing II...................................................................... 5
Radiographic Testing III..................................................................... 5
Capstone Project.............................................................................. 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR CERTIFICATE.............................................................43
62
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
Material Science
Ultrasonic Testing
Certificate
Provides students with foundational knowledge related to nondestructive
testing (NDT) and offers the opportunity to gain hands-on training in
the NDT method of ultrasonic testing. With this method, NDT inspectors
need access to only one side of a material. A transducer sends the
ultrasound through the sample and the inner wall of a defect surface will
send the wave bouncing back. Ultrasonic testing is a portable and
efficient way to measure thickness, detect corrosion, and examine groove
welds in many materials.
The certificate program is two to three quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements.
Prerequisites: COMPASS Reading 68 and Writing 33, or successful
completion of ENG 82, and successful completion of MAT 82 by the end
of the first quarter of the program or Instructor approval.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
MATERIAL SCIENCE
MS 115
MS 120 MS 125
MS 130 MS 135
MS 145 NDT 110
NDT 150
NDT 180
NDT 220 NDT 240
Credits
Intro to Report Forms Writing................................................................. 3
Introduction to Codes & Specifications................................................... 2
Fundamentals of Metallurgy.................................................................. 5
Manufacturing Processes...................................................................... 5
Principles of Troubleshooting................................................................. 3
Fundamentals of Composites................................................................ 4
Introduction to NDT............................................................................. 3
Ultrasonic Testing I.............................................................................. 5
Ultrasonic Testing II............................................................................. 5
Ultrasonic Testing III............................................................................. 5
Capstone Project................................................................................ 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR CERTIFICATE.............................................................43
Media Design & Production
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
New Media, Motion Graphics, Video and Web Design, prepares students
for careers in corporate, government, or private media centers and
production facilities. Future employment may include project developers,
script writers, video editors, web designers, and web computer graphics
designer. Provides exposure to the technique and tools of new media.
Core studies in new media provide a strong foundation for the specialized
courses in Digital Video Production and Post Production, Motion
Graphics and Web Design.
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: Basic competency with personal computers and MS
Office software applications. To enroll in electives, students must have a
cumulative 2.0 GPA or Instructor permission.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters. Part-time admission into
individual courses permitted any quarter, based on seat/room availability
(Instructor permission required).
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
GTC 130
MDP 103
MDPW 134
MDP 121
MDP 119
MDP 133
MDP 146
MDP 171
MDP 189
MDP 251CAP
MDPA 114
MDPA 151
MDPV 115
MDPV 214
MDPV 257
MDPW 123
MDPW 211
MDPW 246
Credits
Digital Imaging I: Photoshop............................................................. 5
Fundamentals of Drawing OR
Web Animation I – Flash................................................................. 5
Photoshop: Compositing & Retouching............................................... 5
Digital Photography........................................................................ 5
Introduction to Dreamweaver............................................................ 5
Digital Video & Audio Editing – Premiere Pro....................................... 5
Designing with Illustration Software.................................................... 5
Camera & Lighting: Portraits/Products................................................ 5
Multimedia Capstone Project............................................................ 5
3D Fundamentals........................................................................... 5
3D Animation................................................................................ 5
Introduction to Compositing.............................................................. 5
Intermediate Compositing................................................................ 5
Field & Studio Production Techniques I............................................... 5
Web Design Principles.................................................................... 5
Web Animation II – Flash................................................................. 5
Advanced Digital Illustration............................................................. 5
Technical Course Requirements (Total).............................................................. 85
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE.............................. 100
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Innovations in computer technology continue to rapidly change and
expand the multimedia field. Therefore, the following courses of study
may be subject to change in order to offer training based on current
industry standards.
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)................................................. 85
General Education Requirements (See listing above).......................................... 20
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Media Substitute
Electives: can be substituted for other classes, Instructor approval
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science –T
(AAS-T). The different requirements for each degree are listed below:
MDP 231
MDP 239
MDPV 260
MDP 245
MDPA 139
MDPW 219
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE........................... 105
Independent Study........................................................................... 5
Internship........................................................................................ 5
Field & Studio Video Production Tech II................................................ 5
Photoshop: Special Effects & Techniques.............................................. 5
Modeling I...................................................................................... 5
Web Animation III............................................................................ 5
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Media Design & Production
Medical Assistant
Web Design & Open Source
Web Development
Certificate
Medical Assistant Program (MAP) graduates may assume positions as
multi-skilled allied health professionals who perform a wide range of
duties in physicians’ offices, clinics, and other outpatient healthcare
settings.
The Web Design & Open Source Web Development Certificate program
focuses on using open source web development languages to create
Internet documents according to industry standards.
Current design and interactive/ authoring software are used to create
products that effectively communicate with the intended audience.
Coursework combines lecture, lab applications, individual and group
projects, potential internship opportunities, and a final website portfolio.
Classes are planned to emphasize practical production techniques and
allow individual lab time for personal portfolio building.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication
(English composition, speech), quantitative reasoning (math) and social
sciences (psychology, sociology) that provide knowledge and abilities
upon which technical skills are built and personal development enhanced.
This certificate program is approximately four quarters in length,
depending on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all
graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: Basic competency with personal computers and MS
Office software applications.
Admission Dates: Fall Quarter. Part-time admission into individual
courses permitted any quarter based on room availability and prior
experience (Instructor permission required).
Want more information? Visit the Instructor’s web page.
Credits
GTC 130 Digital Imaging: Photoshop................................................................ 5
MDP 133 Introduction to Dreamweaver.............................................................. 5
MDP 171 Designing with Illustration Software...................................................... 5
MDP 251 Multimedia Capstone Project.............................................................. 5
MDPW 111 Web Development Languages I – XHTML & CSS................................... 5
MDPW 123 Web Design Principles...................................................................... 5
MDPW 134 Web Animation I – Flash................................................................... 5
MDPW 211 Web Animation II – Flash.................................................................. 5
MDPW 216 Open Source Development Tools – PHP I............................................. 5
MDPW 219 Web Animation III............................................................................ 5
MDPW 231 Databases for the Web – MySQL....................................................... 5
MDPW 241 Open Source Development Tools – PHP II............................................. 5
MDPW 246 Advanced Digital Illustration Software.................................................. 5
MDPW 249 Web Development Languages II – Java Script....................................... 5
MDPW 265 Emerging Technologies...................................................................... 5
MDPW 271 Graphic Design for the Web – Dreamweaver II..................................... 5
ENGL& 101 English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
MAT 105 Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
PSYC& 100 General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).............. 5
8 Electives .................................................................................................. 30
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 125
This program is accredited through the Commission on Accreditation of
Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). Upon successful
completion of the MAP, students will receive a Certificate of Completion
and be eligible to take the national certification exam to become a
Certified Medical Assistant (CMA).
The MAP curriculum includes anatomy and physiology, medical
terminology, medical law and ethics, oral and written communication,
administrative procedures, financial record keeping, mathematics,
insurance billing and medical coding, basic office diagnostic procedures,
principles of pharmacology and medication administration,
venipuncture, basic asepsis, and microbiology.
Students are trained in administrative and clinical procedures performed
in physicians’ offices, and the curriculum meets the requirement for
certification as a Health Care Assistant, State of Washington, categories
A, C, and E. Training will also include professional telephone techniques,
scheduling appointments, interviewing and instructing patients, making
arrangements for patient admission to a hospital, maintaining financial
records and files, completing insurance forms, preparing and maintaining
employees’ payroll records, assisting patients in preparing for
examinations, cleaning and sterilizing instruments and equipment,
collecting specimens, performing electrocardiograms, and assisting
physicians with treatments and surgeries.
Included in this program are general education courses in math, public
speaking, and sociology, providing knowledge and abilities upon which
technical skills are built and personal development enhanced. Additional
courses included in the MAP consist of the following: CAH 102 Medical
Terminology, CAH 103 Introduction to Health Professions, and CAH
105 Computer Applications for Allied Health Professionals. There is an
acceptable replacement course for MAP 168.
This program is approximately five quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Students will receive HIV/AIDS and HIPPA certifications from the
program, but must obtain a First Aid/CPR for Health Professionals/
Providers card external to the program and prior to externship.
Externship hours will vary and will be completed during the day hours
for both day and evening students. Students, with the assistance of the
Instructors and/or clinical placement coordinator, will have the
opportunity to secure their own externship site. Upon completion of the
MAP, students will graduate with a Certificate of Completion.
Prerequisites: Students must attend a mandatory orientation/advising
meeting with the Instructors in order to register in the program.Students
are required to show proof of a high school diploma or GED upon entry
into the MAP. All MAP courses in quarters one through four, including
general education courses, must be successfully completed before
entering the fifth quarter. See course descriptions for other course
prerequisites.
continues on next page
MEDIA DESIGN & PROD
Certificate
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
63
64
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Before entering the Invasive course, students must have current
immunizations or laboratory verification of immune status. This
includes, but is not limited to, Tetanus/Diphtheria, Hepatitis B, Measles/
Mumps/ Rubella, and Varicella, as required by contracts with clinical
facilities and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommendations.
Tuberculosis skin testing is also required.
In order to participate in the externship, students must receive a No
Record on File report related to Crimes against Persons from the
Washington State Patrol. Each student is required to carry personal
health/medical insurance throughout their clinical rotations.
Quarterly-based insurance for students may be purchased; further
information is available through the Advising and Counseling Office. No
student will be allowed at a clinical site without proof of insurance.
Admission Dates: Summer and Winter quarter start dates for the day
program and Fall and Spring quarter start dates for the evening program.
Once a student begins in either the day or evening program section, they
will be unable to change sections without authorization from an
Instructor.
Program Accreditation
The Medical Assistant Program at Clover Park Technical College is
accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health
Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the
Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB).
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
1361 Park Street, Clearwater, FL 33756
(727) 210-2350
MEDICAL HISTOLOGY TECH
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
CAH 102 Medical Terminology........................................................................ 5
CAH 103 Introduction to Health Professions........................................................ 5
CAH 105 Computer Applications for Allied Health Professions............................... 5
MAP 105 Introduction to Medical Assisting......................................................... 4
MAP 125 Medical Assistant Theory & Applications I............................................ 7
MAP 130 Medical Assistant Theory & Applications II............................................ 7
MAP 149 Medical Assistant Theory & Applications III........................................... 7
MAP 143 Medical Office Procedures................................................................ 6
MAP 148 Health Insurance, Coding Practices, and Billing & Collecting................... 4
MAP 162 Automated Computer Applications...................................................... 3
MAP 167 Preparation for Externship.................................................................. 2
MAP 168 Basic Collecting & Financing Practices or ACTG 110.............................. 6
MAP 221 Invasive Procedures.......................................................................... 5
MAP 222 Community Employment Opportunities & Loc......................................... 1
MAP 232 Externship..................................................................................... 10
CMST& 220 Public Speaking............................................................................... 5
MAT 108 Math for Health Occupations (or higher required).................................. 5
SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology (or other social science or humanities class)........ 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................92
Medical Histology Technician
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Associate in Applied Science – T Degree
Trains the student to prepare thin sections of human tissue for microscopic
examination. Prepares students for entry level employment as medical
histology technicians in clinical, veterinary, and research laboratories. It
also serves as a pathway for career advancement and specialized areas in
the medical histotechnology profession.
The program stresses practical application and the development of job
skills as well as medical histotechnology theory.
Designed to enhance the ability of students to reason, understand, and
apply correct principles of medical histotechnology by teaching analytical
and critical thinking skills, this course prepares students to sit for the
National Board Certification Exam.
New entrants into the field, as well as incumbent workers who have not
had the advantage of receiving a strong theoretical foundation, will find
this course of study beneficial. Students will be involved in classroom/lab
work for the first three quarters of the program with the remaining time
spent in a clinical rotation.
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly insurance for students may
be purchased; further information is available through the Advising and
Counseling Office. No student will be allowed at a clinical site without
proof of insurance.
Prerequisites: Before starting the program, students must have a high
school diploma or GED.
In order to participate in the clinical aspect of the program, students
must receive a No Record on File Report related to Crimes Against
Persons from the Washington State Patrol. They must obtain CPR
certification, and must have current immunizations or laboratory
verification of immune status, which could include, but is not limited to,
Hepatitis B series, Tetanus/Diphtheria, Tuberculosis Test, Measles/
Mumps/Rubella, and Varicella, as required by contracts with clinical
facilities and CDC recommendations. Proof of immunizations is required
by the last day of class in Fall quarter, without exception.
Note: This program requires that three of the general education courses
be taken prior to beginning the HISTO course sequence. Therefore,
BIOL 118, CHEM& 110, and ENGL& 101 need to be taken prior to Fall
quarter when the HISTO courses begin.
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition and CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT
105 Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Admission Date: Fall quarter
This program is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for
Clinical Laboratory Sciences, 5600 N. River Road, Suite 720, Rosemont,
IL 60018 (773) 714-8880.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
BIOL 118
CAH 102
CAH 105CL
CHEM& 110
CMST& 220
ENGL& 101
HISTO 105
HISTO 110
HISTO 115
HISTO 120
HISTO 125
HISTO 130
HISTO 135
HISTO 140
HISTO 145
HISTO 150CAP
HISTO 160
Credits
Anatomy & Physiology.................................................................. 5
Medical Terminology................................................................... 5
Computer Applications................................................................. 5
Chemical Concepts w/Lab........................................................... 5
Public Speaking.......................................................................... 5
English Composition I................................................................... 5
Orientation to the Histology Laboratory........................................... 2
Histotechnology I...................................................................... 10
Histotechnology Lab I................................................................... 5
Histotechnology II...................................................................... 10
Histotechnology Lab II.................................................................. 5
Math Applications for Histology..................................................... 3
Histotechnology III..................................................................... 10
Histotechnology Lab III................................................................. 5
Immunohistochemistry................................................................... 5
Histology Internship.................................................................... 10
Histology Seminar....................................................................... 5
Technical Course Requirements (Total).............................................................100
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................10
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.........................................................110
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)................................................100
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE............................115
Note: In addition to BIO 118 and CHEM& 110, 10 credits of social science, humanities,
or science are needed to complete the AAS-T degree.
This program is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for
Clinical Laboratory Sciences:
5600 N. River Road, Suite 720, Rosemont IL 60018-5119
(847) 939-3547
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly-based insurance for
students may be purchased; further information is available through the
Advising and Counseling Office. No student will be allowed at a clinical
site without proof of insurance.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: High School diploma, or GED, as well as college-level
courses in both Biology with a lab, and Chemistry with a lab completed
within five years, with a grade of B or better, prior to admission into the
program. Speaking, understanding, and writing the English language are
required. To enter the program, a student must meet the prerequisites for
college-level reading, writing, and math. In order to participate in the
clinical aspect of the program, students must receive a No Record on File
report related to Crimes Against Persons from the Washington State
Patrol and students must have current immunizations or laboratory
verification of immune status. This includes, but is not limited to, Hepatitis
B series, Tetanus/Diphtheria, Tuberculosis Test, Measles/ Mumps/
Rubella, and Varicella as required by contracts with clinical facilities and
CDC recommendations. Proof of immunizations is required by the last
day of class in Spring quarter, without exception. CPR certification from
the American Heart Association with the designation Health Care
Provider is required prior to commencing clinical rotation.
Medical Laboratory Technician
Admission Date: Spring quarter
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Prepares students to work in clinical laboratories performing routine
analyses on blood and body fluids.
This program is four quarters in length, offered in two phases: 23 weeks
of academics and 19 weeks of clinical experience.
During the academic phase (Spring and Summer quarters, and three
weeks of Fall quarter), students are on campus in a simulated clinical
laboratory, and study focuses on the theory of laboratory testing of body
fluids.
Basic skills, normal values, the significance of abnormal values, and
quality control are emphasized. Normal human anatomy and physiology,
and the changes that occur in disease states are also studied.
During the clinical phase (Fall and Winter quarters), students are
assigned to affiliated clinical laboratories in the Puget Sound area. Each
student rotates through all the departments of the clinical laboratory,
spending appropriate lengths of time in each.
Eight-hour day shifts are assigned by the affiliated laboratory during the
clinical phase. Upon successful completion, graduates are eligible to take
a certification examination qualifying them for employment as a
Laboratory Technician or a Medical Laboratory Technician with
professional recognition of having achieved MLT (ASCP) status.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication
(English composition, speech), quantitative reasoning (math), and social
sciences (psychology) that provide knowledge and abilities upon which
technical skills are built and personal development enhanced.
MLT 110
MLT 203
MLT 204
MLT 208
MLT 210
MLT 214
MLT 216
MLT 217
MLT 218
MLT 221
MLT 227
MLT 232
MLT 235
MLT 236CAP
ENGL& 101
MAT& 141
PSYC& 100
Credits
Introduction to the Laboratory........................................................... 2
Hematology................................................................................ 10
Hemostasis................................................................................... 5
Phlebotomy/Processing................................................................... 2
Immunology.................................................................................. 7
Immunohematology........................................................................ 6
Clinical Blood Banking................................................................... 5
Microbiology.............................................................................. 10
Urinalysis...................................................................................... 3
Body Fluids................................................................................... 1
Clinical Chemistry.......................................................................... 8
Clinical Experience I......................................................................11
Clinical Experience II...................................................................... 9
Clinical Experience III..................................................................... 7
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................. 5
Precalculus I.................................................................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course).......... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 101
Optional Electives:
Students may also choose to take any course in the Hemodialysis
Technician program as an optional elective for this program.
MEDICAL LAB TECH
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
65
2011-2012 Catalog
66
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Nursing
Nursing
Nursing Assistant
Nursing Assistant (I-BEST)
Certificate
Certificate
The Certificate program prepares students for employment as Nursing
Assistants under the supervision of professional licensed nurses, such as a
Registered Nurse or Licensed Practical Nurse.
Prepares the student for employment as a Nursing Assistant, functioning
under the supervision of professional licensed providers such as a
Registered Nurse or Licensed Practical Nurse.
This program prepares the student for employment to provide care for
long-term care residents per the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act
(OBRA) federal law. The Washington State Department of Health
guidelines (nurse aide competency minimum requirements) for licensure
are based on this law. Upon completion of this course, the student will be
eligible to sit for the State Certification Examination - the National
Nurse Aide Assessment Program Exam (NNAAP).
The student must successfully complete classroom theory, nursing
laboratory, and unit-based clinical instruction. The integrated nursing
assistant program combines basic skills instruction with the healthcare
curriculum. Upon completion of this course, the student will be eligible
to sit for the State Certification Examination - the National Nurse Aide
Assessment Program Exam (NNAAP).
The total number of hours to complete the course is 168 hours. There are
three sections which must be completed per grade and skill proficiency.
NAC 101 involves 65 hours of Nursing Assistant theory, which includes
HIV/AIDS and CPR. NURS 104 includes 43 hours of Nursing Skill
Fundamentals. NAC 103 includes 60 hours of Unit-Based Clinical
Rotation, which involves professionally supervised shifts with hands-on
care provided to residents in a long-term care facility, using the knowledge
and skills acquired from NAC 101 and NURS 104. Scheduling of the
Clinical portion of class is determined by facility availability. Attendance
at all clinical instruction days is mandatory.
NURSING
Prerequisites: Students must have current immunizations or laboratory
verification of immune status. This includes Hepatitis B series plus
positive titer, Tetanus or T-dap within last 10 years, 2-step TB screening,
Measles/ Mumps/Rubella (2 injections or 1 injection and positive titer)
and verification of immunity to Varicella. Immunization requirements
may change based on CDC guidelines and / or clinical facility policies.
Immunizations must be presented on the first day of class.
In order to participate in the program, the student must receive a No
Record on File report from the Washington State Patrol and DSHS.
Structured classroom curriculum includes introduction to long-term care,
the role of the nursing assistant, working environment/safety, infection
control/HIV/AIDS, special needs of the elderly and chronically ill, end
of life issues and care, CPR, emergency care, basic nursing, restorative
care, body systems which includes but not limited to review of
cardiovascular, respiratory, integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive,
endocrine, nervous, immune, and lymphatic systems. Additionally
students develop computer skills and prepare for employment search in
the health field. The second quarter includes the Nursing Lab and Unit
Based Clinical Experience. During the laboratory experience, students
will learn and be expected to practice and demonstrate all skills taught.
The Unit Based Clinical instruction gives the opportunity to continue to
practice the skills received in classroom theory and laboratory
environment. The Unit Based Clinical instruction, involves 60 hours of
supervised instruction at a long-term care facility. Mandatory attendance
is required for all Nursing Laboratory and clinical days. Scheduling of the
Unit Based Clinical portion of class is determined by facility availability.
This program is approximately two quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly-based insurance for
students may be purchased; further information is available through the
Advising and Counseling Office. No student will be allowed at a clinical
site without proof of health insurance.
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly-based insurance for
students may be purchased; further information is available through the
Advising and Counseling Office. No student will be allowed at clinical
sites without proof of health insurance, all required immunizations, and
evidence that the student has applied for the Nursing Assistant—
Registered license through the Washington State Department of Health.
Physical Activity: This occupation requires medium physical activity
and lifting/handling objects weighing up to 50 pounds. Nursing
Assistants are often standing for long periods of time.
Prerequisites: Students must pass a criminal background check
performed by the Washington State Patrol and DSHS and have a No
Record on File report.
For safety and protection of patients, the student nurse must be able to
perform basic cardiac life support, including CPR, and function in
stressful and/or emergency situations. Students must be able to safely
assist a patient in moving from bed to a chair, commode, or cart.
Students must have current immunizations or laboratory verification of
immune status. This could include, but is not limited to, Measles/
Mumps/Rubella, Hepatitis B series, Tetanus/Diphtheria (within the last
10 years), TWO-PPD/Tuberculosis Tests (the second PPD should occur
10-14 days after the reading of the first PPD), and Varicella, as required
by contracts with clinical facilities and CDC recommendations. Proof of
immunizations should be submitted the first day of class, unless
arrangements have been made with the Instructor.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
Application packets are available in Advising and Counseling Office. For
additional information, contact Program Coordinator at (253)
589-5885.
Orientation: For additional information contact Program Coordinator
at (253) 589-5885.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
NAC 101 Nursing Assistant Theory.................................................................... 6
NAC 103 Unit Based Clinical Experience........................................................... 3
NURS 104 Nursing Skill Fundamentals................................................................. 4
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 13
The student must have ability to lift up to 50 pounds. The student must
be screened, using the CASAS assessment to meet eligibility requirements.
Admission Dates: Spring and Fall quarters
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
NAC 119
NAC 129
NAC 139
NURS 106
CAH 105
COLL 105
Credits
Nursing Assistant Theory I.................................................................. 6
Nursing Assistant Theory II................................................................. 3
Unit-Based Clinical Experience I-BEST.................................................. 3
Nursing Skill Fundamentals I-BEST....................................................... 6
Computer Applications...................................................................... 3
Career Development......................................................................... 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................24
Nursing
Practical Nursing
Certificate
Prepares the graduate for employment as a Licensed Practical Nurse.
This program includes classroom instruction and laboratory experience.
Clinical experiences provide students with the opportunity to care for a
variety of clients in acute, long-term, mental health, and outpatient
facilities. The program focuses on the practical nursing role of providing
basic care for clients under the supervision of the registered nurse or
physician.
The practical nurse assists in implementing the nursing process and
health teaching. Satisfactory completion qualifies the graduate to apply
for licensure as a practical nurse in the State of Washington and take the
NCLEX-PN exam.
Clinical hours vary, depending on the facility assigned; student may be
assigned to day, evening, and/or weekend shifts.
All students entering the practical nurse program must have completed a
state approved nursing assistant program, successfully passed the state
exam, and maintained their nursing assistant license without any
restrictions on their license.
This program is approximately four quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: Student must have a high school transcript or GED
certificate, completed all academic prerequisites, successfully passed the
state nursing assistant exam and maintain an unencumbered/
unrestricted license, completed American Heart Association CPR for the
Health Care Provider, and completed all immunizations.
Before applying to the Practical Nurse program, students must complete:
(1) general education courses, (2) certifications, and (3) all immunizations.
Successful completion of General Education courses:
ENGL& 101 English composition: (5 credits) or ENGL& 235 Technical
Writing (5 credits); MAT 108 Math for Health Occupations (5 credits) or
MATH& 141 Pre-Calculus I (5 credits), or MATH& 146 Introduction to
Statistics (5 credits); PSYC& 100 General Psychology: (5 credits); BIOL
118 Human Anatomy/Physiology: (5 credits) with B grade or better prior
to applying for the program. If the student is taking prerequisites at
CPTC, students must meet COMPASS scores required for placement
into the core academic courses.
If the student is taking or has taken prerequisite courses at another
educational institution, (s)he must have credits evaluated prior to
submitting the application. The student must request an official college
transcript be sent to CPTC Student Records for evaluation and complete
a transfer credit request form. Your transcripts will be evaluated and a
report will be mailed to you. The Evaluation Transfer Report MUST
accompany your application.
Certifications: Documentation of current CPR training for the
Healthcare Provider that includes adult, child, and infant, under the
guidelines of the American Heart Association. Online CPR courses are
not accepted.
Documentation of immunizations: which include Hepatitis B series
plus positive titer, Tetanus/Diphtheria, TB: (1) 2-step TB screening, OR
(2) Quantiferum Gold TB test, or (3) history of past three years TB
testing. Also required: Measles/ Mumps/Rubella (2 injections or 1
injection and positive titer) and verification of immunity to Varicella.
Seasonal flu and H1N1 are also required. Immunization requirements
may change, based on CDC guidelines and/or clinical facility policies.
Note: Students entering the Practical Nurse Program in the Fall quarter
2011, or later must have taken a state-approved NAC course, passed the
state exam, and be currently licensed as an NAC. Students may apply for
admission to the program when the general education prerequisites,
certifications, and immunizations are complete. Students will be given a
tentative admit date, however, students may not start the Practical Nurse
program until completing the NAC course, exam, and licensure.
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly-based insurance for
students may be purchased; further information is available through the
Advising and Counseling Office. No student will be allowed at clinical
sites without proof of insurance.
In order to participate in the program, the student must receive a No
Record on File Report Related to Crimes Against Persons from the
Washington State Patrol.
Physical Activity: This occupation requires medium physical activity and
lifting/handling objects weighing 10-25 pounds (occasionally up to 50
pounds). Nurses are often standing for long periods of time. For safety and
protection of patients, the student nurse must be able to perform basic cardiac life support, including CPR, and function in stressful and/or emergency
situations. Students must be able to safely assist a patient in moving from bed
to a chair, commode, or cart. Students must sign an affidavit that they meet
the physical requirements before they can be placed in a clinical setting.
Admission Dates: Fall and Spring quarters
Download the LPN Admissions Packet now and fill it out. Applications
are also available in-person in the Advising and Counseling Department,
Building 17. The student may submit the application once all prerequisites
and requirements have been completed. We do not have an application
deadline. Applications are accepted year-round. Once a completed
application is received and approved, you will be placed on a wait list.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
NURS 102
NURS 109
NURS 112
NURS 113
NURS 115
NURS 119
NURS 120
NURS 124
NURS 125
NURS 128
NURS 130
NURS 132
NURS 135
NURS 136
NURS 144
NURS 147
NURS 154
NURS 158
Credits
Issues & Trends in Nursing................................................................. 3
Basic Nutrition for Nursing................................................................. 3
Lab & Clinical I................................................................................ 4
Essentials of Nursing......................................................................... 3
Health Assessment and Promotion....................................................... 3
Dosage Calculation for Nurses........................................................... 2
Medical Surgical Nursing I................................................................ 3
Mental Health Nursing...................................................................... 3
Pharmacology in Nursing.................................................................. 3
Contemporary Maternity Nursing........................................................ 3
Nursing of Children.......................................................................... 3
Lab & Clinical II............................................................................... 4
Geriatric Nursing............................................................................. 3
Medical-Surgical Nursing II................................................................ 6
Medical-Surgical Nursing III............................................................... 6
Clinical Practicum I..........................................................................12
Issues & Trends in Nursing II............................................................... 2
Clinical Practicum II.........................................................................12
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 78
NURSING
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
67
2011-2012 Catalog
68
2011-2012 Catalog
Nursing
RN Option
Associate Degree in Nursing
Associate in Applied Science - T Degree
(253) 589-6013 or (253) 589-6022
Graduates of this program are educated in Nursing as a Registered
Nurse with duties and responsibilities in accordance with the Washington
Administrative Code. The nursing programs at CPTC are (1) accredited
by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, (2) has
program approval through the Washington State Nursing Care Quality
Assurance Commission Nursing Program Approval Panel (allowing all
graduates to be eligible to take the NCLEX-RN exam) and (3) has been
granted candidate status from the National League of Nursing and are
therefore eligible for national accreditation. CPTC courses with an & in
the course name are seamlessly transferable to other Washington State
educational institutions. Upon successful completion of university
prerequisites, the CPTC nursing graduate with an unrestricted and
current RN license can pursue a BSN.Students applying to this program
are advised to check with the nursing program for updated course and
prerequisite information.
NURSING
The program is designed to meet needs of practicing LPNs who desire
additional education to progress to the role of a Registered Nurse. The
combination of previous experience and further education via lecture
and clinical practice prepares the student to assume the role of a Registered Nurse in a variety of clinical settings. The student will receive the
AAS-T degree upon successful completion of all prerequisites, nursing
courses, and general educational courses required. After receiving the
degree, the student is eligible to take the NCLEX-RN exam.
RN Option program complies with all the guidelines set forth in WAC
246-840-575. The curriculum contains theory and clinical experiences
in the areas of medical/surgical nursing, obstetric nursing, nursing of
children, and psychiatric nursing. Clinical experiences will include
opportunities for students to have direct involvement in and accountability
for nursing care for patients with acute and chronic illnesses. Clinical
experiences will include opportunities for the student to demonstrate
assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of nursing care of
diverse individuals and groups. Finally, history, trends, and legal and
ethical issues pertaining to the nursing profession will be presented as a
separate course; however, the concepts will be incorporated throughout.
This four quarter program is a combination of classroom, laboratory,
and clinical experience. A capstone clinical experience with a practicing
Registered Nurse as preceptor will allow immersion into the role of the
RN during a regular working schedule.
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly-based insurance for
students may be purchased; further information is available through the
Advising and Counseling Office. No student will be allowed at clinical
sites without proof of insurance.
Prerequisites: Before applying to the RN program students must
complete: (1) General education courses
(2) Certifications and background check
(3) All immunizations
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
General educational courses: Students must receive a grade of B or
better in the following required prerequisite courses:
• ENGL& 101 English Composition
• BIOL& 241 Anatomy and Physiology I with lab and BIOL& 242
Anatomy and Physiology II with a lab
• BIOL 260 General Microbiology
• PSYC& 100 General Psychology
• PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology (developmental psychology)
• CHEM& 121
• And one of the following math courses: MATH& 141 Precalculus I, or
MATH& 146 Introduction to Statistics
• Speaking, understanding, and writing the English language is required
Certifications and background check: The student must have an
active, unrestricted LPN license in Washington State and 500 hours of
employment experience as an LPN, verified by either documented work
hours or employee’s supervisor signature. Students must have a criminal
background check performed by the Washington State Patrol with a
result of No Record on File in order to be accepted into the program.
Students must have current CPR for the Healthcare Provider training
that includes adult, child, and infant, and AED under the guidelines of
the American Heart Association (online CPR course not accepted).
Documentation of Immunizations, including Hepatitis B series plus
positive titer, Tetanus/Diphtheria, TB: (1) 2-step TB screening, OR (2)
Quantiferum Gold TB test, or (3) history of past three years TB testing,
or (4) negative chest X-ray with annual system free Physician note.
Measles/ Mumps/Rubella (2 injections or 1 injection and positive titer),
and verification of immunity to Varicella. Seasonal flu and H1N1 are
also required. Immunization requirements may change, based on CDC
guidelines and/or clinical facility policies.
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall quarter
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
NURS 211 Physical Assessment with lab............................................................. 7
NURS 208 Pharmacology for Professional Nursing............................................... 5
NURS 214CL Transitioning to Professional Nursing I.................................................. 1
NURS 215CL Transitioning to Professional Nursing II................................................. 1
NURS 212DIV Caring for Women and the Childbearing Family................................... 4
NURS 218 Caring for the Pediatric Patient........................................................... 3
NURS 217 Client Care: Management Practice I................................................... 4
NURS 222DIV Care of the Adult with Chronic Health Problems.................................... 4
NURS 224 Mental Health Nursing..................................................................... 4
NURS 226 Client Care: Management Practice II.................................................. 5
NURS 232 Perspectives in Professional Nursing.................................................... 3
NURS 234 Care of the Adult with Acute Health Problems....................................... 4
NURS 237CAP Capstone Clinical............................................................................ 4
NURS 241 Independent Study (Optional).......................................................... 1-3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION .................................................... 49-51
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Pharmacy technicians process prescriptions, prepare intravenous drugs,
order and stock medications, prepare billing, and operate and trouble
shoot automated drug dispensing systems.
Successful graduates of this program are educated and trained in
Pharmacy Technician duties and responsibilities, under the guidelines of
the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.
The structured classroom curriculum includes customer service,
communication, prescription processing, aseptic technique, human
relations, and pharmacy calculations. The clinical component of the
program gives the student a chance to practice the skills received in
the classroom and laboratory environment. This prepares the student
to assume the role of a pharmacy technician in a variety of pharmacy
settings.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge
and abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal
development enhanced.
This program is a combination of classroom, laboratory and clinical
experience. Daytime and part-time evening options are available.
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly-based insurance for
students may be purchased; further information is available through the
Advising/Counseling Office. No student will be allowed at clinical sites
without proof of insurance.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: Before starting the program a student must have a high
school diploma or GED.
To enter the program, students must meet the prerequisite for college
level reading, writing, and math. They must have completed a collegelevel math course and CAH 105 Computer Applications or equivalent.
Students must also complete Medical Terminology by the end of the first
quarter. Students must maintain a B or above in all technical and general
education courses to continue in the program.
Students will have a criminal background check performed by the
Washington State Patrol and the Washington State Board of Pharmacy
prior to their clinical rotation. Students must have current immunizations
or laboratory verification of immune status. This could include, but not
be limited to, Measles/Mumps/Rubella, Hepatitis B series, Tetanus/
Diphtheria, Tuberculosis Test, and Varicella, as required by contracts
with clinical facilities and CDC recommendations.
Students must have current CPR for the Healthcare Professional. Proof
of immunizations should be submitted the first day of class unless
arrangements have been made with Instructor.
For licensed pharmacy technicians who have been trained and certified
on the job in a retail setting, we offer a hospital training course (PT 149
& PT 159). The course includes IV admixture, unit dosing, automated
dispensing machines, cart fill, and more. You will receive a certificate of
completion at the end of the course. This course is offered in the evening
during Winter and Spring quarters.
Admission Dates: The full-time day Pharmacy Technician course
sequence begins Summer and Winter quarters. The part-time evening
Pharmacy Technician course sequence begins Fall quarter. The college
level math class and Computer Applications need to be completed prior
to entry. Medical Terminology must be completed by the end of the first
quarter of PT classes. Students may take the General Education and
Core Allied Health (CAH) courses at any time.
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
BIOL 118
CAH 102
CAH 105CL
CMST& 220
ENGL& 101
MAT 107
MAT 108
MAT& 141
PSYC& 100
SOC& 101DIV
PT 121
PT 124
PT 128
PT 129
PT 143
PT 147
PT 149
PT 152
PT 156
PT 159
PT 163CAP
PT 165
Credits
Anatomy & Physiology................................................................... 5
Medical Terminology..................................................................... 5
Computer Applications.................................................................. 5
Public Speaking............................................................................ 5
English Composition I.................................................................... 5
Business Mathematics OR................................................................
Math for Health Occupations (Preferred) OR........................................
Precalculus I................................................................................. 5
General Psychology (or higher)....................................................... 5
Introduction to Sociology................................................................ 5
Introduction to Pharmacy & Pharmacy Law........................................ 5
Pharmacology Part I...................................................................... 5
Pharmacology Part II..................................................................... 5
Community Pharmacy Practice........................................................ 5
Generic Drug Names Part I............................................................ 2
Clinical Capstone Research............................................................ 3
Hospital Practice........................................................................... 5
Generic Drug Names Part II............................................................ 2
Pharmaceutical Calculations........................................................... 2
Sterile Parenteral Product Preparation................................................ 3
Community Pharmacy Clinical Capstone........................................... 7
Institutional Clinical Capstone.......................................................... 7
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 91
Pharmacy Technician
Certificate
Successful graduates of this program are educated and trained in
Pharmacy Technician duties and responsibilities under the guidelines of
the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.
The structured classroom curriculum includes customer service,
communication, prescription processing, aseptic technique, along with
human relations, and pharmacy calculations. The clinical component of
the program gives the student a chance to practice the skills received in the
classroom and laboratory environment. This prepares the student to
assume the role of a pharmacy technician in a variety of pharmacy settings.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This program is a combination of classroom, laboratory, and clinical
experience. Daytime and part-time evening options are available for
students.
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly-based insurance for
students may be purchased; further information is available through the
Counseling and Advising Office.
No student will be allowed at clinical sites without proof of insurance.
continues on next page
PHARMACY TECH
Pharmacy Technician
69
2011-2012 Catalog
70
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
continued from previous page
Prerequisites: Before starting the program, a student must have a high
school diploma or GED. To enter the program, a student must meet the
prerequisite for college level reading, writing, and math. They must have
completed a college-level math course. They must also have completed
CAH 105 Computer Applications or the equivalent. Students must also
complete Medical Terminology by the end of the first quarter. Students
must maintain a B or above in all technical and general education
courses to continue in the program.
Students will have a criminal background check performed by the
Washington State Patrol and the Washington State Board of Pharmacy
prior to their clinical rotation. Students must have current immunizations
or laboratory verification of immune status. This could include, but not
be limited to, Measles/Mumps/Rubella, Hepatitis B series, Tetanus/
Diphtheria, Flu, Tuberculosis Test, and Varicella, as required by
contracts with clinical facilities and CDC recommendations.
Students must have current CPR for the Healthcare Professional. Proof
of immunizations should be submitted the first day of class, unless
arrangements have been made with instructor.
For licensed pharmacy technicians who have been trained and certified
on the job in a retail setting, we offer a hospital training course (PT 149
& PT 159). The course includes IV admixture, unit dosing, automated
dispensing machines, cart fill, and more. You will receive a certificate of
completion at the end of the course. This course is offered in the evening
during Winter and Spring quarters.
Admission Dates: The full-time day Pharmacy Technician course
sequence begins Summer and Winter quarters. The part-time evening
Pharmacy Technician course sequence begins Fall quarter.
PILOT
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
CAH 105CL
ENGL& 101
MAT 107
MAT 108
MAT& 141
PSYC& 100
CAH 102
PT 121
PT 124
PT 128
PT 129
PT 143
PT 147
PT 149
PT 152
PT 156
PT 159
PT 163CAP
PT 165
Credits
Computer Applications...................................................................... 5
English Composition I........................................................................ 5
Business Mathematics OR
Math for Health Occupations (Preferred) OR
Precalculus I................................................................................... 5
General Psychology (or higher)........................................................... 5
Medical Terminology or MAP 125...................................................... 5
Introduction to Pharmacy & Pharmacy Law............................................ 5
Pharmacology Part I.......................................................................... 5
Pharmacology Part II......................................................................... 5
Community Pharmacy Practice............................................................ 5
Generic Drug Names Part I................................................................ 2
Clinical Capstone Research............................................................... 3
Hospital Practice.............................................................................. 5
Generic Drug Names Part II............................................................... 2
Pharmaceutical Calculations............................................................... 2
Sterile Parenteral Product Preparation................................................... 3
Community Pharmacy Clinical Capstone.............................................. 7
Institutional Clinical Capstone............................................................. 7
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 76
Professional Pilot
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
A professional pilot possesses a commercial pilot certificate issued by the
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Students graduating from this
course usually begin their careers as flight instructors. After working as a
flight instructor for one to two years, most progress into charter flight,
corporate flying, and commuter or major commercial airlines.
This program is approximately eight quarters in length, depending on
the time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation
requirements.
In addition to the program course requirements, students must also
complete the general education requirements for the degree they seek to
obtain. The two degree options in this program are the Associate of
Applied Technology (AAT) or the Associate of Applied Science –T
(AAS-T) the different requirements for each degree are listed below.
AAT Degree General Education Requirements (15 credits):
ENGL& 101 English Composition or CMST& 220 (or higher). MAT 105
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher). PSYC& 100 General
Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).
AAS-T Degree general education requirements (20 credits):
All AAS-T degrees must have a minimum of 20 credits of transferable
general education. These credits replace the academic courses required
for the AAT degree. Required credits include: 5 credits in Communication:
ENGL& 101. 5 credits in quantitative reasoning: MATH 110, MATH&
141, MATH& 142, MATH& 146 or MATH& 151. 10 credits in social
science, humanities, or science (choose two from the following): PSYC&
100, PSYC& 200, PSY 210, PSYC& 220, SOC& 101, ART& 100,
MUS& 105, ASL& 121, BIOL 118, BIOL& 241, BIOL& 242, CHEM&
121, CHEM& 110, GEOL& 110, PHYS& 121, ECON 101, ECON& 201
or ECON& 202
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
Prerequisites: Must be at least 16 1/2 years of age. Must comply with
FAA licensing standards, and must obtain a second-class FAA medical
examination prior to the first day of class. Please contact Instructor for
details.
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) requires that U.S.
citizens prove citizenship status before beginning flight training by
providing a current passport or birth certificate and driver’s license.
Non-U.S. students must submit to a background and fingerprint check
from the TSA prior to beginning training. Contact Instructor for details.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
AVP 105*
AVP 110*
AVP 115
AVP 125
AVP 130
AVP 135CAP
AVP 140
AVP 145
AVP 150
AVP 155
AVP 160
AVP 170CAP
AVP 175
AVP 180
AVP 185
AVP 210
AVP 215
AVP 220
AVP 230
AVP 235
AVP 240
AVP 245
AVP 250
AVP 255CAP
Credits
Private Pilot I................................................................................... 4
Private Pilot II.................................................................................. 4
Private Pilot III................................................................................. 4
Private Pilot IV................................................................................. 4
Private Pilot V.................................................................................. 4
Private Pilot VI................................................................................. 4
Instrument Pilot I.............................................................................. 4
Instrument Pilot II.............................................................................. 4
Instrument Pilot III............................................................................. 4
Instrument Pilot IV............................................................................. 4
Instrument Pilot V............................................................................. 4
Instrument Pilot VI............................................................................. 4
Commercial Pilot I........................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot II........................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot III.......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot IV.......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot V.......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot VI......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot VII......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot VIII........................................................................ 4
Commercial Pilot IX.......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot X.......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot XI.......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot XII......................................................................... 4
Technical Course Requirements (Total)...............................................................96
General Education Requirements (See listing above)...........................................15
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAT DEGREE...............................111
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
AAS-T PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Technical Course Requirements (Same as AAT)..................................................96
General Education Requirements (See listing above).......................................... 20
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION OF AAS-T DEGREE............................116
Note: Students complete the Professional Pilot Program requirements at different rates due
to their own skills and abilities, availability of planes, and weather conditions that can alter
scheduled flying times. Thus, the number of quarters needed to satisfactorily complete all
graduation requirements may exceed those listed above. Students must meet FAA flight
time requirements prior to graduation.
Optional Training
AVP 260 Certified Flight Instructor I..................................................................... 4
AVP 265 Certified Flight Instructor II.................................................................... 4
AVP 268 Instrument Flight Instructor..................................................................... 4
Optional Elective Courses
AVP 118
AVP 138
AVP 152
AVP 172
AVP 223
AVP 257
Private Pilot Practical Test Standards I..................................................... 4
Private Pilot Practical Test Standards II..................................................... 4
Instrument Pilot Practical Test Standards III................................................ 4
Instrument Pilot Practical Test Standards IV............................................... 4
Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standards V............................................. 4
Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standards VI............................................ 4
Professional Pilot
Commercial Pilot
Certificate
The Commercial Pilot Certificate allows the holder to fly for hire in a
variety of pilot positions. Content of the course includes advanced
aircraft performance maneuvers and cross-country flight. Students
receive advanced training in aircraft systems, meteorology, and aircraft
performance.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication
(English Composition, Speech), quantitative reasoning (Math), and
social sciences (Psychology, Sociology) that enhance personal
development and provide knowledge and abilities upon which technical
skills are built.
This certificate program is approximately four quarters in length,
depending on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all
graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: Must be at least 17 years of age. Must comply with FAA
licensing standards and possess an FAA private pilot certificate and FAA
instrument rating. Second class FAA medical certificate required prior to
the first day of class. Please contact Instructor for details.
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) requires that U.S.
citizens prove citizenship status before beginning flight training by
providing a current passport or birth certificate and driver’s license.
Non-U.S. students must submit to a background and fingerprint check
from the TSA prior to beginning training. Contact Instructor for details.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
AVP 175
AVP 180
AVP 185
AVP 210
AVP 215
AVP 220
AVP 230
AVP 235
AVP 240
AVP 245
AVP 250
AVP 255CAP
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Commercial Pilot I........................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot II.......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot III......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot IV......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot V.......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot VI......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot VII........................................................................ 4
Commercial Pilot VIII........................................................................ 4
Commercial Pilot IX......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot X.......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot XI......................................................................... 4
Commercial Pilot XII........................................................................ 4
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher)............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities course)........... 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................63
Optional Elective Courses
AVP 223
AVP 257
Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standards V.......................................... 4
Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standards VI.......................................... 4
Note: Students often complete their program requirements at different rates due to their
own skills and abilities and the availability of aircraft and suitable weather. Thus, the
number of quarters needed to satisfactorily complete all of the requirements may exceed
those listed above in some cases.
PILOT
AAT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
71
2011-2012 Catalog
72
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters.
Professional Pilot
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Flight Instructor
Certificate
The flight instructor certificate allows a commercial and instrumentrated pilot to train flight students in acquiring their private and
commercial pilot certificates. The instrument flight instructor rating
allows the holder to train students working toward their instrument
rating. Flight instructors can also teach aviation ground schools.
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................24
Optional Elective Courses
AVP 152
AVP 172
Prerequisites: Must be at least 18 years of age. Must comply with FAA
licensing standards and possess an FAA Commercial certificate with
Instrument Rating. Second class FAA medical certificate required prior
to first day of class. Please contact Instructor for details.
Professional Pilot
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) requires that U.S.
citizens prove citizenship status before beginning flight training by
providing a current passport or birth certificate and driver’s license.
Non-U.S. students must submit to a background and fingerprint check
from the TSA prior to beginning training. Contact Instructor for details.
Certificate
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
AVP 260
AVP 265
AVP 268
Credits
Certified Flight Instructor I................................................................... 4
Certified Flight Instructor II.................................................................. 4
Instrument Flight Instructor................................................................... 4
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION.......................................................... 12
Note: Students often complete their program requirements at different rates due to their
own skills and abilities and the availability of aircraft and suitable weather. Thus, the
number of quarters needed to satisfactorily complete all of the requirements may exceed
those listed above in some cases.
Professional Pilot
Instrument Pilot
Instrument Pilot Practical Test Standards III............................................. 4
Instrument Pilot Practical Test Standards IV............................................. 4
Private Pilot
Private pilots are able to fly with passengers aboard an aircraft and have
no limitations on where they can fly. This is the first FAA certificate a
student obtains if (s)he eventually wants to upgrade to higher certificates
and ratings. Content includes basic maneuvering flight, take-offs,
landings, and cross-country flying. Ground training includes in-depth
training on meteorology, aerodynamics, national airspace structure and
navigation, and aircraft systems.
This certificate program is approximately two quarters in length,
depending on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all
graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: Must be at least 16 1/2 years of age. Must comply with
FAA licensing standards and obtain a second-class FAA medical
certificate with student pilot certificate prior to the first day of class.
Please contact Instructor for details.
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) requires that U.S.
citizens prove citizenship status before beginning flight training by
providing a current passport or birth certificate and driver’s license.
Non-U.S. students must submit to a background and fingerprint check
from the TSA prior to beginning training. Contact Instructor for details.
Certificate
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
The Instrument Rating is added to either a private or commercial pilot
Certificate. It allows the holder to fly in clouds and weather navigating
and controlling the aircraft exclusively by reference to the aircraft flight
instruments.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Content includes basic attitude instrument flying, advanced radionavigation, instrument approaches, and cross-country flight.
This certificate program is approximately two quarters in length,
depending on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all
graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: Must be at least 17 years of age. Must comply with FAA
licensing standards and possess an FAA private pilot certificate or FAA
commercial certificate. Second class FAA medical certificate required
prior to the first day of class. Please contact Instructor for details.
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) requires that U.S.
citizens prove citizenship status before beginning flight training by
providing a current passport or birth certificate and driver’s license.
Non-U.S. students must submit to a background and fingerprint check
from the TSA prior to beginning training. Contact Instructor for details.
Credits
Instrument Pilot I.............................................................................. 4
Instrument Pilot II............................................................................. 4
Instrument Pilot III............................................................................. 4
Instrument Pilot IV............................................................................ 4
Instrument Pilot V............................................................................. 4
Instrument Pilot VI............................................................................ 4
This certificate program is approximately one quarter in length,
depending on the time students need to satisfactorily complete all
graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PILOT
AVP 140
AVP 145
AVP 150
AVP 155
AVP 160
AVP 170CAP
AVP 105
AVP 110
AVP 115
AVP 125
AVP 130
AVP 135CAP
Credits
Private Pilot I................................................................................... 4
Private Pilot II.................................................................................. 4
Private Pilot III................................................................................. 4
Private Pilot IV................................................................................. 4
Private Pilot V.................................................................................. 4
Private Pilot VI................................................................................. 4
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................24
Optional Elective Courses
AVP 118
AVP 138
Private Pilot Practical Test Standards I................................................... 4
Private Pilot Practical Test Standards II.................................................. 4
Note: Students often complete their Program Requirements at different rates due to their
own skills and abilities and the availability of aircraft and suitable weather. Thus, the
number of quarters needed to satisfactorily complete all of the requirements may exceed
those listed above in some cases.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Associate of Applied Technology Degree
Prepares students to work with a team of surgeons and registered nurses
in the operating room. Successful graduates of this program are educated
in surgical technology under the guidelines of the Association of Surgical
Technologists.
The structured curriculum includes basic sciences, patient care, surgical
procedures, and human anatomy, combined with clinical rotations in
area health care facilities. Classroom instruction, lab, and clinical
internship prepare the student to assume the role of a perioperative team
member in a variety of healthcare delivery settings.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
This program is a combination of classroom, laboratory, and clinical
experience and is six quarters in length, depending on the time students
need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Each student is required to carry personal health/medical insurance
throughout their clinical rotations. Quarterly-based insurance for
students may be purchased; further information is available through the
Advising and Counseling Office. No student will be allowed at a clinical
site without proof of insurance.
Prerequisites: Students must achieve COMPASS test scores indicating
they are eligible to enroll in college-level math, sociology, and English, or
have had appropriate college classes to meet the prerequisites.
Degree Students: Must have a high school diploma or GED per
governing body (AST). In order to participate in the clinical aspect of the
program, students must pass multiple background checks. Students must
have current American Heart Association CPR for the Healthcare
Provider and immunizations or laboratory verification of immune status.
This includes, but is not limited to, Hepatitis B series, Tetanus/
Diphtheria, Tuberculosis Test, Measles/ Mumps/Rubella, and Varicella,
as required by contracts with clinical facilities and CDC
recommendations.
This occupation requires the ability to stand, sit, and walk for extended
periods of time and to lift and hold 50 pounds. Students must be able to
meet these physical requirements in order to complete lab requirements,
be assigned to a clinical rotation, and get a job in this field.
Proof of immunizations and CPR should be completed by the first day of
class of the 3rd quarter of the SURG courses. No student will be allowed
at a clinical site without completion of immunizations.
A physical is required for each student prior to clinical rotation.
Must be at least 18 years of age by the time clinical experience starts,
usually in September and April.
Note: This program requires that all General Education courses: CAH
102, CAH 103, CAH 105, BIO 118, or higher A&P, SOC 101, ENG 101,
MAT 108, or higher math, be completed prior to beginning the first
quarter of SURG courses.
Students must maintain a B or better in all General Education and Core
Allied Health courses to start the SURG courses.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
BIOL 118
CAH 102
CAH 103
CAH 105CL
ENGL& 101
MAT 108
SOC& 101DIV
SURG 126
SURG 127
SURG 130
SURG 136
SURG 137
SURG 138
SURG 141
SURG 146
SURG 151
SURG 206
SURG 207
SURG 211
SURG 215
SURG 220
SURG 225
SURG 230
SURG 235
SURG 240CAP
Credits
Human Anatomy & Physiology for Non-Science Majors....................... 5
Medical Terminology I................................................................... 5
Introduction to Health Professions..................................................... 5
Computer Applications.................................................................. 5
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220................................. 5
Math for Health Occupations.......................................................... 5
Introduction to Sociology................................................................ 5
Patient Care Theory I..................................................................... 5
Pharmacology & Anesthesia........................................................... 5
Patient Care Theory II.................................................................... 5
Operating Room Theory I............................................................... 8
Introduction to Surgery................................................................... 5
Introduction to Asepsis & Instrumentation........................................... 5
Operating Room Theory II.............................................................. 8
Surgical Lab I............................................................................... 5
Surgical Lab II.............................................................................. 5
Operating Room Theory III............................................................. 8
Microbiology............................................................................... 5
Surgical Lab III.............................................................................. 5
Clinical Applications I.................................................................... 5
Clinical Applications II................................................................... 5
Clinical Applications III.................................................................. 5
Clinical Applications IV.................................................................. 5
Seminar I..................................................................................... 3
Seminar II.................................................................................... 3
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 130
Sustainable Building Science
Associate in Applied Science - T Degree
This program is designed to train construction professionals and facilities
managers for building applications and systems that consume a minimal
amount of non-renewable resources and contribute to environmental
and personal health.
This program will prepare graduates for careers in resource energy
management, indoor air quality, solar installation, home energy rating
systems, and other specialties that support the design, building, and
maintenance of sustainable living environments.
Participants will receive a solid foundation in applied mathematics,
applied physics, and communication, as well as receive training in
industry-specific applications using energy efficiency technology to
diagnose building deficiencies. Advanced training in sustainable systems,
solar (photovoltaic) systems, resource conservation management, and
weatherization will prepare graduates for a variety of careers within the
construction and utilities industries, including resource conservation
managers, energy auditors, weatherization specialists, solar energy
specialists and home energy raters.
This program is approximately five quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Students pursuing an AAT or AAS-T degree must complete all college
degree requirements prior to graduation. This includes courses that meet
the capstone project, diversity, and computer literacy requirements.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
CONST 105
CONST 108
CONST 112
CONST 116
CONST 120
CONST 122
CONST 126
CONST 134
Credits
Measurement, Tools, & Safety........................................................... 2
Site Leveling, Plans, Codes, & Materials............................................. 2
Footings and Foundations................................................................. 3
Floor Framing................................................................................. 3
Wall Framing, Sheeting, & Ceilings.................................................... 5
Roof Framing.................................................................................. 5
Roofing Materials & Installation......................................................... 3
Exterior Finish................................................................................. 3
Admission Dates: Summer and Winter quarters
continues on next page
SURGICAL TECH
Surgical Technology
73
2011-2012 Catalog
74
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
continued from previous page
SBS 105
Introduction to Sustainability.............................................................. 3
SBS 110
Green Building Design..................................................................... 4
SBS 115
Sustainable Materials in Construction................................................. 4
SBS 120
Survey of Energy Ratings.................................................................. 4
SBS 125
Alternative Energy Systems................................................................ 4
SBS 140
Insulation Basics............................................................................. 4
SBS 145
Building Envelope........................................................................... 5
SBS 150
Moisture Mitigation......................................................................... 3
SBS 155
Solar Basics................................................................................... 4
SBS 170
Diagnostics and Testing................................................................... 3
SBS 175
Indoor Air Testing............................................................................ 3
SBS 180
Thermography................................................................................ 3
SBS 185CAP Service Learning Project................................................................... 3
CMST& 220 Public Speaking.............................................................................. 5
ENGL& 101 English Composition........................................................................ 5
MATH 105 Math for Industrial Professions........................................................... 5
MATH& 141 Pre-calculus I.................................................................................. 5
PSYC& 100 General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class)............. 5
Transferable Biology, Chemistry, Geology, or Physics................................................ 5
Certificate
(253) 589-5641 - Day Program
Designed to develop the technical knowledge and skills required for
entry-level employment in welding, metal fabrication, and related
occupations. Graduates may qualify for several types of positions in
industries such as machine manufacturing, industrial maintenance,
construction, marine transportation, and many others.
Students will develop skills in a variety of welding and metal cutting
processes common to industry and are also able to gain practical
experience through realistic projects.
Included in this program are academic courses in communication,
quantitative reasoning, and social sciences that provide knowledge and
abilities upon which technical skills are built and personal development
enhanced.
Technical Course Requirements (Total)...............................................................73
General Education Requirements...................................................................... 20
This program is approximately five quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 103
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters, or by
Instructor permission
Optional Electives
CONST 130
CONST 138
CONST 142
CONST 146
CONST 150
Stairway Construction..................................................................... 4
Interior Finish I................................................................................ 3
Interior Finish II............................................................................... 4
Deck Construction.......................................................................... 3
Carpentry Trades........................................................................... 1
Sustainable Building Science
SUSTAINABLE BUILDING
Welding Technology
Residential Construction
Certificate
This pre-apprentice program prepares students with the knowledge and
skills necessary for employment in the residential construction industry. Safety, hand and power tools use, math, carpentry trades, plan reading,
foundation form work, floor systems and framing, wall and roof framing,
leveling and aligning, and sheeting are covered in the first quarter.
Second quarter expands into residential exterior and interior finish,
including window and door installation, exterior siding, trim, stair
construction, roofing application, interior and exterior trim and cabinet
installation.
This program is approximately two quarters in length, depending on the
time students need to satisfactorily complete all graduation requirements.
Admission Dates: Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
CONST 105
CONST 108
CONST 112
CONST 116
CONST 120
CONST 122
CONST 126
CONST 130
CONST 134
CONST 138
CONST 142
CONST 146
CONST 150
Credits
Measurement, Tools, & Safety.......................................................... 2
Site Leveling, Plans, Codes, & Materials............................................ 2
Footings & Foundation.................................................................... 3
Floor Framing................................................................................ 3
Wall Framing, Sheeting, & Ceilings................................................... 5
Roof Framing................................................................................. 5
Roofing Materials & Installation........................................................ 3
Stairway Construction..................................................................... 4
Exterior Finish................................................................................ 3
Interior Finish I............................................................................... 3
Interior Finish II............................................................................... 3
Deck Construction.......................................................................... 3
Carpentry Trades........................................................................... 1
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION..........................................................40
*Articulated courses with High Schools for Dual Enrollment
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
WLD 105
WLD 110
WLD 112
WLD 116
WLD 120
WLD 124
WLD 135
WLD 142
WLD 144
WLD 152
WLD 156
WLD 168
WLD 172
WLD 177
WLD 179
WLD 210
WLD 213
ENGL& 101
MAT 105
PSYC& 100
Credits
Welding Theory I............................................................................. 5
Thermal Cutting & Gouging............................................................... 3
Oxyacetylene Welding & Brazing...................................................... 4
Shielded Metal Arc Welding I............................................................ 7
Shielded Metal Arc Welding II........................................................... 7
Shielded Metal Arc Welding III.......................................................... 7
Shielded Metal Arc Welding IV.......................................................... 7
Welding Theory II............................................................................ 5
Print Reading for Welders.................................................................. 5
Gas Metal Arc Welding.................................................................... 7
Metallurgy...................................................................................... 2
Flux Cored Arc Welding I.................................................................. 7
Flux Cored Arc Welding II................................................................. 7
Preparation for Welding Certification................................................... 2
Fabrication...................................................................................... 3
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding I.............................................................. 7
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding II.............................................................. 7
English Composition (or higher) or CMST& 220.................................... 5
Math for Industrial Professions (or higher).............................................. 5
General Psychology (or other social science or humanities class).............. 5
TOTAL CREDITS FOR COMPLETION........................................................ 107
Optional Electives
WLD 215
WLD 217
Cooperative Work Experience.........................................................1-5
Special Projects.............................................................................1-5
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
75
Short-Term Training Programs
Students interested in part-time training may choose from a wide variety of short-term training programs, courses, and
workshops. Courses may be offered in a traditional classroom environment, online, or in a blended format. Some short-term
training programs are composed of a course or series of courses mapped to an industry-recognized certification, such as A+
certification. Such courses often use curriculum and materials specified by industry associations and assist students to prepare
for proctored certification examinations.
Other short-term training programs include training for the skills necessary for specific entry-level job opportunities such as
office assistant, and medical billing. Programs are usually offered 3-4 evenings per week for 8-11 weeks. The menu of courses
changes frequently as labor market demands change and may not be offered every quarter.
Additional short-term training courses vary in length from 4 to 40 hours in length, change quarterly, and often may be applied
to various industry requirements for continuing education or professional development. The college offers a variety of courses
in healthcare, human resources, information technology, hospitality & food and construction trades. Consult the quarterly class
schedule for short-term options.
Covers aspects of troubleshooting, preventative maintenance, hardware
installation, configuration, diagnostics and repair. Hands-on training in
a realistic environment will help to prepare students for the (CompTIA)
certification exams.
ANEW (Apprenticeship & Non-Traditional
Employment for Women)...................................... Credits – 43
Provides entry level basics of construction readiness training to transition
students into construction trades apprenticeship programs. Offers
hands-on training at job sites as well as rotations through training sites
run by various trades unions, coupled with safety, trades math, tool use
and maintenance and fitness training.
Medical Billing Specialist Certificate....................... Credits – 15
Students who complete this certificate seek employment at hospitals,
medical clinics, private doctors’ offices, insurance companies, health
care facilities, third-party billing and collection agencies. To receive your
Medical Insurance Billing Certificate you must complete both Medical
Terminology I & II and the Medical Insurance Billing courses.
Brownsfields Job Training..................................... Credits – 13
Prepares participants for entry-level jobs involving the handling and site
clean-ups of hazardous waste materials. An eleven week evening
program providing graduates with CPR/First Aid/OSHA Safety and
HAZWOPER 40 certification cards.
Dietary Manager Program Certificate.................... Credits – 12
Students train in aspects of normal and therapeutic nutrition, diet
therapy, including guidelines for diet management and symptoms of
deficiency and excess, management of food service operations including
procurement, storage, production and presentation of food items.
Sanitation – including HACCP regulations, equipment use, food
preparation techniques, quality assurance, staffing and job assignments,
including human relations and human resource development.
Completion of 150 hours of work experience in a health care or other
institutional food service facility, with satisfactory evaluation from a
Registered Dietitian who has acted as a preceptor, is required to qualify
for the National Credentialing Examination offered by the Dietary
Managers Association. Student should be currently employed.
Emergency Call Taker Certificate........................... Credits – 12
This course will provide the knowledge and basics for entry level
positions in 911 Emergency Call Taking. Prerequisites: Typing 25 wpm,
No Record on File with the Washington State Patrol for crimes against
persons, interview with instructor. High school/GED.
Forklift Certificate..................................................Credits – 4
Covers all aspects of forklift operation with a strong emphasis on safety.
Card presented at end of class.
Human Resources Generalist Certificate...................Credits – 9
This Certificate program is designed to provide practical, hands-on
training in the day-to-day operations of human resource departments of
all sizes. It is geared towards those already employed in the HR field or
those planning to enter the field. Upon successful completion of all 8
modules, the student will receive a Human Resources Generalist
Certificate.
SHORT-TERM TRAINING
A+ Certification.....................................................Credits – 4
76
2011-2012 Catalog
Human Resources Management Certification......... Credits – 14
This online program is for those currently employed in human resource
management or certified by the Human Resource Certification Institute
and/or SHRM. All courses must be completed to earn the certificate.
Flagger Training................................................. Credits – 0.8
Flaggers direct traffic for road construction crews, set up cones, barrels,
barricades and signs to warn drivers that a construction zone is ahead
and to merge traffic into specified lanes. Flaggers are employed in the
construction industry. To receive your flagger certification you must
complete our 8hr training course. Certification is valid for three years.
MCSE Certificate................................................. Credits – 18
Develop the skills required to design, install, configure, and troubleshoot
a network system infrastructure based on the Microsoft Windows 2003
platform. By earning the premiere MCSE credential, individuals are
demonstrating that they have the skills necessary to lead most
organizations in the successful design, implementation, and
administration of the most advanced Microsoft Windows platform and
Microsoft server products.
Medical Transcription Certificate........................... Credits – 22
SHORT-TERM TRAINING
Covers radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, pharmacology,
psychiatry, digestion, and urinary systems. For persons in an allied
health or court reporting field, a medical office, or a business office which
presents learning activities that will develop and/or refine transcription
skills to a competitive level.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Network+ Certification...........................................Credits – 3
Students will learn networking fundamentals on how to identify and
understand the components of a Local Area Network, Wide Area
Network, peer-to-peer and client-server network environments. Students
will also learn the technical components and concepts of network
architectures, network protocols, and media used in different network
communications. This lecture course helps prepare students for the
CompTIA exam.
Nursing Assistant Certificate................................. Credits – 13
Prepare students for employment as basic care providers under the
supervision of licensed providers. Both parts must be successfully
completed to be eligible to take the State Certification Test. Clinical
rotations are professionally supervised eight-hour day/evening shifts and
hands-on nursing assistant skills and tasks in local long-term care,
assisted living and residential care facilities. Attendance of all clinical
hours is mandatory for course completion.
Must have current required immunizations, no limitations in ability to
lift, and a Washington State Patrol background with no record on file for
crimes against children or vulnerable persons. Must register as a
Washington State Nursing Assistant.
Security+ Certification Preparation..........................Credits – 4
Introduces students to the world of computer security in a vendor neutral
environment. Provides broad-based knowledge necessary to prepare
students for entry into a specialized security field. Lecture and hands-on
labs will expose students to the purpose and goals of network security
policies and outlines various security threats. Students will be introduced
to several authentication and encryption methods used in today’s
networking environment for securing a Local Area Network. Helps
prepare students for the CompTIA Security+ exam. Prerequisite: A+
certification or successful completion of an A+ course.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
77
Course Descriptions
ACTG 110
BOOKKEEPING I 4CR
Introduces fundamental principles of full
cycle, double-entry accounting, including
maintaining journals, ledgers, and banking
records to prepare basic financial statements
for service and retail businesses organized as
sole proprietorships or partnerships. Covers
basics of payroll accounting and payroll tax
reports. Explores the concepts and terminology required to perform specific accounting
functions accurately.
Prerequisite: COMPASS score equivalent to
completion of MAT 82 and ENG 82 or higher, or
Instructor approval.
ACTG 115
BOOKKEEPING II 4CR
Introduces continued principles of full cycle,
double-entry accounting. Covers specialty
issues such as uncollectible accounts, depreciation, inventory, notes, interest, accruals,
and end-of- period work for corporations.
Explores concepts and terminology required to perform specific accounting functions accurately.
Prerequisite: ACTG 110
ACTG 120
ELECTRONIC BUSINESS MATH 2CR
Covers business math applications to include
payroll, percents, merchandising, consumer
credit, simple and compound interest, prorating, stocks and bonds, and the metric system,
using the keyboard functions and the touch
method of electronic calculator operation.
Prerequisite: COMPASS score equivalent to
completion of MAT 82 and ENG 82 or higher, or
Instructor approval.
ACTG 135
ACCOUNTING SPREADSHEETS I 5CR
Introduces electronic spread sheets (Microsoft Office-Excel). Covers creating business
forms and spreadsheets to prepare financial
statements.
Prerequisite: CAS 105 or Instructor approval.
Concurrent with ACTG 110 or Instructor approval.
ACTG 141
QUICKBOOKS I 2CR
Covers principal applications, basic operating commands, and functions necessary to
use Quickbooks automated accounting software. Basic applications include, but are not
limited to, vendor, customer and banking
activities, and creating files.
Prerequisite: ACTG 110 or Instructor approval.
ACTG 143
QUICKBOOKS II 3CR
Covers continued applications for vendor
and customer activities using Quickbooks
automated accounting software. Also covers
starting up companies, inventory management, sales tax, payroll, and working with
balance sheet accounts.
Prerequisite: ACTG 115 and ACTG 141 or
Instructor approval.
ACTG 160
PAYROLL & BUSINESS TAXES
5CR
Provides practice in all payroll operations,
the recording of accounting entries involving payroll, and the preparation of payroll
and business tax returns that are required of
business. Covers the concepts, laws, and
terminology required to perform specific
payroll accounting functions.
Prerequisite: ACTG 110 or Instructor approval.
ACTG 211
PRINCIPLES OF
ACCOUNTING I LAB
2CR
Provides instructional activities that support
material covered in ACCT& 201 in a supervised lab environment.
Concurrent with: ACCT& 201.
ACTG 212
PRINCIPLES OF
ACCOUNTING II LAB
3CR
Provides instructional activities that support
material covered in ACCT& 202 in a supervised lab environment.
Concurrent with: ACCT& 202.
ACTG 213
PRINCIPLES OF
ACCOUNTING III LAB
3CR
Provides instructional activities that support
material covered in ACCT& 203 in a supervised lab environment.
Concurrent with: ACCT& 203.
ACTG 222
FUNDAMENTALS OF INDIVIDUAL
INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING
4CR
Introduces the fundamentals of individual
income tax accounting theory and practice,
including a study of the rules and regulations for preparation of the most common
forms and schedules, a brief review of the
history of income taxation, tax laws in the
United States, and the differences between
GA AP and income tax accounting.
Prerequisite: ACTG 115 or Instructor approval.
ACTG 224
FUNDAMENTALS OF
GOVERNMENTAL/NONPROFIT
ACCOUNTING
5CR
Introduces the fundamentals of accounting
theory and practice of governmental/nonprofit accounting, including a study of the
accounting methods, the reasons for and the
use of the various funds, the purpose and use
of budgets in this field of accounting, and the
differences between GA AP, GASB Standards, and fund/governmental accounting.
Prerequisite: ACTG 115 and ACCT& 201 or
Instructor approval.
ACTG 235
ACCOUNTING SPREADSHEETS II4CR
Provides advanced instruction in electronic
worksheets, various business spread sheets,
3-D worksheets, various functions, including the conditional function and accounting
schedules.
Prerequisite: ACTG 135 or Instructor approval.
ACTG 241
QUICKBOOKS III 4CR
Covers advanced accounting activities using
Quickbooks automated accounting software. Topics focus on starting up companies
in mid-cycle of the fiscal period. Covers setting up prior balances with accounts receivable, accounts payable, checking, inventory,
payroll, and fixed assets.
Prerequisite: ACTG 143, ACCT& 201 or
Instructor approval.
ACTG 260
BUSINESS OFFICE I 5CR
Provides an opportunity for students to experience and participate in a realistic office
environment by providing financial statements, completing financial examinations,
preparing payroll, and furnishing other
similar financial accounting work products
to the public.
Prerequisites: ACTG 143, ACTG 235, CAS 120,
and ACCT& 201, or Instructor approval.
ACTG 262
BUSINESS OFFICE II 5CR
Provides an opportunity for students to experience and participate in a realistic office
environment by providing financial statements, completing financial examinations,
preparing payroll, and furnishing other
similar financial accounting work products
to the public.
Prerequisite: ACCTG 260
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ACCOUNTING
78
ACTG 271
INTERNSHIP I 5CR
Provides students with on-the-job practical
field experience. Program offers students a
way to combine classroom study with related
work experience under the supervision of an
employer. Work experience must be related
to the educational and career objective of the
student. Must be approved by the Instructor
and includes a weekly seminar component.
Prerequisite: Instructor approval.
ACTG 281
SPECIALIZED ACCOUNTING I 5CR
Introduces the theory and practice of governmental/nonprofit or managerial accounting. This includes a study of the
accounting methods, concepts, and the purpose and use of budgets in this field of accounting. Independent study is to be
arranged with the Instructor.
Prerequisite: ACCT& 201, ACTG 224, ACTG
235, and CAS 120, or Instructor approval.
Concurrent with: ACTG 283, ACTG 271 may be
completed.
ACTG 283
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
SPECIALIZED
ACCOUNTING I LAB
5CR
Continues with theory and practice of governmental/nonprofit or managerial accounting. This includes a study of the
accounting methods, concepts, and the purpose and use of budgets in this field of accounting. Independent study is to be
arranged with the Instructor.
Prerequisites: ACTG 281 or Instructor approval.
Concurrent with, or immediately following,
completion of ACTG 281, and ACTG 271 must be
completed.
ACTG 291
INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX
ACCOUNTING
5CR
Continues the study of the fundamentals of
individual income tax accounting theory and
practice, including a detailed study of the
rules and regulations for preparation of the
most common forms and schedules, preparation of these forms and schedules, tax laws in
the United States, and the differences between GA AP and income tax accounting.
Prerequisite: ACTG 222 and ACCT& 201, or
Instructor approval. Concurrent with ACTG 293.
ACTG 293
INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX
ACCOUNTING LAB
5CR
Provides a supervised setting, with instructional support, to apply understanding of
federal individual income tax rules and regulations to specific tax problems.
Prerequisite: ACTG 222 and ACCT& 201, or
Instructor approval. Concurrent with ACTG 291.
ACTG 295
INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX
INTERNSHIP
5CR
Provides on-the-job practical field experience. Program offers the student a way to
combine classroom study with related work
experience under the supervision of an employer. Work experience must be related to
the educational and career objective of the
student. Must be approved by the Instructor
and includes a weekly seminar component.
Prerequisite: ACTG 291 and 293 or Instructor
approval.
ACCT& 201
PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I 5CR
Covers fundamentals of accounting theory
and practice, including a study of the accounting cycle, and the use of special journals. Focus is on double entry accounting
system and financial statement preparation.
Covers transactions for a business organized
as a sole proprietorship and their effects on
balance sheet accounts.
Prerequisite: ACTG 115 or Instructor approval.
ACCT& 202
PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II 5CR
Covers fundamentals of accounting theory
and practice continued from ACCT& 201.
Focus is on issues related to businesses organized as a partnership or corporation and
their effects on balance sheet accounts. Also
covers investment, dissolution, and distribution of income.
Prerequisite: ACCT& 201.
ACCT& 203
PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING III 5CR
Introduces the theory of cost accounting and
an analysis of accounting data as a part of
the managerial process of planning, decision-making, and control. Emphasis is given
to job order, process and standard cost accounting data, and the preparation and use
of budgets and internal control reports necessary for making economic decisions for
manufacturing businesses.
Prerequisite: ACCT& 201
ADULT BASIC
EDUCATION
ABE 001
ABE TOOLS FOR SUCCESS
Orients new students to the Basic Skills Programs and resources available at the college.
Develop educational and personal goals, develop self-awareness and learning strategies
and identify ways that will help meet with
success in the Basic Skills Program.
Prerequisites: Required of all new students.
ABE 022
ABE MATH II
Learn to process, estimate and average
whole number operations in addition subtraction, multiplication, and division to
solve real-life word problems.
Prerequisites: Students must receive a score of
201-210 on the CASAS placement test.
ABE 033
ABE READING III
Learn to read with understanding, focusing
on real-life material on familiar subjects related to personal family, citizen/community
or worker roles.
Prerequisites: Students must receive a score of
211-220 on the CASAS placement test.
ABE 043
ABE WRITING III
Focus on writing skills and increasing complexity of sentences and paragraphs. Practice applying these skills to a variety of life
situations.
Prerequisites: Students must receive a score of
211-220 on the CASAS placement test. In addition,
students will be asked to complete a writing sample.
ABE 023
ABE MATH III
Learn to apply mathematical concepts and
procedures to make an estimate, solve a
problem, and carry out a task involving decimals and fractions in situations related to life
roles.
Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete
ABE Math II or receive a score of 211-220 on the
CASAS placement test.
ABE 034
ABE READING IV
Learn to read with understanding expository writing, a variety of periodicals and
non-technical journals on common topics,
common legal forms, and library reference
material.
Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete
ABE III or receive a score 221-235 on the CASAS
placement.
ABE 044
ABE WRITING IV
Learn to convey ideas in writing using several
connected paragraphs with correct mechanics, usage, and varied sentence structure.
Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete
ABE III or receive a score of 221-235 on the
CASAS placement test. In addition, students will be
asked to complete a writing sample.
ABE 024
ABE MATH IV
Learn to apply mathematical concepts and
procedures to make estimates, solve problems, and carry out tasks involving percent,
ratio and proportion, simple formulas, measurements, and tables and graphs in personally realistic situations.
Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete
ABE Math III or receive a score of 221-235 on the
CASAS placement test.
GED 030
GED BASICS READING
Learn to comprehend, explain and analyze
information from a variety of literacy works,
including primary source materials and
professional journals. Use context cues and
higher order processes to interpret meaning
of technical information, complex manuals
and some college level books.
Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete
ABE level IV or receive a score of 236-245 on the
CASAS placement test.
GED 040
GED BASICS WRITING
Learn to write with clearly expressed ideas
supported by relevant detail, and use varied
and complex sentence structure with few
mechanical errors.
Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete
ABE level IV or receive a score of 236-245 on the
CASAS placement test. In addition, students will be
asked to complete a writing sample.
GED 020
GED BASICS MATH
Learn to make mathematical estimates of
time and space; apply principles of geometry
to measure angles, lines and surfaces; and
also apply trigonometric functions.
Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete
ARCHITECTURAL
ENGINEERING
DESIGN
ARC 121
Prerequisites: English reading with comprehen-
sion, composition, and basic verbal skills.
ARC 123
CIVIL ENGINEERING
SITE DESIGN 5CR
Overview of site design and planning, lot,
subdivision and road layouts, contouring,
slopes and profiles, and zoning regulations.
Prerequisites: ARC 121
ARC 125
RESIDENTIAL DESIGN
& DRAFTING
5CR
Overview of basic residential design and
specialized floor plans, exterior and interior
elevations.
Prerequisites: ARC 123
GED 031
ARCHITECTURAL REPORTING I 3CR
Includes investigation, research, and report
preparation on materials, methods, and
trends in construction.
Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete
GED Basics. Reading or receive a score of 246 or
higher on the CASAS placement.
GED 041
GED ADVANCED WRITING
Focus on fine-tuning reading and writing
skills necessary to successfully complete the
reading sections of the GED.
Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete
GED Basics. Writing or receive a score of 246 or
higher on the CASAS placement test. In addition,
students will be asked to complete a writing sample.
GED 021
GED ADVANCED MATH
Focus on fine-tuning skills necessary to successfully complete the math section of the
GED.
Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete
GED Basics. Math or receive a score of 246 or
higher on the CASAS placement test.
GED 012
GED JUMP START
Continuous enrollment self-paced class designed to help students focus on strengthening math, reading, and writing skills to
prepare for the five sections of the GED Test.
Special focus on writing clear concise essays.
Prerequisites: CASAS Reading 211 CASAS
CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS
RESEARCH II 1CR
Requires research of manufacturers and
suppliers information, and assembly of
Construction Specifications Institute (CSI)
materials three sub-groups.
Prerequisites: ARC 151
sion, composition, and basic verbal skills.
ARC 141
Prerequisites: English reading with comprehension, composition, and basic verbal skills, and
computer keyboarding skills of 30 wpm.
ARC 143
ARCHITECTURAL REPORTING II 2CR
Includes investigation, research, diagrams,
and report preparation on basic framing
systems in house construction.
Prerequisites: ARC 141
ARC 145
ARCHITECTURAL REPORTING III 2CR
Includes investigation, research, and report
preparation on construction materials and an
actual ArcView GIS project using word processing skills to prepare a report on ArcView
and a detailed technical specification section.
Prerequisites: ARC 143
ARC 152
CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS
RESEARCH I 2CR
Requires research of manufacturers and
suppliers information, and assembly of Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) materials Divisions 1 through 14.
Prerequisites: English reading with comprehension, composition, and basic verbal skills.
79
ARC 153
ARCHITECTURAL
DRAFTING & DESIGN 5CR
Overview of floor plans, line types, and line
weights, introduction to media, computeraided drafting, codes, basic design concepts,
and presentation drawings and techniques.
ABE Math IV or receive a score of 236-245 on the
CASAS placement test.
GED ADVANCED READING
Focus on fine-tuning reading and skills necessary to successfully complete the reading
and social studies sections of the GED.
2011-2012 Catalog
ARC 162
SKETCHING I 3CR
Basic line weights, proportions, and sketches
of residential projects.
Prerequisites: English reading with comprehen-
ARC 163
SKETCHING II 2CR
Covers intermediate concepts and sketches
of residential projects.
Prerequisites: ARC 162
ARC 171
DRAFTING TECHNOLOGIES I 5CR
Basic manual drafting skills, orthographics,
isometrics, and roof plans for basic design
and construction necessary for residential
design and printing completed drawings on
industry standard hardware.
Prerequisites: English reading with comprehension, composition, and basic verbal skills.
ARC 173
DRAFTING TECHNOLOGIES II 5CR
Basic manual drafting skills for civil engineering and profile for subdivisions and basic design drawings necessary for residential
design and printing completed drawings on
industry standard hardware.
Prerequisites: ARC 171
ARC 181
INTRODUCTION TO AUTOCAD 5CR
Use Windows based AutoCAD applications
to produce basic design and production
drawings and details, and to save and print
drawings on industry standard hardware.
Prerequisites: English reading with comprehension, composition, and basic verbal skills and basic
keyboarding skills, 30 wpm, ARC 171 or Instructor
permission.
ARC 191
ENGINEERING MECHANICS
OF MATERIALS
5CR
Analysis of loading conditions and selection
of wood member sizes and materials for
house design. Material stress and strain are
computed.
Prerequisites: ARC 125, MAT 99 or higher
ARC 221
DETAILING & LIGHT
COMMERCIAL 5CR
Overview of specialized floor plan types,
framing, sections, detailing, and specifications for light-framing and commercial
buildings.
Prerequisites: ARC 125
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
80
ARC 223
DESIGN PROJECT I 5CR
Project management and design of basic architectural drafting project. Project includes
one-story house and placement on a subdivision lot, conforming to regulatory codes and
established schedules. Production of a complete set of computer-drafted and engineered
construction drawings. Give effective oral
reports of progress.
ARC 253
EMPLOYMENT RESEARCH 2CR
Basic job-seeking skill activities, including
résumé preparation, employer contacts, and
employment opportunities.
ARC 261
SKETCHING III 1CR
Advanced concepts and sketches of residential projects using Google Sketch-Up.
Prerequisites: ARC 173, ARC 181.
Prerequisites: ARC 162, ARC 181
ARC 225
ARC 281
DESIGN PROJECT II 5CR
Project management and design of an intermediate architectural drafting project. Project conforms to regulatory codes, hypothetical
client needs, and established schedules. Producing a complete set of computer-drafted
and engineered construction drawings. Give
effective oral reports of progress.
INTERMEDIATE AUTOCAD
5CR
Use Windows based AutoCAD applications
to produce intermediate design and production drawings and details, and saving and
printing drawings on industry standard
hardware.
Prerequisites: ARC 223, ARC 281
APPLIED AUTOCAD
5CR
Use Windows based AutoCAD applications
to a complete set of design and production
drawings and details for a design project,
and saving and printing drawings on industry standard hardware.
ARC 227
SPECIAL INTERN PROJECT 5CR
Complete the written Work-Based Learning
Experience Plan.
Prerequisites: Instructor permission required.
ARC 229
SPECIAL DESIGN PROJECT 5CR
Complete special design project as approved
by the Instructor to aid in realistic training.
Prerequisites: ARC 225, ARC 231, ARC 281.
ARC 231
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
COST ESTIMATING I 3CR
Completion of a computerized, detailed cost
estimate for one-story house with site
development.
ARC 233
COST ESTIMATING II 2CR
Completion of a computerized, detailed cost
estimate for two-story house.
Prerequisites: ARC 181
ARC 284
Prerequisites: ARC 281
ARC 293
ENGINEERING STATICS
5CR
Beam loading, shear and moment diagrams,
analysis, calculations, and selection of wood
members for light framing. Material stress is
computed.
Prerequisites: ARC 125, MAT 105 or higher.
AMERICAN SIGN
LANGUAGE
ASL& 121
ENERGY ANALYSIS I 1CR
Completion of two computerized energy
analyses for a one-story house.
ARC 238
placement score or successful completion of ENG 094.
ARC 236
ENERGY ANALYSIS II 1CR
Completion of two computerized energy
analyses for a two-story house.
Prerequisites: ARC 236
ARC 251
CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS
RESEARCH III 1CR
Requires research of manufacturers and
suppliers information, and assembly of
Construction Specifications Institute (CSI)
materials Divisions 1 - 14 for green certified
products.
Prerequisites: ARC 153
ART& 100
ART APPRECIATION
5CR
Introduce to the diversity of the art world
from ancient civilizations to contemporary
society. A discussion of art terminology and
methods will be covered in an overview of
artist’s materials, techniques.
AUTOMOTIVE
COLLISION
TECHNICIAN
ACT 102
FUNDAMENTALS OF
COLLISION REPAIR
3CR
Explore career safety, industry certifications, vehicle construction, and an overview
of the career field.
ACT 106
BODY SHOP EQUIPMENT 3CR
Covers operating hand tools, power tools,
and shop equipment. Explore air systems
and their design and function.
ACT 110
WELDING, HEATING,
& CUTTING
4CR
Covers the skills of welding, heating, and
cutting as it relates to the Collision Industry.
ACT 115
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I 5CR
Informs students about deafness, deaf culture,
the deaf community, and American Sign
Language. Learn to communicate both expressively and receptively in American Sign
Language in basic conversation situations.
Prerequisites: ARC 231
ART
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
ASL& 122
AMERICAN SIGN
LANGUAGE II
5CR
An expansion of ASL& 121 working towards
mastery of American Sign Language.
Course focuses on deeper insights into vocabulary, grammar, receptive/expressive
skills and history with increased knowledge
of Deaf communities and culture.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ASL& 121
PLASTICS/SMC REPAIR
4CR
Explore plastic, fiberglass, and SMC repairs
as they relate to the Collision Industry.
ACT 120
GLASS, TRIM, & HARDWARE
5CR
Covers the practical skills used to repair/replace door locks and windows and to repair
water leaks on car and truck bodies, interior
parts, and door skin repair.
ACT 125
INTRODUCTION TO METAL
STRAIGHTENING
3CR
Introduces basic body panel straightening
techniques.
ACT 132
PANEL REPLACEMENT 6CR
Covers the fundamentals of replacing hoods,
bumpers, fenders, grilles, lids, and other
bolted-on panels.
ACT 133
PANEL REPAIR
6CR
Covers metal straightening fundamentals,
including proper tool usage, application of
fillers, and sanding for proper size, shape
and texture.
ACT 134
AUTO BODY MAJOR COLLISION
REPAIR
5CR
Introduces vehicle damage measuring systems, straightening auto body structure, and
replacing structural components.
ACT 140
ARCF 109
WELDING & METAL SKILLS 4CR
Covers welding, heating, and cutting
techniques, using MIG and Oxyacetylene
equipment. Students will learn safe handling
and correct metal forming techniques of
sheet metal.
AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS REPAIR 4CR
Explores basic mechanical repairs, wheel
alignments, electrical repairs, and restraint
system repairs (available Winter quarter
only).
ARCF 114
ACT 145
CUSTOM FABRICATION
6CR
Explores basic customizing techniques used
on original factory parts, as well as fabrication of custom parts.
COLLISION ESTIMATING
5CR
Covers collision damage estimating, reviewing work orders, and acquiring work skills
for job success.
ACT 151
REFINISH EQUIPMENT
PREPARATION
6CR
Covers paint shop equipment and painting
fundamentals.
ACT 154
TOP COAT REFINISHING
8CR
Covers color matching, final masking, surface cleaning, and topcoat finishing.
ACT 156
PRE-PRIME PREPARATION
5CR
Explores corrosion protections and vehicle
refinish preparation.
BASIC REPAIRS & ASSEMBLY
8CR
Covers basic repair and assembly procedures for bolt-on body components.
ARCF 119
ARCF 124
REFINISHING EQUIPMENT 4CR
Explores refinishing equipment use and
maintenance.
ARCF 129
REFINISH PREPARATION
7CR
Explores corrosion protection and vehicle
refinish preparation.
ARCF 130
ADVANCED PAINT APPLICATION 6CR
Covers application of advanced masking,
topcoat shading, and graphics on a restoration or custom project.
ARCF 133
2011-2012 Catalog
ARCF 156
CUSTOM HEADLINER
& SIDE PANEL UPHOLSTERY 5CR
Fabricate and install custom upholstering of
doors, quarter panel trim, and headliners.
ARCF 159
METAL STRAIGHTENING
& SHAPING
6CR
Metal straightening and shaping techniques
on a custom or restoration project.
ARCF 160
CUSTOM UPHOLSTERING
ADVANCED PANELS
6CR
Develop skills in custom and/or restoration
techniques in designing, patterning, removing, and fabricating advanced interior
panels.
ARCF 161
CUSTOM CARPET
FABRICATION & INSTALLATION 5CR
Fabricate and install custom carpet and
other automotive floor coverings.
ARCF 162
CUSTOM UPHOLSTERING
ADVANCED BENCH SEATS
6CR
Develop skills in advanced and/or specialized
techniques in designing, patterning, removing, and fabricating bench seats and headrest
covers on a restoration or custom project.
ARCF 163
FIBERGLASS/COMPOSITES
TECHNIQUES
6CR
Further develop skills in customizing techniques used on original factory parts, as well
as fabrication of custom parts.
CUSTOM UPHOLSTERING
ADVANCED BUCKET SEATS
6CR
Develop skills in custom and/or specialized
techniques in designing, patterning, removing, and fabricating advanced bucket seats
and headrest covers.
SURFACE IMPERFECTIONS/
EXTERIOR TRIM 5CR
Covers paint application problem-solving,
final detailing, decals, and trimming.
ARCF 134
ARCF 164
ACT 171
ARCF 141
ACT 157
POST-PRIME PREPARATION
5CR
Explores final preparations, blocking, and
final sanding for application of topcoat.
ACT 166
PLASTIC REFINISHING
5CR
Covers paint shop equipment and painting
fundamentals as it relates to plastics.
AUTOMOTIVE
RESTORATION &
CUSTOMIZATIONFINISHING
ARCF 103
FUNDAMENTALS
& SHOP EQUIPMENT 3CR
Covers shop safety, fundamentals of tool use,
and proper use of shop equipment.
CUSTOM REFINISHING
6CR
Covers top coat, clear coat, and custom
refinishing.
SURFACE IMPERFECTIONS/
SHOW & SHINE
4CR
Covers paint application problem solving
and show detailing.
ARCF 149
CUSTOM SEAT UPHOLSTERY
7CR
Introduces custom interior upholstering.
ARCF 154
AUTOMOTIVE RESTORATION
& CUSTOMIZATION
FINISHING LAB
9CR
Finish projects and competencies in restoration and/or customizing. 9 credits in Summer quarter; variable credit, other three
quarters.
81
CUSTOM GLASS PATTERNING
& INSTALLATION
4CR
Covers patterning and installation of custom
automotive glass.
ARCF 165
CUSTOM UPHOLSTERING
CONVERTIBLE TOPS
6CR
Develop skills in custom and/or restoration
techniques to repair or replace a convertible
top for a custom or restoration project.
ARCF 166
CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY
DESIGN & INSTALLATION
3CR
Explores upholstery design & installation as
it relates to the student‚ project work.
ARCF 167
CUSTOM PAINT APPLICATION 3CR
Covers application of custom masking, topcoat shading, and graphics.
ARCF 168
APPLIED METAL SKILLS 3CR
Covers application of previously acquired
metal skills as they relate to the student’s
project work.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
82
ARCF 169
CUSTOM UPHOLSTERING
VINYL TOPS
6CR
Develop skills in custom and/or restoration
techniques to replace a vinyl top for a custom or restoration project.
ARCF 170
CUSTOM REFINISHING
SPECIAL PROJECTS
6CR
Develop skills in advanced custom and/or
restoration techniques. Students will have
the opportunity to apply knowledge to projects of personal interest, as assigned, and/or
job shadowing.
ARCF 200
VEHICLE ASSESSMENT 7CR
Designed for assessment of vehicle’s mechanical and cosmetic condition. Develop a
plan for restoration or preservation of a vehicle’s historical significance. Use historical
data and mechanical and cosmetic condition to develop a complete assessment of a
vehicle for its historical, financial, or ownership notoriety value.
ARCF 210
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
VEHICLE RESEARCH
TECHNIQUES
7CR
Research a vehicle’s history, build rates, explore options, and research designers. Use
the Internet, library, and other resources to
produce a capstone research project that includes a class presentation with a story board
and/or PowerPoint presentation.
ARCF 220
VEHICLE MAINTENANCE
5CR
Diagnose and maintain a vehicle’s mechanical and cosmetic condition. Perform mechanical and cosmetic maintenance in order
to complete assessment of vehicle.
AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN
AUT 120
AUTOMOTIVE BASICS
2CR
Provides information on basic shop safety,
hazardous material handling, industry
trends and opportunities, tools and fasteners.
Upon completion of this course, the student
will be familiar with safety, hazardous material handling and disposal procedures, the
future of the industry, and employment potential. The student will also be familiar with
automotive tools, fasteners, and their usage.
Prerequisites: Must have required textbooks,
coveralls, and eye protection.
AUT 132
AUTOMOTIVE WELDING
4CR
Provides the knowledge and skill for industry standard requirements in welding, brazing, and soldering within the automotive
industry. Also included in the course is instruction in oxygen/acetylene and wire feed
welding.
Prerequisites: Must have required textbooks,
coveralls, and eye protection.
AUT 144
FORD BASIC ELECTRICAL
SYSTEMS DIAGNOSIS
AND TESTING
6CR
Diagnose and repair automotive electrical
systems using the Symptom-to-System-toComponent-to-Cause process. Use special
tools and service equipment associated with
electrical diagnosis and repair. Use all service publications in their available formats
to obtain needed information for diagnosis.
Perform diagnosis test procedures. Perform
repair procedures. Students will become familiar with the tools, terminology, basic
theory, diagnostics, removal, and installation procedures used during common service operations and have the opportunity to
practice procedures indentified as priority
task in the NATEF (ASE) task list.
Prerequisites: Must have required textbooks,
coveralls, and eye protection.
AUT 147
AUTOMOTIVE BRAKES
6CR
Theory and troubleshooting of hydraulic
systems, disc brake systems, drum brake
systems, power booster systems, and antilock
brake systems.
Prerequisites: Must have required tools and
textbooks.
AUT 149
AUTOMOTIVE BRAKES,
SUSPENSION, STEERING,
& WHEEL ALIGNMENT
7CR
Theory and troubleshooting of front suspension systems, steering systems, rear suspension systems, and computer-controlled
systems. This course will also cover basic
wheel alignment including two- and fourwheel alignment.
Prerequisites: Must successfully complete AUT
147, and have required tools and textbooks.
AUT 156
AUTOMOTIVE BRAKES,
SUSPENSION, STEERING,
& WHEEL ALIGNMENT LAB
5CR
Repair automotive brakes, steering, and
suspension systems by applying knowledge
attained in required courses. This is a
hands-on class, utilizing live projects.
Prerequisites: Must successfully complete AUT
147, 149, and have required tools and textbooks.
AUT 174
ENGINE MINOR
MECHANICAL REPAIR
6CR
Diagnose and repair general engine mechanical, lubrication, and cooling system
problems. Upon completion of this course,
the student will be familiar with the terminology, basic theory, diagnostics and minor
engine mechanical service and repair
procedures.
Prerequisites: Must have required tools and
textbooks.
AUT 175
ENGINE MAJOR
MECHANICAL REPAIR
7CR
Diagnose and repair engine blocks, heads,
and valve trains. Upon completion of this
course, the student will be familiar with the
terminology, basic theory, diagnostics, and
removal and installation procedures to successfully diagnose and repair automobiles
and light truck engines.
Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed
AUT 174 and have required tools and textbooks.
AUT 178
ENGINE MECHANICAL LAB
3CR
Repair engine components by applying
knowledge attained in required courses.
This is a hands-on class, utilizing live projects. Upon completion of this course, the
student will be familiar with diagnosis,
maintenance, and repair of automobiles and
light truck engines.
Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed
AUT 174, 175 and have required tools and textbooks.
AUT 203
ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS 11CR
Diagnose and repair automotive electrical
systems and study basic application of computerized electronic control systems. Upon
completion of this course, the student will be
familiar with the terminology, basic theory,
diagnostics, removal, and installation procedures used on automobiles and light trucks.
Prerequisites: Must have required tools and
textbooks.
AUT 209
ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS 7CR
Diagnose and repair automotive electronic
systems and study basic application of computerized electronic control systems. Upon
completion of this course, the student will be
familiar with the terminology, basic theory,
diagnostics, removal, and installation procedures used on automobiles and light trucks.
Prerequisites: Must successfully complete AUT
203 and must have required tools and textbooks.
AUT 217
AUTOMOTIVE IGNITION
SYSTEMS 7CR
Diagnose and repair electronic and computer
controlled automotive ignition systems.
Upon completion of this course, the student
will be familiar with the terminology, basic
theory, diagnostic, and repair procedures
used on automobiles and light trucks.
Prerequisites: Must successfully complete courses
AUT 174, 175, 178, 203, 209 and must have
required tools and textbooks.
AUT 223
AUTOMOTIVE FUEL SYSTEMS 7CR
Diagnose and repair fuel management systems. Upon completion of this course, the
student will be familiar with the terminology,
basic theory, diagnostic, and repair procedures used on automobiles and light trucks.
Prerequisites: Must successfully complete courses
AUT 174, 175, 178, 203, 209, 217, and must have
required tools and textbooks.
AUT 236
AUTOMOTIVE EMISSIONS
SYSTEMS 7CR
Diagnose and repair emissions control systems. Upon completion of this course, the
student will be familiar with the terminology,
basic theory, diagnostic, and repair procedures used on automobiles and light trucks.
Prerequisites: Must successfully complete courses
AUT 174, 175, 178, 203, 209, 217, 223 and have
required tools and textbooks.
AUT 239
AUTOMOTIVE CLUTCHES
& MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS
9CR
Provides the student with the knowledge and
skills to competently repair automotive
clutches and manual transmissions/transaxles. Upon completion of the course, the student will be familiar with the terminology,
basic theory, diagnostics, maintenance, and
repair of automobile/light truck clutches
and manual transmissions/transaxles.
Prerequisites: Must have required tools and
textbooks.
AUT 243
AUTOMOTIVE AXLES,
DRIVELINES, DIFFERENTIALS
& TRANSFER CASES
6CR
Provides the student with the knowledge and
skills to competently repair automotive axles, drivelines, differentials, and transfer
cases. Upon completion of the course, the
student will be familiar with the terminology, basic theory, diagnostics, maintenance,
and repair of automobile/light truck axles,
drivelines, differentials, and transfer cases.
Prerequisites: Must successfully complete AUT
239 and have required tools and textbooks.
AUT 246
MANUAL DRIVE TRAINS
& AXLES LAB
4CR
This course is designed to teach the student
to competently repair drive train components
by applying knowledge attained in required
courses. This is a hands-on class, utilizing
live projects. Upon completion of this course,
the student will be familiar with diagnosis,
maintenance, and repair of automobile/light
truck manual drive trains.
Prerequisites: Must successfully complete courses
AUT 239, 243, and must have required tools and
textbooks.
AUT 247
AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS 7CR
This course provides the student with the
knowledge and skills to competently repair
automatic transmissions. Upon completion
of the course, the student will be familiar
with the terminology, basic theory, diagnostics, maintenance, and repair of automobile/
light truck automatic transmissions.
Prerequisites: Must have required tools and
textbooks.
AUT 250
AUTOMATIC TRANSAXLES
7CR
This course provides the student with the
knowledge and skills to competently repair
automatic transaxles. Upon completion of the
course, the student will be familiar with the
terminology, basic theory, diagnostics, maintenance, and repair of automobile transaxles.
Prerequisites: Must successfully complete AUT
247 and have required tools and textbooks.
AUT 251
AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION/
TRANSAXLE LAB
4CR
This course is designed to teach the student
to competently repair automatic transmission/transaxle assemblies by applying
knowledge attained in required courses.
This is a hands-on class, utilizing live projects. Upon completion of this course, the
student will be familiar with diagnosis,
maintenance, and repair of automobile/
light truck drive trains by applying academic
knowledge to hands-on projects.
Prerequisites: Must successfully complete courses
AUT 247, 250, and must have required tools and
textbooks prior to entering this course.
AUT 255
AUTOMOTIVE
AIR CONDITIONING,
HEATING, & VENTILATION
6CR
Theory, troubleshooting, and repair of automotive air conditioning systems, heating
systems, and ventilation systems. Also covers
recovery and recycling of both R-12 and
R134A refrigerants.
Prerequisites: Must successfully complete AUT
203, 209, and have required tools and textbooks.
2011-2012 Catalog
83
AUT 295
ON-THE-JOB TRAINING/
WORK BASED LEARNING
1-12CR
Provides advanced students with realistic
training at work site. Dates and times will be
determined.
Prerequisites: Instructor permission required.
AUTH 105
HYBRID /ALTERNATE FUEL
INTRODUCTION & SAFETY
2CR
This course will cover the history, evolution
& general safety precautions for servicing.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a
NATEF/ASA certified automotive training
program or Instructor’s permission with two years
automotive experience.
AUTH 110
TOYOTA HYBRID
SYSTEM OVERVIEW
2CR
This course will cover the Toyota systems in
use today with a focus on the Prius model.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a
NATEF/ASA certified automotive training
program or Instructor’s permission with two years
automotive experience.
AUTH 115
TOYOTA PRIUS HYBRID SYSTEM 2CR
This course will cover the Toyota systems in
use today with a focus on the Prius model.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a
NATEF/ASA certified automotive training
program or Instructor’s permission with two years
automotive experience.
AUTH 120
HONDA HYBRID
SYSTEM OVERVIEW
2CR
This course will cover the Honda Hybrid
systems in use today with a focus on the
Civic model.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a
NATEF/ASA certified automotive training
program or Instructor’s permission with two years
automotive.
AUTH 125
HONDA CIVIC IMA
HYBRID SYSTEM
2CR
This course will cover the Honda Civic Integrated Motor Assist systems in use today.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a
NATEF/ASA certified automotive training
program or Instructor’s permission with two years
automotive.
AUTH 130
FORD ESCAPE/MERCURY MARINER
HYBRID SYSTEM OVERVIEW
2CR
This course will cover the Ford Escape/
Mercury Mariner Hybrid systems in use today with a focus on the Escape model.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a
NATEF/ASA certified automotive training
program or Instructor’s permission with two years
automotive.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
84
AUTH 135
GENERAL MOTORS
& OTHER HYBRID SYSTEMS
2CR
This course will cover the General Motors &
other systems in use today with a focus on
the G.M. Dual Mode model system.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a
NATEF/ASA certified automotive training program
or Instructor’s permission with two years automotive.
AUTH 140
ALTERNATE FUEL
VEHICLE SYSTEMS
2CR
This course will cover diesel, e84, CNG, and
hydrogen systems in use today.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a
NATEF/ASA certified automotive training
program or Instructor’s permission with two years
automotive experience.
AUTH 145
ADVANCED LAB
& FINAL EXAM PREPARATION
2CR
This course will give the student a handson opportunity for preparation for the final
exam.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a
NATEF/ASA certified automotive training
program or Instructor’s permission with two years
automotive experience.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
AUTOMOTIVE
UPHOLSTERY &
GLASS TECHNICIAN
AUG 103
INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMOTIVE
UPHOLSTERY & GLASS I
4CR
Perform to a required standard in the following skill areas: school policies, departmental practice and procedures, sewing
machine technology, and acceptable business practice.
AUG 104
INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMOTIVE
UPHOLSTERY & GLASS II
4CR
Perform to a required standard in the following skill areas: sewing, hand tools and
shop equipment, fabrics and materials, and
measuring and estimating.
Prerequisite: AUG 103
AUG 107
INTERIOR UPHOLSTERING
BENCH SEATS I
5CR
Perform to a required standard in removal
of a bench seat, preparing it for upholstery,
and creating a pattern.
Prerequisite: AUG 104
AUG 111
INTERIOR UPHOLSTERING
BENCH SEATS II
5CR
Perform to a required standard in bench seat
and headrest fabrication and re-installation.
Prerequisite: AUG 104, 107
AVIATION
MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN
AMT 104
BASIC MATHEMATICS, BASIC
PHYSICS, & WEIGHT& BALANCE 5CR
Perform all of the mathematical computations
required in the Aviation Maintenance Technician curriculum. Understand the scientific
principles that apply to the operation of aircraft, engines and the equipment that the aviation maintenance technician will be in daily
contact with. Develop a comprehensive understanding of the importance of weight and
balance to aircraft safety, and make all of the
required calculations for weight and balance
checks, equipment changes, extreme loading
checks, and the addition of ballast.
AMT 109
BASIC ELECTRICITY 4CR
Direct current circuits, series, and parallel
circuit arrangements and their application,
understanding the relationship of voltage,
current, resistance, and power, calculating
and measuring these values, and understand
the operation of the multimeter and its use in
troubleshooting.
AMT 116
AIRCRAFT DRAWINGS, CLEANING
& CORROSION CONTROL, GROUND
OPERATIONS & SERVICING, & FLUID
LINES & FITTINGS
5CR
Sketch aircraft repairs and alterations and
understand information presented on typical
aircraft blueprints, graphs, and charts. Recognize types of corrosion and know their
causes, identify and use the proper materials
and processes to remove corrosion by-products, treat corroded areas, and apply proper
protection. Gain a thorough understanding of
the importance of safe ground handling procedures, aircraft movement and storage, and
identify aviation fuels. Identify fluid line components, fabricate rigid and flexible fluid lines,
and properly install fluid lines on aircraft.
AMT 119
MATERIALS & PROCESSES 5CR
Learn about identification and selection of
non-destructive testing methods, dye-penetrant, eddy current, ultra-sound, and magnetic particle inspections, as well as basic
heat-treated processes, aircraft hardware,
and materials. Inspect and check welds.
Perform precision measurements.
AMT 125
ADVANCED ELECTRICITY 4CR
Understand the effect of resistance, capacitance, and inductance in AC circuits, and
understand transformers. Learn about basic
semi-conductor devices (diodes and transistors), and be able to explain their function in
simple circuits.
AMT 127
MAINTENANCE FORMS & RECORDS,
PUBLICATIONS, & MECHANICS
PRIVILEGES & LIMITATIONS
4CR
Utilize maintenance records and entries,
maintenance forms, and inspection reports.
Requires reading, comprehension, and application of information from FAA and
manufacturer’s maintenance specifications,
data sheets, manuals, publications, related
FAA regulations, airworthiness directives,
and advisory material. Apply mechanic
privileges within the limitations prescribed
by FAR Part 65.
AMT 131
WOOD STRUCTURES,
COVERINGS, & AIRCRAFT
FINISHES
3CR
Covers wood aircraft construction, repair,
and inspection. Students will select, apply,
inspect, test, and repair aircraft fabric and
fiberglass covering materials. Become familiar with types of aircraft protective coatings,
trim applications, markings, finish problems, and the inspection of finishes.
AMT 133
AIRCRAFT FUEL SYSTEMS,
ICE & RAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS,
& FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS 4CR
Covers principles of operation and configuration of warning systems, electrical brake controls, anti-skid systems, and landing gear
position indicating and warning systems.
Learn the effects of ice and rain on aircraft
during operations in inclement weather, the
equipment and materials used to counter ice
and rain, and the maintenance of this equipment. Explore components and operation of
fire detection and extinguishing equipment, as
well as smoke and toxic gas detection systems.
AMT 135
SHEET METAL STRUCTURES 4CR
Inspection and repair of all types of sheet
metal. Information regarding the fabrication, construction, and repair of sheet metal
aircraft structures.
AMT 136
WELDING, POSITION
& WARNING SYSTEMS 3CR
Principles regarding the fabrication, construction, and repair of welded aircraft
structures. Principles of operation of speed
and configuration warning systems, electrical brake controls, anti-skid systems, and
landing gear position indicating and warning systems.
AMT 137
NON-METALLIC STRUCTURES 4CR
Covers inspection and repair of all types of
non-metallic and composite structures, including transparent plastic enclosures and
interiors.
AMT 138
AIRCRAFT INSPECTIONS
4CR
Lecture, demonstration, and practical application are used to train the student in the
methods and techniques of all phases of aircraft inspections, federal aviation regulations, maintenance record entries, and
disposition of those records.
AMT 139
ASSEMBLY & RIGGING
4CR
Covers basic information regarding the assembly of aircraft, components, rigging of
all flight control surfaces, balancing and inspection of flight controls, alignment of aircraft structures, and jacking of aircraft.
AMT 140
AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR
3CR
Inspect, check, service, and repair landing
gear retraction systems, shock struts, brakes,
wheels, tires, and steering systems.
AMT 141
HYDRAULIC & PNEUMATIC
POWER SYSTEMS 3CR
Inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and
repair hydraulic and pneumatic power systems and components. Identify and select
hydraulic fluids.
AMT 142
HANGAR OPERATIONS
& MAINTENANCE
(NOT FAA APPROVED) 3CR
Perform maintenance on items of shop
equipment used in the day-to-day operation
of the aircraft maintenance hangar, calibrate precision tools as needed, and assist in
repair station operations. Note: Offered
during Winter quarter.
AMT 143
AIRFRAME ELECTRICAL
SYSTEMS 5CR
Learn about operation of AC and DC electrical systems used on large and small aircraft,
generating and starting systems, AC and DC
electric motors, wiring, controls, switches,
indicators, and protective devices, and constant speed and integrated drive generators.
AMT 144
ENGINE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS 5CR
Develop an understanding of the operation
of generators, alternators, DC motors, and
AC motors, and their repair and overhaul.
Learn the special requirements of electrical
components operating in high temperature
areas and how to install wiring, controls,
switches, and indicators, and to protect
them from its effects.
AMT 145
CABIN ATMOSPHERE
CONTROL SYSTEMS 3CR
Physiological aspects of flight. Inspection and
maintenance of oxygen, pressurization, heating, cooling, and air conditioning systems.
AMT 146
AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENT,
COMMUNICATION & NAVIGATION
SYSTEMS 3CR
Learn principles of operation of common aircraft instruments, air or vacuum driven gyros,
pilot-static systems, and static system leak
tests. Gain operating principles of common
avionics equipment, antennas, autopilots,
servos, approach coupling systems, interphones, static discharge devices, and ground
proximity warning systems. Inspect and repair antennas and electronic equipment.
AMT 208
HELICOPTER OPERATIONS &
MAINTENANCE PRACTICES 4CR
Covers history, operations, regulations,
publications, records, special use equipment,
and basic maintenance fundamentals, as
they relate to rotorcraft.
AMT 210
BASIC ROTOR SYSTEMS
MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
4CR
Covers history of rotorcraft and principles
of flight; types and function of rotor systems;
overhaul of rotor hub assemblies; installation and static balancing of rotors; types
and function of anti-torque control systems;
inspection of rotor blades using manufacturer’s data.
AMT 212
ADVANCED ROTOR SYSTEMS
MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
4CR
Covers vibration analysis; installation and
dynamic balancing of rotor systems; tracking of helicopter rotor blades; principles of
helicopter autorotation and adjustment of
autorotation RPM for power off operations.
AMT 215
HELICOPTER SYSTEMS 4CR
Covers helicopter powerplants and controls;
fuel systems, turbine fuels, and fuel system
components; oil systems and types of oils;
mechanical drives, clutches, drive shafts,
freewheeling units, and transmissions; flight
controls, hydraulic, and instrument systems;
rotor rpm, engine out, and master caution
and warning systems; electrical systems,
Nicad batteries, and starter generators; fuselage structures, and landing gear.
2011-2012 Catalog
85
AMT 217
FAA TESTING
& TURBINE ENGINES 7CR
Covers preparation for and completion of
FAA certification examinations. FAA written examinations are accomplished outside
of CPTC at an FAA Designated Written
Examination Center. After successful completion of written examinations, students
must pass an oral and practical examination
administered by an FAA Designated Maintenance Examiner (DME). Students are
charged a fee for these examinations. Note:
Fees for these examinations are not included
in the college tuition or lab fees. The remaining 120 hours of training concentrate
on turbine engines to include: the history,
different types, the theory of operation of
turbine engines, the Brayton cycle, Bernoulli’s theory, and turbine engine air flow
characteristics. Learn the theory of operation of different types of compressors, combustion chamber, turbines, turbine stator
vanes (nozzles), and exhaust sections maintenance of turbine engines to include: turbine
engine removal, overhaul, inspection, and
repair procedures. Learn to install turbine
engines, make adjustments, troubleshoot,
test and check run procedures; become familiar with regulations, publications, and
records for turbine engines.
AMT 219
ENGINE LUBRICATION SYSTEMS 4CR
Covers the components of and the operation
of engine lubrication systems. Introduction
to the requirements and characteristics of
engine lubricants and lubrication systems.
AMT 221
ENGINE INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS 4CR
Covers the theory and principal of operation
of electrical and mechanical fluid rate of
flow indicating systems, and electrical and
mechanical temperature, pressure, and
RPM indicating systems.
AMT 224
POWERPLANT RECIPROCATING
ENGINE THEORY 6CR
Covers the history of aircraft engines, principles of energy transformation, theory of
operation, engine requirements and configuration, and overhaul of horizontally opposed engines.
AMT 225
POWERPLANT MAINTENANCE
& OPERATION
6CR
Powerplant maintenance and operation consists of theory of operation, engine requirements and configuration and installation,
troubleshooting and removal of horizontally
opposed engines.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
86
AMT 226
ENGINE FUEL SYSTEM
& FIRE PROTECTION 1CR
Fuel systems and fire protection consists of
transformation of energy, chemistry of combustion and thermal efficiency of fuel air
mixtures. Fire protection covers the components and the operation of fire detection and
extinguishing equipment.
AMT 228
ENGINE FUEL
& METERING SYSTEMS 5CR
Fuel metering consists of the principles of
fuel metering for float carbs, pressure carb,
fuel injection, and detonate injection, turbine fuel controls, and electronic engine fuel
controls.
AMT 229
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
PROPELLERS & FAA FINAL
TESTING SYSTEMS
4CR
Propellers consist of the theory of operation
and nomenclature. Propeller controls and
instrumentation. Fixed pitch, controllable
pitch, constant speed, and feathering propellers. Governors, anti-ice, phasing, and
synchronization systems. Inspection, maintenance, and repairs to propellers and related systems. Familiarization of unducted fan
engines. Included at the end of the course, 6
hours devoted to preparation for FAA certification examinations. FAA written examinations are accomplished at an FAA
Designated Written Examination Center.
After successful completion of written examinations, students must pass an Oral and
Practical Examination administered by an
FAA Designated Mechanics Examiner
(DME). Students are charged a fee for these
examinations administered by FAA designated examiners and centers. Note: Fees for
theses examinations are not included in the
college tuition or lab fees systems.
AMT 231
ENGINE INSPECTION 4CR
Engine inspection consists of detailed work
with the Federal Aviation Regulations, types
of inspections, conformance to type certificate data sheets and major alterations, airworthiness directives, and maintenance
record entries.
AMT 233
ENGINE IGNITION
& STARTING SYSTEMS 4CR
Covers the operation, maintenance, and
overhaul of magnetos and ignition, harnesses, the inspection, servicing, troubleshooting, and repair of reciprocating and turbine
engine ignition system, components and
turbine engine electrical and pneumatic
starting systems.
AMT 235
INDUCTION, AIRFLOW, COOLING,
& EXHAUST SYSTEMS 3CR
Learn about the maintenance of carburetors
and fuel-injected, naturally-aspirated, turbo-charged, and super-charged induction
systems. Learn about maintenance of ice
and rain control systems as well as principles
of air-cooled engines and problems that can
occur with an air-cooled engine. Study the
history and development of exhaust systems,
and their function to safely remove exhaust
gasses. Students will describe, inspect,
maintain, troubleshoot, and repair components of exhaust systems. Learn principles of
operation of turbine engine reversing systems and power recovery turbines.
AMT 239
ADVANCED HANGAR OPERATIONS
& MAINTENANCE
(NOT FAA APPROVED) 3CR
Advanced hangar operations and maintenance is designed for the students currently
enrolled in the helicopter and powerplant
classes. It includes servicing and repair of
shop equipment, calibration of precision
tools, and assisting in the repair station operations. Note: This course work is only offered during Winter quarter.
AEROSPACE
COMPOSITE
TECHNICIAN
ACM 120
COMPOSITE FABRICATION
4CR
Learn manufacturing methods and processes commonly utilized for the fabrication of
composite materials. Instruction includes
material choices, fabrication techniques,
material handling, and safety procedures.
ACM 125
COMPOSITE ASSEMBLY
4CR
Identify and utilize appropriate materials
and processes to assemble structures made
of composite materials. Includes the lay-up,
vacuum bagging, and cure processing of wet
laminating techniques and preimpregnated
materials.
ACM 130
COMPOSITE REPAIR
4CR
Inspect, test, and repair composite structures.
This course explains how imperfections affect composite properties and provides
hands-on training for the repair of defects.
ACM 145
SPECIAL PROJECTS
3CR
Develops skills in print reading, project
planning, layout, distortion control, fixturing, and other fabrication techniques. Students will have the opportunity to apply
knowledge to projects of personal interest
and/or as assigned.
BIOLOGY
BIOL 100
BIOLOGY FOR NON-MAJORS 5CR
Explores how life expresses itself from a cellular and molecular level in an online approach that will help the student better
understand the many current biological issues such as cancer, genetic disease, evolution, and human impact on the environment.
Other related issues including stem cell research, genetic manipulation of embryos
and genetically modified crops will be addressed. Laboratory component included.
BIOL 118
HUMAN ANATOMY
& PHYSIOLOGY
5CR
An in-depth approach to body systems, emphasizing the relationship between structure
and functions. A non-laboratory course appropriate for non-science majors or for students beginning study in life sciences.
Prerequisites: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
placement score or Instructor permission.
BIOL& 241
ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I 5CR
Provides students with the first course of the
two-quarter study of body structure and related physiology on cellular through system
levels. Includes an in-depth study of cells
and tissues; integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and sensory systems. Laboratory
component included.
Prerequisites: BIOL 118 with a grade of C or 2.0
or better and CHEM& 110 with a grade of C or 2.0
or better or evidence of basic knowledge of
chemistry.
BIOL& 242
ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II 5CR
Provides students with the second course of
the two quarter study of body structure and
related physiology on cellular through system
levels. Includes an in-depth study of body organization and physiological processes of
cardiovascular lymphatic includes immunology, respiratory, digestive includes metabolism, excretory, reproductive and endocrine
systems. Laboratory component included.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of BIOL&
241 or grade of C or 2.0 or better
BIOL& 260
MICROBIOLOGY 5CR
Provides students with the content of diversity, structure, and physiology of beneficial
and harmful microbes. Laboratory practice
in identification of microbial species through
culturing, staining, and biochemical testing.
Includes laboratory.
Prerequisites: BIOL 118 with a grade of C or 2.0
or better and CHEM& 110 with a grade of C or 2.0
or better.
BUSINESS
BUS& 201
BUSINESS LAW
5CR
Introduces students to Business law as it applies to the business world through the Uniform Commercial Code. Examines legal
institutions and processes, legal reasoning,
and the interaction of law and business.
Laws pertaining to business contracts, sales,
bailments, commercial paper, employment,
agency, business organization, insurance
and property are reviewed.
Prerequisite: ACTG 115 or instructor approval.
CENTRAL SERVICE/
STERILE PROCESSING
MMN 103
INTRODUCTION TO
THE PROGRAM & THE
HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY 3CR
Covers overall program content, including
policies, procedures, philosophy, and terminal objectives. The history and evolvement of
the central service profession, human relations, legal issues, and regulatory agencies affecting the field are explored. Web enhanced.
MMN 108
ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY/
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 3CR
Explore the overall makeup of the human
body, its systems and functions, related medical, and surgical terminology. Surgical instrumentation is introduced. Web enhanced.
Prerequisite: Completion of MMN 103.
MMN 113
MICROBIOLOGY/
INFECTION CONTROL 3CR
Examination of human pathogens in microbiology. Students will learn about infection
control as it relates to the sterilization process. Safety issues in the healthcare environment are covered. Web enhanced.
Prerequisite: MMN 103, 108.
MMN 124
SURGICAL INSTRUMENTATION 4CR
Students learn to identify basic and complex
surgical instruments. They will demonstrate
thorough knowledge of the manufacture,
care, and processing of surgical, endoscopic
and power instruments. In addition, students will have an understanding of special
protocols required with loaner instruments.
Prerequisite: MMN 103, 108, 113
MMN 126
PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF
CLEANING & DISINFECTING 6CR
Classroom and laboratory experience in the
fundamentals of cleaning and disinfection.
Topics include water quality issues, water
purification systems, chemical cleaning and
disinfecting agents, handling and transporting of patient care equipment, and general
cleaning protocols for instruments. The
proper and safe handling of infectious waste
is also included.
Prerequisite: MMN 103, 108, 113, 124.
MMN 129
PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES
OF STERILIZATION 6CR
Classroom and laboratory experience in the
packaging, assembly, and sterilization of
procedural trays, instrument sets, and sterile
supplies. Major topics include methods of
high and low temperature sterilization, sterilization chemicals, and packaging materials. Guidelines for point of use processing
are discussed. Operations, parameters, and
maintenance of various sterilizers is included, as well as monitoring of the sterilization
process and quality control. Proper storage
and storage concerns for sterile supplies are
included.
Prerequisite: MMN 103, 108, 113, 124, 126.
MMN 131
MATERIEL MANAGEMENT/
CENTRAL SERVICE
APPLICATIONS
4CR
Overview of the handling and distribution
of materials in a medical facility. Inventory
management, replenishment methods, and
tracking systems are included. Students become familiar with quality assurance measures and techniques.
Prerequisite: MMN 103, 108, 113, 124, 126, 129.
MMN 213
CLINICAL INTERNSHIP I 6CR
Provides the student with the opportunity to
apply the theories and principles of Central
Service learned in the classroom to the actual work experience in a central service or
distribution department. The role of the CS
technician in a hospital central service department will be the focus. In order to participate in the clinical aspect of the program,
students must receive a No Record on File
report from the Washington State Patrol, re:
Crimes Against Persons, have proof of current immunizations, complete CPR for
health care professionals, be able to lift 50
pounds, and be able to work on their feet for
up to 8 hours.
Prerequisite: Completion of MMN 103, 108, 113,
124, 126, 129, 131.
2011-2012 Catalog
87
MMN 215
CLINICAL INTERNSHIP II 6CR
Continued participation in the clinical setting at local facilities allows the student to
gain a variety of experiences in Central
Service and Materiel Management. Requirements are the same as MMN 213.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MMN 213.
MMN 216
JOB SKILLS MATHEMATICS
3CR
Utilizing the online classroom, this selfpaced hybrid course will guide the student to
prepare a resume, cover letter, and application. Interviewing tips and techniques will
be covered, as well as the online application
process. Students will return to the classroom the last 2-3 days of the class to demonstrate clear understanding of the process and
be given job search information. Hybrid.
Prerequisite: Completion of MMN 103, 108, 113,
124, 126, 129, 131.
CHEMISTRY
CHEM& 110
CHEMICAL CONCEPTS W/LAB 5CR
An introduction to chemistry intended for
non-science majors. This course looks at
how models of atoms, bonding and the
structures of materials provide an understanding of common chemical properties
and reactions.
Corequisites: Students who have not completed
MAT 99 or achieved a COMPASS score of 76 or
higher on College Algebra must take MAT 99
concurrently with this course.
CHEM& 121
INTRO TO CHEMISTRY
5CR
Understanding the metric system, atomic
theory, bonding, quantitative relationships,
solutions, gases, acids and bases, salts, and
nuclear chemistry. Lab included.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM& 110 or High School
Chemistry; Corequisite: MATH 99 or higher OR
appropriate COMPASS placement concurrently
with this course.
CHEM& 161
GENERAL CHEMISTRY
WITH LAB I 5CR
Course covers methods and measurements
including significant figures and scientific
notation, states of matter, atomic structure,
the periodic table, ionic and covalent bonding, and calculations and chemical equations including the mole.
Prerequisite: MAT& 141 and 1 year of high school
chemistry or CHEM& 121, ENV 153, or other
college-level chemistry class.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
88
CHEM& 162
GENERAL CHEMISTRY
WITH LAB II 5CR
A continuation of General Chemistry with
instruction in properties of solutions, calculation of solution concentrations, thermodynamics, acids and bases, oxidation and
reduction and radioactivity. Also the structure, properties and nomenclature of organic molecules are covered. The course
requires completions of General Chemistry
or acceptable equivalent.
Prerequisite: CHEM& 161Computer Applications
courses (with a CAS prefix) are listed in the Business
Support Services section of the course descriptions.
COLLEGE SUCCESS
COLL 101
FOUNDATION FOR
STUDENT SUCCESS
2CR
Provides students with skills to be successful
in college. Topics include study skills, learning styles, communication skills, time management, campus resources, test taking
strategies and diversity. This program is required for certificate and degree seeking
students with COMPASS placement at or
below Math 82 and/or English 82 and is
available to any students that would benefit
from the course.
COLL 105
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
CAREER DEVELOPMENT
Variable Credit - 2, 3 or 5CR
Explore career options and educational
pathways related to the medical field. Develop an educational plan and timelines to
achieve the pathway goal. Refine job acquisition skills and workplace communication
skills related to targeted employment field.
SVL 101
SERVICE LEARNING
3CR
Participate in organized service that addresses local community needs – specifically,
the issue of poverty - while developing academic and professional skills. Work directly
with community partners to link community
activities and projects to academic growth
and self-discovery through reflection. Relate
service experience to local and global social
issues and broaden knowledge of chosen
profession. Requires a minimum of 20 hours
of community service work in addition to
class assignments and activities.
COMPUTER
APPLICATIONS
CAH 105
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
5CR
Provides training in the uses of Microsoft
Windows and related programs. Students will
use computers to develop touch control and
proper keyboarding and 10-key techniques.
CAS 140
POWERPOINT
2CR
Create professionally formatted presentations
that include animation and transitions. Insert
and format charts, graphics, diagrams, and
pictures. Save presentations for various delivery options including Web pages.
CAS 145
KEYBOARDING
3CR
Use computers to develop touch control and
proper keyboarding techniques; introduction to basic word processing functions.
PUBLISHER
5CR
Explore desktop publishing in this projectbased class. Create and edit flyers, newsletters, brochures, logos, calendars, Web pages,
and various business publications. Use mail
merge to create letters and labels. Use tools to
edit text, colors, graphic design objects, and
logos. Prepare files for commercial printing.
CAS 115
CAS 150
CAS 105
INTRODUCTION TO
COMPUTING
3CR
Explore personal computer concepts from a
user’s perspective. In this introductory
course, learn computer terminology; run
programs; save, retrieve, and search for files;
use help; and perform computer maintenance. Develop basic skills in word processing, Internet, e-mail, and PowerPoint.
CAS 120
WORD I
2CR
Utilize beginning word processing techniques while creating and editing business
documents. Create tables, columns, Web
pages, envelopes, and mailing labels. Work
with special features to track and review
changes and compare documents.
CAS 125
WORD II
3CR
Explore advanced word processing with Microsoft Word. Perform mail merges; create
styles; use advanced graphics tools; create basic forms with formulas; and utilize advanced
report functions including indexes. Create
macros and modify the Word environment.
Prerequisite: CAS 120
CAS 130
EXCEL I
3CR
Create and analyze professionally formatted
spreadsheets. Enter data, formulas, and
functions. Create charts and insert graphics.
Sort and filter lists.
Prerequisite: Math 82 skills preferred.
CAS 135
EXCEL II
3CR
Use advanced spreadsheet features and
functions to analyze and project data. Learn
how to use what-if analysis tools such as
scenarios and solver. Create macros; validate data; link worksheets/books; use pivot
tables; find errors; and share, merge, and
protect workbooks.
Prerequisite: CAS 130.
ACCESS I
2CR
Develop basic relational databases as you
create, edit, format, and print tables, queries,
forms, and reports. Copy records and import
tables from another Access database. Define
field properties and create relationships.
Run, sort, and filter queries. Use comparison
and logical operators, and perform
calculations. Explore the basics of creating a
cohesive database.
COMPUTER
INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
CIT 101
PROGRAMMING
FUNDAMENTALS
5CR
Introduction to programming concepts
while enforcing good programming style
and logical thinking. Designed for students
with little or no programming language experience, it begins with basic general programming concepts and key concepts of
structure. Course then progresses to the intricacies of decision-making, looping, array
manipulation, and methods.
CIT 105
FUNDAMENTALS OF
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 5CR
Explore computer concepts and their application in today’s world. Learn about the
most current information on computers,
software, hardware, the Internet, and
emerging issues and technologies. Tailored
to prepare students for the rest of the program to identify their interests and talents.
CIT 107
OPERATING SYSTEMS
FUNDAMENTALS
5CR
Designed to explore and expand on core
knowledge and skills pertaining to what operating systems are, what they do, and how
they are designed and constructed. Learn
about process, memory, and storage management. Identify reasons for protection and security of operating systems, and learn about
distributed and special-purpose systems.
CIT 141
PROGRAMMING
FUNDAMENTALS JAVA LAB
5CR
Practice programming computer solutions
in Java to solve small-scale to medium-scale
computing world problems, using procedural design and programming techniques.
Design, code, compile, execute, and debug
programs that satisfy provided functional
specifications.
CIT 142
JAVA OBJECT-ORIENTED
PROGRAMMING I 5CR
Construct a foundation of procedural programming concepts and skills requisite for
professional object-oriented software development. Use Java, a modern structured,
object-oriented language, to develop your
problem-solving and algorithm formulation skills.
Prerequisite: CIT 101.
CIT 143
JAVA OBJECT-ORIENTED
PROGRAMMING II 5CR
Build your problem-solving skills with the
fundamental concepts and techniques of Object-Oriented Java programming in analyzing, designing, and implementing computer
programs. Practice problem-solving methods
and algorithm development to analyze, design, implement, modify, verify, and document computer programs that solve real-world
problems. Develop a good conceptual understanding of data and functional abstraction.
Prerequisite: CIT 142.
CIT 150
PRINCIPLES OF
RELATIONAL DATABASES
5CR
Delve into the fundamental concepts, terminologies, methodologies, and system organizations of database management systems.
Develop the theoretical foundation of understanding necessary to design, implement,
optimize, query, and maintain a database
system. Propose, design, and develop a database, using Microsoft Access to reinforce the
theoretical concepts.
CIT 151
MYSQL 5CR
Apply your understanding of relational database theory, and gain practical experience
designing and implementing data-driven
business applications using MySQL in a client-server environment. Learn to administer MySQL, create and maintain data using
the database. Query and run scripts using
SQL using the database.
Prerequisite: CIT 150.
CIT 153
SQL SERVER 5CR
Learn SQL commands, such as how and
where to type an SQL query; and how to
create, populate, alter, and delete tables;
customize SQL server’s settings; and learn
about SQL server’s functions; create joins, a
common database mechanism for combining tables; perform query development, the
use of views, and other derived structures
and simple set operations; and write subqueries, aggregate functions, and correlated
subqueries, as well as indexes and constraints
that can be added to tables in SQL server.
Prerequisite: CIT 150.
CIT 161
HTML & CSS 5CR
Learn basic programming and graphical
user interface techniques for developing effective and useful web sites. Utilize HyperText Markup Language (HTML and
XHTML) and Cascading Style Sheets
(CSS) to present static text and graphic content in an appealing, organized, and informative manner.
CIT 163
CLIENT-SIDE
WEB PROGRAMMING 5CR
Enliven your web pages by adding clientside
scripting to your professional skill set. Develop your understanding of the tools necessary to create Dynamic Hypertext Markup
Language (DHTML) applications that effectively manipulate and put some life into
static web pages.
Prerequisite: CIT 161.
CIT 164
SERVER-SIDE
WEB PROGRAMMING 5CR
Activate your web pages by learning how to
add server-side scripting to your work. Explore the possibilities of the Common Gateway Interface (CGI) that brings your static
web pages to life. By linking your web page
to a server-side program that generates web
pages on the fly, you can develop dynamic
web-based applications that can query databases or do just about anything to respond to
user requests.
Prerequisite: CIT 163.
2011-2012 Catalog
89
CIT 167
XML & WEB SERVICES 5CR
Advance into the future of web programming by discovering how to integrate
HTML -accessible web services in processing XML encapsulated data. Find out how
to use XML in leveraging applications developed remotely on the world wide web.
Prerequisite: CIT 161.
CIT 180
INTRODUCTION TO
GAME PROGRAMMING 5CR
Experience the ultimate challenge of computer gaming: designing and creating your
own computer games. Develop an introductory academic understanding of the various
aspects of the game development process,
while at the same time, applying basic objectoriented programming techniques to create
your own tangible first product.
Prerequisite: CIT 143.
CIT 185
INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS 5CR
Project yourself into the robotic future of
computing, wherein programmed automatons are able to do more than just process
data. Design, build, and program real, functional robots, while applying basic objectoriented programming skills.
Prerequisite: CIT 143.
CIT 205
OBJECT-ORIENTED
ANALYSIS & DESIGN 5CR
Explore methodologies and technologies
used in analyzing, designing and developing
object-oriented software systems intended to
solve real-world problems. Build on the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) model
initially presented in the CIT 101 course to
model and design systems using tools such as
CRC cards, and the Unified Modeling Language (or UML, which includes class, use
case, and sequence diagrams). Discuss the
theoretical and practical aspects of object
orientation.
Prerequisite: CIT 143.
CIT 224
C++ .NET 5CR
Study the mother tongue of modern objectoriented computer languages to not only
develop programming skills in a widely-used
commercial programming language, but to
also gain an understanding of the origins
and use of more current object-oriented
technologies, such as Java and C#.
Prerequisite: CIT 143.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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CIT 234
C# .NET 5CR
Leverage your success in CIT 143 to learn
C#, a commercially successful and important
object-oriented computer language. Whether
you consider it a completely new language or
just a derivative of Java, acquiring the ability
to program in C# opens the door to developing professional Windows applications on the
Microsoft .Net platform. Develop a basic
problem- solving tool set for working in this
environment comparable to the one you have
acquired with Java, and in the process, extend your understanding and ability to apply
the fundamental concepts and techniques of
Object-Oriented Programming.
Prerequisite: CIT 143.
CIT 245
DATA & LOGIC STRUCTURES 5CR
Expand your understanding of object-oriented programming techniques by implementing abstract data types as data
structures in solving complex computing
problems. Study the fundamental algorithms of computer science while using
mathematical principles to analyze the efficiency of their implementation.
Prerequisite: CIT 143.
CIT 248
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
VISUAL BASIC.NET
5CR
Advance your object-oriented design and programming skills into the practical realm of
moderately complex professional business applications. Develop forms, procedures, functions, classes using Visual Basic.Net. Work
with databases using the same language.
Prerequisite: CIT 143.
CIT 250
USER INTERFACE DESIGN
5CR
Covers the concepts involved with programming on the phone – source control, phone
emulators, phone apis, and deployment.
Prerequisite: CIT 161
CIT 252
PHONE PROGRAMMING
5CR
Covers the concepts involved with programming on the phone – source control, phone
emulators, phone apis, and deployment.
Prerequisite: CIT 143
CIT 254
SQL SERVER ADMINISTRATION 5CR
Develop a strong understanding of the concepts and skills necessary to perform the
duties of a Database Administrator (DBA) in
departments and enterprises using medium
to large relational databases. Install, configure, manage and tune Microsoft SQL Server
to ensure that data is consistently and reliably available throughout an organization.
Learn how to manage SQL Server databases, files, and users, and troubleshoot operating and performance problems.
Prerequisite: CIT 153.
CIT 257
ORACLE
5CR
Apply your understanding of relational database theory, and gain practical experience
designing and implementing data-driven
business applications using Oracle in a clientserver environment. Throughout the course
we will identify and discuss the PL/SQL extensions, but practice the SQL standard.
Prerequisite: CIT 150.
CIT 264
JSP & SERVLETS 5CR
Qualify for professional experience in analyzing, designing, and developing active,
commercial web applications for the open
source Apache web server using Java Server
Pages ( JSP) and Java servlets, connecting to
open source client-server MySQL relational
database management systems. Design and
produce a professional e-commerce web
application.
Prerequisite: CIT 142.
CIT 265
ASP.NET
5CR
Earn professional experience in analyzing,
designing, developing active, commercial
web applications for the Microsoft web
server using Microsoft ASP.Net with C#,
connecting to Microsoft relational database
management systems.
Prerequisite: CIT 142.
CIT 280
JAVA GAME PROGRAMMING 5CR
Exercise and apply your Java programming
skills to creating real computer games,
learning advanced Java capabilities, and
exploring exciting and challenging programming issues. This advanced programming elective is more than just creating a
practical computer program, or obtaining a
programming job -it is an invitation to consider the possibilities of computer programming as a profession and a life-long pursuit.
Prerequisite: CIT 180.
CIT 282
C# GAME PROGRAMMING 5CR
Explore the available tools for developing
computer games on Microsoft Windows
and Xbox 360 platforms while applying and
expanding your C# programming skills.
This course is an advanced programming
elective that is focused on applying and expanding technical skills, as well as introducing some of the most exciting challenges of
computer science.
Prerequisite: CIT 180.
CIT 285
JAVA ROBOTICS
PROGRAMMING LAB
5CR
Stretch your Java programming skills to create and program real robots that perform
potentially useful functions. By utilizing the
leJOS NXJ open source Java virtual machine in this advanced programming elective course, you can open your mind to all
kinds of incredibly practical and exciting
ways to apply your computer programming
skills, and direct your career.
Prerequisite: CIT 185.
CIT 297
SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
(REPEATABLE,VARIABLE1-5CR)
Study an advanced or specialized subject in
the field of Computer Information Technology (CIT). This course provides an opportunity for in-depth study of an emerging or
specialized topic not yet included in this
catalog. The offering is a normal college
class taught by an instructor, with the usual
textbook, written assignments, lab exercises,
and examinations. Course topics offered are
announced in the quarterly schedule. May
be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of
different topics.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
CIT 298
SPECIAL PROJECTS IN COMPUTER
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
(REPEATABLE,VARIABLE 1-10CR)
Pursue Computer Information Technology
(CIT) subjects above and beyond regular
course offerings, demonstrating your ability
to apply knowledge and utilize mastered
skills in solving real-world problems on a
schedule. This course provides an opportunity for in-depth study of topics of special interest to advanced students through directed
readings, independent study, experimental
research, or creative exercise. You may propose a special projects course by developing a
detailed plan, including course outline, faculty consultation plan, learning objectives,
study materials, measurable results, and
evaluation standards. This proposal may be
arbitrarily accepted or rejected subject to
faculty discretion; however, if accepted, the
burden of completing the proposed study
project within the agreed-upon timeline falls
completely upon you, the student. May be
repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different projects.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
CIT 299
PROFESSIONAL WORK EXPERIENCES
IN COMPUTER INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
5CR
Earn college credit by applying learned technical skills in professional work experiences
directly related to your studies in Computer
Information Technology. Perform 165 hours
of part-time or full-time labor as an intern
with a public or private enterprise, as a paid
employee or as a volunteer. Study and practice in résumé building, interviewing, and
job search skills by actually identifying and
then applying for an intern position. Your
performance will be jointly evaluated by
work site supervisor and CIT faculty.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
COMPUTER
NETWORKING &
INFORMATION
SYSTEMS SECURITY
(CNISS)
NSS 101
IT ESSENTIALS I 5CR
Introduces students to the knowledge and
skills necessary to competently install, build,
configure, upgrade, troubleshoot, and repair
PC compatible hardware, including troubleshooting basic networks and Internet connectivity. Additionally, this course will cover
the latest memory, bus, peripherals, and
wireless technologies.
NSS 105
IT ESSENTIALS II 4CR
Introduces students to the knowledge and
skills necessary to competently use, install,
configure, upgrade, and troubleshoot current operating systems technologies.
Prerequisites: NSS 101 or equivalent knowledge
and skills.
NSS 110
NETWORKING
FUNDAMENTALS I 4CR
Study components of a local area network,
wide area network, peer-to-peer and clientserver network environments. Introduces
students to UNIX operating systems and to
the network technologies it supports. Learn
technical components and concepts of network architectures, network protocols, and
media used in different network communications. Topics include networking technologies, layers, TCP/IP, networking practices,
installation, support, and troubleshooting.
NSS 115
LAW & ETHICS IN
THE WORKPLACE
4CR
Liability and litigation can arise from many
situations, including misuse and abuse of
computer databases, bulletin boards, e-mail,
web pages, electronic funds transfer systems,
and proprietary computer programs. Recommended business practices for policies,
codes of conduct, and communications are
examined.
NSS 120
MS DESKTOP SUPPORT I 5CR
Introduces students to the knowledge, skills,
and tasks necessary to troubleshoot basic
problems computer users will face while
running a desktop operating system.
NSS 125
MS DESKTOP SUPPORT II 4CR
Introduces students to the knowledge, skills,
and tasks necessary to troubleshoot basic
problems computer users will face related to
configuring and maintaining applications
running on a desktop operating system.
2011-2012 Catalog
NSS 150
INTERNET BASICS
4CR
Learn technical knowledge of Internet, intranet and extranet technologies independent of specific internet-related career roles.
Topics include Internet networking technologies, OSI layers, TCP/IP, Internet clients,
development, networking and infrastructure, security, and business concepts.
NSS 155
COMPUTER SECURITY
CONCEPTS 4CR
Basic concepts of computer and information
systems security and a conceptual model of a
total security program comprised of high
technology, classical security practices, and
common sense. An overview of the CISS
program and its utility in today’s work
environment.
NSS 160
and skills.
INTRODUCTION TO LINUX
5CR
Introduces the fundamentals of the UNIX
operating system, concepts, architecture,
and administration. The student will practice these basic concepts and approaches using LINUX.
NSS 130
NSS 165
Prerequisites: NSS 120 or equivalent knowledge
SERVER FUNDAMENTALS
4CR
Understand server installation, configuration, upgrading, maintenance, troubleshooting, and disaster recovery in a vendor
neutral environment. Topics include advanced hardware issues, such as RAID,
SCSI, multiple CPUs, SANs, server types,
system bus architectures, disaster recovery,
upgrading, and security concepts.
NSS 135
IMPLEMENTING
SYSTEM SECURITY 4CR
Capstone course of general security concepts, communications security, infrastructure security, basics of cryptography, and
organizational security. Includes access, attacks, auditing, vulnerabilities, devices, algorithms protocols, disaster recover, and
documentation.
NSS 140
INTRODUCTION TO
DATA ANALYSIS
5CR
Introduces the use of software to perform
recovery of deleted or corrupted data. Techniques will be used to demonstrate the use of
statistical analysis practices to predict or
show trends involving security issues of access, crime, or loss prevention.
91
CONTINGENCY PLANNING
4CR
Course consists of five linked modules, which
build on each other. The first module, Situation Assessment, consists of steps for situation
assessment; provides situation assessment job
aids. The second module, Hazard Analysis,
presents methods for conduction of a hazard
analysis and developing a risk index; provides
job aids for performing these tasks. The third
module, Basic Plan Development, addresses
procedures for developing the basic plan;
provides job aids for developing or revising a
basic plan. The fourth module, Finalizing the
Plan, presents an opportunity to develop an
action plan for completing the contingency
plan; provides a job aid for doing so. Module
five, Long Range Contingency Planning,
provides basic concepts and a recommended
process for long-range contingency planning.
NSS 170
TELECOM SECURITY 4CR
Telecommunications systems, including
voice, video, and data services. The basic
network structures, services, and methods of
communication are described, including:
commercial carrier, value added carrier, the
LATA, LEC, CLEC, and the toll-switching
hierarchy. Common telephone services
fraud, abuse, and theft are introduced, along
with common countermeasures.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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NSS 175
NETWORK FUNDAMENTALS II 4CR
Introduction to networking fundamentals
with a focus on Cisco equipment, including
network protocols, switching, routing, security, IPX, mapping, monitoring, and
configuration.
NSS 180
INTERNSHIP I 2CR
On-the-job practical field experience combining classroom study with related work
experience under the supervision of an employer. Includes scheduled seminars.
NSS 201
ADVANCED LINUX
5CR
Advanced fundamentals of the Linux operating system, the operating system of the
Internet, servers, and desktop computers.
This course is a hands-on, practical approach to the advanced abilities and usage
of Linux system concepts, architecture, and
administration.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of NSS 160.
NSS 211
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
SERVER ADMINISTRATION
5CR
Introduces knowledge, skills and tasks necessary to deploy, support, and secure windows server network operating systems in a
variety of stand-alone and enterprise network environments. Provides extensive
hands-on training for Information Systems
Security professionals responsible for managing accounts and resources, maintaining
server resources, monitoring server performance, safeguarding data, and securing
Windows Server network operating system.
NSS 250
INTERNSHIP II 2CR
This course provides practical field experience in a security-related specialty area. Includes a scheduled seminar.
NSSB 201
OVERVIEW OF HACKING,
PHREAKING & CRACKING 5CR
Introduces the history of hacking, its various
forms and some examples of the latest attacks, tools, and techniques employed by today’s hackers as well as countermeasures
that illustrate how to protect against these
devastating maneuvers.
Prerequisites: NSS 135.
NSSB 215
COMPUTER FORENSICS 4CR
Basic practices and techniques used in computer forensics. This course introduces the
chain of custody and determination of the
sequence of events when a misuse or crime is
suspected. Topics include: evidence collection and analysis, interpretation of clues
from mail messages, news posting, and file
signatures on hard drives and other computer storage media.
Prerequisites: NSS 140.
NSSB 225
COMMUNICATION
BEST PRACTICES
5CR
Introduces students to common techniques
used to commit communications fraud in
the work- place. Includes a review of the history of fraud and common practices. Additionally, counter- measures are reviewed on
how to protect the corporate network from
being exploited by communications fraud.
NSSB 231
WEB SECURITY 5CR
Analyze the risks involved and determine
what level of security is needed to operate a
web site. Topics include how to protect a web
setup from intrusion, sabotage, eavesdropping and tampering, and view the website
with existing tools and techniques of hackers.
Develop a secure website plan to select, secure, configure, and set up firewalls, as well
as secure an extended and distributed enterprise network or Virtual Private Network.
NSSB 238
VIRUS, WORMS
& HAZARDOUS SOFTWARE
5CR
Introduction to viruses, worms, and hazardous software that comprise a data integrity
and access issue with today’s computer use.
Several types of hazardous software will be
examined, along with common tools, techniques, and procedures to detect, clean, and
prevent spreading.
NSSB 245
INTRODUCTION TO SCRIPTING 5CR
Scripting languages are often used for oneoff
programming jobs and for prototyping.
Scripting is also used in some large generic
applications as a flexible way to configure
and secure generic software components to
fit specialist requirements. Today, a bewildering variety of scripting languages offer a
range of powerful features. This class will illustrate some practical applications of scripting and provide an introduction to some of
the most widely-used scripting languages.
NSSC 200
CISCO NETWORKING I 5CR
The first of four courses in the Cisco Networking Academy curriculum, which
teaches networking concepts by applying
them to a type of network students may encounter in a home or small office.
NSSC 201
CISCO NETWORKING II 5CR
The second of four courses in the Cisco
Networking Academy curriculum, which
teaches networking concepts by applying
them to a type of network students may encounter on the job in a small-to-medium
business or ISP.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of NSSC 200.
NSSC 203
CISCO NETWORKING III 5CR
The third of four courses in the Cisco Networking Academy curriculum, which familiarizes
students with the equipment,
applications, and protocols installed in enterprise networks, with a focus on switching,
routing, IP addressing, WAN technologies,
and security.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of NSSC 201
NSSC 205
CISCO NETWORKING IV 5CR
The last of four courses in the Cisco Networking Academy curriculum, which takes
the student through a variety of case studies
and role playing exercises, which include
gathering requirements, designing basic
networks, establishing proof-of-concept, and
performing project management.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of NSSC 203
NSSC 207
CISCO LEARNING LAB I 3CR
Provides opportunities for students to gain
the knowledge, skills, and hands-on experience needed to prepare for the Cisco
CCENT certification exam.
Prerequisites: Concurrently enrolled in NSSC
200 (Cisco Networking I) & NSSC 201 (Cisco
Networking II).
NSSC 210
CISCO LEARNING LAB II 3CR
Provides opportunities for students to gain
the knowledge, skills, and hands-on experience needed to prepare for the Cisco CCNA
certification exam.
Prerequisites: Concurrently enrolled in NSSC
203 (Cisco Networking III) & NSSC 205 (Cisco
Networking IV).
NSSD 251
SECURING NETWORK
INFRASTRUCTURE 6CR
Introduces knowledge, skills, and tasks necessary to deploy, support, and secure a Windows network infrastructure. Provides
extensive hands-on training for Information
Systems Security professionals responsible for
implementing, managing, and securing a variety of enterprise networking technologies.
CONSTRUCTION
RESIDENTIAL
CONST 105
MEASUREMENT,
TOOLS & SAFETY
2CR
Introduction to residential and light construction applications and trades. Explores
and applies safety standards to the use of
various hand and power tools associated
with the carpentry field.
CONST 108
and skills.
SITE LEVELING, PLANS,
CODES & MATERIALS
2CR
Introduction to use and operation of a
builder level, including leveling and squaring a building site. Covers building plans,
codes and inspections, and construction
materials.
NSSD 254
CONST 112
Prerequisites: NSS 211 or equivalent knowledge
ACTIVE DIRECTORY
CONFIGURATION
6CR
Introduces knowledge, skills, and tasks necessary to deploy, support, and secure a
Windows active directory environment.
Provides extensive hands-on training for
Information Systems Security professionals
responsible for managing accounts and resources and securing a Windows Server Active Directory Network.
Prerequisites: NSS 211 or equivalent knowledge
and skills.
NSSD 257
IMPLEMENTING APPLICATION
SERVICES
6CR
Introduces knowledge, skills and tasks necessary to deploy, support and secure a Windows applications infrastructure in a variety
of stand-alone and enterprise network
environments.
Prerequisites: NSS 211 or equivalent knowledge
and skills
NSSD 260
MAIL SERVER
ADMINISTRATION
6CR
Introduces students to the knowledge and
skills of installing, configuring and troubleshooting an E-Mail Server Environment.
Provides hands-on training for Information
Technology (IT) professionals responsible
for installing, configuring, upgrading, maintaining, securing, and troubleshooting for
E-Mail servers. Helps prepares student for
industry certification exams.
Prerequisites: NSS 211 or equivalent knowledge
and skills
FOOTING & FOUNDATION
3CR
Introduction to the methods of construction
footing and foundation forms, terminology,
and inspections for the typical residential
home.
CONST 116
FLOOR FRAMING 3CR
Introduction to the construction procedures
and terminology used in framing a residential wood floor.
CONST 120
WALL FRAMING,
SHEETING & CEILINGS 5CR
Introduction to wall framing construction
procedures and terminology, the application
of ceiling and/or two-story framing, inspections, sheeting, and aligning.
CONST 122
ROOF FRAMING 5CR
Introduction to roof framing and the use of a
framing square, including both truss roof
and stick-built residential roofs.
CONST 126
ROOFING MATERIALS
& INSTALLATION
3CR
Introduction to various roofing materials,
including proper installation techniques.
CONST 130
STAIRWAY CONSTRUCTION
4CR
Introduction to basic stair construction, including the application of building codes,
stairway arrangements, component, and
layout.
CONST 134
EXTERIOR FINISH 3CR
Introduction to the installation of exterior
trim, siding, window and door installation,
or the equivalent of typical residential homes.
2011-2012 Catalog
93
CONST 138
INTERIOR FINISH I 3CR
Introduction to interior wall and ceiling finish, interior doors and hardware, cabinet
and counter top installation, interior trim,
and finish flooring.
CONST 142
INTERIOR FINISH II 3CR
Continuation of interior wall and ceiling
finish, interior doors and hardware, cabinet
and counter top installation, interior trim,
and finish flooring.
CONST 146
DECK CONSTRUCTION
3CR
Introduction to outside deck construction,
including types, code requirements, and
safety.
CONST 150
CARPENTRY TRADES
1CR
Introduction to trade regulations, other
building trades workers, industry and standards organization, and entering the carpentry trade.
CORE ALLIED HEALTH
CAH 102
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY I 5CR
Provides students with the basic techniques
of medical word building using basic word
elements. The class will be organized according to specific body systems and will
include key terms and the introduction of
anatomical, physiological, and pathological
terms.
CAH 103
INTRODUCTION TO
HEALTH PROFESSIONS
5CR
Provides an overview of Law & Ethics a student should know to help provide competent,
compassionate care to patients.
CAH 105
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
5CR
Provides training in the uses of Microsoft
Windows and related programs. Students will
use computers to develop touch control and
proper keyboarding and 10-key techniques.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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COSMETOLOGY
COSMO 111
SALON ECOLOGY
3CR
Salon Ecology presents the concepts of microbiology, infection control, first aid, and
safety. It is the foundation for safe infection
control practices and procedures, including
proper disinfecting of tools and work stations, safe handling of chemicals to protect
stylist and client, and first aid in case of cuts
or minor chemical burns or irritation. Topics include safe handling of tools, proper
dispensing of chemicals, and how to prevent
the spread of bacteria in a school, clinic, or
salon atmosphere.
COSMO 113
TRICHOLOGY 6CR
Trichology includes concepts of hair theory,
hair care and draping, shampooing and
scalp massage. Phases of hair growth, proper
cleansing of the scalp and hair, recognition
of hair and scalp disorders, parasites, and
how to refer clients for medical attention are
also covered in this course.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 111.
COSMO 119
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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2011-2012 Catalog
DESIGN DECISIONS
3CR
Design decisions are an important concept in
beginning a consultation with your client.
Topics include client’s body style and proportions, hair type, client’s personality, lifestyle,
all points to consider when consulting with a
client for hair sculpting and design work. Use
of design principles of repetition, alternation,
progression, and contrast are covered to assist in understanding hair sculpting.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 113.
COSMO 126
HAIR DESIGN 9CR
This hair styling course serves as a foundation in the art of dressing and arranging hair
to create temporary changes to hair. Hair
Design covers wet styling, thermal styling,
air forming, and long hair design utilizing
form and texture combined with direction
and movement to create hairstyles. The
practice of infection control and safety practices required by salon standards and state
board regulations are also presented.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO
111, COSMO 113, COSMO 119, and COSMO 134.
COSMO 134
HAIR SCULPTING 13CR
The fundamentals of this class assist the
student in sculpting of hair. Concepts covered are safe tool usage (including shears,
taper shear, razor, and clippers), areas of the
head, and cutting techniques. The four basic
forms of haircutting, solid, graduated, increase layer, uniform, and combination, are
practiced on mannequins.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 119.
COSMO 143
CHEMICAL TEXTURIZING 5CR
This course presents the three main concepts
of chemical texturizing: perming, chemical
relaxing, and curl reforming. It covers the
theory of perming, tool use to achieve desired
effect, infection control, safety and first aid,
client consultation, and patterns of perming.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO
166 and COSMO 247.
COSMO 156
HAIR COLORING 6CR
Covers concepts of basic color theory, identifying existing hair color, and changing existing hair color. Students will study the law of
color, the color wheel, fields, tone, and levels
of hair color. Related topics include coloring
techniques, safe and sanitary application of
color, infection control, and techniques to
achieve desired results of hair coloring.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO
111, COSMO 113, COSMO 119 and COSMO 134.
COSMO 161
LAB CLINIC I 6CR
Hands-on learning experience in Clover
Park Technical College’s student clinic. The
learner will practice the skills of Design Decisions, Hair Sculpting, and various hair styling techniques on clients. All related safety
and sanitation measures will be followed.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO
111, COSMO 114, COSMO 119 and COSMO 134.
COSMO 166
LAB CLINIC II 7CR
Hands-on learning experience in Clover Park
Technical College’s student clinic. The learner will continue skills applied in Lab Clinic I
in addition to hair color and design skills.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO
161 and COSMO 156.
COSMO 170
LAB CLINIC III 9CR
Hands-on learning experience in Clover
Park Technical College’s student clinic. The
learner will continue skills applied in Lab
Clinic I and II, in addition to advanced design services.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO
166 and COSMO 224.
COSMO 178
ARTIFICIAL HAIR
2CR
This course introduces different types of artificial hair and their applications and removal techniques. Infection control and
safety related to artificial hair services are
also covered.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 161.
COSMO 179
STUDY OF NAILS
3CR
An introduction to the fundamental principles of manicuring and nail care. Topics include basic nail theory, nail disease and
disorder, and anatomy of the hands.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 166.
COSMO 186
STUDY OF SKIN 3CR
An introduction to the principles of esthetics. Topics include temporary hair removal,
basic skin care, skin diseases and disorders,
physiology and histology of the skin, and
waxing services.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 166.
COSMO 224
ADVANCED HAIR COLORING 10CR
Covers the advanced skills and the many
techniques of the chemical and physical
process of hair coloring. Safety precautions,
sanitation, and first aid will be applied
throughout the course.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO
156 and COSMO 161.
COSMO 228
STATE BOARD
PRACTICAL PREPARATION
3CR
Prepares the student to take the Washington
State practical skills exam. Topics of safety
and sanitation, hair design, hair sculpting,
chemical texturizing, hair coloring, skin
care, and nail care will be reviewed.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 170.
COSMO 230
LAB CLINIC IV 9CR
Hands-on learning experience in Clover
Park Technical College’s student clinic. The
learner will continue skills applied in Lab
Clinic 1, 2, and 3, in addition to artificial
hair services, advanced hair sculpture and
advanced chemical texturizing techniques.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 170.
COSMO 235
STATE BOARD
WRITTEN TEST REVIEW
4CR
Prepares the student to take the written
component of the Washington State skills
exam. Industry vocabulary, practices, and
procedures will be reviewed in the areas of
trichology, salon ecology, hair design, hair
sculpting, chemical texturizing and hair
coloring, skin, and nail care.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 228.
COSMO 242
CLOVER PARK
PRACTICAL BOARDS
6CR
Reviews basic, intermediate, and advanced
technical skills taught in quarters 1 through
5 in Clover Park Technical College’s Cosmetology Program. Students demonstrate skill,
proficiency, and knowledge retention prior
to completion of the program.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 235.
COSMO 247
DESIGN FORUM 1CR
This course utilizes Pivot Point’s Design Forum and additional concepts to present current trends in hair design. Students will
learn step-by-step procedures for cutting,
coloring, and styling the hair to create specific looks.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO
126, 156, 161.
COSMO 248
INDUSTRY INTERNSHIP I 1CR
Provides on-the-job experience for students
in the field of cosmetology. This is an optional 33-hour course for students desiring
an internship experience or who need additional hours to meet the state licensing
requirements.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 230.
COSMO 250
INDUSTRY INTERNSHIP II
2CR
Provides on-the-job experience for students
in the field of cosmetology. This is an optional 66-hour course for students desiring
an internship experience or who need additional hours to meet the state licensing
requirements.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 230.
COSMO 252
INDUSTRY INTERNSHIP III 3CR
Provides on-the-job experience for students
in the field of cosmetology. This is an optional 99-hour course for students desiring
an internship experience or who need additional hours to meet the state licensing
requirements.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 230.
COSMO 254
INDUSTRY INTERNSHIP IV 4CR
Provides on-the-job experience for students
in the field of cosmetology. This is an optional 132-hour course for students desiring
an internship experience or who need additional hours to meet the state licensing
requirements.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 230.
COSMO 256
INDUSTRY INTERNSHIP V
5CR
Provides on-the-job experience for students
in the field of cosmetology. This is an optional 160-hour course for students desiring
an internship experience or who need additional hours to meet the state licensing
requirements.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of COSMO 230.
CULINARY ARTS
CUL 104
SANITATION IN FOOD SERVICE
OPERATIONS
3CR
Presents the principles of food microbiology,
food borne illness and the standards that are
enforced by regulatory agencies. Applied
measures for the prevention of food borne
illness and other microbiological factors are
incorporated. National Restaurant Association ServSafe Certification.
CUL 107
PROFESSIONAL COOKING I 7CR
Provides the student with a general understanding of the professional kitchen. Topics
include kitchen safety, dishwasher procedures, how to handle food in a safe environment, selection and caring of knives,
understanding of how a professional kitchen
is organized and the rationale, cleaning, and
function of kitchen equipment. Students will
learn to cut foods in a variety of shapes as
well as recognize and use a variety of herbs
and spices.
CUL 109
COOKING METHODS I 7CR
Introduces students to the experience of
preparing and cooking meals for restaurant
service. Students will be given assignments
and will rotate through restaurant stations
throughout the quarter. Students will learn
dish washing and basic food preparation, to
read and follow standardized recipes, deli
operations, and station organization.
CUL 111
FOOD PREPARATION I 3CR
Practice and apply the skills of a restaurant
cook. Students will learn the importance of
organizing and planning their work stations
as well as preparing items needed prior to
actual cooking. Topics include fruit and
vegetable varieties, uses, and preparation.
CUL 113
INTRODUCTION TO BAKING
3CR
Introduces culinary students to the fundamentals of baking and to scientific principles.
Students will learn different mixing and
production methods in producing quick
breads, pastries, cakes, pies, soufflés,
mousses, and custards.
CUL 117
PROFESSIONAL COOKING II 7CR
Covers the procedures and techniques of
sauces and stocks. Students will learn how to
prepare a variety of classic hot and cold
sauces, use thickening agents properly, recognize and classify sauces, and prepare a
variety of stocks.
2011-2012 Catalog
95
CUL 119
FOOD PREPARATION II 3CR
Provides practice in the fundamental techniques related to hot food cooking. Students
will perform specific competencies to develop their proficiency in techniques and the
science of cooking. Topics that will be covered are pasta, potatoes, and grain cookery.
CUL 123
COOKING METHODS II 7CR
Introduces the experience of preparing and
cooking meals for restaurant service. Students will be given assignments and will rotate through restaurant stations throughout
the quarter. They will be expected to practice a high level of previously learned competencies in knife skills, sanitation, proper
handling and storage of product, and working under stringent time guidelines.
Prerequisite: CUL109.
CUL 127
PROFESSIONAL COOKING III 7CR
Introduces students to basic meat cooking
procedures, breakfast cookery, and dairy
products. Students will learn the composition of meats, eggs, and dairy products and
apply various cooking methods.
CUL 132
AMERICAN REGIONAL CUISINE 3CR
Explores the history and styles of food from
specific regions: Pacific Northwest, California, Southwest, New England, and Florida.
Students will create regionally-inspired
dishes with continued emphasis on solid
cooking methodologies.
CUL 135
FOOD PREPARATION III 3CR
Focuses on beef, chicken, and fish cookery
and fabrication. Instruction will center on
understanding the structure and composition of meats, being able to identify a variety
of fish and shellfish, use of proper storage,
and application of various cooking methods.
CUL 139
COOKING METHODS III 7CR
Introduces students to the experience of preparing and cooking meals for restaurant service. Students will be given assignments and
will rotate through restaurant stations
throughout the quarter. Students will be expected to practice a high level of previously
learned competencies in knife skills, sanitation, proper handling and storage of product,
and working under stringent time guidelines.
Prerequisite: CUL123
CUL 241
ADVANCED
RESTAURANT BAKING
3CR
Teaches individual-style desserts for the student-run restaurant. This course will cover
technique in breads, puff pastry, cakes, and
tortes, basic decoration, and dessert sauces.
Prerequisite: CUL113
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
96
REST 103
REST 122
DAS 109
REST 107
REST 126
DAS 111
FOOD & BEVERAGE
COST CONTROL 4CR
Outlines the fundamentals of food costing in
relation to menu writing. Students will be
responsible for pricing out each item on the
menu as well as preparing yield tests and
standardizing recipes.
KITCHEN & DINING
MANAGEMENT
3CR
Learn how to communicate, lead, and manage different types of people. This entails how
to hire and fire, inventory control, writing job
descriptions, and creating performance reviews for both front and back of the house.
FOOD SERVICE NUTRITION
4CR
Learn the basics of food service nutrition for
culinary professionals. This class will teach
students about the biological process that
occurs as you eat, what constitutes a healthy
diet, and gain an understanding of the structure and functions of food.
Prerequisite: REST 112
FINANCE & ACCOUNTING
4CR
Prepares students to understand, interpret,
and analyze financial statements, budgeting, cash flow, and cash management. This
gives students a chance to become familiar
with financial statements prior to entering
the work force so they have a working knowledge in this area.
REST 109
REST 131
MARKETING/
PUBLIC RELATIONS
3CR
Learn how to create a marketing concept for
your restaurant. Learn to define your target
market and understand the importance of
effective marketing in the industry. We will
also look at current market trends, consumer
behavior, market segmentation, and positioning of your business in the market to get
the desired results.
REST 112
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
RESTAURANT DINING
7CR
Familiarizes the student with all aspects of
running a casual-style dining room which is
open to the public. Included are opening/
closing procedures, table set-up, customer
service techniques, leadership, sanitation,
and safety procedures.
REST 115
CATERING PRODUCTION 3CR
Emphasis will focus on buffet preparation
and presentation. Students will receive
hands-on experience creating and executing
catering requisitions. Students will explore
designing menus for various events, functions, and price limits.
REST 119
OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
4CR
Explore all aspects of running a successful
operation in the hospitality industry. Students will learn how to create a positive work
environment, team building, and leadership
skills. Students will also learn how to recruit
new team members, hiring procedures, how
to organize and implement systems and
controls, as well as how to handle issues that
arise on a daily basis. Students will also explore how to use Excel programs and the
benefits of using Excel for restaurants.
BUSINESS PLAN DEVELOPMENT 4CR
Develop a restaurant concept from start to
finish, including a hands-on look at how to
develop a business plan to present to possible
investors. Students will practice decisionmaking and problem-solving skills through
creating and planning their own concept.
REST 133
BEVERAGE SERVICE
MANAGEMENT
4CR
Learn to set up and manage a beverage service operation successfully. Includes the history of bar service, beverage making
ingredients and processes, safety, and sanitation in the bar.
REST 137
HOSPITALITY LAW
4CR
Learn about laws affecting the hospitality
industry on both a national and state level.
This class will look at operating an establishment according to government regulations
regarding sales, civil rights, liability, administration issues, and organization.
DENTAL SCIENCES I 7CR
Covers the process of exposing and processing dental radiographs. In addition, the student will explore information which will
assist in accurately identifying oral anatomy,
oral embryology, histology, and key elements
of personal oral hygiene and nutrition.
DENTAL ASSISTING SKILLS I 7CR
Introduces the student to the dental treatment room. This includes the proper names,
description, use, and care of dental instruments and equipment used in restorative
dental procedures. In addition, the course
will cover techniques that will enable them
to successfully achieve the goal of proper
moisture control to provide better visibility
of the operating field and reduce the transmission of infectious diseases. Students will
learn to take alginate impressions, pour and
trim diagnostic study casts, perform coronal
polish and fluoride treatments, and be able
to accurately record vital signs, including
blood pressure, pulse and respiration. Students will be able to accurately identify dental charting symbols.
DAS 210
DENTAL SCIENCES II 5CR
Explores the general characteristics and uses
of dental materials, pharmacology and pain
control as they apply to dentistry and cover
oral pathology conditions in the oral cavity.
This course introduces the student to accommodations for the medically and physically compromised patient in regards to
dental treatment and the recognition and
management of a medical or dental emergency in the dental office.
Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete
DAS 103, DAS 101, DAS109, DAS111 prior to
continuing in the Dental Assisting Program.
DAS 212
DENTAL ASSISTANT
DAS 101
BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES 5CR
Designed to provide the necessary information to accurately identify each of the body’s
systems, functions, and how they interact
with each other. The student will explore the
structures of the head and oral cavity, as this
is valuable information in a variety of applications in dentistry. The student will furthermore, be able to demonstrate how to prevent
disease transmission and the proper handling of infectious and hazardous materials.
DAS 103
GENERAL STUDIES
2CR
Introduces the student to the dental profession,
including the knowledge to correctly recognize
and identify the various occupations within
the dental field, as well as the terminology
necessary to complete all other courses.
DENTAL SPECIALTIES 8CR
Explores in depth the dental specialties, including endodontics, removable and fixed
prosthodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, including implants, pediatric dentistry,
orthodontics and periodontics. This course
introduces the students to the expanded functions of pit and fissure sealants, construction
and placement of temporary crowns, retraction cord placement, construction of vital
bleach trays and periodontal charting.
Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete
DAS 103, DAS 101, DAS109, DAS111 prior to
continuing in the Dental Assisting Program.
DAS 214
DENTAL ASSISTING SKILLS II 10CR
Covers the theory and practice of chairside
assisting, including oral evacuation and instrument exchange. Students are introduced
to advanced chairside instruments and tray
systems, and rubber dam application. During this course, students will be required to
complete an employment packet to include a
résumé, cover letter, thank you letter, and
personal reference list. Students will demonstrate their ability to participate in a professional job interview. This course will cover
the assembly and placement of matrix systems. The culminating projects in this
course cover the operatory preparation for
various dental procedures and assisting during restorative procedures.
Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete
DAS 103, DAS 101, DAS109, DAS111 prior to
continuing in the Dental Assisting Program.
DAS 240
CLINICAL EXPERIENCE I 10CR
Provides Dental Assistant students with the
opportunity to utilize the skills and information acquired in DAS 101 -214. Students will
spend the final quarter rotating through two
or more private offices and/or dental clinics.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of DAS 103,
101, 109, 111, 210, 212, 214, the Infection Control
component of the DANB Exam, and completion of
the Radiation Health & Safety component.
DAS 245
CLINICAL EXPERIENCE II
7CR
Provides Dental Assistant students with the
opportunity to utilize the advanced skills
and information acquired in DAS 101-214.
Students will spend the final quarter, 330
hours, rotating through two or more private
offices or dental clinics.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of DAS 103,
101, 109, 111, 210, 212, 214, the Infection Control
component of the DANB Exam and completion of
the Radiation Health & Safety component.
DENTAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
SPECIALIST
DBOA 104
DENTAL TERMINOLOGY
& PROCEDURES 5CR
Introduces information to correctly recognize and identify various occupations within
the dental environment. Terminology necessary to complete all other courses. Information provided to accurately identify the
names and numbers of teeth in the primary
and permanent dentition.
DBOA 111
DENTAL CHARTING, SCHEDULING
AND RECALL MANAGEMENT
5CR
Explores dental charting symbols and treatment descriptions. Develop, decipher and
present a comprehensive treatment plan.
Covers the necessary information to accurately develop a patient recall system, maintain productive and effective patient
scheduling.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: DBOA 104
DBOA 118
DENTAL CORRESPONDENCE
& EMPLOYMENT SKILLS 9CR
Introduces the various types of written communication for the dental office. Explores a
wide variety of dental office forms and development of simple manual and computerized filing and inventory systems. Covers the
information and tools necessary to successfully seek a work based learning experience
and employment. Organizational skills are
the primary emphasis of this course.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: DBOA 104
DBOA 120
DENTAL INSURANCE
6CR
Covers the process of accurately processing
dental insurance claim forms, making financial arrangements, and collecting on pastdue accounts. Students will receive Health
Insurance Portability & Accountability Act
(HIPA A) training. Provides students with
the information to accurately operate an
electronic calculator.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: DBOA 104
DBOA 121
FISCAL MANAGEMENT
6CR
Covers the financial management of a dental office. Students will complete computerized bookkeeping processes and make
banking arrangements as they apply to the
dental office.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: DBOA 104
DBOA 126
PROFESSIONAL
COMMUNICATIONS
4CR
Designed to introduce students to the professional phone skills that are necessary in the
dental environment. Covers the different
types of interpersonal communication used
in the dental profession, explores different
problem-solving techniques, and teaches
students about team and personal strategies
for providing exceptional patient care. Introduces various types of organizational
conflicts, barriers to communication, and
appropriate resolution styles.
2011-2012 Catalog
97
DBOA 128
DENTAL LAW & ETHICS 5CR
Designed to familiarize students with the
state and federal laws as they apply to dentistry. Students will become acquainted with
OSHA guidelines for infection control and
risk management for the dental office. This
course includes activities and discussions related to cultural diversity.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: DBOA 104
DBOA 132
CLINICAL PRACTICE 6CR
Provides the Dental Administrative Specialist student the opportunity to utilize the
skills and information acquired in the previous courses and to participate in all aspects
of training in the dental business office.
Emphasis is placed on performance of duties
and utilization of skills to the satisfaction of
the Work Station Supervisor who will complete the student evaluation at the end of the
330 hours of work-based experience.
Prerequisite: Completion of DBOA 104, 111, 118,
120, 121, 126 , 128, ACTG: 110, & 141, and elective
computer skills courses.
EARLY CARE &
EDUCATION
ECE 102
INTRODUCTION TO
APPRENTICESHIP 1CR
Introduces beginning apprentices to apprenticeship training, state requirements, apprentice responsibilities, and professional
and ethical conduct in the workplace.
ECE 120
INTERPERSONAL SKILLS
FOR THE ECE PROFESSIONAL
2CR
Covers human relations roles and workplace
skills. Information on balancing individual
technical skills with human relations and
competencies will be discussed.
ECE 125
JUST FOR THE FUN OF IT:
PRESCHOOL 1CR
Students will explore the use and development of age-appropriate curriculum, creative
ideas, projects, and activities that will make
planning for the individual child and group
fun and exciting! A fun hands-on class that
will inspire you and enrich the lives of children in your program. ***Meets STARS
continuing education requirements.
ECE 126
NATURE & OUTDOOR
2CR
Gain skills and knowledge on the components
of an outdoor classroom. Ways to incorporate creativity while supporting children as
they explore nature in the environment will
be included, as well as sustainable practices
for young children.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
98
ECE 132
ECE 149
ECE 133
ECE 150
RAISING AN EMOTIONALLY
INTELLIGENT CHILD 1CR
This course will focus on teaching parents,
teachers, and providers how to use emotion
coaching techniques that foster emotional
intelligence in children.
EMOTIONALLY INTELLIGENT
PARENTING
1CR
Examine the developmental needs across all
domains from conception through infancy.
Explore parenting/caregiving skills, how
they are formed from prior experiences, and
how they are affected by a deeper understanding of the child and oneself.
ECE 134
ISSUES & TRENDS GREEN
2CR
Research current issues and trends in the
ECE field in relation to sustainable “green”
practices. Student will explore how to
implement researched practices. Student
will explore how to implement researched
practices in their current work with children,
families and peers.
ECE 135
SCHOOL AGE MATH,
SCIENCE, & TECHNOLOGY
3CR
Explore the different aspects of the School
Age curriculum in Science, Math, and
Technology.
ECE 136
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
RAISING A PHYSICALLY
& NUTRITIONALLY
INTELLIGENT CHILD 1CR
Explore different aspects of health and
nutrition in young children.
ECE 141
ECE CURRICULUM: MATH
2CR
Explore the different aspects of early childhood curriculum in mathematics.
ECE 142
ECE CURRICULUM:
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
2CR
Explore the different aspects of early childhood curriculum in science and technology.
ECE 143
JUST FOR THE GREEN OF IT
1CR
Student will explore the use of developing
sustainable “green” curriculum ideas that
are age appropriate, creative projects and
activities to use in your work with young
children. They will make planning for the
individual child and group fun and exciting!
A fun hands on class that will inspire you
and enrich the lives of children in your
program.
ECE CURRICULUM:
HEALTH, SAFETY, NUTRITION
& COOKING LAB
4CR
Explore the different aspects of early childhood curriculum in health, safety and nutrition as well as cooking with young children!
CHILD DEVELOPMENT
3-12 YEARS
3CR
Covers development levels in children three
to twelve years of age. Topics include diversity and the importance of play.
ECE 156
FROM SEED TO TABLE:
GARDENING WITH CHILDREN 2CR
Discover how important connecting with
nature and caring for living plants can be for
children. Students will learn techniques to
create plantings and cooking items grown to
serve at the snack table.
ECE 235
CREATING A QUALITY
ENVIRONMENT FOR CHILDREN 3CR
Designed to assist in creating an enriching
environment for infants, toddlers, preschool,
and school-aged children. There will be a
strong emphasis on the psychological effects
of environment, and using an innovative,
creative approach to designing indoor and
outdoor spaces for children.
ECE 240
LITERACY IN EARLY
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
4CR
Exploration of emergent literacy and
curriculum development within the context
of developmentally-appropriate practice to
include children’s picture books, language
development, writing, and reading.
ECE 245
JUST RECYCLE IT!
1CR
Student will explore the use of developing
sustainable “green” curriculum ideas that
utilize recyclable materials to make creative
projects and activities to use in your work
with young children.
DIVERSITY AWARENESS &
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 3CR
Exploring our own cultural awareness
supports our work with diverse populations
and is paramount to planning for and
interacting with young children and their
families. In this course, you will explore the
various aspects of bias to develop strategies
and an anti-bias approach within the Early
Childhood Curriculum.
ECE 175
ECE 268
ECE 157
CURRICULUM & ENVIRONMENT
FOR INFANTS/TODDLERS 2CR
Focuses on curriculum and environment
suitable for the development of infants and
toddlers.
ECE 190
PRACTICUM 4: GREEN
3CR
Provides the student with the opportunity for
practical field experience with a sustainable
practices or “green” specialization. Includes
a seminar component.
ECE 194
PRACTICUM 4:
THE EMOTIONALLY
INTELLIGENT CHILD
3CR
Provides the student with the opportunity
for practical field experience with an “emotional intelligence” specialization. Includes
a seminar component.
ECE 198
PRACTICUM 4:
WORKING WITH FAMILIES
3CR
Provides the student with the opportunity
for practical field experience with a “working with families” specialization. Includes a
seminar component.
ECE 230
INCLUSION IN ECE 3CR
Introduction to including children with
special needs in the ECE field.
INCLUSION IN ECE 2CR
Introduction to including children with special needs in the ECE field.
ECE 275
CURRICULUM & ENVIRONMENT
FOR INFANTS/TODDLERS
2CR
Focuses on curriculum and environment
suitable for the development of infants and
toddlers.
ECE 290
PORTFOLIO ADVENTURE
2CR
Provides the student with the opportunity to
compile their Early Care and Education degree portfolio. The portfolio adventure is an
opportunity for the student to establish self
marketing goals in the field as well as produce
an end product which reflects the student’s
best practice, passion, and experience to date
in the program and field. Students will receive
instructor guidance and feedback as well as
participate in the ECE Portfolio Review process prior to graduation.
ECS 102
BASIC CHILD
CARETRAINING (S.T.A.R.S.)
2CR
Covers the elements and criteria to satisfy
the required 20-hour basic training for child
care providers required by S.T.A.R.S (State
Training and Registry System). Curriculum
is based on the STARS core competencies.
ECS 106
OVERVIEW OF EARLY
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION I 3CR
Introduction to the Early Childhood Education field. Will include all areas of development: physical, intellectual, and social/
emotional. Planning, curriculum development, and application to the children will
also be covered.
ECS 107
OVERVIEW OF EARLY
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION II 3CR
Introduction to the Early Childhood Education field. Will include all areas of development: physical, intellectual and social/
emotional. Planning, curriculum development, and application to the children will
also be covered.
ECS 110
COMPUTER ESSENTIALS
FOR THE ECE PROFESSIONAL
4CR
Covers the essential computer tools and techniques necessary for the ECE professional.
Designing forms, parent newsletters, flyers,
brochures, and other materials needed for the
smooth running of the child care center.
ECS 111*
INTRODUCTION TO THE EARLY
CHILDHOOD PROFESSION
2CR
Examines the personal characteristics, responsibilities, and rewards for individuals
working with young children.
ECS 112*
WAYS TO STUDY HOW
CHILDREN GROW/LEARN 2CR
Covers introductory research and theory,
sequential stages of growth and development
for children from birth to five years of age,
and planning individual and developmentally appropriate curriculum.
ECS 113*
SAFE, HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT 2CR
Covers ways to provide a safe environment
that promotes good health and nutrition
practices. Students will use space and materials as resources for constructing an interesting and enjoyable environment that
encourages play and exploration.
ECS 114
SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
DEVELOPMENT 2CR
Topics will include how to help children
know, accept, and take pride in themselves.
ECS 115*
PHYSICAL, INTELLECTUAL
COMPETENCE 2CR
Covers equipment, activities, and opportunities to promote the physical development
of children. Activities and opportunities will
be presented that encourage curiosity, exploration, and problem-solving appropriate
to the developmental levels and learning
styles of children.
ECS 116*
FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS 2CR
Covers knowledge and skills needed to establish positive and productive relationships
with families. Ideas to help support each
child’s relationship with her or his family
and ways to encourage family involvement.
ECS 117*
EARLY CHILDHOOD
PROFESSIONAL
2CR
Covers knowledge and skills needed to manage resources to ensure an effective early
childhood program. Regulatory, legislative,
and workforce issues and how they affect the
welfare of young children will be covered.
ECS 146
CHILD DEVELOPMENT
INFANT/TODDLER
2CR
Covers development levels in children birth
to three years of age. Topics include diversity
and the importance of play.
ECS 156
ECE CURRICULUM HEALTH/
NUTRITION 3CR
Explore the different aspects of the early
childhood curriculum in health and
nutrition.
ECS 160
CREATIVE ART CURRICULUM
FOR CHILDREN MUSIC,
MOVEMENT & CREATIVITY 5CR
Explore the different aspects of the early
childhood curriculum in creative art, music,
movement, and creativity.
ECS 181
ECE PRACTICUM I 5CR
Provides the student with practical field experience. Students will work at community
child care centers or the campus Hayes
Child Development Center, allowing them
to apply classroom study to the on-the-job
situations. Includes a scheduled seminar.
ECS 182
ECE PRACTICUM II 5CR
Provides the student with practical field experience. Students will work at community
Child Care Centers or the campus Hayes
Child Development Center, allowing them
to apply classroom study to the on-the-job
situations. Includes a scheduled seminar.
ECS 183
ECE PRACTICUM III 5CR
Provides the student with practical field experience. Students will work at community
child care centers or the campus Hayes
Child Development Center, allowing them
to apply classroom study to the on-the-job
situations. Includes a scheduled seminar.
2011-2012 Catalog
99
ECS 202
PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES 2CR
Covers developmentally-appropriate activities for preschoolers. This is a hands-on class
that will provide a chance for making and
sharing samples.
ECS 206
SIGNING WITH INFANTS
& TODDLERS 2CR
Signing for basic communication with infants and toddlers with an emphasis on
working with children who exhibit language
delays.
ECS 217
ECE PRACTICUM IV
INFANTS/TODDLERS
3CR
Provides the student with the opportunity
for practical field experience with specialization in infants and toddlers.
ECS 220
CURRICULUM FOR
SCHOOL AGE
2CR
Focuses on curriculum suitable for the development of school-age children.
ECS 225
SCHOOL AGE ENVIRONMENT 2CR
Focuses on the environment suitable for the
development of school-age children.
ECS 230
ECE PRACTICUM IV
SCHOOL AGE
3CR
Provides the student with the opportunity
for practical field experience with school age
specialization.
ECS 235
ISSUES & TRENDS 2CR
Research that covers some of the current issues and trends in the ECE field.
ECS 260
CURRICULUM FOR
FAMILY CHILD CARE 2CR
A focus on developmentally-appropriate
curriculum for children in family child care
settings with multiple ages.
ECS 264
PARTNERSHIPS WITH FAMILIES 3CR
Develop effective staff-parent involvement
through exploration of various methods of
communication and program activities.
ECS 266
LEADERSHIP IN EARLY
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
4CR
Designed for leaders in the early childhood
field. Essential skills for effective leadership
will be covered: creating a shared vision,
team building, managing change, personal
development, communication, conflict management, staff development, and empowerment strategies.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
100
ECS 270
INTRODUCTION TO EARLY
CHILDHOOD MANAGEMENT
3CR
Covers the historical development of child
care, responsibilities of child care staff positions, administrative policies, and organizational structures in the business.
ECS 277
PROFESSIONALISM & ETHICS 2CR
Examines NAEYC’s Code of Ethical
Conduct. Includes determining an Early
Childhood professional’s responsibilities to
children, families, colleagues, and the
community, utilizing frameworks for ethical
decision-making and exploration of personal
and professional growth.
ECS 279
ECS 292
THEORIES OF CHILD
DEVELOPMENT 3CR
Exploration of child development theories
and their application to the education of
young children.
ECS 295
DEVELOPMENTALLY
APPROPRIATE PRACTICES
SPECIAL NEEDS
2CR
Designed for caregivers of children with
special needs. Specific techniques for working with these children and how their cognitive, physical, social, and emotional
development are affected. Impact on the
family and attempts at regular classroom
inclusion will also be covered.
OBSERVATION
& APPLICATIONS IN ECE 3CR
Cover different systematic observation techniques, developmental milestones. Discover
how to plan appropriate activities for children
and how to establish appropriate expectations
for guiding children’s behavior and learning.
ECS 297
ECS 284
PARA 105
GUIDING YOUNG CHILDREN
3CR
Presents factors, which influence behaviors
and relationships. Included will be guidance techniques and emotional-social development of young children birth through
school age.
ECS 286
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
PRACTICUM IV
LEADERSHIP
3CR
Provides the student with the opportunity for
a practical field experience with a leadership
specialization. Includes a seminar component
and observations. There is a focus on emotional intelligence and conducting meetings.
ECS 287
PRACTICUM IV
PRESCHOOL 3CR
Provides the student with the opportunity
for a practical field experience with a preschool specialization. Includes a seminar
component and observations.
ECS 288
PRACTICUM IV
FAMILY CHILDCARE
PROFESSIONAL
3CR
Provides the student with the opportunity
for a practical field experience with a Family
Childcare specialization. Includes a seminar
component and observations.
ECS 290
MENTORING IN E.C.E 1CR
Learn fundamental skills needed for early
childhood mentors who practice as trainers
and coaches. Covers concepts of adult learning, communication, observation, feedback,
and conflict resolution. Also offered online.
PRACTICUM IV
SPECIAL NEEDS
3CR
Provides the student with the opportunity
for a practical field experience with specialization in special needs. Includes a seminar
component.
INTRODUCTION TO
EDUCATION
5CR
Explores teaching as a profession as well as
the history and philosophy of education.
Includes classroom procedures, reports and
research.
ECONOMICS
ECON 101
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 5CR
An overview of both microand macroeconomics. Topics include organization and
operation of the U.S. economy including
unemployment, inflation, and GDP issues;
fiscal and monetary policies; supply and
demand; market structures; determination
of prices in a market economy; and income
distribution.
Prerequisites: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
placement score or successful completion of MAT 99.
ECON& 201
MICROECONOMICS 5CR
Study of scarcity; the allocation of resources;
supply and demand; production; market
structures; determination of output and
prices with emphasis on a market economy;
labor and capital markets; role of government in a market economy; comparative
advantage; international trade; and distribution of income.
Prerequisites: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
placement score or successful completion of MAT 99.
ECON& 202
INTRODUCTION TO
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Focuses on human development risk factors
and early intervention. Includes cultural
perspectives and family dynamics. Covers
specific disability information.
MACROECONOMICS
5CR
Study of the organization and operation of
the U.S. economy including unemployment,
inflation and GDP issues; the business cycle
and long run growth; national income accounting; aggregate supply and aggregate
demand; government spending, taxation,
and budget deficit/surplus; fiscal policy; the
monetary system, the Federal Reserve
Banking System; monetary policy; interest
rates; and international trade.
PARA 133
placement score or successful completion of MAT 99.
PARA 124
AUGMENTED & ALTERNATIVE
COMMUNICATION
4CR
Assist special needs learners with various
educational software programs designed to
improve basic skills. Discusses best practices
in CAI.
PARA 140
STRATEGIES FOR
TEACHING READING
4CR
Techniques to aid the special needs child’s
reading comprehension and the gifted
child’s ability to elevate to a higher level of
comprehension. Covers general principles
for teaching reading.
PARA 201
CORE COMPETENCIES
PORTFOLIO
5CR
Students prepare portfolios documenting
completion for the 14 Washington State
Core Competencies required for para-educators working with special needs children.
Prerequisites: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
ELECTRICIAN LOW
VOLTAGE FIRE/
SECURITY
EFS 105
AC/DC ELECTRICITY:
BASIC THEORY, FRACTIONS,
& OHMS LAW
7CR
Introduces basic theory of electricity, electrical measurements of circuits, fractions,
ohm’s law, decimals, and decimal fractions.
Formulas in electrical work, positive and
negative numbers, exponents, powers of ten,
and solving ohm’s law formulas.
EFS 106
AC/DC ELECTRICITY:
SERIES PARALLEL
& COMBINATION CIRCUITS 7CR
Introduces the student to voltage, current,
and resistance in a series circuit, total values,
and control of current in a series circuit. Introduction to parallel circuits, current and
resistance, and voltage in a parallel circuit.
Prerequisites: EFS 105, or Instructor’s permission.
EFS 107
AC/DC ELECTRICITY:
ELECTRICAL & POWER
APPLICATIONS
7CR
Introduces electric power in electric circuits,
solving the power formula for current and
voltage. Algebra for complex electric circuits. Resistance of wire of different sizes
and length, sizing wire for a given load. Instantaneous values, maximum values and
phase angles of an AC sine wave.
Prerequisites: EFS 106, or Instructor’s permission.
EFS 108
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL
PRINT READING
7CR
Introduces the student to practical print
reading as it applies to the National Electrical Code.
Prerequisites: EFS 105, EFS 106, and EFS 107, or
Instructor’s permission.
EFS 109
NATIONAL ALARM INSTALLER
TRAINING PROGRAM 7CR
Introduces the student to basic alarm by
completing the comprehensive lessons,
viewing video, and completing lesson tests.
With final test, the student will have a thorough exposure to alarm systems.
Prerequisites: EFS 105, EFS 106, and EFS 107, or
EFS 121
CCTV FIELD SERVICE
& INSTALLATION
7CR
Introduces basic systems service and installation of CCTV systems. Through individual
lessons, the student will be exposed to the basics of CCTV field service and installation.
Prerequisites: EFS 108, EFS 109, and EFS 110, or
Instructor’s permission.
EFS 124
WASHINGTON
ADMINISTRATIVE CODES 2CR
Introduces the student to the Washington
Administrative Codes pertaining to industrial safety and the administrative code pertaining to electrical installations in the state
of Washington.
Prerequisites: EFS 108, EFS 109, and EFS 110, or
Instructor’s permission.
EFS 207
ADDRESSABLE FIRE
SLC SYSTEMS/DESIGN 7CR
Introduces Addressable and Intelligent Fire
Alarm Systems using SLC Circuits (Signaling Line Circuits). Includes comprehensive
lessons, lecture, and hands-on practical application and design.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of the
78-Credit Hour Electrician Low Voltage Fire/
Security Certificate Program, or Instructor’s
permission.
EFS 211
BIOMETRICS ACCESS 7CR
Introduces Biometrics Access Control. Various biometrics systems are explored, as well
as computer programmed access control
systems. Includes comprehensive lessons,
lecture, as well as hands-on practical application, installation, and design.
Instructor’s permission.
Prerequisites: EFS 207 or Instructor’s permission.
EFS 110
EFS 216
CCTV APPLICATION & DESIGN 7CR
Introduces the student to basic of CCTV
systems design and applications. Through
individual lessons, the student will be exposed to the basics of CCTV systems design,
and applications.
Prerequisites: EFS 105, EFS 106, and EFS 107, or
ADVANCED VOICE EVACUATION
FIREALARM SYSTEMS 7CR
Introduces Advanced Voice Evacuation Fire
Alarm Systems as used in high rise applications. Includes comprehensive lessons, lecture, and hands-on practical application,
installation, and design.
Instructor’s permission.
Prerequisites: EFS-211 or Instructor’s permission.
EFS 118
EFS 221
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODES 6CR
Introduces National Electrical Codes.
Through individual tests, the student will be
able to research applicable electrical codes.
Prerequisites: EFS 108, EFS 109, and EFS 110, or
Instructor’s permission.
EFS 119
NATIONAL FIRE CODES 6CR
Introduces the National Fire Codes.
Through individual tests, the student will be
able to research applicable fire codes.
Prerequisites: EFS 108, EFS 109, and EFS 110, or
Instructor’s permission.
FIRE CODES, NICET, NFPA
7CR
Introduces Fire Codes, AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction), NICET (National Institute
for Certification of Engineering Technologies), and NFPA (National Fire Protection
Association). Includes comprehensive lessons, lecture, as well as hands-on practical
application, installation, and design.
Prerequisites: EFS-216 or Instructor’s permission.
2011-2012 Catalog
101
EFS 226
HIGH SECURITY
STRUCTURED CABLING
7CR
Introduces High Security Structured Cabling
in residential and commercial applications.
Explores cabling as a total package. Includes
most applications of security and low voltage
needs. Includes comprehensive lessons,
lecture, as well as hands-on practical
application, installation, and design.
Prerequisites: EFS-221 or Instructor’s permission.
EFS 231
CCTV DIGITAL NETWORK
SOLUTIONS
7CR
Introduces CCTV (Closed Circuit Television) Digital Network Solutions. Explores
applications that require the camera to be
recorded and viewed digitally and or remotely via various networks. Includes comprehensive lessons, lecture, as well as
hands-on practical application, installation,
and design.
Prerequisites: EFS-226 or Instructor’s permission.
ENGLISH
CMST& 220
PUBLIC SPEAKING
5CR
AN OPEN COURSE LIBRARY CLASS;
inexpensive course materials. Assists students in developing real world oral communication skills. Capture the dynamics of
today’s business realities and see the benefits
of effective communication. Selection of topics, library research, analysis, oral style, use
of visual aids, and preparation and delivery
of various types of speeches and oral presentations are included. The Internet, e-mail,
community interaction, and other practical
tools support students learning and increase
their public speaking skills.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
placement score or successful completion of ENG 094.
ENG 079
BASIC READING & WRITING
PREPARATION
5CR
Designed for students who have a high school
diploma or GED and place below English
082 on the COMPASS placement test. Remedial instruction is provided in writing and
reading skills necessary for pre college English courses. Content includes basic grammatical and mechanical concepts as they
apply to writing clear and concise sentences,
vocabulary building, study skills and skill
building necessary to succeed in pre college
level reading and writing courses.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
102
ENG 082
BASIC READING & WRITING
5CR
Introduces and develops basic reading and
writing skills. Focus in on writing proper
sentences and sound paragraphs which express a main idea clearly and fully with a
minimum of errors in sentence structure,
punctuation and spelling. Coursework emphasizes writing from observation as well as
writing in response to reading. Helps refine
reading comprehension and increase vocabulary for college level reading requirements.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
placement score.
ENG 094
ADVANCED READING
& WRITING
5CR
Enhances writing ability with emphasis on
organization, unity, coherence, and adequate
development of short essays. Introduction to
various types of paragraphs and essays and
review of the rules and convention of standard written English. Both paper and electronic communication tools will be used.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
placement score or successful completion of ENG 082.
ENG 102
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
COMPOSITION:
ARGUMENTATION & RESEARCH 5CR
Continues to develop writing skills practiced
in English 101 with an emphasis on writing
the research paper and writing analytical
essays about literature. Through lecture,
discussion, research, reading and writing,
become familiar with the literary genres of
prose, poetry and drama.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL& 101.
ENG 104
BUSINESS WRITING
5CR
Review structure, content, & usage as applied to Business correspondence. Emphasis
will be placed on writing clear, effective
written communication, including memoranda, email, letters, resumes, & feasibility
reports. Compile a portfolio. Researching &
documenting data using electronic databases & the Internet will be required.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
placement score or successful completion of ENG 094.
ENGL& 101
ENGLISH COMPOSITION I 5CR
Introduction to expository writing where
emphasis is placed upon unified, coherent
essays. Learn to generate essays that support
a thesis and to use the rhetorical modes of
development (narration, description, comparison/contrast, cause and effect, persuasion) appropriately. Recognize writing as a
process and use secondary MLA/ APA documentation styles to support critical thinking
and writing.
Prerequisite: COMPASS Score of Writing 77
AND Reading 86. Placement score or successful
completion of ENG 094. (revised 11/30/09)
ENGL& 235
TECHNICAL WRITING
5CR
Focuses upon technical writing skills and
projects for industry and professions. Strong
emphasis will be placed on principles of good
writing and research techniques. Students
will use appropriate technology and research
to prepare letters, resumes, reports, proposals, newsletters, specifications, and other
writing tasks typically required in a technical work setting. Discovery and knowledge of
workplace ethics and guidelines as it pertains
to writing will be researched, discussed, and
used to enhance research. Use of technology
including, but not limited to, computers,
printers, and scanners will be required.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL& 101.
ENGLISH AS A
SECOND LANGUAGE
ESL 001
ESL EDUCATIONAL INTERVIEW
Orients new students to the Basic Skills
Programs and resources available at the college. Develop educational and persona goals
develop self-awareness and learning strategies and identify ways that will help with
success in the Basic Skills Program.
Prerequisite: Required of all new students.
ESL 010
ESL I LITERACY
Designed for those with little to no knowledge of the English language. Learn English
skills for basic survival needs. BASIC reading, writing, speaking and listening skills
will be covered.
Prerequisite: Students must receive a score of
<180 on the CASAS placement test.
ESL 012
ESL II BEGINNING
Designed for those with very basic knowledge of the English language. In ESL II,
Learn English skills for basic everyday activities in the community. Begin to develop
reading, writing, speaking and listening
skills necessary to participate in family, community, and employment related activities.
Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete
ESL I or receive a score of 181-200 on the CASAS
placement test.
ESL 013
ESL III LOW INTERMEDIATE
Designed for those with an intermediate
level of English language skills. In ESL III
real-life materials on familiar subjects related to family, citizen/community or worker
roles are studied. The course focuses on
more complex reading, writing, speaking,
listening skills and application of these skills
to a variety of life situations.
Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete
ESL II or receive a score of 201-210 on the CASAS
placement test.
ESL 014
ESL IV HIGH INTERMEDIATE
Designed for those with a high intermediate
level of English language skills. In ESL IV,
learn to listen actively and participate in
conversations about everyday activities and
subjects. Continue to read more complex
material including descriptions and narratives. Begin to convey ideas through writing
and learn to edit their own work.
Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete
ESL III or receive a score of 211-220 on the CASAS
placement test.
ESL 015
ESL V LOW ADVANCED
Designed for those with an advanced level of
English language skills. In ESL V, learn to
actively participate in conversations related
to everyday activities, work and social situations. Practice reading and interpreting reallife materials including charts, graphs and
tables. Learn to convey complex ideas in
writing and complete lengthy forms and applications. Work on critical thinking skills
such as separating fact from opinion, drawing conclusions and predicting outcomes.
Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete
ESL IV or receive a score of 221-235 on the CASAS
placement test.
ESL 016
ESL VI HIGH ADVANCED
Designed for those high advanced levels of
English language skills. In ESL VI, learn to
participate independently in complex conversations and organize and relay information
effectively. Learn to monitor comprehension
when reading difficult materials and write
using complex grammatical structures.
Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete
ESL V or receive a score of 236 or higher on the
CASAS placement.
ESL 017
ESL COMMUNICATION CIVICS
LEVELS III-IV
Develop oral and written language skills
through classroom activities related to employment, health, family, education, community and civic activities. Fosters becoming a
more active member of the local community.
Prerequisite: Students must score between 201 and
220 on the CASAS placement test and be registered
in ESL II, or III
ESL 018
ESL COMMUNICATION LEVELS V-VI
Develop oral and written language skills
through classroom activities related to employment, health, family, education, community and civic activities. Fosters becoming a
more active member of the local community.
Prerequisite: Students must receive a minimum
score of 221 on the CASAS placement test or
complete ESL III, and registered in ESL IV, V or VI.
ESL 019
FOCUS ON FLUENCY I
Focuses on conversation and strengthening
English language and skills.
Prerequisite: Students must receive a score of
201-220 on CASAS placement test and be currently
enrolled in levels 3-4.
ESL 020
FOCUS ON FLUENCY 2
focuses on conversation and strengthening
English language and skills.
Prerequisite: Students must receive a score of 221+
on CASAS placement test and be currently enrolled
in levels 5-6.
ESL 021
ESL WRITING IMPROVEMENT
Improvement personal writing skills while
learning to use MS Word to create and edit
written work. Students practice keyboarding
skills and learn to use the basic editing features of MS Word to facilitate their written
communications. Students plan, write and
edit various types of documents including
personal and business letters. Students develop descriptive and opinion paragraphs.
Prerequisites: CASAS range of 211-220 or
instructor permission.
ESL 022
ESL TRANSITIONS
Students practice reading and interpreting
real life materials, work on critical thinking
skills and convey complex ideas in writing in
preparation for transitioning to higher level
academic classes and/or employment or career advancement.
Prerequisites: CASAS range of 211-220 or
instructor permission.
ESL 031
ESL FOR HEALTH CAREERS
Designed for English language learners who
want to increase language fluency and vocabulary related to the health care professions. This is a recommended course prior to
enrolling in a medical IBEST program.
Prerequisites: CASAS range of 211-220 or
instructor permission. Should be interested in a
health career.
ENVIRONMENTAL
SCIENCES &
TECHNOLOGY
ENV 109
INTRODUCTION TO ECOLOGY 4CR
Covers the basic topics of Ecology, including
population biology, plant and animal species
characterization, and habitat restoration.
ENV 134
HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE
OPERATIONS
7CR
Training provided in accordance with 29
CFR 1910.120 HAZWOPER Standard and
WAC 296-843-20010. Training includes
theory and application of incident management/command structures, response operation, toxicology, and planning, in addition
to statutory requirements.
ENV 141
ORIENTATION TO
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 4CR
Survey the wide range of duties and career
choices available to the environmental
technician.
ENV 152
MAPPING & SURVEYING
2CR
Provides students with a wide variety of
mapping skills necessary for many phases of
environmentally-related
investigations.
This will be accomplished utilizing guided
hands-on training with a wide variety of
map resources and texts.
ENV 153
ENVIRONMENTAL
SAMPLING METHODS
2CR
Basic principles of environmental sampling
of both water and soil will be covered. Students will practice sampling techniques and
learn procedural requirements for defensible
sampling methods.
ENV 157
ENVIRONMENTAL SITE
ASSESSMENT
4CR
Includes studying potential liability associated with property transfers. Students learn
and implement historical research, site investigation, liability assessment, and regulatory assessment.
ENV 158
ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY 5CR
This is a continuation of ENV 160 General
Chemistry or CHEM&161 General Chemistry with lab I with progressive instruction
in laboratory methods, chemical calculations, properties of solutions, acids and bases
and an introduction to organic chemistry.
ENV 160
GENERAL CHEMISTRY
5CR
This course provides the basic concepts,
principles and applications of inorganic
chemistry germane to the environmental
field. Related instruction includes mathematics used in designing, conducting and
interpreting analytical procedures.
ENV 161
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW I 5CR
Provides an overview of the American legal
system and how the branches of government
work together to create and enforce laws.
Focuses on environmental legislation and
case law.
2011-2012 Catalog
103
ENV 162
GENERAL CHEMISTRY
WITH LAB 6CR
This course provides the basic concepts,
principles and applications of inorganic
chemistry germane to the environmental
field. Related instruction includes mathematics used in designing, conducting and
interpreting analytical procedures. Laboratory methods, chemical calculations, properties of solutions, and properties of acids
and bases are also covered.
ENV 163
ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY
WITH LAB 6CR
This is a continuation of ENV 162 General
Chemistry with progressive instruction in
laboratory methods, chemical calculations,
properties of solutions, acids and bases and
an introduction to organic chemistry
ENV 230
RURAL TECHNOLOGIES
4CR
Explore potential job areas in which the
student might seek employment. The rural
aspect examines agriculture, forestry, fish,
and wildlife.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ENV
100-level courses, except ENV 134.
ENV 231
ISSUES IN THE URBAN
ENVIRONMENT 5CR
Course explores a variety of urban environmental issues. Storm water management,
sewage treatment, drinking water treatment, and waste disposal.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ENV
100 -level courses, except ENV 134.
ENV 237
URBAN TECHNOLOGIES
4CR
Course explores a variety of urban environmental issues. Storm water management,
sewage treatment, drinking water treatment, and waste disposal.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ENV
100 level courses except ENV 134.
ENV 240
INTERNSHIP 10CR
All students finishing the program are required to complete an internship. This is a
temporary full-time position in the public or
private sector where the student gains confidence and experience in a chosen area of
employment. Students experience on-thejob opportunities as well as making a skilled
contribution to the internship provider. Opportunities to find internships are provided,
but the student is in charge of finding his or
her own internship.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 4th quarter
courses, or Instructor permission.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
104
ENV 245
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW II 5CR
Course places an emphasis on correct, accurate interpretation of environmental regulations and their applications. Students will
be able to research, interpret, and utilize a
variety of regulations upon completion.
Regulations include RCRA, CERCLA,
CWA, Washington Drinking Water Rules,
Washington State Water Quality regulations, SDWA, and other applicable state,
federal and local regulations. Course also
covers Federal Energy Policy, including development of fossil fuels and alternative energy sources.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ENV
100-level courses, except ENV 134.
ENV 246
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
CAPSTONE 2CR
This course accompanies ENV 240 Internship. The Capstone Project integrates the
CPTC Core Abilities with the Internship
and identification of how the Core Abilities
apply in the workforce.
ENV 248
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
HYDROLOGY
6CR
Provides the basic principles of applied surface water hydrology, ground water hydrology, and water quality. Emphasis is placed on a
watershed-based approach that utilizes water
quality standards to regulate surface water
quality. The concepts and principles of biologically-based water quality standards are
also introduced. The occurrence, movement,
and quality of water beneath the earth’s surface, aquifers, well testing methods, and sampling techniques are also covered.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ENV
100-level courses, except ENV 134.
ENV 250
INTRODUCTION TO
AIR POLLUTION
3CR
Provides a basic knowledge of the sources,
mechanisms, and health effects of noise and
atmospheric air pollution, and its interaction
with the weather and other climatological
conditions. Methods of regulatory-required
air monitoring, sampling, and data interpretation will also be introduced.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ENV
100-level courses, except ENV 134.
ENV 251
ENVIRONMENTAL
CRITICAL AREAS
7CR
Environmental critical areas, including wetlands, wildlife conservation areas, aquifer
recharge areas, flood hazard, and landslide
areas are covered. Focus is on wetland delineation and reporting. Appropriate sections of
federal, state, and local regulations are addressed. Field trips to local sites. Delineation
project on the campus wetland.
ENV 260
ES 106
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ENV
Prerequisite: ES 103.
INTRODUCTION TO SOILS
5CR
Course focuses on basic physical, biological,
and chemical concepts of soil science. Practical exercises and projects will be utilized to
demonstrate how soil data is commonly used
in regulatory, legal, and scientific land use
interpretations and decisions.
100-level courses, except ENV 134.
ENV 261
WATER SHED ANALYSIS
4CR
Focuses on issues associated with timber,
fish, and wildlife watershed analysis. Study
various modules and make an in-depth presentation to the class, using visual aids.
Monitoring and analytical skills will be
covered and demonstrated through the collection of field data in remote areas. Willingness to be outdoors in rough terrain is a
consideration.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ENV
100-level courses, except ENV 134.
ENV 265
ADVANCED LABORATORY
TECHNIQUES
3CR
Course covers basic applied environmental
chemistry useful for both indoor and outdoor
lab settings. Instrumentation useful in sample analysis is demonstrated, including spectrometry and chromatography. Students will
develop basic techniques/skills used in industrial and municipal laboratories.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ENV
100 level courses except ENV 134.
ENV 270
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
TRANSPORTATION
3CR
Covers the requirements associated with
transportation of hazardous materials as
defined in Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations (49CFR) and 171.8 (not including radioactive). Meets the Hazmat Employee
training requirements found in 49 CFR 172
Subpart H.
ESTHETIC SCIENCES
ES 103
SKIN PHYSIOLOGY
& HISTOLOGY I 4CR
Explore the skin’s cellular structure and
skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems as
they pertain to facials and body treatments.
Basic skin diseases and disorders are covered, preparing the student for identification
of the composition of skin to determine
treatment protocol for facials and body
treatments. All related first aid, safety, and
sanitation are also covered.
FACIAL PROCEDURES I 4CR
Cleansing, exfoliation, manipulation techniques, and treatment masks for beautifying
the skin of the face and body. Determine the
type of treatment and basic treatment protocol for all skin types. First aid, safety, and
sanitation are also covered.
ES 109
MACHINE FACIALS, ELECTRICITY
& LIGHT THERAPY
4CR
Covers equipment used in facial salon treatments, including steamers, magnifying
lamps, galvanic and high frequency current
machines. Learn the benefits of electric current machines vs. manual facial manipulations and when it is appropriate to
incorporate electrical treatments. First aid,
safety, and sanitation are also covered.
Prerequisite: ES 106.
ES 112
TEMPORARY HAIR REMOVAL I 3CR
Covers temporary hair removal used in the
salon atmosphere, including tweezing, hot
and cold wax, and cream depilatories. Also
covered are all contraindications with waxing
and related first aid, safety, and sanitation.
Prerequisite: ES 109.
ES 115
MAKEUP APPLICATION
TECHNIQUES I 2CR
Explore color theory as it relates to the skin,
psychology of color, and basic makeup application techniques. First aid, safety, and
sanitation are also covered.
Prerequisite: ES 112.
ES 117
SKIN CARE & BODY WRAPS I 3CR
Skin care to include masque and scrub applications and technique, lash and brow
tinting. Body treatment protocol to include
client comfort foot soaks and draping techniques, as well as discussion of various body
treatments in today’s market.
Prerequisite: ES 103.
ES 121
SKIN PHYSIOLOGY
& HISTOLOGY II 4CR
Examine advanced skin cell structure, genetic or hereditary skin disorders, and acquire the ability to identify skin type through
analysis. First aid, safety, and sanitation are
covered.
Prerequisite: ES 103
ES 122
SALON MANAGEMENT
& STATE LAWS I 2CR
Washington State Department of Licensing
laws and regulations regarding sanitation,
safety, and licensing requirements for salon
management and ownership are covered.
Examine reception desk duties, including
handling of money, balancing the till, tracking services, retail sold customer service,
and marketing techniques. Course hours do
not apply toward Washington State licensing requirements.
ES 124
FACIAL PROCEDURES II 4CR
Covers advanced facial techniques and
treatments, enzyme therapy, and facial massage techniques, including pressure point.
All related first aid, safety, and sanitation
are covered.
Prerequisite: ES 106
ES 127
TEMPORARY HAIR REMOVAL II 4CR
Advanced hair removal techniques such as
speed waxing through proper application
techniques. All related first aid, safety, and
sanitation are covered.
Prerequisite: ES 112
ES 129
MAKEUP APPLICATION
TECHNIQUES II 2CR
Photography makeup techniques, including
color, black and white photography, shading
and contouring, and artificial lash application. First aid, safety, and sanitation are
covered.
Prerequisite: ES 115
ES 131
SKIN CARE & BODY WRAPS II 3CR
Holistic skin care, hydrotherapy, nutrition,
herbal and aromatherapy for skin and body
treatments. First aid, safety, and sanitation
are covered.
Prerequisite: ES 117
ES 147
SALON MANAGEMENT
& STATE LAWS II 2CR
Bookkeeping and records management,
résumé writing, inventory control, marketing, and Guild Attendance are covered.
Prerequisite: ES 122. Course hours do not apply
toward Washington State licensing requirements.
ES 199
CHEMISTRY FOR ESTHETICS 3CR
Fundamentals of chemistry, including differences between organic and inorganic
matter, simple chemical reactions, pH for
estheticians, and composition of, as well as
indications for, commonly-used products for
esthetic salon services.
ES 201
PHARMACOLOGY FOR
ESTHETICIANS
3CR
Covers common drugs used to treat skin
conditions, indications, and contraindications. Information also given on skin reactions possible with medications.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ES 205
and state-approved entry-level esthetic program
and proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
ES 205
INTRODUCTION TO
MEDICAL ESTHETICS
OFFICE PROCEDURES 4CR
Develop skills necessary to work efficiently in
a medical office. Includes ethics, professionalism, records management, chart writing,
patient intake, post-surgical care skills, first
aid, CPR, and BBP. Medical terminology as
it pertains to esthetic medical procedures
will also be covered.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of
state-approved entry-level esthetic program and
proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
ES 211
INFECTION CONTROL FOR
MEDICAL ESTHETICIANS
1CR
Provides students with the skills necessary to
implement proper infection control and biohazardous waste disposal. Sanitation, disinfection, and autoclaving instruments and
equipment are covered. Review of bacteriology and spread of disease, OSHA and bloodborne pathogens will be covered, in addition
to HIV/AIDS/HEPATITIS for patient and
esthetician safety and protection.
Prerequisite: ES 205 and successful completion of
state- approved entry-level esthetic program and
proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
ES 216
CAMOUFLAGE MAKEUP
2CR
Introduces the theory and application of
makeup services used in dermatology or
plastic surgery offices. Tips on how to apply
to cover bruising, scarring, or redness, in
addition to reducing pain during application
on post-surgical clients.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ES 221
and state-approved entry-level esthetic program
and proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
ES 221
MEDICAL ESTHETICS
PROCEDURES 6CR
Theory of all medical esthetic procedures to
include such topics as: microdermabrasion,
cellulite reduction, micro current, bio-toning, IPL, manual and mechanical lymphatic
drainage. Safety, sanitation, first aid and
contraindications for each procedure are
also included.
Prerequisite: ES 227 and successful completion of
state-approved entry-level esthetic program and
proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
2011-2012 Catalog
105
ES 227
MEDICAL ESTHETIC
MACHINERY 4CR
Includes theory and hands-on demonstrations of machinery and equipment used in
medical esthetic offices. Safety, sanitation,
first aid, and contraindication theory will be
covered.
Prerequisite: ES 221 and successful completion of
state-approved entry-level esthetic program and
proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
ES 230
PATIENT EDUCATION
1CR
Incorporates effective strategies and marketing skills to educate patients on their home
care and treatment plans.
Prerequisite: ES 227 and successful completion of
state-approved entry- level esthetic program and
proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
ES 236
INDEPENDENT RESEARCH
PROJECT FOR MEDICAL
ESTHETICS 2CR
Research any medical esthetic topic or treatment modality, to include, but not limited to,
microdermabrasion, laser treatments, lymphatic drainage, chemical peels, surgical
care, etc.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ES 205 and
state-approved entry-level esthetic program and
proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
ES 240
BUSINESS SKILLS & PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT FOR MEDICAL
ESTHETICS
5CR
Covers business skills necessary for the medical esthetician to succeed, incorporating résumé writing, cover letters, how to develop a
business plan, and how to negotiate a salary.
Prerequisite: All courses included in first quarter
of Medical Esthetics and successful completion of
state approved entry level esthetic program and
proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
ES 242
LASER THEORY 4CR
Covers necessary theory of laser and laser
physics, types and styles of lasers, and what
laser should be used for each skin type and
condition. Includes first aid and safety.
Prerequisite: All courses included in first quarter
of Medical Esthetics and successful completion of
state- approved entry-level esthetic program and
proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
ES 252
ADVANCED COSMETIC
CHEMISTRY 2CR
In-depth study of cosmetic chemicals and
product knowledge. Research papers will be
produced consisting of chemical products,
ingredients, and contraindications that may
occur during a medical esthetic treatment.
Prerequisite: All courses included in first quarter
of Medical Esthetics and successful completion of
state-approved entry-level esthetic program and
proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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106
ES 256
CLINICAL LABORATORY FOR
MEDICAL ESTHETICS 10CR
Participate in practical application of medical esthetic skills and services while working
with clients in the student-run clinic. Includes all machinery covered in ES 227.
Also includes all safety, sanitation, first aid,
and contraindications.
Prerequisite: All courses included in first quarter
of Medical Esthetics and successful completion of
state-approved entry-level esthetic program and
proof of esthetic license from Washington State.
GEOLOGY
GEOL& 110
GEOLOGY
5CR
Focus on the geological impacts associated
with human activities, hence, environmental geology. Emphasis includes internal and
surface processes, and the basic formation of
the earth. Also covers conflicts associated
with resource development and human responses to natural hazards.
GEOGRAPHY
GEO 210
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
INTRODUCTION TO ARCGIS 1 2CR
Introduces ESRI’s ArcGIS software. Includes basic GIS (Geographic Information
System) functionality, how to use view and
use maps composed of data frames, tables,
charts and layouts.
Note: ESRI and ArcView are trademarks of
Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc.
GEO 215
GPS TECHNOLOGIES
GRAPHIC TECHNOLOGIES
2CR
Use global positioning system equipment to
create maps and to create files for use in
ArcGIS (geographic information system).
Focuses Trimble GPS technologies. Analysis
tools and layout features for map creation
are covered.
GRAPHIC
TECHNOLOGIES
GTC 110
ART, DESIGN
& VISUAL THINKING
5CR
Introduction to visual arts and design principles. Stresses the components of visual
thinking and visual language underlying
design for digital media. A series of real-life
case studies and exercises applies the design
process and use of basic elements of design,
typography, images, color, and layout.
GTC 123
MACINTOSH OPERATIONS
& IMAGE ACQUISITION
5CR
Introduction to Macintosh computer operations and file management. Covers image
acquisition and archiving from Internet and
analog sources.
GTC 130
DIGITAL IMAGING I:
PHOTOSHOP
5CR
Introduces the fundamentals of Photoshop
to include basic tools, image editing, painting, and the creation, use, and management
of layers and channels.
GTC 143
ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING
& LAYOUT
5CR
Apply typographic terms, vocabulary, and
concepts; examine type identification and
explore the relationships or essence of typographic design. Apply and solve mathematical problems common to typography. Apply
basic page layout and create files. Explore
proofreading and correcting copy changes.
GTC 149
DIGITAL IMAGING II:
PHOTOSHOP
5CR
Builds on the fundamentals of Photoshop
and introduces advanced imagery to include blending, advanced layers, advanced
selections, vector tools, filters, and tonal
correction.
Prerequisite: GTC 133 or Instructor approval.
GTC 164
PREPRESS I 5CR
Students will learn to create, edit, and manipulate PDF files, to combine files into
portfolios, and to secure PDF documents.
They will also learn how to work with many
of the advanced features of Adobe Acrobat 9
to include: OCR text recognition, pre-flight,
print production tasks, touch up and commenting, proofing, live review, and
collaboration.
GTC 169
INTRO TO VECTOR-BASED
ILLUSTRATION SOFTWARE
5CR
Vector-based software, tools and features
will be used to create text and logos, apply
image effects, and design web graphics. The
course incorporates branding and identifiers
when designing products and enables students to design for both Print and Web.
GTC 174
INDESIGN I 5CR
Perform techniques of the application on the
Macintosh computer. Create files for electronic output, create documents using color
and color separations for creating ads, brochures, menus and other documents. Explore
PDF files, EPS files and production work.
Prerequisite: GTC 143 or Instructor approval.
GTC 203
PREFLIGHT 5CR
Use applications on the Macintosh computer
to create high-level graphics, images, logos,
projects in color. Perform graphic manipulation, computer output, PDF formats and
postscript files.
Prerequisites: GR 223, GTC 276 or Instructor
approval.
GTC 209
ADVANCED VECTOR
DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION
5CR
Perform advanced techniques using Adobe
Illustrator; create documents using Color
Swatches and color separations for a variety
of projects. Explore the abilities of different
tools/Panels, Effects and filters, Integrate
Adobe Acrobat Pro as soft proofing software
from within Illustrator and prepare files for
electronic output ready for a service
provider.
GTC 210
DIGITAL IMAGING III:
PHOTOSHOP
5CR
Building on a solid knowledge of Photoshop’s
basic functions, this course explores advanced color theory and utilization of Photoshop for color correction. Efficient use of
layers, masks, and channels for photo retouching and special effects. Optimization
for production, importing and exporting of
images is also included.
Prerequisite: GTC 154 or Instructor approval.
GTC 223
PREPRESS II 5CR
Covers the digital production of printing
jobs through the use of Adobe PDF and raster image processing.
Prerequisite: GTC 164 or Instructor approval.
GTC 233
QUARKXPRESS I 5CR
Explore and apply page layout techniques
using QuarkXpress software on the Macintosh computer for creating files. Examine
the software and its use for electronic preflight. Explore EPS exporting and formats
along with production skills, image creation
and project development using the software.
Prerequisite: GTC 143 or Instructor approval.
GTC 254
CAPSTONE CLASS
5CR
Preparation of portfolio, covering all aspects
of student’s chosen specialty within the
Graphic Technologies Program.
Prerequisite: GTC 223, 243 or Instructor approval.
GTC 264
PAPER, PRICING & ESTIMATING 5CR
Explore paper choices and cost within the
printing industry. Estimate both materials
and time for various printing processes.
GTC 276
INDESIGN II 5CR
Perform advanced techniques with InDesign, create documents, and use color and
color separations for a variety of projects,
and prepare files for electronic output.
Prerequisite: GTC 174 or Instructor approval.
HEALTH UNIT
COORDINATOR
HUC 104
HUC 112
UNIT COORDINATOR TASKS
& PROCEDURES II 5CR
Focuses on cognitive knowledge and performance skills in the computer laboratory.
The student will demonstrate performance
skills for maintaining medical records, accurately transcribing physicians’ orders to
the appropriate chart forms and Kardex, as
well as completion of pseudo patient charts.
Prerequisite: HUC 109: completion of 104, 106,
115, and 120
HUC 115
ORIENTATION/
INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH UNIT
COORDINATING/ INTRODUCTION
TO AUTOMATION
7CR
Focus is on orientation and introduction to
campus policies and rules of conduct. This
course will also introduce the student to program policies, dress code, attendance, classroom, work place rules of conduct, program
goals, and grading system. Instruction and
demonstration will explore the use of various
communication devices in the hospital.
COMMUNICATION APPLICATION
IN THE HEALTH UNIT
COORDINATOR ROLE 3CR
Enables the student to describe and utilize
good listening skills as a means of preventing
and/or solving conflicts with a variety of
people in different situations. The focus also
will be to develop skills for the role of the
communicator for the nursing unit. The student will also be given the tools for developing and practicing assertive communication,
interpersonal relationships, and confidentiality skills.
HUC 106
Prerequisite: HUC 104.
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY/
ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I 3CR
Introduces basic word elements that are
used in building medical terminology and
identifies the different types of word elements present in each medical term by
name. Introduces medical terms, body
structure, and pathology in relation to each
body system: integumentary, musculoskeletal, sensory, circulatory, nervous, endocrine,
and digestive systems.
Prerequisite: HUC 104
HUC 109
UNIT COORDINATOR TASKS
& PROCEDURES I 8CR
Enables identification of the forms commonly used in the patient’s chart, explain
the purpose of a patient’s chart, and recognize the charting responsibilities for each
healthcare team member. Presents instruction and procedures for scheduling appointments by telephone, computer, and written
requests. Also focuses on students’ performance in the computer skill laboratory,
demonstrating their cognitive knowledge for
maintaining medical records; ordering laboratory and diagnostic exams; accurately
transcribing physicians’ orders; recognizing
treatment orders; ordering nursing supplies;
identifying abbreviations, symbols, and
terms used in a medication order; and charting information accurately to the appropriate forms and the Kardex for their pseudo
patients.
Prerequisites: HUC104; enrollment in HUC106.
HUC 120
UNIT MANAGEMENT I 3CR
Covers management responsibilities for the
nursing unit, including time management
and identification of possible fire and safety
hazards on the nursing unit.
Prerequisite: HUC 104; enrollment in HUC 106,
109, and 115.
HUC 122
UNIT MANAGEMENT II 3CR
Focus is on cognitive knowledge for managing the nursing unit and developing communication skills using verbal and written
communication. The student will develop
leadership and performance skills by practicing classroom management.
Prerequisites: Completion of HUC 115 and 120
HUC 126
LEGAL/ETHICAL ASPECTS
OF UNIT COORDINATING
2CR
Enables the student to identify legal elements that are necessary in regard to preparing legal documents, discussing hospital
and patient confidentiality, or witnessing
signatures on consents for treatment. The
ethics of this profession will be explored and
how to apply these ethics in professional
behaviors. AIDS education, blood-borne
pathogens, HIPPA, and hepatitis information will also be covered.
Prerequisites: Completion of HUC 104, 106, 109,
115, and 120; enrollment in HUC 107, 111, and 122.
2011-2012 Catalog
107
HUC 132
CLINICAL EXPERIENCE
8CR
Enables the student to utilize the cognitive
and performance objectives that were presented in courses, HUC 103 through 126, in
the clinical setting. The focus is on preparation of a résumé, employment application, and
an employment interview. In order to participate in the clinical aspect of the program,
must receive a No Record on File report from
the Washington State Patrol regarding Crimes
Against Persons. Clinical hours vary from 6 to
8 hours per day, 4 days a week. Students unable to complete course HUC 131 will have
the option of completing clinical rotation with
the next available program, on approval from
the Instructors, within 6 months.
Prerequisite: Completion of HUC 104, 106, 109,
115, 120, 107, 112, 122, and 126.
HEATING & AIR
CONDITIONING
SERVICE TECHNICIAN
(HVAC)
HAC 102
BASIC ELECTRICITY 5CR
Discusses the structure of matter, movement,
electrons, conductors, insulators, direct and
alternating current, and electrical units of
measurement. The electrical circuit will also
be studied along with making electrical measurements, Ohm’s law, series and parallel
circuits, and electrical power. Magnetic
fields, inductance, transformers, capacitance,
impedance, sine waves, and using electrical
measuring instruments are also included.
HAC 105
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS 4CR
Discusses types of automatic control devices
that respond to thermal change, the bimetal
device, control by fluid expansion, the thermocouple, and electronic sensing devices.
Space temperature controls, (both high and
low voltage), sensing temperature of solids,
pressure sensing devices, oil pressure safety
controls, air pressure controls, devices that
control fluid flow, and maintenance of mechanical and electromechanical controls are
covered.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
108
HAC 120
ADVANCED CONTROLS
& TROUBLE SHOOTING
4CR
Control terminology, applications, and electronic control circuits are covered. Pneumatic
controls and direct digital controls are also
explored, along with programmable thermostats. Also covers procedures for troubleshooting basic and complex circuits, thermostats,
and high voltage circuits controlled by thermostats. Describes procedures for measuring
amperage and voltage in low voltage circuits
and discusses pictorial and line diagrams.
HAC 160
SIEMENS CONTROLS 2CR
Serves as an introduction to the concepts of
direct digital controls (DDC training). The
course is a generic approach to understanding DDC terminology, the fundamentals of
today’s new building control systems, how
they work, features, and troubleshooting.
Improve your control of HVAC systems,
fire, security, access, control, lighting, and
energy management.
HAC 162
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
ELECTRIC MOTORS
& THEIR APPLICATIONS
4CR
Types of electric motors are discussed, along
with starting and running components and
characteristics, motor speeds, and power
supplies. Specific topics also included are
single and split phase motors, the centrifugal
switch, electronic replay, capacitor start motors, capacitors run motors, permanent split
capacitor motors, shaded pole motors, and
single phase hermetic motors, positive temperature coefficient motors, and variable
speed motors. Discussions will take place
pertaining to various characteristics and insulations, bearings, mountings, and motor
drives.
HAC 164
ELECTRIC MOTORS
& TROUBLE SHOOTING
3CR
Discusses mechanical and electrical motor
troubleshooting. This includes drive assemblies, belt tension, pulley alignment, open
and shorted windings, shorts to ground, capacitor problems, wiring and connectors,
and troubleshooting hermetic motors.
HAC 166
SIEMENS CONTROLS 3CR
The DDC training course serves as an introduction to the concepts of direct digital
controls. The course is a generic approach to
understand DDC terminology and the fundamentals of today’s new building control
systems. Improve your control of HVAC
Systems, Fire, Security and Access, control,
lighting, and energy Management. The focus is on DDC fundamentals, how they
work, features and troubleshooting.
HAC 167
GREEN AWARENESS
3CR
When it comes to HVAC/R Electrical,
“Green” means maximizing the energy
efficiency of existing equipment, specifying
the most efficient systems available for the
application and the available budget using
renewable and sustainable fuel sources and
conserving water. Those items along with
the core knowledge of Energy management
and Analysis, Green Heating, Ventilation,
Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration,
Electrical Generation and Consumption,
and “Green” Plumbing will be discussed in
the course.
HAC 168
PLC PROGRAMMING 2CR
This class is the beginning instruction for
the student or trades worker wanting to enter
the field of Programmable Logic Controllers. Industrial and commercial demands for
safe and productive automated facilities require that electricians, maintenance technicians and other industry personnel posses a
thorough understanding of programmable
logic controllers.
HAC 170
HEATING I 7CR
Covers controls, thermal physics, electrical,
and equipment for residential and light commercial heating system installation and servicing with emphasis on gas heating.
Prerequisite: HAC 102 - 167.
HAC 175
HEATING LAB I 5CR
Will teach students to competently troubleshoot and repair gas burning appliances.
Also covers thermal physics and equipment
for heating systems’ analysis and efficiency,
as well as pipe threading and silver brazing.
This is a hands-on class utilizing live
projects.
Prerequisite: Must have required hand tools of the
trade and be enrolled in Heating.
HAC 181
HEATING II 6CR
Covers controls, thermal physics, and equipment for residential and light commercial
heating system installation and servicing
with emphasis on electric, oil, and hydronic
heating.
HAC 183
HEATING LAB II 4CR
Will teach students to competently troubleshoot and repair electric, oil, and hydronic
heating equipment. Also covers thermal
physics and equipment for heating systems
analysis and efficiency. This is a hands-on
class utilizing live projects.
Prerequisite: Must have required hand tools of the
trade and be enrolled in Heating.
HAC 201
ADVANCED REFRIGERATION 10CR
Troubleshoot and repair refrigeration equipment, thermal physics and equipment for
refrigeration
systems
analysis
and
efficiency.
HAC 230
EPA REFRIGERANT
CERTIFICATION 1CR
Mandatory course designed to provide EPA
nationally recognized certification required
for purchasing, removing and recycling of
refrigerants. The class is a 12-hour training
session with the certification test upon completion and is taught by a registered proctor.
HAC 237
BASIC REFRIGERATION I 7CR
Introduction to controls, thermal physics,
and equipment for air conditioning system
installation and servicing.
Prerequisites: HAC 101 through 168 and must be
registered in HAC 237, 242, 246, and 255.
HAC 242
BASIC REFRIGERATION LAB I 5CR
Hands-on experience with introduction to
controls, thermal physics, and equipment for
air conditioning system installation and
servicing.
Prerequisites: Must have required hand tools of
the trade and must be enrolled in the Basic
Refrigeration course.
HAC 246
BASIC REFRIGERATION II 6CR
Introduction to controls, thermal physics,
and equipment for air-conditioning system
installation and servicing.
HAC 249
JOB READINESS 5CR
Covers résumé writing, cover letter preparation, Internet job search, Work Source job
readiness workshop, and tips on filling out
job applications.
HAC 255
BASIC REFRIGERATION LAB II 3CR
Hands-on experience with introduction to
controls, thermal physics, and equipment for
air conditioning system installation and
servicing.
HAC 256
COMMERCIAL HEAT PUMPS 7CR
Troubleshoot & repair residential and commercial heat pumps through study material
and DVD format. Heat pump fundamentals, heat pump electrical, and heat pump
charging are explored.
Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in HAC 201,
249, 256
HEMODIALYSIS
HDT 125
FIRST AID/CPR/HIV
1CR
Adult CPR, First Aid and rescue breathing
for adult patients. Includes history, causes,
virility of blood borne pathogens, bodily
substance isolation, and personal protection
devices relating to dealing with HIV/Aids
patients. Proper lifting techniques and body
mechanics will be covered.
HDT 131
LAW & ETHICS FOR THE
HEMODIALYSIS TECHNICIAN
3CR
Covers the aspects of the legal relationship
between the Hemodialysis Technician and
patient with an emphasis on the principles of
medical ethics, standards of conduct, and
patient confidentiality. Includes an overview
of HIPA A and OSHA regulations, national
and state governmental structure, and the
legal system as it relates to medical facilities.
HEMODIALYSIS PRINCIPLES
& PROCEDURES 4CR
Defines the basic principals of diffusion, filtration, fluid dynamics and osmosis relating
to the dialysis process. Overviews of the dialysis environment and kidney functions.
Patient vitals and monitoring the treatment,
including normal and abnormal values. Perform laboratory tests and utilize patient
documentation procedures. Identify causes,
signs, and symptoms, preventions and interventions for medical and technical complications that may occur during dialysis. Includes
patient dietary and nutrition requirements.
HDT 113
HDT 138
HDT 105
PHLEBOTOMY FUNDAMENTALS 4CR
Develop the skills necessary to draw blood
specimens for analysis in a laboratory. Includes an introduction to the structure and
function of a clinical laboratory. Safety procedures and universal precautions are included. Hands-on practice in phlebotomy
skills will be provided.
HDT 116
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS/
KEYBOARDING
2CR
Students will use computers to develop touch
control and proper keyboarding and keypad
techniques with emphasis on alpha/numeric
data entry. Course includes keyboarding alphabetic, figure, symbol keys, and skill
building; continued keyboarding drills and
practice to develop a minimum speed and
accuracy of 25 wpm. Introduction to MS
Office Suite for basic business correspondence. Internet navigation will be used for
student research projects.
HDT 122
HEMODIALYSIS TERMS/
ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY
6CR
Provides the basic techniques of medical
word building to be applied in acquiring an
extensive medical vocabulary. Introduces
anatomical, physiological, and pathological
terms relating to body systems and medical
abbreviations.
MACHINE SETUP/
MAINTENANCE
4CR
Covers use and setup of hemodialysis machines. Instruction focuses on organizing
and setting up the dialysis machine and
equipment, priming and dry machine
stringing. Various testing equipment commonly used in dialysis units are studied, as
well as preparation and mixing of hemodialysis concentrates. Includes standard precautions and aseptic techniques. Prepares
student to initiate monitor and terminate a
routine hemodialysis treatment.
HDT 141
WATER TREATMENT FOR
HEMODIALYSIS
3CR
Basic concepts of water treatment and dialyzer reuse are covered, including instruction on the varied devices used in
hemodialysis. Also studied are advantages
and disadvantages of filters, carbon tanks,
dionizers, ultraviolet light, and reverse osmosis in the treatment of water for dialysis.
Students will prepare a typical water treatment-monitoring schedule.
HDT 149
VASCULAR ACCESS 3CR
The history and importance of vascular access are reviewed, including the major types
of permanent and temporary vascular access. Use of appropriate needle insertion for
arteriovenous fistulae and grafts. Instruction in catheter care and connections. Utilize the four types of anastomosis used for
internal arteriovenous fistulae. Management of thrombosis, infection, hematoma,
bleeding, steal syndrome, aneurysm, and
catheter dislodgment.
2011-2012 Catalog
109
HDT 151
PROFESSIONAL INTERACTION 3CR
Explores the relationship and psychological
boundaries between the technician, the patient, and the renal facility. Includes concepts
of patient education. Basic interpersonal
verbal and non-verbal communication are
covered, with a focus on adapting to an individual’s special needs or cultural orientation.
Students will be given the tools to develop
listening skills by practicing assertive communication, and developing appropriate interpersonal relationships using the concepts
of patient confidentiality. Covers body mechanics and proper lifting techniques. Includes information on sexual harassment.
HDT 161
CLINICAL PRACTICUM 6CR
During the clinical experience, the student
will participate in a dialysis facility as a
member of the healthcare team in applying
principles of hemodialysis, standard precautions, fluid management, initiating and concluding a dialysis treatment, patient and
equipment monitoring, and treatment of
routine hemodialysis problems in accordance with the standard dialysis procedures
and policies of the facilities.
HDT 163
FIELD STUDY
1CR
Familiarizes the student with various dialysis companies in the greater Puget Sound
area. The student will be partnered with
another student and required to contact four
of the companies in the area in order to
conduct an interview with a staff member.
The information gathered will be collected
into a notebook to be submitted at the end of
the class. Information to be included: interview notes, locations of individual dialysis
units, maps to each unit, contact person for
each of the units, size of the company, etc.
The notebook will be a reference for the
student when seeking a dialysis technician
position at the end of the course.
HUMAN SERVICES/
CHEMICAL
DEPENDENCY
HS 115
THERAPEUTIC
COMMUNICATION SKILLS 5CR
Acquaints students with the basic methods
of therapeutic communication. Emphasis is
placed upon building basic active listening
skills. Students will demonstrate mastery of
theory through classroom activities, including mock interviews and videotaping.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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110
HS 123
HIV/AIDS & BLOOD
BOURNE PATHOGENS
1CR
Increases students’ knowledge of HIV/AIDS
& blood-borne pathogens. Students will gain
knowledge of the history of HIV/AIDS and
related issues. Provides ten hours of HIV/
AIDS training in the areas of transmission,
occupational
safety,
and
standard
precautions.
HS 127
INTRODUCTION TO
HUMAN SERVICES 5CR
Introduces students to human services as a
profession and will include a historical and
philosophical framework of human service
delivery. Contemporary roles and the human
service worker will be covered, including areas such as typical duties and tasks of human
service workers, income, maintenance, children’s services, family services, aging, substance abuse, mental health, services for
persons with disabilities, and the sociocultural aspects of providing services in a multiculturally diverse society. Students will also
examine the competencies and qualifications
required to become an effective human service worker, as well as the occupational and
educational alternatives for graduates.
HS 130
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
FAMILY DEVELOPMENT
3CR
Provides the student with a clear definition
and understand of family development, the
stages of family development and the impact
of gang involved youth and adults on the
family systems. Special attention will be
given to how the family system evolves and
the generational impact that occurs in a gang
involved family. Students will learn how to
educate and implement change and provide
culturally sensitive counseling services to
support affected families.
Prerequisites: High school diploma or GED and
successful completion or concurrent enrollment in
Introduction to Gang Culture is required.
HS 134
CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE
CASE MANAGEMENT 3CR
Culturally responsive case management examines cultural strengths, diversity and delivery of services within the family system.
Students will learn to identify and apply culturally responsive techniques to individuals
and family systems involved in gang culture.
Prerequisites: High school diploma or GED and
successful completion or concurrent enrollment in
Introduction to Gang Culture is required.
HS 136
PREVENTION EARLY
INTERVENTION
& ASSESSMENT
4CR
Provides students with the opportunity to
accompany professionals into the field and
provide assessments to gang involved youth
and families. Students will learn prevention
and early intervention techniques that can
be applied within the community, take part
in community educational forums and provide case management services to youth and
families. Students will be responsible for
obtaining a 55 hour field study placement in
their local community.
Prerequisites: High school diploma or GED and
successful completion or concurrent enrollment in
Introduction to Gang Culture is required.
HS 150
INTERNSHIP I 5CR
Students will participate in on-the-job training in the human services field of their
choice. Duties and tasks are supervised.
Students perform relevant job duties and
tasks within their agency of choice, attend
supervision meetings, identify community
resources that are applicable, and perform
other job duties as assigned. Instructor permission is required for site choice.
HS 220
THEORIES OF COUNSELING
5CR
Increases student knowledge of a variety of
counseling theories, theorists, and techniques from both a historical and contemporary viewpoint. Students will explore the
practical application and appropriate uses of
these theories in the human services system.
HS 221
FAMILY SYSTEMS 3CR
Explores the dynamics of healthy and unhealthy family systems in both traditional
and alternative families. Students will study
a variety of approaches to assist families in
managing and coping with the stressors of
family life in contemporary society. Introduces family intervention strategies and the
development of human service skills to service families.
HS 223
INTERVIEWING
& ASSESSMENT SKILLS 5CR
Expands knowledge and provides a theoretical background and specific interviewing
skills and techniques. Students will examine
a variety of interviews used in human service agencies, and demonstrate proficiency
with documentation procedures associated
with client interviews and assessments. An
overview of the Diagnostic and Statistical
Manual will be presented. Students will examine symptoms associated with a variety of
mental disorders.
HS 224
DYNAMICS OF VIOLENCE
5CR
Presents an overview of the dynamics of violence in relationships to both the perpetrator
and the victim. Areas of emphasis include
child neglect, child sexual and physical
abuse, missing and exploited children & adolescents, domestic violence, the cycle of violence, elder abuse, and the impact on the
family system. Strategies for treatment and
community intervention are explored.
HS 225
SURVEY OF
COMMUNITY RESOURCES
3CR
Introduces students to a variety of community-based human service agencies through
examination of their services, functions,
and service populations. The class will participate in field visits, guest lectures, and
exercises designed to assist them in understanding the relevance of each service component to the whole community, regional,
and state system.
HS 226
MENTAL HEALTH ASSESSMENT
& EVALUATION 5CR
Explores current perspectives of mental
health in the helping professions by focusing
on the identification, definition, diagnostic
criteria, and the assessment and evaluation
of psychological disorders. An emphasis will
be placed on the continuum that exists between normal and abnormal behavior by
examining biological, psychological and socio-cultural causal factors as they relate to
adults and children.
HS 227
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
& WELLNESS
5CR
Introduces students to the dimensions of
wellness, including physical, emotional, social, and spiritual components. Students explore strategies for personal behavioral
health & wellness, including coping strategies, personal boundaries, self awareness
and how to avoid burnout on the job.
HS 229
INTRODUCTION TO
GANG CULTURE 3CR
This culturally-sensitive course clearly describes the historical foundations of gangs
and the gang culture that currently exists in
the United States. Students will learn to identify gang symbols, attire, language, and culture. Social change agents such as educational
awareness programs, parent programs, parent awareness programs, and community
awareness programs will also be examined.
Prerequisites: High school diploma or GED.
HS 230
CASE MANAGEMENT
5CR
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of case management practice.
Students will review different models of case
management and learn about common case
management functions such as outreach,
engagement, assessment, planning, accessing resources, coordination, and advocacy.
HS 235
CULTURALLY COMPETENT
PRACTICE 5CR
Provides students with an awareness of the
historical, cultural, socio-economic, biological, and psycho-social influences that define
diversity. Examines culturally competent
standards that influence best practice standards for human service workers. Students
will explore culture, guidelines for culturallysensitive practices, the impact of inequality
on a variety of service populations, racism,
prejudice, and inclusion strategies.
HS 237
LAW & ETHICS FOR
HUMAN SERVICES 3CR
Presents an overview of the ethical and professional issues that human services workers
will face in the field. Included are such topics
as ethical decision making, professional responsibilities, liability, confidentiality, records and rights of clients, professional codes
of ethics, core values and personal issues, supervision, leadership, and the legal system.
HS 238
SPECIAL PROJECTS 3-5CR
Students will be responsible for formulating
and implementing ideas to complete a special project related to the human services
field. Students must obtain authorization
from the Instructor for the project prior to
enrolling in the course.
HS 239
SELECTED TOPICS 3-5CR
Students will be responsible for performing
either a literature review and/or research on a
human services-related topic. Students must
obtain authorization from the Instructor for
the project prior to enrolling in the course.
HS 244
INTERNSHIP II 5CR
Students will participate in on-the-job training in the human services field of their
choice. Duties and tasks are supervised.
Students perform relevant job duties and
tasks within their agency of choice, attend
supervision meetings, identify community
resources that are applicable, and perform
other job duties as assigned. Instructor permission is required for site choice. Successful
completion of Internship I is required.
HS 246
GROUP PROCESS 3CR
An introduction to the dynamics of group
interaction with emphasis upon the student’s
firsthand experience as a group leader and
member. The factors involved in problems of
communication, effective emotional responses, and personal growth will be highlighted. Emphasis will be placed on group
process as a means of changing behavior.
This course is designed to assist human services students who will function as group
leaders and co-leaders.
HS 258
INTERNSHIP III 5CR
Students will participate in on-the-job training in the human services field of their
choice. Duties and tasks are supervised.
Students perform relevant job duties and
tasks within their agency of choice, attend
supervision meetings, identify community
resources that are applicable, and perform
other job duties as assigned. Instructor permission is required for site choice. Successful
completion of Internship II is required.
HSCD 135
2011-2012 Catalog
HSCD 155
CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY
& COUNSELING I:
INDIVIDUALS & GROUPS
5CR
Focuses on learning a collaborative process
that facilitates the client’s progress toward
mutually determined treatment goals and
objectives. Students will learn counseling
competencies that include: sensitivity to the
client’s individual characteristics and culture, the role of the counselor, approaches to
counseling & addiction disorders, use of
warmth, respect, genuineness, concreteness,
empathy, and the therapeutic use of power
and authority. Group dynamics and strategies will also be covered.
HSCD 215
CASE MANAGEMENT
& RECORD-KEEPING
FOR THE CDP 5CR
Focuses on the basic case management
skills of service coordination, referral practices, community services, ongoing evaluation of treatment progress, client needs, and
learning documentation standards and applicable laws.
INTRODUCTION TO
CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY
3CR
Introduction to the field of chemical dependency with emphasis on the roles and responsibilities of the addiction paraprofessional
counselor, ethical issues, pharmacology, family dynamics, dual diagnosis, intervention
techniques, self-help groups, levels of care,
symptom identification, and conducting alcohol/drug histories. Interactive work stressed.
HSCD 226
HSCD 140
CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY
& THE LAW
2CR
Examine the federal & state laws that pertain to chemical dependency for individuals
and facilities. Students also become familiar
with the criminal, civil, and juvenile court
systems.
ETHICS FOR CHEMICAL
DEPENDENCY PROFESSIONALS 2CR
Focuses on understanding the obligations to
adhere to ethical and behavioral standards
of conduct in the helping relationship as well
as the importance of supervision and continuing education.
HSCD 145
PHYSIOLOGICAL ACTIONS
OF DRUGS & ALCOHOL
3CR
Students will learn to identify the physiological effects of psychoactive substances on the
user. Management of chronic and acute conditions and drug interactions are covered.
111
CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY
ASSESSMENT & EVALUATION
2CR
Includes learning how to use screening,
evaluation, and assessment techniques, as
well as being able to determine a client’s
readiness for treatment and change, and determining an appropriate level of care for
the client.
HSCD 228
HSCD 238
SPECIAL PROJECTS 3-5CR
Students will be responsible for formulating
and implementing idea to complete a special
project related to the chemical dependency
field. Students must obtain authorization
form the instructor for the project prior to
enrolling in the course
HSCD 249
CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY
& COUNSELING II:
ADOLESCENTS & FAMILIES
5CR
Become familiar with culturally competent
models of diagnosis and intervention for
families and adolescents, as well as build an
understanding for the dynamics among
family members.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
112
HSCD 251
RELAPSE PREVENTION 3CR
Become familiar with the basic philosophy
and techniques of relapse prevention for substance abuse and the ongoing process that
involves all aspects of the person’s wellness
and culture. Learn to recognize the warnings
signs for relapse, the 12-step approach to recovery, and general wellness concepts.
HSCD 256
SPECIAL PROJECTS 3-5CR
Students will be responsible for formulating
and implementing idea to complete a special
project related to the human services field.
Students must obtain authorization from the
instructor for the project prior to enrolling in
the course
HSCD 259
SELECTED TOPICS
3-5CR
Students will be responsible for performing a
either a literature review and/or research on
a human services related topic. Students must
obtain authorization from the instructor for
the project prior to enrolling in the course.
INTERIOR DESIGN
DSN 105
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
DRAFTING I 6CR
This course introduces students to the fundamental skills and concepts necessary for interior design planning and drawing to include:
use of drafting tools, exercise in line weight
and line type quality, architectural scale, dimensioning and architectural lettering.
DSN 119
INTERIOR DESIGN & THE
CREATIVE DESIGN PROCESS
4CR
This course is an introduction to inspiration,
identification, conceptualization, communication, the elements and principles of design
and trendspotting.
DSN 121
DRAFTING II 5CR
This course introduces students to the fundamental principles needed to create an asbuilt plan set to include: Floor Plan,
Reflected Ceiling Plan, Power/Mechanical
Plan, and Elevation. Field surveys, symbols
and graphics, and formatting of drawings
will be introduced.
Prerequisites: DSN 105
DSN 123
MATERIALS, METHODS,
& TECHNIQUES OF
INTERIOR DESIGN 4CR
This course is an introduction to the fundamental design materials and applications for
interior environments to include: hard and
resilient flooring, soft flooring, paint, wall
coverings, cladding, acoustics, metal, plaster, glass and millwork. Students will also
learn to visually present material selections
in a professional manner.
DSN 124
COLOR THEORY 4CR
An introduction to color, color systems, color
theories, coloring agents, dimensions of color
in compositions, the influence of color and
exercises of putting color to use.
DSN 132
LIGHTING
5CR
This course introduces students to the fundamental skills and concepts of lighting design. It is an approach to quality lighting
with a primary focus on the design process.
Areas covered are: basic lighting, human
factors, sustainability, products and design
fundamentals.
DSN 136
INTRODUCTION TO
DRAWING & RENDERING
4CR
Introduction to Drawing and Rendering is a
beginning look at some of the drawing methods and materials used by Interior Designers. This course begins with the fundamental
concepts of freehand sketching and gaining
the ability to think three-dimensionally. It is
also an introduction for methods to communicate your design vision through hand
drawn renderings. This is shown by the use
of shade, shadow, texture, pattern, color and
material qualities.
DSN 140
TEXTILES 4CR
A comprehensive coverage of the textile
products available for use in residential design. An emphasis is made on window, upholstery, and the selection of materials.
DSN 145
RESIDENTIAL PLANNING,
DESIGN & EXTERIOR SPACES
5CR
Completion of this course will provide students with the understanding of interior
space planning basics and concepts using
diagrams, residential codes, planning guidelines and presentation techniques. Students
will also learn exterior elements and finishes
that help to enclose the space.
Prerequisites: DSN 105, 121
DSN 152
FURNITURE & CABINET DESIGN 2CR
This course covers the fundamentals of custom furniture and cabinet design. Based on
the study of furniture design theory, function, social use, materials and fabrication,
students will design a unique custom piece of
furniture.
DSN 153
DRAFTING III 5CR
Completion of this course will provide students with an understanding of typical
planning dimensions and guidelines for
residential interiors, as well as proper techniques to combine cabinetry, appliances
and applied measurements for graphic presentation standards.
Prerequisites: DSN 121.
DSN 158
HISTORY OF INTERIORS 4CR
A comprehensive overview of art, the history
of interiors, and furniture from antiquity to
the present day.
DSN 159
INTRODUCTION TO
TECHNOLOGY FOR
INTERIOR DESIGNERS 3CR
This course covers basic computer skills for
interior designers. Contents include computer use for file management, spreadsheet
creation, internet research, as well as Google
SketchUp and other graphics media for design presentations.
DSN 202
ELEMENTS OF KITCHEN
& BATH DESIGN
5CR
This course is an introduction to the principles and elements of design for kitchens and
bathrooms including: basic components,
mechanical and lighting systems, color theory and construction applications.
DSN 204
INTRODUCTION TO COMMERCIAL
INTERIOR DESIGN 4CR
This course provides an introduction to
commercial interiors. Contents include
areas of practice, ADA and code compliance,
as well as commercial design case studies.
DSN 206
20/20 DRAFTING
5CR
Learn through computer aided drafting
methods to design kitchen and bath spaces
using 20-20 Design software. Skills learned
will include the execution of floor plans,
elevation drawings, rendered perspectives,
and specification sheets.
DSN 208
MATERIALS & ESTIMATING
4CR
This course is an introduction to recommending and calculating quantities for cabinetry, appliances, plumbing fixtures,
lighting, hardware and surfacing materials
for kitchens and bathrooms.
DSN 211
BUSINESS PROCEDURES
AND SALES
4CR
Completion of this course will provide students with the understanding of business
practices generally conducted by interior
designers. The study will acquaint students
with the basic procedures, documents, ethical conduct, associations and certification
requirements within various business formats. This course is designed to address
current topics on interior design and help
prepare the student for a professional job
search.
DSN 214
GREEN DESIGN: AN OVERVIEW 5CR
Learn the basic fundamentals of green design. What is this new concept of living?
When did it begin, and how far have we
come? How can it benefit our lives and our
planet? In this brief overview, students will
study relevant vocabulary and examine the
basics of sustainable design.
DSN 216
CAD I 5CR
Introduction to CAD (Computer Aided
Drafting). The successful student will learn
the basic functions and commands to produce basic drawings for interior design
construction.
DSN 219
A CLOSER LOOK AT
LIVING GREEN 4CR
Live a greener life. Students will learn the
Seven Paths to a Good Green Home and
take a closer look at what the interior design
field can do for the green cause by studying
the text and reporting on local case studies.
DSN 221
BUILDING THE GREEN LIFE:
MATERIALS & ESTIMATING
5CR
Finding and specifying the right green products for your project will benefit both your
client and your planet. Students will become
familiar with green resources, as well as
when and where to specify green products
for their projects.
DSN 223
PROJECT GREEN:
DEVELOPING A GREEN DESIGN 5CR
Design and present a green space. Spend
class time developing a green design based
on knowledge obtained throughout the
quarter, and present them to the class in
preparation for real-life interior design
proposals.
DSN 225
DESIGN I 5CR
Utilizing provided programming information, students will be introduced to space
planning for commercial interiors to include: programming, design schematics,
ADA standards for accessibility, and code
considerations.
Prerequisites: DSN 216.
DSN 227
COMMERCIAL SPECIFICATIONS 4CR
The Commercial Specifications course covers general notes used within construction
documents, the specification of products,
fabrication, and applications for commercial
interior design. It also covers the liabilities of
the designer in regard to specification writing for codes, standards, and federal regulations which are an essential part of designing
building interiors.
Prerequisites: DSN 225.
DSN 231
20TH CENTURY & CURRENT
DESIGN PHILOSOPHIES
& SIGNIFICANT WORKS
3CR
Includes the study of historically significant
20th and 21st century designers and architects, their philosophies, and the role of
their significant historic works.
DSN 236
DESIGN II 7CR
Using codes and standards simulating parts
of the NCIDQ Examination, students will
complete three unique exercises that focus
on the following areas of commercial design:
space planning, lighting design and egress.
Prerequisites: DSN 225.
DSN 239
CAD II 5CR
This course includes the intermediate level
use of 2-dimensional CAD (computer aided
drafting). To develop increased knowledge,
speed, and accuracy, following demonstration and in class exercises, the student will
use AutoCAD software to develop advanced
layouts in paper space.
Prerequisites: DSN 216.
DSN 241
BUSINESS PRACTICES
4CR
Completion of this course will provide students with the understanding of business
practices generally conducted by interior designers. The study will acquaint students with
the basic procedures, documents, ethical
conduct, associations and certification requirements within various business formats.
This course is designed to address current
topics on interior design and help prepare the
student for a professional job search.
2011-2012 Catalog
113
DSN 245
INTERNSHIP OR
ALTERNATIVE STUDY
4CR
Interact with established businesses or related businesses of interior design by going to a
place of business and working in the field.
An alternative option for students would be
to participate in a specific design project approved by the instructor. Students will arrange to work with a sponsor, and will
observe and assist the sponsor with meaningful design activities for a total of 80 hours.
DSN 251
CONTRACT FURNITURE 3CR
This course provides an introduction to the
various types of furniture used in commercial design. We will concentrate on the selection and specification and use of furnishings
as well as contracts, documents, and the
procurement of contract furniture.
DSN 265
INDEPENDENT STUDY
3CR
Explore or expand knowledge of interior
design within an independent study format.
With guidance and instructor approval, the
student will select a meaningful project
within an area of interest to strengthen their
range of abilities. The student will fulfill
several pre-approved objectives at the conclusion of the course where they will complete a self-assessment and final presentation
to the instructor.
DSN 266
PORTFOLIO/PROFESSIONAL
PRESENTATION
7CR
Students will create and present a professional portfolio of their work illustrating the
level of design and technical skills they are
capable of achieving. Students will learn to
present themselves and their work professionally, as well as how to develop a professional resume, cover letter, and business card
appropriate for the interior design industry.
DSN 270
INDEPENDENT STUDY
4CR
Explore or expand knowledge of interior
design within an independent study format.
With guidance and instructor approval, the
student will select a meaningful project
within an area of interest to strengthen their
range of abilities. The student will fulfill
several pre-approved objectives at the conclusion of the course where they will complete a self-assessment and final presentation
to the instructor.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
114
DSN 275
INDEPENDENT STUDY
5CR
Explore or expand knowledge of interior
design within an independent study format.
With guidance and instructor approval, the
student will select a meaningful project
within an area of interest to strengthen their
range of abilities. The student will fulfill
several pre-approved objectives at the conclusion of the course where they will complete a self-assessment and final presentation
to the instructor.
MANUFACTURING
TECHNOLOGIES
MCH 101
ORIENTATION/
MACHINE SHOP SAFETY
2CR
Provides an overview of the program, orientation to shop procedures, and the responsibilities associated with personal safety and
the safety of others.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
MCH 105
SHOP MATH/BLUEPRINT I 6CR
Provides a review of basic arithmetic, using
addition, subtraction, fractions, and decimal
fractions. Study of drawings and prints, and
an overview of basic measuring tools.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
MCH 107
SHOP MATH/BLUEPRINT II 6CR
Provides study of basic geometry concepts
and introduction to calculators. Advanced
study of prints and reading of machine
details.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 109
SHOP MATH/BLUEPRINT III 6CR
An introduction to trigonometric functions,
practical machine mathematical applications, the Cartesian coordinate system, geometric dimensioning, and tolerancing.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 111
SHOP MACHINES & TOOLS
6CR
Use and care of hand and machine tools used
in measurement, layout, and inspection. Beginning machine tool operation of pedestal
grinders, drill presses, and power saws.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 117
LATHES I 6CR
Progressively difficult operations on lathes
with emphasis on setups, speeds and feeds,
turning, facing, grooving, threading, and
tapers. Actual turning jobs from industry
may be utilized.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 121
MCH 216
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 122
MCH 219
MILLS I 6CR
Progressively difficult operations on milling
machines, with emphasis on setups, speeds
and feeds, end milling, side milling, shell
milling, drilling, and tapping. Actual machining jobs from industry may be utilized.
LATHES & MILLS II 8CR
Intermediate calculations and machining
operations with emphasis on accessories for
lathes and milling machines. Actual machining jobs from industry may be utilized.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 125
LATHES & MILLS III 10CR
Progressively advanced turning and milling
techniques with emphasis placed on precision setup using geometric dimensioning
and tolerancing. Actual machining jobs
from industry may be utilized.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 126
LATHES & MILLS IV 8CR
Progressively advanced turning and milling
techniques with emphasis placed on the use
of all shop equipment to complete advanced
precision projects. Actual machining jobs
from industry may be utilized.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 129
SURFACE GRINDING 4CR
Progressively difficult grinding operations
with emphasis on surface grinding, mounting, dressing, and truing grinding machine
wheels.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101
MCH 133
TOOL & CUTTER GRINDING 5CR
Progressively difficult tool and cutter grinding with emphasis on milling cutters, reamers, and form tools.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 202
INTRODUCTION TO CNC 7CR
Introduction to CNC programming software and setups using CAD/CAM interfacing and project milling, drilling, and lathe
turning. Actual machining jobs from industry may be utilized.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 211
INTERMEDIATE CNC 10CR
Understanding and operating Computer
Numerical Control (CNC) machinery. Writing programs and manual data input. Actual
machining jobs from industry may be
utilized.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
ADVANCED CNC 12CR
Progressively advanced CNC machining
techniques with emphasis placed on program troubleshooting, and increased production. Actual machining jobs from
industry may be utilized.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
4CR
Covers writing a résumé, researching employers, and job search techniques.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 223
INSPECTION TECHNIQUES
6CR
Proper use of inspection tools and equipment. Emphasis is on applied use of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, with use
of granite layout surfaces.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 229
METALLURGY
& HEAT TREATMENT 4CR
Provides insight into the study of the properties and compositions of metals. Emphasis is
on heat treatment of metals.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 231
MANUFACTURING
RESOURCES & RESEARCH 4CR
Study of resources for machining information with emphasis on methods of research.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MCH 240
TRAINING & PRACTICE 1-10CR
Special instruction to suit the individual’s
needs. Repeated enrollment ensures progressively advanced training. The number of
times one may enroll is based on the student’s
needs, and is at the Instructor’s advisement.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and MCH 101.
MASSAGE STUDIES
MASST 110
ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY
& PATHOLOGY I 5CR
Introduces the student to anatomy and physiology, cytology, integumentary, osteology,
mycology, and nervous system.
MASST 111
ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY
& PATHOLOGY II 5CR
Explores endocrinology, cardiovascular, digestive, and respiratory systems.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 110
MASST 114
SWEDISH MASSAGE THEORY 5CR
Introduces the learner to the history, application, and principles of Swedish massage.
This includes not only the massage strokes,
but also client safety, communication, and
charting of results.
Prerequisite: The student will have submitted a
medical statement of health from a primary care
provider verifying their ability to safely participate in
all aspects of the program prior to admission. MASST
114 must be taken concurrently with MASST 117
MASST 115
CLINICAL MASSAGE
TECHNIQUES
4CR
Covers a variety of massage techniques used
in clinical massage. Students will learn and
practice when and how to employ these
techniques in order to safely and effectively
treat their clients.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Swedish
Massage Practitioner Program, completion of a
similar program from another accredited
institution, or currently a Washington State
Licensed Massage Practitioner.
MASST 116
COMPLEMENTARY MASSAGE
MODALITIES I
3CR
Introduces the student to a variety of massage modalities that can be safely integrated
into a massage practice. Modalities covered
include fascial techniques, acupressure,
seated massage and side-lying. Indications,
contra-indications and treatment modifications will be identified.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST
114 and MASST 117.
MASST 117
MASST 126
KINESIOLOGY:
UPPER EXTREMITY
2CR
Introduces students to the study of movement. Presents the beginning principles and
skills for locating and identifying bony landmarks and muscles of the upper extremity
using palpation techniques, movement, and
anatomical terminology.
MASST 130
Massage Practitioner program, completion of a
similar program from another accredited
institution, or currently a Washington State
Licensed Massage Practitioner.
ASSESSMENT & TREATMENT
OF THE BACK
2CR
Detailed and extensive review of the structure and function of the back. Students will
explore common musculoskeletal and neurological pathologies that can affect the back,
and formulate a treatment plan to safely and
effectively assess and treat those conditions.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST
115 and MASST 123
MASST 133
DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE THEORY 4CR
Introduces the student to a variety of massage
treatment techniques, providing groundwork
for clinical massage applications. Indications,
contraindications, and treatment modifications will be identified and discussed.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST
Prerequisite: MASST 117 must be taken
Prerequisite: Completion of MASST 114 and
CLINICAL APPLICATION
OF MASSAGE THERAPY
4CR
Introduces and prepares the learner to recognize, assess, and effectively treat common
musculoskeletal pathologies. Other information covered is scope of practice, tissue
healing, defining causes of injury, stages of
rehabilitation, and common errors that massage therapists make.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Swedish
Practitioner course or equivalent, or currently a
Washington State licensed massage practitioner.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 126.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 126
114 and MASST 117. MASST 133 must be taken
concurrently with MASST 134.
MASST 123
KINESIOLOGY:
HEAD AND NECK
1CR
Continue the study of movement. This
course builds upon the priniciples and skills
for locating and identifying bony landmarks
and muscles of the head and neck, using
palpation techniques, movement, and anatomical terminology.
MASST 139
MASST 131
MASST 134
DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE
PRACTICE
4CR
Building on the massage techniques learned
in Swedish massage theory and practice,
students become proficient in a variety of
deep tissue techniques.
MASST 117. MASST 134 must be taken
concurrently with MASST 133
MASST 136
COMPLEMENTARY MASSAGE
MODALITIES II
2CR
Introduces the student to a variety of massage modalities that can safely integrated
into a massage practice. Modalities covered
include pregnancy massage, sports massage,
and hydrotherapy, including hot stone massage. Indications, contraindications, and
treatment modifications will be identified.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST
114 and MASST 117.
115
MASST 137
KINESIOLOGY: TRUNK 1CR
Continue the study of movement. This
course builds upon the principles and skills
for locating and identifying bony landmarks
and muscles of the trunk using palpation
techniques, movement, and anatomical
terminology.
SWEDISH MASSAGE PRACTICE 4CR
Apply knowledge and techniques taught in
Swedish Massage Theory. This class prepares the learner to practice safe, relaxing,
therapeutic, and effective Swedish Massage.
In addition to proper use and application of
Swedish Massage strokes, the learner will
also practice proper self-care techniques,
and learn how to care for their equipment.
concurrently with MASST 114.
2011-2012 Catalog
CLINICAL MASSAGE
BUSINESS & ETHICS I 1CR
Prepares the learner to communicate with
other healthcare practitioners through
proper and thorough documentation.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Swedish
MASST 143
MASSAGE BUSINESS & ETHICS I 2CR
Introduces the learner to important business
knowledge, skills, and professional ethics vital to the successful practice of massage therapy after licensure. Students know and follow
professional ethics as related to massage, will
learn and practice universal safety precautions, utilize and understand common medical terms, research the different avenues of
employment available, and begin the process
of building a successful massage business.
MASST 144
MASSAGE BUSINESS & ETHICS II 2CR
Learn and demonstrate a variety of successful business strategies, from marketing to
record keeping, in addition to becoming
knowledgeable regarding state and local
laws that govern massage therapy in Washington State.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 143
MASST 145
ORTHOPEDIC ASSESSMENT 4CR
Detailed analysis of joints, ligaments, and
how movements are affected by surrounding
structures. Integrating basic assessment and
treatment of common musculoskeletal injuries and conditions.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST
126, MASST 130, MASST 137 and MASST 146 or
currently a Washington State licensed massage
practitioner.
MASST 146
KINESIOLOGY:
LOWER EXTREMITY
2CR
Continue the study of movement. This course
builds upon the principles and skills for locating and identifying bony landmarks and
muscles of the lower extremity using palpation techniques, movement, and anatomical
terminology.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 126.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
116
MASST 147
CLINICAL MASSAGE
ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I 3CR
Explores body systems with an emphasis on
the common pathologies of those systems. In
addition to covering the cause and effect of
those pathologies, the learner will also be
presented with the common allopathic
treatment(s) their clients may be receiving
for those conditions. Pharmacology will include effects and side-effects of the medications, and how those relate to the indications
and contraindications of massage.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Swedish
Massage Practitioner program, completion of a
similar program from another accredited
institution, or currently a Washington State licensed
massage practitioner.
MASST 149
CLINICAL MASSAGE THEORY:
SPECIAL POPULATIONS
5CR
Explores how massage can be modified to
safely and effectively treat individuals who
have unique situations that could include
physical, emotional, and health-related
challenges. Indications and contraindications will be discussed as they apply to each
population. To be taken concurrently with
MASST 151.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Swedish
Massage Practitioner program, completion of a
similar program from another accredited
institution, or currently a Washington State licensed
massage practitioner.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
MASST 151
CLINICAL MASSAGE PRACTICE:
SPECIAL POPULATIONS
3CR
Practice techniques and positioning to adapt
massage to safely and effectively treat individuals who have unique situations that
could include physical, emotional, and
health-related challenges. Indications and
contraindications will be discussed as they
apply to each population. To be taken concurrently with MASST 149.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Swedish
MASST 155
ASSESSMENT & TREATMENT:
LOWER EXTREMITY 2CR
Detailed and extensive review of the structure
and function of the lower extremity. Students
will explore common musculoskeletal and
neurological pathologies that can affect the
lower extremity, and how to safely and effectively assess and treat those conditions.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST
115 and MASST 123, or currently a Washington
State licensed massage practitioner.
MASST 157
ASSESSMENT & TREATMENT:
HEAD & NECK 2CR
Detailed and extensive review of the structure and function of the head and neck.
Students will explore common musculoskeletal and neurological pathologies that can
affect the head and neck and formulate a
treatment plan to safely and effectively assess and treat those conditions.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST
115 and MASST 123, or currently a Washington
State licensed massage practitioner.
MASST 158
PRACTICUM I 3CR
Allows the student to choose and pursue individual workplace experience opportunities. This opportunity may be in a supervised
internship setting, on-site events, and/or
practice in Clover Park Technical College’s
student-run massage clinic.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Swedish
Massage Practitioner program, completion of a
similar program from another accredited
institution, or currently a Washington State licensed
massage practitioner.
MASST 159
CLINICAL MASSAGE
BUSINESS & ETHICS II 1CR
Prepares the learner to communicate with
and leads the learner through the process of
billing insurance companies for services, from
codes to filling out forms and follow-up.
114 and MASST 117. Student must have current
First Aid/CPR certification, as well as having
completed a minimum of four hours HIV-AIDS
training, and a report from the Washington State
Patrol. Some results from the background check
may prevent individuals from participating in the
Student Clinic.
MASST 163
CLINICAL MASSAGE ANATOMY &
PHYSIOLOGY II
3CR
Continues the exploration of body systems
with an emphasis on the common pathologies of those systems started in MASST 147.
In addition to covering the cause and effect
of those pathologies, the learner will also be
presented with the common allopathic
treatment(s) their clients may be receiving
for those conditions. Pharmacology will include effects and side-effects of the medications, and how those relate to the indications
and contraindications of massage.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST 147.
MATERIAL SCIENCE
MS 110
BLUEPRINT READING
AND SKETCHING
4CR
Introduces principals, terms, and definitions
of reading and understanding blueprints.
MS 115
MASST 160
MS 120
MASST 153
PRACTICUM II 3CR
Allows the student to choose and pursue individual workplace experience opportunities. This opportunity may be in a supervised
internship setting, on-site events, and/or
practice in Clover Park Technical College’s
student-run massage clinic.
MASST 123, or currently a Washington State
licensed massage practitioner.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST
139, or currently a Washington State licensed
massage practitioner.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MASST
Prerequisite: Completion of MASST 115 and
STUDENT CLINIC 2CR
Gain first-hand knowledge and experience
by running a massage clinic. In addition to
providing relaxation and deep tissue massage, each student will also have an opportunity to experience the more administrative
positions in a clinic by rotating through the
positions of receptionist, cashier, and scheduling manager.
INTRO TO REPORT/
FORMS WRITING
3CR
Introduces the student to the technical style
of report and test procedure and writing
commonly used in nondestructive testing.
Massage Practitioner program, completion of a
similar program from another accredited
institution, or currently a Washington State licensed
massage practitioner.
ASSESSMENT & TREATMENT:
UPPER EXTREMITY 2CR
Detailed and extensive review of the structure
and function of the upper extremity. Students
will explore common musculoskeletal and
neurological pathologies that can affect the
arm and shoulder, and how to safely and effectively assess and treat those conditions.
MASST 162
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Swedish
Massage Practitioner program, completion of a
similar program from another accredited
institution, or currently a Washington State licensed
massage practitioner.
INTRO TO CODES
& SPECIFICATIONS
2CR
Introduces codes and specifications terms,
definitions, and applications. Learn how to
use and interpret in specific applications in
field situations.
MS 125
FUNDAMENTALS OF
METALLURGY
5CR
Provides an overview of metallurgy and its
application in industry. Topics covered include metallographic sample preparation,
hardness and tensile testing, fundamentals
of physical metallurgy and heat treating.
MS 130
MANUFACTURING PROCESSES 5CR
Provides an overview of manufacturing
processes. Topics include material properties, machining, joining, casting, forming,
heat treating, and finishing. Emphasis is
placed on fundamental parameters of each
process, advantages, limitations, and factors
that should be considered when choosing a
manufacturing process.
MS 135
PRINCIPLES OF
TROUBLESHOOTING
3CR
Gain knowledge and understanding of
troubleshooting processes and procedures.
Identifies thought process utilized when
troubleshooting and allows each student the
opportunity to put theory into practice.
MS 140
STATISTICS FOR MATERIAL
ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS
3CR
Apply statistical concepts to the principles of
material testing. Topics in statistics include
analysis of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability and theoretical frequency distributions, confidence
intervals and hypothesis testing for means
and proportions of samples, correlation and
regression, and statistical process control.
MS 145
FUNDAMENTALS OF
COMPOSITES
4CR
Learn the fundamental construction of composites, advantages of composites over traditional materials, manufacturing methods,
fabrication and assembly, testing and quality
assurance, damage control and repair.
NDT 110
INTRODUCTION TO NDT
3CR
Introduction to terms, definitions, and
method overview of nondestructive testing.
Methods include: eddy current liquid penetrant, magnetic particle, radiography, and
ultrasonic testing.
NDT 115
NDT WELDING
3CR
Presents structural profile and dimensional
discontinuities as they relate to the oxyacetylene process for welding, brazing, and cutting. Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)
exercises are also included as they relate to
visual inspection for Nondestructive Testing
Technology.
NDT 120
VISUAL AND OPTICAL TESTING 5CR
Visual inspection is the most widely used
method of nondestructive testing. Learn to
detect various discontinuances that are related to the power plant industry, structural
steel fabrication and construction industry,
aerospace industry, petro-chemical industry, and manufacturing processes. Exercises
are performed using many visual inspection tools.
NDT 125
MAGNETIC PARTICLE TESTING 5CR
Learn proper magnetization techniques,
evaluate indications, interpret accept/reject standards, and implement quality control techniques. Students develop and write
procedures and inspect welds, castings,
and machined components. Includes extensive hands-on training in the magnetic
particle lab.
NDT 130
LIQUID PENETRANT TESTING 5CR
Covers principles and practices of liquid
penetrant inspection. Learn why and when
to use various types of penetrant materials,
and the proper techniques necessary for reliable inspection. Addresses the evaluation of
liquid penetrant indications, interpreting
standards and specifications, and checking
penetrant system quality. Review fundamental liquid penetrant principles and techniques; develop and write procedures; and
inspect welds, castings, forgings, and machined components. Parts are evaluated according to relevant codes and/or standards.
NDT 135
2011-2012 Catalog
NDT 170
EDDY CURRENT TESTING II
5CR
Presents advanced theory and application as
it relates to depth of penetration, characteristic frequency, and flaw characteristics. Lab
exercises prove and reinforce these advanced
theories.
NDT 180
ULTRASONIC TESTING II
5CR
Covers the use of angle beam testing to locate and size welding flaws. Immersion inspection of composite materials will also be
covered. At the completion of this course,
the student will be given Level I General,
Specific, and Practical Tests.
NDT 190
RADIOGRAPHIC TESTING II
5CR
Covers radiographic techniques commonly
used in industrial testing. The student will
make radiographs using X-ray machines
and Iridium 192 isotope sources. Focuses on
the safety aspect of working with radioisotopes and equipment used in isotope
radiography.
NDT 210
NDI FOR COMPOSITE
STRUCTURES 3CR
Learn theory, principles, techniques and
applications of NDT methods for composite
structures. Students will inspect numerous
composite structures and components utilizing NDT practices.
EDDY CURRENT TESTING III
5CR
Presents the student with advanced eddy
current inspection techniques. Advanced
applications will include multi-frequency
inspection, nuclear tubing inspection, and
many aircraft inspection techniques.
NDT 140
ULTRASONIC TESTING III
5CR
Covers the application of advanced ultrasonic techniques, procedures, codes, and
specifications as they apply to industry. Advanced applications will be performed using
normal beam testing, angle beam testing,
and immersion techniques. Techniques will
be applied to a variety of industries, such as
power, construction, manufacturing, and
aircraft inspection. Also exposes students to
computerized ultrasonic applications.
EDDY CURRENT TESTING I
5CR
Covers the theory of the production of eddy
currents, including electrical concepts. The
calibration and operation of eddy current
machines will be covered, along with the
applications of eddy current testing.
NDT 150
ULTRASONIC TESTING I
5CR
Introduces ultrasonic principles of sound
wave propagation and term definitions. Introduces the student to the calibration ultrasonic equipment and the various straight
beam testing methods. Also covers linearity
and immersion testing, Snells law, and angle
beam calibration and testing.
NDT 160
RADIOGRAPHIC TESTING I
5CR
Introduces radiographic principals, terms,
definitions, and basic theory. Basics covered
give an understanding of how an X-ray tube
generates X-radiation and how the use of
radiation will provide a finished product.
Explores basic use of X-ray film, film speed,
and film processing. Introduction to finished
film quality and interpretation. Introduction
to procedures using radiographic standards
and codes. Introduces film interpretation for
welds, castings, and nonmetallic materials,
teaching accept-reject criteria.
117
NDT 220
NDT 230
RADIOGRAPHIC TESTING III
5CR
Covers radiographic techniques used by the
American Society of Mechanical Engineers,
American Welding Society Structural
Welding Code, American Petroleum Institute, and other codes used in industry. The
student will do radiographic inspection and
evaluation to each code, computer enhanced
real-time radiography, and Cobalt 60 isotope radiography.
NDT 240
CAPSTONE PROJECT
3CR
Designed to synthesize and integrate the
knowledge gained in all previous courses
and demonstrate the application of theory
and practice through a project.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
118
NDT 250
NDI INTERNSHIP
1-11CR
Provides on-the-job practical experience under the supervision of an employer. Instructor
permission is required for the site choice.
Prerequisite: Advanced standing and Instructor’s
permission.
NDT 255
NDT SPECIAL PROJECTS
1-3CR
Strengthen technical skills in NDT topics by
applying knowledge to projects of personal
interest and/or assigned.
Prerequisite: Advanced standing with Instructor’s
permission.
MATHEMATICS
MAT 060
FUNDAMENTALS OF
ARITHMETIC 5CR
Comprehensive instruction in basic arithmetic including whole numbers, fractions,
decimals, ratio, proportion and percentages.
Math vocabulary and problem solving strategies and approaches are taught.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score is required.
MAT 072
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
MEDICAL MATH APPLICATIONS 3CR
Emphasis on fractions, combined percentages, metric, apothecary measurements and
conversions, roman numerals and dosage
calculation formulas. Self-paced lab. (For
Hemodialysis students only).
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score is required.
MAT 082
PREALGEBRA
5CR
Covers basic operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percentages, ratio
and proportion, signed numbers, algebraic
expressions, linear equations, order of operations, basic geometry, units of measurements, and introduction to statistics.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score or successful completion of MAT 60 is required.
MAT 089
INTRODUCTION TO
ALGEBRA PART 1
5CR
Designed for sudents with no algebra background. Reviews basic operations and order
of operations with real numbers. Develops
algebraic topics including solving linear
equations, and graphing linear equations.
Prerequisite: COMPASS placement score of 32 or
higher or successful completion of MAT 82.
MAT 090
INTRODUCTION TO
ALGEBRA PART II 5CR
Continuation of a course designed for students with no algebra background. Develops
algebraic topics including systems of equations, polynomials, factoring and rational
expressions.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MAT 89.
MAT 091
INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA 5CR
Develops algebraic topics including algebraic expressions, solving linear equations
and inequalities, coordinate graphing, systems of equations, polynomials, factoring
and introduction to rational expressions.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score; or successful completion of MAT 82 is
required.
MAT 098
INTRODUCTORY
& INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 5CR
Designed for students who have an extensive algebra background and only need a
refresher before moving to college level
work. Develops algebraic topics including
solving equations and inequalities, graphing of linear and nonlinear equations, solving systems of equations, polynomials,
factoring, rational expressions, roots and
radicals, solving absolute value equations
and inequalities, solving quadratic, exponential and logarithmic equations, and introduction to functions.
Prerequisite: COMPASS score of 50 or higher
AND instructor permission.
MAT 104
INTRODUCTORY COMPUTER
MATHEMATICS
5CR
Develops techniques in discrete mathematics
common to computers, electronic communications, and digital electronics. Discusses
scientific notation, introductory trigonometry, logarithms, analog to digital conversion;
decimal, binary, octal, and hexadecimal
number systems; introductory Boolean algebra, and binary arithmetic as core elements.
Prerequisite: COMPASS placement score 62
algebra or 40 college algebra, or successful
completion of MAT 91 is required
MAT 105
MATHEMATICS FOR
INDUSTRIAL PROFESSIONS
5CR
Develops elements of algebra, geometry,
metric measure, and trigonometry to calculate areas, volumes, and angles for polygonal
objects, objects with smooth curves, and
composite objects; with applications to material strength, tapers, pulleys, gears, screw
threads, and elementary engines. Scientific
calculator required.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score or successful completion of MAT 91 is
required.
MAT 106
MATH FOR ELECTRONICS 5CR
Covers elements of algebra, geometry, and
trigonometry; trigonometric, exponential,
and logarithmic functions; and current,
voltage, resistance, power, reactance, capacitance, and inductance, focusing on DC
and AC electronics; introduces logic gates
and Boolean algebra as applied to logic
controllers. Scientific calculator required.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score or successful completion of MAT 91 is required.
MAT 107
BUSINESS MATHEMATICS
5CR
Develops elements of algebra applied to
percentages, markup and markdown, discounts, payroll, and simple and compound
interest. Scientific calculator required.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score or successful completion of MAT 91 is required.
MAT 108
MATH FOR
HEALTH OCCUPATIONS
5CR
Develops elements of algebra including
quadratic equations with real roots; unit
conversion processes applied to U. S. and
metric measure, calculation of dosages, and
intravenous infusions; covers solutions and
dilutions, elementary chemical calculations,
and elementary non-linear functions. Scientific calculator required.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score or successful completion of MAT 91 is required.
MAT 110
MATH FOR
NON-SCIENCE MAJORS
5CR
Covers a variety of topics including probability, statistics, finance, modeling, sets and
counting, matrix operations, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Graphing
calculator required.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score or successful completion of MAT 99 is required.
MAT 210
DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
5CR
Develop tools for reasoning about discrete
mathematical objects. Topics include counting and combinations, laws of logic, methods
of proof, set theory, cardinality, proof by induction, recursion and relations/functions.
Prerequisite: COMPASS college algebra of at
least 53 or successful completion of MATH& 141.
MAT 99
INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA
5CR
Expands on algebraic topics including solving equations and inequalities, graphing of
linear and nonlinear equations, and rational
expressions. Develops topics including roots
and radicals, solving absolute value equations and inequalities, solving quadratic,
exponential and logarithmic equations, and
introduction to functions.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score or successful completion of MAT 91 is required.
MATH& 141
PRE-CALCULUS I,
COLLEGE ALGEBRA
5CR
Covers linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions and equations,
composite functions, linear and quadratic
inequalities, graphs of functions, relations,
and inequalities; and graphic transformations. Introduces limits, linear and quadratic
curve fitting, and mathematical modeling
including exponential growth and decay.
Graphing calculator required.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score or successful completion of MAT 99 is required.
MATH& 142
PRE-CALCULUS II,
FUNCTIONAL TRIGONOMETRY 5CR
Covers circular, trigonometric, and inversetrigonometric functions and graphs, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric identities,
trigonometric equations, vectors and elementary vector operations, De Moivre’s theorem
and equations with complex solutions, and
polar and parametric equations and their
graphs. Graphing calculator required.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score or successful completion of MATH& 141 or
equivalent is required.
MATH& 146
INTRODUCTION TO STATS
5CR
Descriptive and inferential statistics, including measures of central tendency, dispersion
or variation, and skewness. The student is
introduced to basic concepts in probability,
as well as discrete and continuous probability
distribution functions. Statistical inference
includes sampling, elementary experimental
design, and hypothesis testing using normal,
student-t, and F distributions, linear regression and correlation, and the Chi-square distribution. Graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS placement
score or successful completion of MAT 99 is required.
MATH& 151
CALCULUS I 5CR
Algebraic and transcendental functions,
continuity, limits (including indeterminate
forms), derivatives and differentials of algebraic and transcendental functions (e.g., exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric
forms), applications of differential calculus,
and an introduction to antiderivatives or indefinite integrals. Graphing calculator is
required.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH&
142 or equivalent is required.
MEDIA DESIGN &
PRODUCTION
MDP 103
FUNDAMENTALS OF DRAWING 5CR
Drawing is broken down into methods of observing the world around you and capturing it
on paper. Examine simple and complex objects in terms of contour, proportions, weight,
negative space and light. Gain a heightened
awareness and understanding of form.
MDP 107
VISUAL ART, DESIGN
& STORYBOARDING
5CR
Introduction to visual arts and storytelling,
stressing the components of visual thinking
and visual language underlying design for
digital media. The basic elements of art;
line, form, shape, texture, value, and color
are practiced throughout the course. Using a
variety of techniques and media, creative
and practical skills are developed in order to
understand more about the visual world.
MDP 119
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
5CR
Digital images are captured using technical
control of the digital camera’s depth fields,
light, clarity, motion, and memory requirements. The selection of image content and
application of composition principles are
determined based on the photography objectives of the final multimedia project.
MDP 121
2011-2012 Catalog
MDP 146
DIGITAL VIDEO
& AUDIO EDITING
5CR
Experience digital video editing using Adobe Premiere CS5. Perform nested and multiple sequencing and real-time multi-point
and single-frame editing for export to DVD,
YouTube and other formats. Add transitions, motion paths, and titling, manage
color, key frames, and audio.
MDP 171
DESIGNING WITH
ILLUSTRATION SOFTWARE
5CR
Vector-based software, tools, and features
will be used to create text and logos, apply
image effects, build vector graphics, and incorporate branding and identifiers when
designing products. Special attention will be
given to developing skill with the Pen tool.
MDP 189
CAMERA & LIGHTING:
PORTRAITS & PRODUCTS
5CR
Explore design lighting in a studio controlled
environment for digital still capture of portraits and products to use in multimedia
projects. Some basic PhotoShop compositing of the studio photos will be required.
Prerequisite: MDP 119 and GTC 130.
MDP 231
INDEPENDENT STUDY PROJECT 5CR
Students prepare a project for their portfolio, practicing all aspects of their specialization area.
Prerequisite: instructor permission.
PHOTOSHOP:
COMPOSITING & RETOUCHING 5CR
Builds on the fundamentals of Photoshop to
enhance, alter, combine, and integrate photos, images, type, and graphics using advanced techniques in retouching, color and
tone adjustments, selections, blending options, filtration, masking, sharpening, etc.
MDP 239
Prerequisite: GTC 130.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MDP 124
MDP 245
DIGITAL PORTFOLIO:
RESUME, DVD, WEB FLASH
5CR
Design and develop a personal portfolio and
resume using DVD/BLUE RAY/WEBFLASH authoring software and Web Development. Create professional interactive
presentations that exhibit and display employable skills through various media.
MDP 133
INTRODUCTION TO
DREAMWEAVER
5CR
Use Dreamweaver and PhotoShop to create
and manage a 12-page interface-based
XHTML website, which will be posted on
the Internet. Introduces Dreamweaver’s
ability to write clean Cascading Style Sheet
code and JavaScript to add functionality
and beauty to a website.
119
INTERNSHIP 5CR
On-the-job practical field experience. Apply
classroom study to actual work applications
and assignments related to area of specialization. Internships may be paid or non-paid
assignments and occur at onor off-campus
locations. Includes an arranged seminar.
PHOTOSHOP: SPECIAL EFFECTS
& TECHNIQUES
5CR
Building on a solid knowledge of Photoshop’s
basic functions, this course explores advanced texturing and special effects using
layers, masks, channels, blending modes,
filters, styles, painting modes, etc.
Prerequisite: GTC 130.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
120
MDP 249
MULTIMEDIA
CAPSTONE PROJECT 5CR
Provides the practical experience of developing one of the following from concept to
completion: a fully functional website, video
production, 2D/3D motion graphic project,
or other multimedia project, as approved
by Instructor. Students are expected to
employ their entire knowledge base in defining, designing, and implementing their
Capstone Project.
Prerequisite: GTC 130, MDP 103, MDP 133,
MDPW 123, MDP 119, MDPW 134, MDPA 114,
MDPV 115, MDPW 211, MDP 171, MDP 189, MDPV
214, MDP 146, MDPV 257 and Instructor approval.
MDP 250
ADVANCED MULTIMEDIA
TEAM PROJECT 5CR
Explore and take part in a program wide
team project that will bring together all aspects of the program. The students will be
working on a common project that will have
all aspects of what they have learned over
the years that have been in the program.
The project will involve Video, 3D and Motion Graphics, It will also call on the talents
of other students in other areas such as Photoshop and DVD authoring. The goal of the
project is to create a client based video applying each students area of expertise.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval.
MDPA 114
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
3D FUNDAMENTALS
5CR
Explore the basic areas of 3D. Areas covered
will include UI, Modeling, UVW Mapping,
Animation, Materials, Lighting, Rendering,
Workflow, and Scene Management.
Prerequisite: MDP 103
MDPA 139
MODELING I
5CR
Explores 3DS Max modeling techniques
such as Box Modeling, learn about Sub Division surfaces and how to create objects for
both games and production work.
Prerequisite: MDPA 114
MDPA 151
ANIMATION I 5CR
Bring life to your 3D objects with basic animation techniques. Use modifiers to control
animation, combine modifiers to create
great animations. Explore 3D animation
features such as key frames, track view,
function curves, animation constraints, and
controllers.
Prerequisite: MDPA 114.
MDPV 115
INTRODUCTION TO
COMPOSITING 5CR
We will explore the UI of Adobe After Effects CS5. Explore how to create Keyframe
animations using multiple layers from Photoshop files and video layers. Create a Typography animation using dialog or music
and much more.
MDPV 214
INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITING 5CR
The theory, procedures, and practices of
multimedia video compositing. Students create training and marketing video packages.
Prerequisite: MDPV 110.
MDPV 257
FIELD & STUDIO VIDEO
PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES I 5CR
Conduct video field production and in-studio
video productions. Use professional equipment, including cameras, 3 point lighting
and microphones, etc. Video projects will be
developed from concept script to production
and completion using digital video editing
software Adobe Premiere CS5.
Prerequisite: MDP 146, MDP 189.
MDPV 260
FIELD & STUDIO VIDEO
PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES II 5CR
Build intermediate skills in conducting field
production on location and studio video production in the CPTC Digital Studio while
mastering hands-on expertise of professional
equipment. Video projects will be developed
from concept script to production and completion using digital video editing software.
Prerequisite: MDP 146, MDP 189, MDPV 257.
MDPV 261
FIELD & STUDIO VIDEO
PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES II 5CR
Design and develop video and audio production encoded for internet streaming delivery
with Real Media, Quicktime, and Windows
Media codecs.
MDPW 111
WEB DEVELOPMENT
LANGUAGES I XHTML & CSS 5CR
Provides demonstrations and practical exercises for using XHTML and CSS to create
attractive and well-formed web documents.
Prerequisite: MDPW 123, MDP 133.
MDPW 123
WEB DESIGN PRINCIPLES 5CR
Explores how the web works and methods
and limitations of delivering content on the
web. Examines usability issues such as page
layout, optimizing graphics, and navigation. Students will build a 4-page website
using Notepad and PhotoShop and post it to
the Internet.
MDPW 134
WEB ANIMATION I FLASH 5CR
Explore the basic tool set while creating
nine animated movies. Use movie clips,
graphic symbols, and buttons to add interactivity to the movie. Use Actionscript 3 to
control interactivity and the movement of
the playhead along the timeline. Create,
import, and animate graphics, audio, and
video onto the stage.
MDPW 211
WEB ANIMATION II FLASH
5CR
Offers intermediate experience using Adobe
Flash. Topics covered include: building an
all Flash website featuring Actionscript
3-based slide-in page transitions, drop down
and dangle slide show effects, importing .flv
videos, and loading images with components. The bone tool will be covered while
converting a static Adobe Illustrator manikin to a dancing manikin.
Prerequisite: MDPW 134.
MDPW 216
OPEN SOURCE
DEVELOPMENT TOOLS PHP I 5CR
Introduction to PHP scripting, one of the
most popular development tools on the web.
This course demonstrates using this tool to
create dynamic web-based applications.
Provides experience using sessions, cookies,
and web forms to build easily maintainable,
interactive and e-commerce enabled sites.
Prerequisite: MDPW 123.
MDPW 219
WEB ANIMATION III 5CR
Explores Advanced Macromedia Flash.
Students will build a series of increasingly
complex animation projects utilizing vector,
pixel, and video-based imagery. Use indepth object oriented programming (OOP)
in Actionscript 3 to create image viewers,
both still and video, with gravity and magnetic navigation systems. Build interactive
animated games and banner ads.
Prerequisite: MDPW 211.
MDPW 231
DATABASES FOR
THE WEB MYSQL 5CR
Provides experience with data modeling and
relational database design for use in dynamic web applications. Presents concepts
of normalization, entity relationships, and
data integrity. Introduces writing SQL queries to retrieve and store data from database
management systems such as MySQL.
Prerequisite: MDPW 216
MDPW 241
OPEN SOURCE
DEVELOPMENT TOOLS PHP II 5CR
Combines further studies using PHP scripting and MySQL, one of the most popular
open source database management systems
on the web. Explores back-end functionality,
interacting with databases, and creating dynamic web pages.
Prerequisite: MDPW 216, MDPW 231
MDPW 246
ADVANCED DIGITAL
ILLUSTRATION SOFTWARE
5CR
Explores the advanced use of vector-based
software to create professional-quality graphics for multimedia.
MDPW 249
WEB DEVELOPMENT
LANGUAGES II JAVASCRIPT 5CR
Introduces the fundamentals of working with
JavaScript. Applies variables, objects, arrays,
strings, conditional statements, and external
data to create DHTML web pages.
Prerequisite: MDPW 111.
MDPW 265
EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES
5CR
Introduces emerging technologies such as
Search Engine Optimization (SEO), Search
Engine Marketing (SEM). New technologies
are always changing, and therefore, the material is subject to change, based on Instructor discretion.
Prerequisite: MDPW 123, MDP 133.
MDPW 271
GRAPHIC DESIGN FOR THE WEB
DREAMWEAVER II
5CR
Designed to improve visual presentation
skills needed to create attractive and functional websites. Using Photoshop, Notepad,
and Dreamweaver, students will build a series
of working web page interfaces, exploring the
all-CSS approach to web design. Students
will also address accessibility and designing
for Search Engine Optimization (SEO).
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
MAP 105
INTRODUCTION TO
MEDICAL ASSISTING
4CR
Learn and demonstrate asepsis and infection control, assist with minor office surgery.
Perform anthropometric measurements and
vital signs, physical examination, identify
instruments and equipment, and operate the
autoclave. Instruction and discussion also
includes the overall function of the medical
assistant within the healthcare team, including legal responsibilities and limitations.
College and program policies and procedures are extensively discussed. This course
must be successfully completed in order to
proceed in the program.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of CAH 102,
CAH 103, & CAH 105, or taken along with CAH
102, CAH 103, & CAH 105.
MAP 125
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
THEORY & APPLICATION I 7CR
Learn to care for patients with disorders of
the blood and of the reproductive, endocrine,
sensory, and immune systems. Instruction
will include anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and terminology.
Instruction and practical includes breast selfexam, blood glucose monitoring, care and
use of the microscope, blood typing, cell
identification and staining, along with practicing care and usage of the otoscope, ear/
eye exams, and audiometry.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all
Quarter 1 courses.
MAP 130
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
THEORY & APPLICATION II 7CR
Learn to care for patients with disorders of
the integumentary, musculoskeletal, and respiratory systems. Instruction will include
anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology,
pharmacology, and terminology. Learn
wound and burn care, assisting with sutures,
and suture removal. The course also includes
hands-on experience with fiberglass construction and cast removal, and assisting
with cast application. Students will learn to
use peak flow meters and small volume nebulizers. Learn and demonstrate asepsis and
infection control, assist with minor office
surgery and assessment of pediatric patients.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all
Quarter 1 courses.
MAP 143
MEDICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES 6CR
Emphasis on customer service, within the
health care field, while projecting and promoting a positive image of the profession
and the office. This course also includes
telephone techniques, chart management,
business correspondence for the medical office, including preparation of cover letter
and resume. Define law and ethics relating
to the healthcare field focusing on components specific to medical assistants.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all
Quarter 1 courses.
MAP 148
HEALTH INSURANCE,
CODING PRACTICES &
BILLING & COLLECTING
4CR
Acquire information regarding private and
public insurance programs. Practice the
fundamental skills relating to ICD-9 and
CPT coding. Included are billing and introduction of manual procedures for accounts
receivable management for both private patients and insurance companies.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all
Quarter 1 courses.
Corequisite: MAP 162.
MAP 149
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
THEORY & APPLICATION III 7CR
Learn to care for patients with disorders of
the nervous, cardiovascular, lymph, digestive, and urinary systems. Includes anatomy
and physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and terminology. Perform and
mount ECG’s, physician and chemical urinalysis, and perform UA slide preparation.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all
Quarter 1 courses.
2011-2012 Catalog
121
MAP 162
AUTOMATED COMPUTER
APPLICATIONS
3CR
Practice fundamental skills relating to ICD9
and CPT coding, utilizing the computer.
Included are computerized patient scheduling, and procedures for accounts receivable
management for both private patients and
insurance companies.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all Quarter
1 courses and completion of MAP 148.
Corequisite: MAP 148.
MAP 167
PREPARATION FOR
EXTERNSHIP 2CR
Demonstrate competencies of basic skills
acquired throughout the Medical Assistant
Program. Each student will perform and
must pass the following skills; urinalysis, hematocrit, blood pressure, work-ups, blood
glucose check, audio and visual exam, electrocardiogram and telephone techniques.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all
Quarter 1 courses through MAP 168, excluding
MAP 221, 222, and 232. This course must be taken
the quarter immediately prior to taking MAP 221.
MAP 168
BASIC COLLECTING
& FINANCIAL PRACTICES
6CR
Covers basics of accounting, bookkeeping,
and banking procedures. Provides the foundation for the management of accounts payable, financial records, and methods of
preparation for employee payroll and business taxes. Includes expanded discussion on
manual procedures for accounts receivable
management for both private patients and
insurance companies.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all Quarter
1 courses. Recommend students meet prerequisites
for college-level math.
MAP 221
INVASIVE PROCEDURES 5CR
Introduction of intramuscular, subcutaneous, and intradermal injections as well as
phlebotomy and microbiology. Also includes
calculation of dosages.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all
Quarter 1 courses through MAP 168, including
general education courses and compliance with the
MAP immunization policy and health insurance
policy.
Corequisites: MAP 222 and 232.
MAP 222
COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES & LOCATIONS 1CR
Locate the major medical employers (including hospitals) in the student’s community,
along with their human resource department. This course also includes updating the
résumé and methods of applying for employment through a variety of sources.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all MAP
courses, excluding MAP 232.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
122
MAP 232
EXTERNSHIP MEDICAL
HISTOLOGY TECHNICIAN
10CR
Capstone course gives students practical
experiences in physician offices and clinics.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all MAP
courses, excluding MAP 222.
MEDICAL HISTOLOGY
TECHNICIAN
HISTO 105
ORIENTATION TO THE
HISTOLOGY LABORATORY
2CR
Introduces laboratory and chemical safety as
well as universal precautions. Covers basic
overview of standard histology instrumentation, quality control procedures, specimen
accessioning, record keeping, and documentation. Explores laboratory and personnel
certification requirements.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of BIOL 118,
CHEM& 110, and ENGL& 101.
HISTO 110
HISTOTECHNOLOGY I 10CR
Explores the theory and principles of fixation, processing, embedding, sectioning, and
coverslipping of tissue sections.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of BIOL 118,
CHEM& 110, and ENGL& 101.
HISTO 115
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
HISTOTECHNOLOGY LAB I 5CR
Explores work in a simulated histology laboratory located on the campus. During this
course, students will have hands-on training
in basic grossing techniques, as well as indepth training in processing, embedding,
and cutting of tissue sections. Students will
also learn to identify basic tissue structures
using a light microscope.
HISTO 120
HISTOTECHNOLOGY II 10CR
Covers and expands upon the knowledge
and skills learned in Histotechnology I.
Students will begin to learn the theory and
principles of hematoxylin and eosin staining, as well as the basic principles and procedures of carbohydrate stains.
HISTO 125
HISTOTECHNOLOGY LAB II 5CR
Expands upon the knowledge and skills
learned in Histotechnology Lab I. Students
continue to increase their skills in embedding and tissue sectioning, including the
cutting and staining of frozen tissue specimens. Students learn to do carbohydrate
and Amyloid stains.
HISTO 130
MATH APPLICATIONS
FOR HISTOLOGY
3CR
Introduces laboratory mathematics with an
emphasis on solution preparation.
HISTO 135
HISTOTECHNOLOGY III 10CR
Covers theory and techniques learned in
Histotechnology I and II. Students will
study more complicated special stains, focusing on methods used for microorganisms,
pigments, minerals, the nervous system,
connective tissue, and muscle stains.
HISTO 140
HISTOTECHNOLOGY LAB III 5CR
Expands upon the knowledge and techniques learned in HistoTechnology Lab I
and II. Students perform more complicated
special stains focusing on methods used to
demonstrate microorganisms, pigments,
and minerals. Students also perform special
stains commonly run on brain, muscle, and
connective tissue. HISTO 145
IMMUNOHISTO CHEMISTRY 5CR
Covers basic immunohistochemistry theory
and techniques.
HISTO 150
HISTOLOGY INTERNSHIP 10CR
Covers the clinical phase of working in an
affiliated histology laboratory. Students are
directly supervised by the staff of the affiliated laboratory. A report of No Record on
File Regarding Crimes Against Persons
from the Washington State Patrol is required
for participation in this class.
HISTO 160
HISTOLOGY SEMINAR MEDICAL
LABORATORY TECHNICIAN
5CR
Covers what students have learned while
working in an affiliated histology laboratory. Students will also review for their certification exam.
MLT 203
HEMATOLOGY
10CR
Explores the role of the circulatory system
and heart, before beginning an in-depth
study of blood cells: Erythrocytes and Leukocytes. For each cell group, principles of
production, function, normal numbers, and
associated diseases are covered. Laboratory
practice includes manual and automated
counting of all cell types, and routine procedures associated with each. This course is
offered in the Spring quarter.
Prerequisite: MLT 110.
MLT 204
HEMOSTASIS
5CR
Covers the processes involved in coagulation
(hemostasis), both primary and secondary,
and fibrinolysis. Normal coagulation activity,
as well as coagulation deficiencies, are presented, and routine coagulation procedures
are performed in the student laboratory. This
course is presented in the Spring quarter.
Prerequisite: MLT 203.
MLT 208
PHLEBOTOMY/PROCESSING
2CR
Learn to collect both venous and capillary
blood specimens, as well as to separate plasma or serum from cells, when necessary for
testing. The color-coding of evacuated tubes,
the specimen requirements for major procedures, and, particularly, the practice of standard precautions are all stressed throughout
the course. This course is presented during
the Spring quarter, and skills development
continues through Summer and Fall quarters
prior to the clinical experience.
Prerequisite: MLT 203.
MLT 210
MEDICAL
LABORATORY
TECHNICIAN
MLT 110
INTRODUCTION
TO THE LABORATORY
2CR
Orients the student to the campus, the program, and the laboratory field. School and
program policies, the metric system, basic
techniques, microscopy, physiological processes, medical terminology, and laboratory
organization are covered. A large block of
time is dedicated to a discussion of laboratory
safety and standard precautions, HIPAA,
and professionalism. These topics are then
integrated into the applied academic courses
for the remainder of the program. This
course is presented in Spring quarter.
Prerequisites: Completion of a college course in
biology and a college course in chemistry within the
last five years, with a grade of C or better.
IMMUNOLOGY
7CR
Covers the immune process in terms of active-versus-passive, innate-versus-acquired,
and humoral-versus-cell-mediated immunities. Laboratory procedures employing a
variety of in vitro demonstrations of antigenantibody reactions are performed. This
course is presented in the Spring quarter.
Prerequisite: MLT 204.
MLT 214
IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY
6CR
Applies the principles of antigens and antibodies covered in MLT 210 to red blood cell
antigens and antibodies, with emphasis on
blood banking procedures, and culminating
in performance of pre-transfusion cross
matching. This course is offered during the
Summer quarter.
Prerequisite: MLT 210.
MLT 216
CLINICAL BLOOD BANKING
5CR
Experience a mock clinical training rotation
in blood banking under the direction of a
currently practicing blood banking specialist. Building on the procedures mastered in
MLT 214, students will solve real-world
blood banking problems, including identification of antibodies; they will deal with daily
inventory and temperature record-keeping,
perform quality assurance procedures, and
receive and complete stat orders. This course
is presented during the Summer quarter.
Prerequisite: MLT 214.
MLT 217
MICROBIOLOGY 10CR
Begin with an introduction to bacterial growth,
culture requirements, sterilization procedures,
and biochemical activity. This introductory
material is followed by detailed study of the
gram positive cocci, the gram negative cocci,
the enterobacteriaceae, and the non-fermentative gram negative bacilli; particular attention
is paid to human pathogenic versus normal
flora organisms, depending on body site. Identification by classical and packaged systems is
followed by susceptibility studies. Brief presentations on anaerobes, parasitology, and mycology conclude the course. This course is offered
during Summer quarter.
Prerequisite: MLT 214.
MLT 218
URINALYSIS
3CR
Perform the routine urine analysis, both
macroscopic and microscopic, with attention to abnormal results and their possible
cause. Laboratory practice is accompanied
by an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the excretory system, and the normal
and abnormal constituents of urine. This
course is presented during Summer quarter.
Prerequisite: MLT 217.
MLT 221
BODY FLUIDS
1CR
Introduces the production, collection, and
analyses of various body fluids, including
Cerebro-Spinal and Synovial fluids. This
lecture-only course is presented on Wednesday afternoons during the Fall quarter clinical phase.
Prerequisite: MLT 218
MLT 227
CLINICAL CHEMISTRY 8CR
Beginning with an overview of the digestive
system, students will study the relationship
between blood levels of many substances
and normal-versus-abnormal physiology. In
the student laboratory, manual and semiautomated procedures are performed for the
assay of many commonly-measured blood
components. Preventative maintenance of
instruments, troubleshooting, and quality
assurance are stressed throughout the
course. This course is offered Fall quarter.
Prerequisite: MLT 223.
MLT 232
CLINICAL EXPERIENCE I 11CR
Begin the clinical phase of training in an
affiliated laboratory. During this course,
students will complete eight weeks of the experience. In the next courses (MLT 235 and
236), they will continue training for eleven
more weeks. Over the course of the nineteen
weeks of clinical training, the students will
rotate through all departments and perform
current routine procedures by state-of-theart methodologies. Appropriate amounts of
time are spent working in each particular
discipline; to accomplish this, some students
rotate through two or three different laboratories. Students are directly supervised by
staff of the affiliated laboratory; there is ongoing contact with the Instructor in the form
of weekly site-visits and Wednesday afternoon class sessions. A report of No Record
on File regarding crimes against persons
from the Washington State Patrol is required
for participation in this training. This course
is offered during Fall quarter.
Prerequisite: MLT 218
MLT 235
CLINICAL EXPERIENCE II 9CR
Continues the clinical training begun in
MLT 232. Students continue for six weeks of
training (five eight-hour days each week),
rotating through those departments not yet
experienced, and continuing to meet objectives listed in the MLT 232 syllabus. As in
MLT 232, students are directly supervised
by staff of the affiliated laboratory, and there
is ongoing contact with the Instructor in the
form of weekly site visits, as well as Wednesday afternoon class sessions. This course is
offered during Winter quarter.
Prerequisite: MLT 232
MLT 236
CLINICAL EXPERIENCE III 7CR
Complete the clinical training begun in
MLT 232 and 235. Students complete five
more weeks of training (five eight-hour days
each week), completing the remainder of the
objectives in the MLT 232 syllabus. This
course is offered during Winter quarter.
Prerequisite: MLT 235
MUSIC
MUSC& 105
MUSIC APPRECIATION
5CR
Learn about elements of music, that is, the
building blocks: pitch, melody, harmony,
rhythm, texture, timbre and dynamics and
study the evolution of music through the
ages. This will not be a music history class,
but rather an investigation of how music
changed through time.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP score;
or successful completion of ENG 094 is required.
2011-2012 Catalog
123
NURSING
NAC 101
NURSING ASSISTANT THEORY 6CR
The Nursing Assistant Certified Program
prepares students for employment as a basic
patient care provider under the supervision
of a professional licensed provider such as a
Registered Nurse. This course is an introduction to the role and responsibilities of being a
Nursing Assistant and includes the following
topics: resident/work environment, infection
control, HIV/AIDS training, special needs of
the elderly, communication and interpersonal
skills, body systems (including introduction
to key anatomical, physiological, and pathological terms), CPR training, documentation
responsibilities, residents rights, long-term
care setting, legal/ethical issues, stages of
death and dying and HIPPA training. This
course will meet the didactic portion of
Washington State and Omnibus Budget
Reconciliation Act (OBRA) requirements for
Nursing Assistant training prerequisites:
documentations of required immunizations,
ability to lift up to 50 pounds, and no record
on file for crimes against children or vulnerable adults from the Washington State Patrol
and DSHS.
NAC 103
UNIT BASED CLINICAL
EXPERIENCE 3CR
Prepares students for employment as a basic
patient care provider under the supervision
of professional licensed providers such as a
Registered Nurse. The course includes content describing principles of documentation,
accurate observation, reporting of residents’
conditions, and philosophy of restorative
nursing as well as clinical practice experience
under the supervision of the NAC instructor.
Students must demonstrate skills at an acceptable or exceeds standard level to pass
this course. Students must correctly demonstrate 100% of the steps for each skill tested.
Students will not be allowed to participate in
the final skills exam unless attendance for all
clinical hours has been fulfilled.
Prerequisites: Documentations of required
immunizations, ability to lift up to 50 pounds, and a
no record on file for crimes against children or
vulnerable adults from the Washington State Patrol
and DSHS. Successful completion of NAC 101 and
NURS 104.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
124
NAC 105
INTRODUCTION TO
LONG TERM CARE I 2CR
Content focuses in describing the long-term
care setting and Ominbus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) requirements for nursing
assistant training. The Integrated/Nursing
Assistant Program (Nursing Assistant Program for ESL) combines oral and written
English language skills and basic health care
concepts specific to long-term care and the
role of the nursing assistant.
NAC 113
WORKING ENVIRONMENT/
SAFETY/INFECTION CONTROL 3CR
Emergency and accident prevention, combines oral and written English language
skills and basic safety and infection control
skills specific to long-term care and the responsibility of the nursing assistant in that
environment.
NAC 116
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
SPECIAL NEEDS OF THE
ELDERLY & CHRONICALLY III:
PART 1 4CR
Philosophy of care and rehabilitation, psychological aspects of aging, understanding
the needs of resident and changes associated
with aging, common causes and care of residents with cancer, and understanding end of
life issues and the differences in cultural responses by residents are studied. Combines
oral and written English language skills and
basic care issues specific to long-term care
and the responsibility of the nursing assistant in that environment.
NAC 119
NURSING ASSISTANT THEORY I 6CR
Introduction to the role and responsibilities
of a Nursing Assistant. Includes the following topics: resident/work environment, infection control, special needs of the elderly,
communication and interpersonal Skills,
body systems (introduction to key anatomical, physiological and pathological terms),
documentation responsibilities, residents’
rights, long-term care setting, legal/ethical
Issues, stages of death and dying. This
course will meet the didactic portion of
Washington State and Omnibus Budget
Reconciliation Act (OBRA) requirements
for Nursing Assistant Training.
NAC 123
BODY SYSTEM REVIEW/
RESTORATIVE NURSING
6CR
Functions of systems and age-related
changes specific to: integumentary, muscular, skeletal, digestion, urinary, nervous and
endocrine systems and restorative nursing
are studied. Combines oral and written
English language skills and basic care issues
specific to long-term care and the responsibility of the nursing assistant in that
environment.
NAC 129
NURSING ASSISTANT THEORY II 3CR
Covers infection control, documentation responsibilities, First Aid & CPR training,
HIPAA, and HIV training. This course will
meet the didactic portion of Washington
State and Omnibus Budget Reconciliation
Act (OBRA) requirements for Nursing Assistant Training.
NAC 132
SPECIAL NEEDS OF THE ELDERLY &
CHRONICALLY III CARDIOVASCULAR/
RESPIRATORY CPR/EMERGENCY
CARE PART 2 3CR
The course include content describing functions of systems and age related changes
specific to cardiovascular and respiratory,
types of services provided in a subacute unit
and identification of life-threatening emergencies. Students must participate in the
CPR class. The Integrated/Nursing Assistant Program (Nursing Assistant Program
for ESL) combines oral and written English
language skills and basic care issues specific
to longterm care and the responsibility of
the nursing assistant in that environment.
NAC 139
UNIT BASED CLINICAL
EXPERIENCE I-BEST 3CR
Prepares students for employment as a basic
patient care provider under the supervision
of professional licensed providers such as
Registered Nurses. The course includes
content describing principles of documentation, accurate observation, and reporting of
resident’s conditions and philosophy of restorative nursing program as well as clinical
practice experience under the supervision of
the NAC instructor. Students must demonstrate skills at an acceptable or exceedsstandard level to pass this course. Students
must correctly demonstrate at least 100% of
the steps for each skill tested. Students will
not be allowed to participate in the final
skills exam unless attendance for all clinical
hours has been fulfilled.
Prerequisites: Documentation of required
immunizations, ability to lift up to 50 lbs, a No
Record on File report from the Washington State
Patrol and DSHS, successful completion of NAC
119, NAC 129 and NURS 106.
NURS 102
ISSUES & TRENDS IN NURSING 3CR
Explores the healthcare system and the profession of nursing with emphasis on care of
clients in a multicultural environment. The
student will develop an understanding of the
legal and ethical issues in nursing, levels of
nursing education, and the functions and
role of the practical nurse. The nurse-client
relationship is also discussed. The student
will utilize research and writing skills to
discuss a nursing-related topic.
Prerequisites: Admission to Nursing program.
NURS 103
FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING 5CR
Presents basic nursing concepts and skills
utilized in client care. Focus is on assisting
clients with needs for safety, comfort, nutrition, and elimination using the nursing process. Emphasis is placed on communication,
professional conduct, documentation, legal
issues and nursing as an art and a science.
Prerequisite: Admission to Practical Nursing
program.
NURS 104
NURSING SKILLS
FUNDAMENTALS
4CR
Prepares students for employment as a basic
patient care provider under the supervision
of professional licensed providers such as a
Registered Nurse. The course includes content describing principles of providing basic
patient care and includes the minimum requirements for skill competencies as required
under the Washington State and Omnibus
Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) requirements for the Nursing Assistant Training.
Students must correctly return demonstrate
all skills taught prior to advancing to NAC
103 Unit Based Clinical Rotation. Mandatory attendance is required for this course.
Prerequisites: Documentation of required
immunizations, ability to lift up to 50 pounds, and
no record on file from the Washington State Patrol
and DSHS. Successful completion of NAC 101.
NURS 105
NURSING LAB I 4CR
Provides opportunity of laboratory demonstration and supervised practice of nursing
skills discussed in NURS 103 and 111. The
student will demonstrate competence in
performance of selected skills utilizing principles taught. During laboratory practice,
student utilize simulated equipment and
classmates as patients.
Prerequisite: Admission to Practical Nursing
program.
NURS 106
NURSING SKILL
FUNDAMENTALS I-BEST 6CR
Prepares students for employment as a basic
patient care provider under the supervision
of a professional licensed provider such as a
Registered Nurse. Explore the principles of
providing basic patient care; includes the
minimum requirements for skill competencies as required under the Washington State
and Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act
(OBRA) requirements for the Nursing Assistant Training, as well as those fundamental skills required by the Licensed Practical
Nurse program. Students must correctly
demonstrate 100% of the steps for each of
the skills tested.
Prerequisites: Documentation of required
immunizations, ability to lift up to 50 lbs., and a
No Record on File from the Washington State
Patrol and DSHS.
NURS 107
MENTAL HEALTH NURSING
3CR
Focuses on the continuum between mental
health and illness and the therapeutic nurseclient relationship. Selected mental disorders will be discussed with emphasis on
nursing interventions, common interdisciplinary treatments and services available for
clients in inpatient and outpatient settings.
Prerequisite: NURS 102, 103, 105, 109, 111, 119.
NURS 109
NUTRITION FOR NURSING
3CR
Focuses on basic nutritional concepts. The
student is introduced to the role of nutrition
in promoting, achieving, and maintaining
healthy lifestyles. The course emphasizes the
use of the nursing process to provide teaching
for clients with consideration of developmental stages, cultures, lifestyles, and socioeconomic status.
Prerequisite: Admission to Practical Nursing
program.
NURS 111
MEDICAL/SURGICAL NURSING I 5CR
Focuses on the utilization of the nursing
process in care of clients with selected health
disturbances. Emphasis is given to psychological, sociocultural, and developmental
factors. Pharmacologic and nutritional considerations and client teaching are integrated. This course includes AIDS Education as
required by the WAC. The nursing process,
nursing assessment, and data collection are
introduced.
Prerequisite: Admission to Practical Nursing
program.
NURS 112
LAB & CLINICAL I 4CR
Provides opportunity of laboratory demonstration and supervised practice of nursing
skills discussed in NURS 110 and 113. The
student will demonstrate competence in
performance of selected skills, utilizing principles taught. During laboratory practice,
student utilize simulated equipment and
classmates as patients.
Prerequisite: Admission to Practical Nursing
program.
NURS 113
ESSENTIALS OF NURSING 3CR
Introduces the beginning LPN student to
the essential nursing concepts of therapeutic
communication, infection control, the nursing process, principles of caring, promoting
comfort, and patient safety.
Prerequisite: Admission to Practical Nursing
program.
NURS 115
HEALTH ASSESSMENT
AND PROMOTION
3CR
Focuses on the acquisition of skills needed
to obtain a complete physical health assessment of a client. The importance of therapeutic communication in performing a
health assessment is emphasized. The
nursing process and its relationship to the
prevention and early detection of disease
are also emphasized.
NURS 119
DOSAGE CALCULATION
FOR NURSES 2CR
Prepares the student for calculation of drug
dosages in order to accurately prepare and
administer medications to a varied client
population. Basic principles for client safety
are reviewed.
Prerequisites: Admission to Practical Nursing.
NURS 120
MEDICAL/SURGICAL
NURSING I 3CR
Focuses on the use of the nursing process in
care of clients with selected health disturbances. Emphasis is given to psychological,
sociocultural, and developmental factors.
Nursing invertventions, pharmacological
considerations and client teaching are
integrated.
Prerequisites 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119.
NURS 124
MENTAL HEALTH NURSING 3CR
Focuses on the continuum between mental
health and illness and the therapeutic nurseclient relationship. Selected mental disorders
will be discussed with emphasis on nursing
interventions, common interdisciplinary
treatments, and services available for clients
in inpatient and outpatient settings.
2011-2012 Catalog
NURS 130
NURSING OF CHILDREN 3CR
Presents the principles necessary for the student to care for clients throughout the age
continuum with special emphasis on developmental stages and how they impact self
care. Common diseases and disorders related
to each developmental stage are explored.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119.
NURS 132
LAB & CLINICAL II 4CR
Students will demonstrate competence in
selected nursing skills using simulation
equipment or other nursing students as clients. Students will also have a clinical experience focusing on safe nursing practice,
nursing process, communication , documentation and client teaching.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119
NURS 135
GERIATRIC NURSING 3CR
Provides a review of issues related to aging.
Topics covered include demographics, attitudes toward aging, development of the older
adult, biological theories of aging, normal
physiological changes, problems of special
populations, cultural considerations, and
nursing management in care of the older
adult. End of life care is also included.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119.
NURS 136
MEDICAL/SURGICAL
NURSING II 6CR
Focuses on use of the nursing process in care
of clients with selected health disturbances.
Emphasis is given to psychological, sociocultural, and developmental factors. Pharmacologic and nutritional consideration and
client teaching are integrated.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119,
Prerequisite: NURS 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119.
120, 125, 128, 130, 132, 135.
NURS 125
NURS 139
PHARMACOLOGY IN NURSES 3CR
Presents pharmacological concepts and
principles for preparation and administration of medications along with related client
assessment and teaching. The role and responsibility of the practical nurse in drug
therapy is emphasized. The student is prepared to participate safely and effectively in
medication therapy.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119.
NURS 128
CONTEMPORARY
MATERNITY NURSING
3CR
Focuses on the care of childbearing women
and their families through all stages of pregnancy and childbirth as well as the first six
weeks after birth.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119.
125
NURSING LAB II 3CR
Provides opportunity for lab demonstration
and supervised practice of skills discussed in
NURS 125, 129, and 136. The student will
demonstrate safe preparation and administration of medications by varied routes. This
course also includes a clinical experience at
a long-term care facility or hospital. This
experience focuses on providing basic client
care and beginning experience with client
assessment and the nursing process.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 103, 105,109,111, 119
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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126
NURS 141
INTERIM MEDICAL/
SURGICAL NURSING
6CR
Focuses on the utilization of the nursing
process in care of clients with selected health
disturbances. Emphasis is given to psychological, sociocultural, and developmental
factors. Pharmacologic and nutritional considerations and client teaching are integrated. Introduction to the upcoming clinical
experience is included.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 103, 105, 109, 125,128,
130. 135, 136,139.
NURS 144
MEDICAL/SURGICAL
NURSING III 6CR
Focuses on the utilization of the nursing
process in care of clients with selected health
disturbances. Emphasis is given to psychological, sociocultural, and developmental
factors. Pharmacologic and nutritional considerations and client teaching are
integrated.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119,
120, 125, 128, 130, 132, 135, 136, 147.
NURS 147
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
CLINICAL PRACTICUM I 12CR
Provides an opportunity for the student to
provide care to clients in long-term care,
acute, and community settings. Experience
involves direct client care, nursing procedures, and administration of medications to
diverse clients of every stage of life. Focus is
on safe nursing practice, nursing process,
communication, documentation, and client
teaching.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119,
120, 125, 128, 130, 132, 135.
NURS 154
ISSUES & TRENDS
IN NURSING II 2CR
Prepares the student for entry into nursing
practice. Emphasis is on concepts of leadership, role of the practical nurse, and nursing
laws governing practice. Career opportunities, preparation for licensure, and opportunities for further education in nursing are
explored.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119,
120, 125, 128, 130, 132, 135, 136, 147.
NURS 158
CLINICAL PRACTICUM II 12CR
Provides an opportunity for the student to
provide care to clients in long-term care,
acute, and community settings. Experience
involves direct client care, nursing procedures, and administration of medication to
diverse clients of every stage of life. Focus is
on safe nursing practiced, nursing process,
communication, practice in providing complete care for 2 or more clients.
Prerequisites: NURS 102, 109, 112, 113, 115, 119,
120, 125, 128, 130, 132, 135, 136, 147.
NURS 203
PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT
5CR
Focuses on the acquisition of skills needed to
obtain a complete physical health assessment of a client. The importance of therapeutic communication in performing a
health assessment is emphasized. The nursing process and its relationship to the prevention and early detection of disease are
also emphasized.
NURS 208
PHARMACOLOGY FOR
PROFESSIONAL NURSING
5CR
Examines the nursing process as it relates to
pharmacology. Basic math skills necessary
for safe dosage calculation are reviewed.
Course includes pharmacology principles,
drug action, interaction, adverse effects, and
legal considerations. Nursing implications of
drug classifications are emphasized.
NURS 210
TRANSITIONING TO
PROFESSIONAL NURSING
2CR
Introduces the practicing Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to the role differentiation
between the LPN and the Registered Nurse
(RN). This course provides the foundations
of critical thinking, the change process, role
transition, and provides further knowledge
of the nursing process. Introduction to the
concept of the RN as provider of care, manager of care, and member of a professional
discipline.
Prerequisites: Student must be a Washington
State LPN with an unrestricted license, and must
have completed 500 hours of employment as an
LPN. Academic prerequisites for the RN program
(with a B or better): Engl& 101, Biol& 241, Biol&
242, Biol& 260, Chem& 121, Math& 141 or Math&
146, Psych& 100, and Psych& 200.
NURS 212
CARING FOR WOMEN
& THE CHILDBEARING FAMILY 4CR
Focuses comprehensively on the family-centered approach to maternal and newborn
care through the continuum of Women’s
Health, using cognitive analytical skills, applying culturally diverse concepts, identifying evidence-based practice, and using
contemporary theories.
Prerequisites: Student must be a Washington
State LPN with an unrestricted license, and must
have completed 500 hours of employment as an
LPN. Academic prerequisites for the RN program
(with a B or better): Engl& 101, Biol& 241, Biol&
242, Biol& 260, Chem& 121, Math& 141 or Math&
146, Psych& 100, and Psych& 200.
NURS 217
CLIENT CARE:
MANAGEMENT PRACTICE I 4CR
Provides the opportunity to examine and
evaluate current clinical experiences and
competencies, and through the process of
portfolio development, expand clinical nursing expertise within the community.
Prerequisites: Acceptance into RN program.
Student must be a Washington State LPN with an
unrestricted license, and must have completed 500
hours of employment as an LPN. Academic
prerequisites for the RN program (with a B or
better): Engl& 101, Biol& 241, Biol& 242, Biol& 260,
Chem& 121, Math& 141 or Math& 146, Psych&
100, and Psych& 200.
NURS 218
CARING FOR THE
PEDIATRIC PATIENT
3CR
Focuses on care of the pediatric patient from
infancy through adolescence. Emphasis is
on health assessment and promotion with
consideration given to cultural perspectives
and perspectives of the individual, family,
and community. Definitions of health and
quality of life issues are discussed.
Prerequisites: Acceptance into RN program.
Student must be a Washington State LPN with an
unrestricted license, and must have completed 500
hours of employment as an LPN. Academic
prerequisites for the RN program (with a B or
better): Engl& 101, Biol& 241, Biol& 242, Biol& 260,
Chem& 121, Math& 141 or Math& 146, Psych&
100, and Psych& 200.
NURS 222
CARE OF THE ADULT WITH
CHRONIC HEALTH PROBLEMS 4CR
Didactic course that focuses on nursing care
of patients experiencing chronic physical
disorders across the lifespan. Content areas
include, but are not exclusive to, the Institute
of Medicine’s top 15 priority conditions.
Principles of the nursing process, growth
and development, nutrition, cultural sensitivity, pharmacology, patient and family education, caring, and communication are
integrated throughout the curriculum.
Prerequisites: NURS 210, NURS 212, NURS
217, NURS 218.
NURS 224
MENTAL HEALTH NURSING
4CR
Focuses on mental health throughout the
lifespan with integration of multicultural
beliefs and practices.
Prerequisites: NURS 210, 212, 217, 218.
NURS 226
CLIENT CARE:
MANAGEMENT IN PRACTICE II 5CR
Provides an opportunity to examine and
evaluate current experience, determine
clinical proficiencies, and, through the process of portfolio development, expand clinical expertise in the community.
Prerequisites: NURS 210, NURS 212, NURS
217, NURS 218.
NURS 232
PERSPECTIVES IN
PROFESSIONAL NURSING
3CR
Focuses on professional role development and
contemporary issues in nursing, such as licensure and legal aspects of nursing practice,
ethical issues in professional relationships,
professional development through participation in professional organizations, and advocacy through political activism. Theories and
concepts of leadership and management, as
well as issues of quality and cost effectiveness
of care, interdisciplinary collaboration, and
emerging care delivery models.
Prerequisites: NURS 210, NURS 212, NURS 217,
NURS 218, NURS 222, NURS 224, NURS 226.
NURS 234
CARE OF THE ADULT WITH
ACUTE HEALTH PROBLEMS
4CR
Didactic course that focuses on nursing care
of patients experiencing acute, complex
health problems across the lifespan. Content
areas include, but are not exclusive to patients with major injuries, disease, and/or
multi-systems failure. Principles of the nursing process, growth and development, nutrition, disease prevention, cultural sensitivity,
pharmacology, patient and family education, caring, and communication are integrated throughout the curriculum.
Prerequisites: NURS 210, NURS 212, NURS 217,
NURS 218, NURS 222, NURS 224, NURS 226.
NURS 237
CAPSTONE CLINICAL
4CR
An individual immersion assignment intended to strengthen the student’s clinical
skills and make possible the final transition
from LPN to RN. The clinical objectives
will be determined by careful assessment of
the collective work experience as an LPN,
the further education acquired within this
program, the Nurse Practice Act, and documented skill standards.
Prerequisites: NURS 210, NURS 212, NURS 217,
NURS 218, NURS 222, NURS 224, NURS 226.
Office Technology courses (CAS or OFCT prefixes)
are listed in the Business Support Services section.
NURS 241
INDEPENDENT STUDY:
SELECTED TOPIC
1-3CR
Develop an independent study plan that will
enhance learning of patient-related topics,
or enhance understanding and demonstration of the registered nurse role. Conduct an
in-depth literature review with a written
synthesis paper, or complete additional preceptorship hours. Students must submit a
plan for the independent study to include
objectives and grading criteria to the Instructor and/or Director for approval prior
to registering for the class.
PASTRY ARTS
BAKE 105
CHOCOLATE I (CONFECTIONS) 5CR
Explores the different types of chocolate
used in making assorted treats, candies and
garnishes. Various methods of tempering,
chocolate decorating, fudges, truffles and
other candies will be identified.
BAKE 108
CHOCOLATE II
4CR
Explores proper tempering techniques,
chocolate molds, fillings, and cooling techniques. Students will demonstrate how to
make chocolate display pieces and boxes.
BAKE 111
DECORATING
3CR
Introduces students to cake and pastry decorating. Techniques in assembling, masking,
tooling handling and piping skill will be addressed. More elaborate cakes using color
design along with reinforcement of structure
will be used.
BAKE 112
CAKES I (FILLINGS AND ICINGS) 7CR
Introduces students to the mixing methods,
their ingredients and function in cake baking. Correct scaling, portioning, baking and
determining doneness of assorted cakes.
Fillings and icings will be introduced in the
presentation of basic cakes.
BAKE 114
DESSERT ALTERNATIVES
(SUGAR FREE, GLUTEN FREE)
3CR
Covers how to make sugar free, vegan, and
gluten free desserts. Students explore how to
develop use special ingredients, techniques
and methods when making desserts not using
standard ingredients such as eggs, butter,
white flour, and milk.
BAKE 117
FROZEN DESSERTS
3CR
Explores the world of frozen desserts. Students will develop recipes for various frozen
desserts such as gelato, sorbets, parfaits and
ice creams along with savory desserts with
the use of herbs, spices and vegetables.
BAKE 120
YEAST BREADS
7CR
Introduces students to the techniques used
with starters and yeasts. Students will demonstrate how to cultivate yeast, proper
proofing and baking techniques along with
completing a variety of yeast breads.
2011-2012 Catalog
127
BAKE 125
BAKING TECHNIQUES
AND INGREDIENTS
3CR
Introduces students to the ingredients, ingredient function, mixing methods, terminology, and the use of hand tools, equipment
and kitchen procedures.
BAKE 130
PIES, TARTS, CUSTARDS
AND FILLINGS
5CR
Introduces students to a variety of pie crust
and the preparation of assorted fruit fillings.
Tarts, custards and pastry cream will also
be explored.
BAKE 134
QUICK BREADS,
COOKIES, BROWNIES
3CR
Introduces students to the ingredients and
function in preparation of quick breads and
cookies. Students will explore the assorted
dough’s shapes, baking and finishing
methods.
BAKE 140
RESTAURANT (INDIVIDUAL)
DESSERTS AND PETIT FOURS
5CR
Introduces students to the challenges of creating individual desserts for restaurants.
Students will make individual desserts for
the college restaurant and learn the detailed
art of the Petit Fours.
BAKE 153
SUGAR WORK
3CR
Introduces students to the stages of sugar
work. Students will demonstrate how to
make various sugar based candies and
pulled sugar items. The coloring and handling of sugar flowers and ribbons will also
be demonstrated in this course.
BAKE 156
WEDDING CAKES
7CR
Covers elaborate techniques used in the
composition, design, and execution of wedding cakes. The use of gum paste, fondant,
and modeling chocolate will be explored.
Students will develop a cake rendering on
the spot with a customer.
BAKE 210
CAKES II
3CR
Introduces students to advanced cakes such
as high ratio, chiffon cakes and torts along
with buttercream icings and fondant. Temperature and environmental factors in cake
making will also be covered.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
128
PHARMACY
TECHNICIAN
PT 121
INTRODUCTION TO
PHARMACY & PHARMACY LAW 5CR
Orients students to the work of pharmacy
technicians and the context in which technicians’ work is performed. Study of pharmacy
law, as it pertains to the practice of pharmacy in the state of Washington, compared
to the United States as a whole.
Prerequisites: High school diploma or GED.
Computer literate. Ability to speak, read, and write
the English language. Successful completion of
Math 107, 108, or 109, or higher. Successful
completion of Medical Terminology or have tested
into Medical Terminology. Concurrent with this
quarter. Successful completion of CAH 105
Computer Applications. All courses must be
completed with a B or above.
PT 124
PHARMACOLOGY, PART I 5CR
Explores drug action mechanisms, the
routes of administration, and the effects on
body systems. Emphasis on the uses, effects,
and side effects of the major drug classes.
Prerequisite: Same as PT 121
PT 128
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
PHARMACOLOGY PART II 5CR
Continues the exploration of drug action
mechanisms, the routes of administration,
and the effects on body systems. Emphasis
on the uses, effects, and side effects of the
major drug classes and the systems they are
used on.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of PT 121,
PT 124, PT 129, PT 143 and CAH 102 or
equivalent (Medical Terminology) with a grade of
B or above.
PT 129
COMMUNITY PHARMACY
PRACTICE 5CR
Introduces the retail pharmacy experience.
All aspects of community pharmacy practice,
including keyboarding, prescription filling,
and compounding, are explored in this
course. Customer service is explored as well.
Prerequisite: Same as PT 121.
PT 143
GENERIC DRUG NAMESPART I 2CR
Introduces the top 200 drugs prescribed in
the United States each year.
Prerequisites: Same as PT 121.
PT 147
CLINICAL CAPSTONE RESEARCH 3CR
Discover local pharmacies and the requirements for internship. Explore professional
conduct and appearance.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of PT 121,
PT 124, PT 129, PT 143 and CAH 102 or
equivalent (Medical Terminology) with grades of
B or above in all courses.
PT 149
HOSPITAL PRACTICE 5CR
Introduces students to formularies, manual
and electronic distribution systems, and
procedures for hospital practice.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of PT 121,
PT 124, PT 129, PT 143 and CAH 102 or
equivalent (Medical Terminology) with grades of
B or above in all courses.
PT 152
GENERIC DRUG NAMES PART II 2CR
Continues the exploration of the top 200
drugs prescribed in the United States each
year, adding the component of drugs used
specifically in the hospital setting.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of PT 121,
PT 124, PT 129, PT 143 and CAH 102 or
equivalent (Medical Terminology) with a grade of
B or above.
PT 156
PHARMACEUTICAL
CALCULATIONS
2CR
Math specific to the practice of pharmacy
will be explored.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of PT 121,
PT 124, PT 129, PT 143 and CAH 102 or
equivalent (Medical Terminology) with grades of B
or above in all courses.
PT 159
STERILE PARENTERAL
PREPARATION
3CR
Apply the techniques learned to make
intravenous admixture and chemotherapy
products.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of PT 121,
PT 124, PT 129, PT 143 and CAH 102 or
equivalent (Medical Terminology) with grades of
B or above in all courses.
PT 163
COMMUNITY PHARMACY
CLINICAL CAPSTONE
4CR
Clinical training in retail, hospital, and/or
long-term pharmacies. This is the first of
three clinical rotations in local pharmacies
where the student is directly supervised by a
pharmacist preceptor and the pharmacist
preceptor’s staff, with ongoing contact with
the Instructor in the form of site visits and
seminars.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all in-class
pharmacy technician requirements with grades of B
or above in all courses.
PT 165
INSTITUTIONAL
CLINICAL CAPSTONE
4CR
Clinical training in retail, hospital, and/or
long-term pharmacies. This is the second of
three clinical rotations in local pharmacies
where the student is directly supervised by a
pharmacist preceptor and the pharmacist
preceptor’s staff, with ongoing contact with
the Instructor in the form of site visits and
seminars.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all in-class
pharmacy technician requirements with grades of B
or above in all courses.
PT 173
CLINICAL CAPSTONE
EXPERIENCE PART 1-B 6CR
Clinical training in retail, hospital and/or
long term pharmacies. This is the first of
four clinical rotations in local pharmacies
where students are directly supervised by a
pharmacist preceptor and their staff, with
ongoing contact with the instructor in the
form of site visits and seminars.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all in-class
pharmacy technician requirements except PT 183
with grades of B in all courses.
PT 175
CLINICAL CAPSTONE
EXPERIENCE PART 2-B 6CR
Clinical training in retail, hospital and/or
long term pharmacies. This is the second of
four clinical rotations in local pharmacies
where students are directly supervised by a
pharmacist preceptor and their staff, with
ongoing contact with the instructor in the
form of site visits and seminars.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all in-class
pharmacy technician requirements except PT 183
with grades of B in all courses.
PT 183
ENTERING THE WORKPLACE
2CR
Students will investigate and practice resume writing and interview skills. Discussions of clinical experiences will take place,
along with National Exam studies.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all other
in-class pharmacy technician requirements with a
grade of B or above.
PHYSICS
PHYS& 121
GENERAL PHYSICS I 5CR
Covers problem-solving concepts in physics
including, vectors & motion, force, momentum, work, energy, rotational motion, simple
machines, universal gravitation, matter, fluids, temperature and heat transfer.
Prerequisites: MED 167-168 or MATH 099
PROFESSIONAL PILOT
AVP 105
PRIVATE PILOT I 4CR
Training in basic aircraft control, aircraft
systems, airport procedures, and traffic pattern operations.
Prerequisite: FAA Class II Medical with Student
Pilot Certificate prior to the first day of class.
AVP 110
PRIVATE PILOT II 4CR
Covers aircraft control, establishing and
maintaining specific flight attitudes, and
ground reference maneuvers.
Prerequisite: AVP 105 or equivalent.
AVP 115
PRIVATE PILOT III 4CR
Basic performance maneuvers, traffic pattern procedures, and takeoffs and landings.
Upon successful completion, the student
shall solo the aircraft.
Prerequisite: AVP 110 or equivalent.
AVP 118
PRIVATE PILOT
PRACTICAL TEST STANDARDS I
Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification
requirements.
AVP 125
PRIVATE PILOT IV 4CR
Introduces knowledge, skill, and aeronautical
experience necessary to successfully complete
the navigation and cross country flight portion of flight training.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in AVP 115
or equivalent.
AVP 130
PRIVATE PILOT V
4CR
Provides the knowledge, skill, and aeronautical experience necessary to read and
understand disseminated weather reports
and forecasts. Meets the requirements for
cross country navigation and basic instrument flight.
Prerequisite: AVP 125 or equivalent.
AVP 135
PRIVATE PILOT VI 4CR
Gain the proficiency to meet the requirements
necessary for FAA Private Pilot Certification
with an Airplane Category and Single-Engine
Class Rating.
AVP 152
INSTRUMENT PILOT
PRACTICAL STANDARDS III
Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification
requirements.
AVP 155
INSTRUMENT PILOT IV 4CR
Perform holding patterns and instrument
approach procedures.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in AVP 150
or equivalent.
AVP 160
INSTRUMENT PILOT V
4CR
Perform x-country flight, utilizing advanced
navigation procedures. Utilize ATC communication procedures and conduct instrument departures, arrivals, and approaches.
Prerequisite: AVP 155 or equivalent.
AVP 170
INSTRUMENT PILOT VI 4CR
Acquire the flight and aeronautical knowledge proficiency required for the issuance of
the FAA Instrument-Airplane Rating.
Prerequisite: AVP 160 or equivalent.
AVP 172
INSTRUMENT PILOT
PRACTICAL STANDARDS IV
4CR
Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification
requirements.
AVP 175
Prerequisite: AVP 130 or equivalent.
COMMERCIAL PILOT I 4CR
Acquire initial VFR cross-country flight
training. Pilotage, dead-reckoning, and radio navigation will be covered.
AVP 138
Instrument-Airplane Rating.
PRIVATE PILOT
PRACTICAL TEST STANDARDS II 4CR
Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification
requirements.
AVP 140
INSTRUMENT PILOT I 4CR
Introduces skills that will establish a strong
foundation in basic attitude instrument flying and basic instrument navigation.
Prerequisite: FAA Private Pilot Certificate.
AVP 145
INSTRUMENT PILOT II 4CR
Perform precision attitude instrument flight,
including advanced navigation techniques
and procedures.
Prerequisite: AVP 140 or equivalent.
AVP 150
INSTRUMENT PILOT III 4CR
Apply advanced navigation techniques and
perform holding pattern entry proecdures.
Prerequisite: AVP 145 or equivalent.
Prerequisite: FAA Private Pilot Certificate,
AVP 180
COMMERCIAL PILOT II 4CR
Receive additional VFR cross-country flight
training. Additional flight training will encompass mountain flying techniques and local night flight operations.
Prerequisite: AVP 175 or equivalent.
AVP 185
COMMERCIAL PILOT III 4CR
Receive final training in VFR cross-country
flight and night operations. The necessary
cross-country flight hours required for Commercial Pilot Certification will be completed.
Prerequisite: AVP 180 or equivalent.
AVP 210
COMMERCIAL PILOT IV 4CR
Receive initial flight and ground training in
high performance Commercial Pilot Certification maneuvers. Flight maneuver training
includes chandelles, lazy eights, steep power
turns, and accuracy landings.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in AVP 185
or equivalent.
2011-2012 Catalog
129
AVP 215
COMMERCIAL PILOT V
4CR
Gain additional aeronautical knowledge and
flying skills necessary for the performance of
advanced precision flight maneuvers.
Prerequisite: AVP 210 or equivalent.
AVP 220
COMMERCIAL PILOT VI 4CR
Receive advanced training in all of the required Commercial Pilot Certification maneuvers. Flying proficiency in these
maneuvers will meet the requirements set
forth in the FAA Practical Test Standards.
Prerequisite: AVP 215 or equivalent.
AVP 223
COMMERCIAL PILOT
PRACTICAL STANDARDS V
Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification
requirements.
AVP 230
COMMERCIAL PILOT VII 4CR
Operate a high-performance aircraft with
retractable landing gear and constant speed
propeller. Basic flight maneuvers and aircraft systems will be covered.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in AVP 220
or equivalent.
AVP 235
COMMERCIAL PILOT VIII 4CR
Operate a high-performance aircraft with
retractable landing gear and constant speed
propeller. Advanced flight maneuvers as well
as emergency procedures will be mastered.
Prerequisite: AVP 230 or equivalent.
AVP 240
COMMERCIAL PILOT IX 4CR
Operate a high-performance aircraft with
retractable landing gear and constant speed
propeller. Increase proficiency in advance
flight maneuvers and emergency procedures. Obtain logbook endorsement for the
operation of High Performance Airplanes.
Prerequisite: AVP 235 or equivalent.
AVP 245
COMMERCIAL PILOT X 4CR
Receive initial preparative training to increase aeronautical skills and experience to
meet the requirements for the issuance of a
Commercial Pilot Certificate.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in AVP 240
or equivalent.
AVP 250
COMMERCIAL PILOT XI 4CR
Receive additional preparative training to
increase aeronautical skills and experience
to meet the requirements for the issuance of
a Commercial Pilot Certificate.
Prerequisite: AVP 245 or equivalent.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
130
AVP 255
COMMERCIAL PILOT XII 4CR
Receive final advanced preparative training
to increase aeronautical skills and experience to meet the requirements for the issuance of a Commercial Pilot Certificate.
Prerequisite: AVP 250 or equivalent.
AVP 257
COMMERCIAL PILOT
PRACTICAL STANDARDS VI
4CR
Receive additional flight and ground training as required to meet pilot certification
requirements.
AVP 260
CERTIFIED FLIGHT
INSTRUCTOR I 4CR
Receive initial training in teaching and
learning theory as well as overall review of
commercial pilot aeronautical knowledge
subject areas. Student will be trained to fly
the aircraft from the right seat to Commercial Pilot Practical Test Standards.
Prerequisite: FAA Commercial Pilot; Airplane
Certificate and Instrument Airplane Rating.
AVP 265
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
CERTIFIED FLIGHT
INSTRUCTOR II 4CR
Master proper teaching techniques from the
right seat of the training aircraft. Develop
proficiency in conducting aeronautical
knowledge briefings. Successful completion
will result when knowledge and proficiency
meet and/or exceed FAA Practical Test
Standards.
Prerequisite: AVP 260 or equivalent.
AVP 268
CERTIFIED INSTRUMENT FLIGHT
INSTRUCTOR PSYCHOLOGY
4CR
Acquire the aeronautical knowledge, skills,
and experience necessary to obtain an FAA
Instrument Flight Instructor Rating added to
their Certified Flight Instructor Certificate.
Prerequisite: FAA Commercial Pilot Airplane
Certificate with Instrument Airplane Rating
Certified Flight Instructor-Airplane Certificate.
PSYCHOLOGY
PSY 112
PSYCHOLOGY OF
THE WORKPLACE
5CR
Introduces general psychological principles
and their application to the workplace emphasizing critical thinking with regard to
self-awareness, interpersonal relations, motivation, and teamwork.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
placement score or successful completion of ENG 094.
PSY 210
PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT 5CR
Emphasis is placed on the practical application of knowledge and techniques within
various theoretical frameworks. These
frameworks are applied to normal adjustment situations in human lifespan, such as
gender role development, love, sex, relationships, work, marriage, separation and
divorce, and death and loss. Students will
explore methods of effecting change in
their lives.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of PSYC& 100
or PSY 112.
PSYC& 100
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
5CR
Surveys the knowledge and methods of the
discipline of psychology. Abroad view of the
subject is presented and establishes the foundation for further study of the discipline.
Emphasis will be placed upon the application of psychological knowledge to daily situations, and upon accessing and assessing
information about behavior from a variety
of sources. Skills in scientific reasoning and
critical thinking will be developed.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
placement score or successful completion of ENG 094.
PSYC& 200
LIFESPAN PSYCHOLOGY
5CR
This course provides an introduction to the
milestones of human development from
conception to death. It describes physical,
cognitive, and social growth of people, with
special attention to various cultural contexts
of development and the rich diversity of individuals. The content is drawn from research and theories in developmental
psychology. Students are expected to integrate their personal experiences, knowledge
of psychology, and their observations of human development with the content of this
course. Implications for parenting, education, and social policy making will be discussed so that the student may apply course
information to meaningful problems.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of PSYC& 100.
PSYC& 220
ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
5CR
A study of the development and symptoms of
mental health disorders. Topics covered include schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety
disorders, personality disorders, psychosomatic disorders, sexual deviation, organic
disorders, and the process of adjustment to
stress. Attention is given to biosocial, cognitive, and cultural factors and their role in
mental health.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of PSYC& 100
or PSY 112.
SOCIOLOGY
SOC& 101
INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 5CR
Focuses on understanding and applying the
sociological perspective, which stresses the
importance of the impact of social forces
external to the individual in shaping people’s
lives and experiences. Topics studied will
include socialization, social interaction, culture, groups, social structure, deviance, social inequality, social class, race, gender,
institutions (political, economic, educational, family, and religious), collective behavior
and social change. Students will be asked to
learn the basic concepts, theories, and perspectives of sociology, to see how these operate in terms of social processes, structures,
and events, and to apply this knowledge to
better understand the social world.
Prerequisite: Appropriate COMPASS/SLEP
placement score or successful completion of ENG 094.
SURGICAL
TECHNOLOGY
SURG 126
PATIENT CARE THEORY I 5CR
Covers surgical attire, instrument groups,
OR preparation and equipment, case selection, patient transfer, positioning, skin
preparation and draping concepts, patient
identification, and consent.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
136, 137, 138, 146.
SURG 127
PHARMACOLOGY
& ANESTHESIA
5CR
Introduces the student to basic surgical-related pharmacologic and anesthetic principles,
including drug classification, proper medication labeling and handling, aseptic medication preparation, and usage principles of
anesthesia administration and monitoring,
including complications and intervention.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
136, 137, 138,146.
SURG 130
PATIENT CARE THEORY II 5CR
Develops the student’s understanding of the
surgical patient, the needs of special patient
populations, and basic biomedical science.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
126, 127, 141, 151.
SURG 136
OPERATING ROOM THEORY I 8CR
Introduces the student to the OR environment, aseptic principles and practices,
scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and preparation of the sterile field, abdominal incisions,
ob-gyn, general, ophthalmic, and genitourinary surgeries.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of BIOL 118,
CAH 102, 103, 104, and SOC& 101.
SURG 137
INTRODUCTION TO SURGERY 5CR
Orients the student to the field of surgical
technology, including history, working conditions, personal characteristics, professionalism, healthcare facilities, standards of
conduct, the physical environment, and
safety standards.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of BIOL 118,
CAH 102, 103, 104, and SOC& 101.
SURG 138
INTRODUCTION TO ASEPSIS
& INSTRUMENTATION
5CR
Orients the student to the principles of asepsis and sterile technique, surgical case management, instrumentation, supplies, wound
healing related to sutures, needles, and stapling devices.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of BIOL 118,
CAH 102, 103, 104, and SOC& 101.
SURG 141
OPERATING ROOM THEORY II 8CR
Classroom and lab presentations of surgical
specialties to include otorhinolaryngologic,
orthopedic, oral/maxillofacial, plastic/reconstructive procedures, and surgical anatomy.
2011-2012 Catalog
SURG 207
MICROBIOLOGY 5CR
Students will discuss the historical background
of microbiology and be able to identify basic
equipment used to identify microorganisms.
We will go into many aspects of microbiology,
including the description of structure and
characteristics of different microorganisms,
conditions that affect the life and the death of
microorganisms, the relationships between
humans and pathogenic and nonpathogenic
bacteria, and factors that enable pathogens to
invade a host and cause a disease.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
126, 127, 141,151.
SURG 211
SURGICAL LAB III 1CR
Lab presentations and practice of surgical
procedures to include cardiothoracic, peripheral vascular, laparoscopic, emergent,
and neurosurgical procedures.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
126, 127, 141,151.
SURG 215
CLINICAL APPLICATIONS I 5CR
Provides the framework for the student to
receive experience in the operating room.
Through one-on-one training in a perioperative setting, the student will develop the
professional attitude, behavior, and skills to
reinforce their role as a member of the perioperative team.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
130, 206, 207, 211.
SURG 220
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
136, 137, 138,146.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
SURG 146
SURGICAL LAB I 5CR
Introduces students to the OR environment, aseptic principles and practices,
scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and preparation of the sterile field, abdominal incisions,
ob-gyn, general, ophthalmic, and genitourinary surgeries.
CLINICAL APPLICATIONS III See Clinical Applications.
215, 220, 235.
SURG 230
CLINICAL APPLICATIONS IV See Clinical Applications.
SURG 151
215, 220, 225, 235.
SURGICAL LAB II 5CR
Lab presentations and practice of surgical
procedures to include otorhinolaryngologic,
oral/maxillofacial, and plastic/reconstructive procedures.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
136, 137, 138, 146.5.
SURG 206
OPERATING ROOM THEORY III 8CR
Classroom and lab presentations of surgical
procedures to include cardiothoracic, peripheral vascular, neurosurgical procedures,
and surgical anatomy.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
126, 127, 141, 151.
5CR
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
CAH 102, 103, 104, and SOC& 101.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of BIOL 118,
5CR
130, 206, 207, 211, 215.
SURG 225
5CR
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
SURG 235
SEMINAR I 3CR
Classroom presentations on health and wellness, and death and dying. Classroom preparation for the NBSTSA exam.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
130, 206, 207, 211.
SURG 240
SEMINAR II
3CR
Classroom presentations of employability
skills, preoperative routines, and transportation. Classroom preparation for the NBSTSA Certification Exam.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of SURG
215, 220, 235.
SUSTAINABLE
BUILDING SCIENCE
SBS 105
INTRODUCTION
TO SUSTAINABILITY
3CR
A survey of economic, environmental, and
human health principles behind the different
approaches to sustainability in the workforce.
SBS 110
GREEN BUILDING DESIGN
4CR
Overview of sustainable green building
models, with a focus on energy, indoor
health, natural resources, and other environmental impact.
SBS 115
SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS
IN CONSTRUCTION
4CR
Introduction to the construction materials
used in sustainable building design and their
impact on a structure’s initial and long term
costs, as well as considerations for the local
environment and economy.
SBS 120
SURVEY OF ENERGY RATINGS 4CR
An overview of the current and emerging
efficiency standards for measuring energy
usage and consumption, including, but not
limited to, Energy Star, BPI, LEED, Built
Green, etc.
SBS 125
CLINICAL APPLICATIONS II See Clinical Applications.
131
ALTERNATIVE
ENERGY SYSTEMS
4CR
An overview of existing and emerging approaches to energy production for use in
residential and commercial structures, including, but not limited to, solar/photovoltaics, wind, geothermal, biofuels, etc.
SBS 140
INSULATION BASICS
4CR
Introduction to the different types of insulation commonly used in homes and businesses, with comparisons for their respective
costs and levels of energy efficiency.
SBS 145
BUILDING ENVELOPE
5CR
Introduction to the principles of heat, light,
sound, moisture, and air movement within a
residential structure, including an overview
of external factors which impact a building’s
energy integrity.
SBS 150
MOISTURE MITIGATION
3CR
Introduction to practices in construction
that prevent moisture intrusion, as well as
techniques for maintaining healthy living
environments free from the destructive impacts of moisture.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
132
SBS 155
SOLAR BASICS
4CR
Introduction to the basic concepts, components, and uses of photovoltaic technology,
as well as costs, benefits, and drawbacks in
sustainable construction.
SBS 170
DIAGNOSTICS & TESTING
3CR
Overview of the equipment, technology,
systems, and software used to measure a
building’s energy usage and loss.
SBS 175
INDOOR AIR TESTING
3CR
An introduction to understanding and diagnosing environmental problems in residential structures, and the means for mitigating
those issues.
SBS 180
THERMOGRAPY
3CR
Introduction to infrared themography, its
principles, and the proper operations of IR
camera equipment for diagnosing problems
that lead to energy loss in a building.
SBS 185
SERVICE LEARNING PROJECT 3CR
A capstone project that gives students an
opportunity to apply their sustainable building science knowledge in a real life setting,
focusing on helping nonprofit organizations
achieve sustainability in the buildings where
they live, work, and serve the public.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
WELDING
WLD 105
WELDING THEORY I 5CR
Introduces the tools and equipment used in
welding. Includes safety considerations,
electrical principles, weld quality, and technical orientation for select welding and cutting processes.
WLD 120
SHIELDED METAL
ARC WELDING II 7CR
Builds further skill with SMAW deep penetrating electrodes by welding various joints
in the vertical and overhead positions.
Prerequisite: WLD 105.
WLD 124
SHIELDED METAL
ARC WELDING III 7CR
Develops understanding of the applications
and techniques for using low hydrogen
SMAW electrodes in the flat and horizontal
positions.
Prerequisite: WLD 105.
WLD 135
SHIELDED METAL
ARC WELDING IV 7CR
Develops further skill with SMAW low hydrogen electrodes by welding various joint
designs in the vertical and overhead
positions.
Prerequisite: WLD 105.
WLD 142
WELDING THEORY II 5CR
Explores methods of weld inspection and
testing, and continues the technical orientation to select welding processes.
Prerequisite: WLD 105.
WLD 144
PRINT READING FOR WELDERS 5CR
Develops the ability to interpret prints used
in welding and fabrication. Introduction to
sketching, lines, views, visualization, dimensioning, applied math, and welding symbols.
Prerequisite: WLD 105.
cored arc welding to join carbon steels with
various joint designs in all positions.
Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent
enrollment in WLD 142.
WLD 177
PREPARATION FOR
WELDING CERTIFICATION 2CR
Develops skill in preparation for employer,
Washington Association of Building Officials (WABO), or similar welder qualification tests.
Prerequisite: WLD 142 or Instructor’s permission.
WLD 179
FABRICATION
3CR
Develops knowledge in project planning,
layout methods, fixturing, distortion control,
and the use of tools and equipment for metal
fabrication.
Prerequisite: WLD 144.
WLD 210
GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING I 7CR
Develops the ability to use the gas tungsten
arc welding process to join carbon and stainless steels with various joint designs in all
positions.
Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent
enrollment in WLD 142.
WLD 213
GAS TUNGSTEN
ARC WELDING II 7CR
Develops the ability to use the gas tungsten
arc welding process to join aluminum alloys
with various joint designs in all positions.
Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent
enrollment in WLD 142.
WLD 215
WLD 152
COOPERATIVE
WORK EXPERIENCE 1-5CR
Provides on-the-job practical experience
under the supervision of an employer. Instructor permission is required for site
choice.
Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent
Prerequisite: Advanced standing with Instructor’s
Corequisites: WLD 110 and WLD 112.
GAS METAL ARC WELDING
7CR
Develops the ability to use the gas metal arc
welding process to join carbon steels and
aluminum with various joint designs in all
positions.
WLD 110
enrollment in WLD 142.
permission.
WLD 156
WLD 217
THERMAL CUTTING & GOUGING 3CR
Develops the knowledge and skill for manual
and machine-guided oxyfuel cutting, manual
plasma arc cutting, and carbon arc gouging.
Corequisite: WLD 105.
WLD 112
OXYACETYLENE
WELDING & BRAZING
4CR
Develops the knowledge and skill for welding, brazing, and braze welding various joint
designs using oxyacetylene equipment.
Corequisite: WLD 105.
WLD 116
SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING I 7CR
Introduces the shielded metal arc welding
(SMAW) process with emphasis on skill development, using deep penetrating electrodes in the flat and horizontal positions.
Prerequisite: Completion of or Concurrent
enrollment in WLD 105.
Prerequisite: WLD 142.
SPECIAL PROJECTS
1-5CR
Develops skill in print reading, project planning, layout, distortion control, and other
fabrication techniques. Students will have
the opportunity to apply knowledge to projects of personal interest and/or as assigned.
WLD 168
permission.
METALLURGY
2CR
Examines metal identification and classification, mechanical properties, crystalline
structures, heat treatments, and metallurgical effects of welding.
FLUX CORED ARC WELDING I 7CR
Develops the ability to use gas-shielded flux
cored arc welding electrodes to join carbon
steels with various joint designs in all
positions.
Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent
enrollment in WLD 142.
WLD 172
FLUX CORED ARC WELDING II 7CR
Develops the ability to use self-shielded flux
Prerequisite: Advanced standing with Instructor’s
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
133
Northwest Career & Technical High School Nursing Assistant Certificate Program.
POLICIES & PROCEDURES
Policies & Procedures
For more info www.cptc.edu/catalog or call 253-589-5800.
Academic Standards 134
Campus Policies 148
Student Records 143
Academic Calendar 150
Student Code of Conduct 144
134
Academic Standards
Clover Park Technical College is committed to facilitating
the academic success of students. The primary purpose of
Academic Standards is to provide guidance in academic
processes and procedures, which govern student progress
through programs of study.
Student Academic Responsibilities
Attendance Policy
The student is expected to attend all classes for which the
student is registered in order to gain the maximum benefit. The
instructor may establish an attendance policy for the program.
It is the responsibility of the student to know and comply with
the policy. Programs having established attendance policies will
include relevant information in course syllabi. Financial aid
recipients are subject to the Student Progress Policy as stated in
the financial aid section of this catalog.
Program admission to Clover Park Technical College carries
with it the understanding that students will conduct themselves
as responsible members of the college community. This includes an expectation that students will obey appropriate laws,
will comply with the rules of the college and its departments,
and will maintain a high standard of integrity and honesty.
A student who does not attend the first two class sessions and/
or comply with the established attendance policy for the class
or program may forfeit the right to continue and may be
subject to administrative withdrawal.
1. Dishonesty: Honest assessment of student performance
is of crucial importance to all members of the college
community. Acts of dishonesty are serious breaches of
honor and shall be dealt with in the following manner:
The quality of a student’s performance is measured by a
grading system using grades A through F. The grade for
a course is calculated into a student’s GPA as 4 to 0 grade
points. Faculty may choose to utilize or not utilize the + or designation with grades.
a It is the responsibility of the college administration
and faculty to provide reasonable and prudent security
measures designed to minimize opportunities for acts of
dishonesty that occur at the college.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
b Any student who, for the purpose of fulfilling any assignment or task required by a staff member as part of the student’s program of study, shall knowingly tender any work
product that the student fraudulently represents to the staff
member as the student’s work product, shall be deemed to
have committed an act of dishonesty. Acts of dishonesty
shall be cause for disciplinary action and be subject to the
processes described on page 145 of the catalog.
c Any student who aids or abets the accomplishment of
an act of dishonesty, as described in sub-paragraph b)
above, shall be subject to disciplinary action.
d This section shall not be construed as preventing an
instructor from taking immediate disciplinary action
when the instructor is required to act upon such breach
of dishonesty in order to preserve order and prevent
disruptive conduct in the classroom. This section shall
also not be construed as preventing an instructor from
adjusting the student’s grade on a particular project,
paper, test, or class grade for dishonesty.
1. Classroom Conduct: Instructors have the authority to take
whatever summary actions may be necessary to maintain
order and proper conduct in the classroom and to maintain
the effective cooperation of the class in fulfilling the
objectives of the course.
2. Any student who substantially disrupts any college class by
engaging in conduct that renders it difficult or impossible
to maintain the decorum of the class shall be subject to
disciplinary action.
Grades
Each individual program establishes criteria for achieving
each grade based on percentage scores and specific assessment
criteria as listed in the course syllabi.
The grade points allotted to each grade are as follows:
A 4.0
C 2.0
A- 3.7
C- 1.7
B+ 3.3
D+ 1.3
B 3.0
D 1.0
B- 2.7
D- 0.7
C+ 2.3
F 0.0
Some programs require that the student complete each
individual course with a C (2.0) or better grade in order to
progress in the program. Programs with this requirement will
have it noted in the course description section of the catalog
and in the course syllabus. Financial aid recipients are subject
to the Student Progress Policy on page 140 of this catalog.
Other Grade Indicators
* Course not graded. No grade point assigned.
I
Incomplete. An incomplete grade indicates that the
student completed most of the course requirements at
a passing level and intends to complete missing course
work. Prior to the last day of the quarter, the instructor
must complete a Clover Park Technical College
Agreement for Incomplete Grades form indicating the
work to be completed and the expected completion
date, not to exceed one academic quarter from the
date of issue. The form must be signed by both the
instructor and the student. A grade of I reverts to the
grade F if work has not been satisfactorily completed
by the end of the following quarter.
N Audit Course. No grade point assigned.
P
Pass. No grade point assigned. A P grade indicates
passing with a C (2.0) in courses designated as pass/
fail. Courses graded with P may not meet program
requirements for graduation.
R Repeated Courses. The R will be placed next to the
lowest grade, and only the highest grade received for
the course will be used in the calculation for the GPA.
V Unofficial Withdrawal. No grade point assigned.
Instructor-initiated, a V appears on the transcript
when an instructor withdraws a student who has
never attended (No Show) or has discontinued
participation without initiating official withdrawal.
W Official Withdrawal. No grade point assigned.
Student-initiated, a W appears on the transcript
when a student officially withdraws from a course
in accordance with the college Drop/Withdrawal
procedure.
X
Prior Experiential Learning. No grade point
assigned. Instructor-initiated, an X appears on the
transcript after the student successfully demonstrates
mastery of program competencies.
Course Numbering
Courses numbered below 100 are not considered college level
and do not meet degree/certification requirements.
Criterion for Good Standing
A student is in good academic standing when the quarterly
grade point average remains at or above 2.0. Financial aid
recipients are subject to the Student Progress Policy as stated
on page 140 of this catalog.
Grade Changes
Students who believe that an error has been made in the grade
received for a course should contact the instructor as soon as
possible to discuss the issue. Requests for grade changes will be
accepted no later than one quarter from the date the grade was
issued. Appeals will be addressed through the Academic Appeal
Process described in this catalog.
Adding a Course
Students may add courses online through the second day of
the quarter without faculty permission. After that date, faculty
permission is required. Add/Drop forms are available in the
Student Records Office.
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135
Withdrawing From a Course
Students dropping or withdrawing from any course or program
must complete an official Add/Drop Form in Student Records
on their last day in class. If an emergency occurs preventing the
student from coming to the college, withdrawals may be made by
telephone at (253) 589-5666, by fax at (253) 589-5852, or on the
web at www.cptc.edu/drop. Failure by the student to officially
withdraw will affect grades and possible refunds. Financial Aid
recipients are subject to the Student Progress Policy as stated on
page 140 of this catalog and should contact the Financial Aid
Office prior to withdrawing from a program or course.
Withdrawals through the 5th class day after the start of a
course or program will be considered a drop and will not
appear on the student transcript.
Withdrawals after the 5th class day, and through the 35th class
day of a quarter may receive a W grade. Students withdrawing
after the end of the 35th class day of a quarter will receive the
grade earned for the quarter at the time of withdrawal.
Students re-enrolling in a course or program for which a W,
F, or V was assigned must begin the course or program in the
first week of the quarter and in accordance with established
prerequisites.
Administrative Withdrawal
Clover Park Technical College reserves the right to administratively withdraw students under the following conditions:
1 Student has not attended the first two class sessions
and/or complied with the established attendance
policy for the class or program.
2 Student has not successfully fulfilled the prerequisites
for the class or program. Student will be notified of
the withdrawal and provided registration options.
3 If a student violates the Student Code of Conduct,
an administrative withdrawal may be done. Student
will be notified of this action.
Auditing a Course
A student may enroll to audit a course with permission of the
program faculty. The auditing student is expected to pay tuition
and fees but is not required to take examinations and will not
receive credit for the course. A grade of N will be listed on the
student’s transcript and will not be computed in the GPA.
Registration status changes from audit to credit or from credit to
audit are not allowed after the start of the course.
Repeating a Course
Students may repeat a course in which they have not
received a passing grade, unless prohibited by program
policy. To repeat a course, a student must register for the
course on a space available basis, complete a Course Repeat
form at the time of registration, and pay all necessary fees.
Repeating a Course continues on next page
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
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136
2011-2012 Catalog
Repeating a Course continued
A course may be repeated no more than twice (this is defined
as two repeats in addition to the original enrollment). All
courses and earned grades will remain on the student’s
transcript, with only the highest grade received for a repeated
course used in the calculation of the GPA.
Financial aid recipients and veterans should check with the
Financial Aid and Student Records (veteran’s) offices regarding
funding for repeated courses.
Other colleges may not accept a grade earned in a
repeated course.
General Education
All degree or certificate programs of 45 credits or longer
require a minimum of five credits each in three college-level
(100 level or above) General Education areas: communication,
quantitative reasoning (math), and social sciences. Students
are responsible for registering and completing these courses
prior to graduation. Specific courses are identified in the
program descriptions. General Education courses are offered
at convenient hours throughout the day each quarter.
Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) in all development
courses in order to advance to the next level course or any 100
level course.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
Core Abilities
Clover Park Technical College has identified four core abilities
that all certificate- and degree-seeking students should possess
upon completion of their program. These competencies
represent workplace skills that will prepare graduates to be
valued employees and will contribute to their success.
Communication: Students will receive and deliver written,
spoken, and visual information clearly and accurately.
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Students will
apply principles and strategies of purposeful, active,
organized thinking.
Personal/Professional Responsibility: Students
will apply effective work habits and attitudes within an
organizational setting and to work successfully with others as
part of the total team, both inside and outside the workplace.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Additional Degree Requirements
To receive an Associate of Applied Technology (AAT) or
Associate of Applied Science – T (AAS-T) degree at Clover
Park Technical College, the following degree requirements
must be met:
• Successful completion of the technical and General
Education courses required for your program.
• Completion of a high school diploma or GED. Students
who do not have a high school diploma or GED may
request one at the time that they apply for their degree.
• Completion of a capstone project course. Courses that
satisfy the degree requirement for a capstone project are
identified in the catalog with a CAP postscript following the
course number.
• Completion of a diversity requirement. Courses that satisfy
the diversity degree requirement are identified in the
catalog with a DIV postscript following the course number.
• Completion of a computer literacy requirement.
Computer literacy may be demonstrated by either passing
a competency test or successfully completing a computer
literacy course designated with a CL postscript following the
course number.
Transfer of Credit to
Clover Park Technical College
Total combined credit granted from all external sources shall
not exceed 50 percent of the credits needed for program
completion.
Programs may have exceptions to the maximum credits
accepted in transfer due to special articulations or consortium
agreements. These exceptions will be noted in the program
description section of this catalog.
CREDIT FROM COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES
Clover Park Technical College curriculum is based on current
industry standards. Transfer credit from an accredited
institution may be accepted if the course work:
1. Was college level.
2. Was graded as C (2.0) or better.
3. Meets required time limitations:
Information/Technological Literacy: Students will use
modern electronic and industrial devices to accomplish tasks in
today’s workplace.
a Technical Courses: Must meet the program’s
requirements as described in the Clover Park
Technical College catalog.
College Success Course
b General Education Courses do not have a
required time limitation unless specified by an
individual program.
A course entitled College 101 – Foundations for Student
Success is recommended for all students entering the
educational arena and required for those with a COMPASS
placement at or below of English 82 or Math 82. The course
should be completed during the first quarter of study at CPTC.
Requirements can be found in the program
description section of this catalog.
4.Transfer credit combined with all sources may
constitute no more than 50 percent of the credits
needed for program completion.
5.Transfer of credit for programs with license
requirements are subject to current licensing laws.
HIGH SCHOOL LEARNING EXPERIENCE / DUAL CREDIT
Credit/dual credit may be accepted for high school learning
experience where formal articulation agreements are in
place. Courses that have Dual Credit Articulation agreements
are marked with an asterisk * in both program and course
description. Please contact Student Records at (253) 589-6003
for specific agreements..
MILITARY EXPERIENCE
Credit may be accepted for military experience or education
based on guidelines from the American Council on Education.
PRIOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING CREDIT
Students who wish to receive credit for prior learning will
complete the Prior Learning Assessment Request Form
available from the Student Records Office and pay the
following fees for assessment services: $40 evaluation fee and
$20 for each course for which prior learning credit is requested.
Instructors will evaluate the prior experiential learning of a
student in relation to the competencies of the program and
will award credit for demonstrated learning outcomes that are
appropriate to the subject, course, or program offered.
All credits awarded for this type of experience will be noted
as such on the student’s transcript with a grade of X. Credit
for prior experiential learning may constitute no more than 25
percent of the credits needed for program completion.
SERVICEMEMBER OPPORTUNITY COLLEGE (SOC)
Clover Park Technical College has been designated as a
member of Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC),
a group of more than 1,900 colleges and universities that
provide educational opportunities for servicemembers and
their families throughout the world.
Recognizing the problems faced by military students whose
jobs require frequent moves, SOC member schools make it
easier to obtain college degrees rather than just accumulate
course credit by:
• Limiting the amount of course work students must
take at a single college to no more than 25% of
degree requirements
• Designing transfer practices to minimize loss of
credit and avoid duplication of course work
• Awarding credit for military experience
• Awarding credit for tests such as CLEP, DSST
(formerly DANTES)
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137
CLEP & DSST CREDIT
The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) is a way
to earn credit for comprehensive knowledge you may have
acquired through independent or prior study, cultural pursuits,
work, or other life experiences. If you successfully pass the
CLEP tests, you may receive credit for completing certain
certificate or degree requirements. Clover Park Technical
College (CPTC) accepts the following subject tests when passed
with the recommend American Council on Education (ACE)
score: College Mathematics, College Algebra, Introductory
Psychology, and English Composition. Information about
CLEP tests and testing sites can be obtained on the College
Board website at www.collegeboard.com.
DSST (formerly known as DANTES Subject Standardized
Tests) is also accepted as a way to earn credit for prior
knowledge or experience. The subject must be equivalent to
CPTC courses and will be accepted according to the ACE
recommendations for passing and credit value. Information
about DSST tests and testing sites can be obtained online at
www.dantes.doded.mil.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT
Clover Park Technical College (CPTC) grants credits to
students who have earned a score of three or more on the
Advanced Placement Tests of the College Board in the
following subject areas: English, Mathematics, Psychology, and
Environmental Studies. For more information about AP study
and testing, please see the AP counselor at your high school
or go to www.collegeboard.com and search for Advanced
Placement. When you take your test, be sure to indicate that
the results should be sent to CPTC.
ALTERNATIVE CREDIT OPTIONS
CPTC accepts many alternative credit options for completion
of degrees and certificates; however, if your plans include
transfer to another college or university, they may not provide
the same credit and you should check with their Admissions
Office to determine your best options for meeting your
educational goals.
Transferability of Clover Park
Technical College Credit
Many Clover Park Technical College programs have
individual agreements with other academic institutions that
provide for the transfer of credits. Acceptance of credit taken
at one educational institution is always at the discretion of
the receiving institution. Students are advised to contact the
registrar of the receiving institution to discuss its policies and
procedures for transfer credit.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
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2011-2012 Catalog
Transfer Rights and Responsibilities
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Students have the right to clear, accurate, and current
information about their transfer admission requirements,
transfer admission deadlines, degree requirements, and
transfer policies that include course equivalencies.
2. Transfer and freshman-entry students have the right to
expect comparable standards for regular admission to
programs and comparable program requirements.
3. Students have the right to seek clarification regarding their
transfer evaluation and may request the reconsideration of
any aspect of that evaluation. In response, the college will
follow established practices and processes for reviewing its
transfer credit decisions.
4. Students who encounter other transfer difficulties have the
right to seek resolution. Each institution will have a defined
process for resolution that is published and readily available
to students.
5. Students have the responsibility to complete all materials
required for admission and to submit the application on or
before the published deadlines.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
6. Students have the responsibility to plan their courses
of study by referring to the specific published degree
requirements of the college or academic program in which
they intend to earn a bachelor’s degree.
7. When a student changes a major or degree program, the
student assumes full responsibility for meeting the new
requirements.
COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY RIGHTS
AND RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Colleges and universities have the right and authority to
determine program requirements and course offerings in
accordance with their institutional missions.
2. Colleges and universities have the responsibility to
communicate and publish their requirements and course
offerings to students and the public, including information
about student transfer rights and responsibilities.
3. Colleges and universities have the responsibility to
communicate their admission and transfer-related decisions
to students in writing (electronic or paper).
Clover Park Technical College Degrees
Clover Park Technical College awards two types of degrees.
The Associate of Applied Technology (AAT) degree
is awarded to students who satisfactorily complete the
competencies and requirements in programs approved by the
college’s Curriculum Committee and by the State Board for
Community and Technical Colleges. AAT degree options are
available in programs 90 credits or more in length containing a
core of fifteen (15) college-level academic credits. College-level
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
academic courses in communication, quantitative reasoning,
and social sciences required for AAT degrees are designed
to prepare students for work. While they meet program
graduation requirements, they are not likely to transfer to
other colleges or universities.
The Associate in Applied Science - T (AAS-T) degree
is awarded to students who satisfactorily complete the
competencies and requirements in programs approved by
the college’s Curriculum Committee and by the State Board
for Community and Technical Colleges. AAS-T degrees are
workforce degrees with a core of General Education courses
commonly accepted in transfer. The General Education
component of the AAS-T degree is comprised of not less
than twenty (20) credits of courses, including a minimum of 5
credits in communication; 5 credits in quantitative reasoning;
and 10 credits in social science, humanities, or science. It is
assumed that many AAS-T degrees will have significantly more
than the minimum 20 credits of General Education courses.
Degree options are indicated on individual program
descriptions in this catalog..
Clover Park Technical College Degrees
Transfer Agreements
Clover Park Technical College has agreements with several
universities and colleges for transfer into specific baccalaureate
programs for selected programs.
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY
TRANSFER AGREEMENTS
Capella University – Capella University, founded in 1993,
offers Bachelor’s degrees in the fields of business, information
technology, nursing, and psychology. The university is exclusively
online, and focuses on the needs of adult students who want
a high-quality education they can pursue from any location.
Capella degree programs are based on professional standards
and employer recommendations so that from the beginning, your
program delivers what you need to succeed in your field.
Capella is committed to providing a high quality online education
that challenges you, while providing the resources, support, and
assistance you need to keep on track toward your goals.
Capella University has formed an alliance with Clover Park
Technical College that is intended to allow graduates of Clover
Park Technical College a smooth transfer of credits toward
Capella programs, as well as reduced tuition. Visit www.capella.
edu/cptc for more information. Capella University is accredited
by The Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the
North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.
City University of Seattle – Clover Park Technical College
students may transfer up to 90 credits from approved programs
to City University of Seattle for inclusion in the degree
requirements of appropriate Bachelor’s degrees.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
To be considered for admission to City University of Seattle,
students must submit a City U of Seattle admission application
form, including any additional admission documents if
required, and submit an official transcript from Clover Park
Technical College.
City University of Seattle – City University of Seattle
accepts all credits in the AAS-T, though more than two years
may be required to complete the City University of Seattle
degree. To find out more about City University of Seattle,
contact them at http://www.cityu.edu.
City University of Seattle, founded in 1973, addresses the
educational needs of working adults and offers certificates
and degrees in more than 50 programs. It has nearly two
dozen locations throughout the state of Washington as well
as the state of California, the Canadian province of British
Columbia, Denmark, Germany, Slovakia, and Switzerland.
City University is accredited by the Northwest Association of
Schools and Colleges.
DeVry University – Students completing an AAS-T degree
at Clover Park Technical College will receive a block transfer
of courses to DeVry’s Bachelor of Science degree in Technical
Management (BSTM). The following programs are eligible:
The Associate in Applied Science-T (AAS-T) degree is built
upon the technical courses required for job preparation but
also includes a college-level General Education component.
Clover Park Technical College has identified AAS-T degree
options for the following programs:
Accounting
Architectural Engineering Design
Aviation Maintenance Technology
Computer Information Technology
Computer Networking & Information Systems Security
Culinary Arts
Early Care and Education
Environmental Sciences & Technology
Graphic Technologies
Interior Design
Human Services
Material Science - Nondestructive Testing
Material Science - Composites
Media Design and Production
Medical Histology
Nursing – RN Option
Professional Pilot
Sustainable Building Science
Currently, the following universities have agreements to
accept Clover Park Technical College’s Associate in Applied
Science-T (AAS-T) degrees. Call (253) 589-4333 for updated
information.
Accounting
Aviation Maintenance Technology
Computer Networking and Information Systems Security
Computer Information Technology
Emergency Management
Environmental Sciences & Technology
Interior Design
Media Design and Production
Professional Pilot
To find out more about DeVry University, contact them at
http://www.devry.edu
Bellevue College (BAS degree) – An articulation agreement
has been established to enable graduates of CPTC’s Interior Design program to apply for acceptance into the Bachelor of Applied Arts (BAA) degree in Interior Design at Bellevue College.
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – The EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University accepts ten Clover Park
AAS-T degrees in transfer. To find out more about The
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, contact them at
http://www.embryriddle.edu:
Aviation Maintenance Technician
Professional Pilot
Computer Information Technology
Computer Networking & Information Systems Security
Environmental Sciences & Technology
Architectural Engineering Design
Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security
Heating & Air Conditioning/Refrigeration Service
Technician
South Seattle Community College (BAS degree) – The
Bachelor of Applied Science degree at South Seattle Community College accepts the following AAS-T degrees in transfer:
Culinary Arts
Accounting
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE-T (AAS-T)
TRANSFER AGREEMENTS
139
140
2011-2012 Catalog
The Evergreen State College – The Evergreen State College
accepts several Clover Park degrees in transfer. To find out more
about Evergreen’s Upside Down Degree Program, contact them
at http://www.evergreen.edu
Accounting (AAT or AAS-T)
Computer Information Technology (AAT or AAS-T)
Early Care and Education (AAT or AAS-T)
Environmental Sciences & Technology (AAT or AAS-T)
Graphic Technologies (AAS-T)
Human Services (AAT or AAS-T)
Human Services: Chemical Dependency (AAT or AAS-T)
Interior Design (AAS-T)
Massage Studies (AAT with approved math)
Medical Histology Technicial (AAT or AAS-T)
Nursing: RN Option (AAS-T)
Pharmacy Technician (AAT)
Sustainable Building Science (AAT)
The Evergreen State College is accredited by the Northwest
Commission on Colleges and Universities.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
University of Phoenix – The University of Phoenix has
agreed to accept the AAS-T in transfer for their Bachelors
of Science in Management (BSM) degree. To find out more
about the University of Phoenix, contact them through their
website at www.phoenix.edu.
University of Washington, Tacoma – An articulation
agreement has been established with the University of
Washington, Tacoma, for the following program:
Environmental Sciences & Technology
OTHER TRANSFER OPPORTUNITIES
Many individual academic courses offered at Clover Park
Technical College are accepted for transfer to two-year
colleges and baccalaureate institutions, including Washington
State University, The Evergreen State College, Central
Washington University, the University of Washington, Western
Washington University, Eastern Washington University, The
Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising and National
University. For more information on transferability,
call 253-589-4333.
Academic Honors
QUARTERLY HONORS
Each quarter, Clover Park Technical College recognizes
outstanding academic achievement by placing students on
the President’s List or the Vice President’s List. Each student
who meets the criteria for these awards will receive a letter of
acknowledgment and will have a notation of the award placed
on his/her transcript.
President’s List – Granted to students with a minimum
quarterly enrollment of 12 college-level credits in courses
receiving grades other than V, W, N, or I and a minimum
quarterly grade point average of 4.0.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Vice President’s List – Granted to students with a
minimum quarterly enrollment of 12 college-level credits
in courses receiving grades other than V, W, N, or I and a
minimum quarterly grade point average of 3.75 – 3.99.
GRADUATION HONORS
A student completing an Associate of Applied Technology
degree or Associate of Applied Science-T degree who
achieves a cumulative grade point average of 3.75 – 4.0 is
eligible for honors at graduation. Each student who meets
these criteria will receive a letter of acknowledgment and will
have the notation of Honors placed on his/her transcript.
HONOR SOCIETIES
Phi Theta Kappa is the largest honor society in American higher
education. Clover Park Technical College’s Beta Omicron
Gamma chapter is one of 1,200 chapters. Phi Theta Kappa’s
focus is on scholarship, leadership, service and fellowship.
Students with a 3.50 GPA are eligible to join Phi Theta Kappa.
A one-time induction fee is required. Please contact a Phi Theta
Kappa advisor at 589-5610 for more information.
Psi Beta National Honor Society is the National Honor
Society in Psychology for community and junior colleges. The
mission of Psi Beta is professional development of psychology
students through promotion and recognition of excellence in
scholarship, leadership, community research, and community
services. Clover Park Technical College’s chapter is one of 170
chapters nationwide. Students with a 3.50 GPA are eligible
to join Psi Beta. A one-time induction fee is required. Please
contact a Psi Beta advisor at 589-5610 for more information.
Student Progress Policy
Clover Park Technical College is a state technical college.
Tuition covers about 38% of the cost of a student’s education.
State tax dollars provide the rest. Washington State Law (SB
5135. RCW 28B.10.695) requires all state colleges to adopt
policies that ensure students seeking degrees and certificates
complete in a timely manner.
Clover Park Technical College is in a partnership with students
to work towards an educational plan that will assist them in
making consistent progress. The following Student Progress
Policy and Degree/Certification Completion will assist students
with their responsibilities to make progress towards their goals.
Degree/Certificate Completion Procedures
The college requires that students complete their degree or
certificate within 125% of the published length of the program.
The college will take the following steps to ensure that students
are completing programs within a timely manner.
Step 1 When a student has completed the credits of the
published length of the program, registration will be
restricted until the student has developed a completion
plan in consultation with instructional faculty. The plan
must show that the student will be able to complete
2011-2012 Catalog
within the 125% of the normal timeframe. If the student has mitigating circumstances, such as a disability,
that must be documented with the Disabilities Specialist, and an appropriate plan should be in place.
any alleged case of inequitable treatment. Student rights are
protected in the concern process and the college must insure
that a student will not suffer repercussions because he or she
chooses to file a concern.
Step 2 At 150% of credits required for the degree/certificate,
the student will be blocked from further registration.
The student may appeal to the appropriate dean for
special circumstances.
In the event that a student is dissatisfied with the conduct or
performance of a college or instructional program employee,
the college encourages informal resolution of disputes
whenever possible, and also maintains fair and equitable
procedures for formally expressing and resolving concerns.
Academic Progress
The following are guidelines for determining who can assist a
student with a concern regarding:
These policies are intended to support a successful learning
experience at Clover Park Technical College.
At the conclusion of each quarter, the grades of all students
enrolled in that quarter will be reviewed. A student whose
quarterly grade point average is less than 2.0 and is taking
6 or more credits that quarter will be notified of his/her
standing. Through this process the student will be alerted to
potential problems in a timely manner so that the student may
take effective corrective action. Any student whose quarterly
GPA is under 2.0 will be encouraged to take advantage of the
assistance provided by the college to help assure student success.
The following guidelines have been established to ensure that
academic standards are maintained:
Step 1 The first quarter in which the grade point average is
less than 2.0 will cause the student to receive notification of the level of academic achievement. The student may not be allowed to continue to the next course
in accordance with established program prerequisites.
Step 2 If the student experiences two consecutive quarters
of work in which the GPA is less than 2.0 (each
quarter), the student will be placed on academic
probation for the following quarter of attendance.
Step 3 If a student experiences three consecutive quarters of
work in which the GPA is less than 2.0 (each quarter),
the student will be suspended from attendance at the college and may not register for the next academic quarter.
Students placed on academic probation or suspension may
appeal to the Academic Review Committee for reassessment
if they believe that unusual circumstances beyond their control
were the cause of their low academic achievement. Financial
Aid recipients are subject to the Student Progress Policy.
Reinstatement to the college, following one quarter of academic suspension, requires the student to meet with advising/counseling staff to develop an educational plan. Upon reinstatement, the student will resume classes on academic probation.
Student Concerns
GENERAL INFORMATION
It is the policy of Clover Park Technical College to provide
students with an opportunity to resolve any alleged violation of
college academic policy, procedure, or regulation, or to resolve
141
Academic.................................... Division Dean/Instruction
Accommodations........................ Student Services
Disciplinary................................. Student Services
Discrimination/Harassment....... Human Resources
Facilities/Bookstore.................... Operations & Facilities
Financial..................................... Financial Aid Office
ACADEMIC APPEAL PROCESS
Academic Appeal must be made within fifteen (15) instructional days following the issuance of the grade or decision.
Step 1 Before a student can file a written concern or appeal,
he or she should try to resolve the problem informally.
The college expects the student to address his/her
concern by first meeting with the college employee(s)
whose actions resulted in the concern, discussing the
issue, and documenting the discussion with notes. If
not resolved, the student may proceed to the next step.
Step 2 If, within 5 instructional days following the informal
meeting, the student feels a satisfactory resolution has not
been achieved, the student may file a written concern
with the employee’s division dean or immediate supervisor, the concern or appeal must be in writing. A Student
Concern Form is available from any instructor, division
dean’s office, or Advising & Counseling Office.
Step 3 Within 5 instructional days after receiving the concern
or appeal in writing, the dean or supervisor will be
responsible to investigate the concern. The dean or
supervisor will provide the employee or instructor with
a copy of the written concern or appeal; the employee
or instructor will have 5 instructional days in which to
provide a written response to their supervisor/dean.
Step 4 The dean or supervisor will convene a meeting of both
parties in an attempt to resolve the issue, provided that
the parties agree to meet for this purpose. In the event
that one or both parties do not agree to meet, the dean
or supervisor will investigate and render a decision
based on the written statements and testimony of the
parties. The dean or supervisor will impart this decision
in writing to both parties within 5 instructional days. If
the student feels a satisfactory resolution has not been
achieved, the student may proceed to the next step.
Student Concerns/Academic Appeal continues on next page
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
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142
2011-2012 Catalog
Step 5 Within 5 instructional days after Step 4, the student
will notify the appropriate Vice President, in writing, to
request a hearing before the Appeal Review Committee.
The Committee will be chaired by the Vice President for
Instruction (or designee) and will also include the Vice
President for Student Services (or designee), two student
representatives appointed by the Student Council, and
two faculty members appointed by the Faculty Union.
Step 6 Within 10 instructional days, the Appeal Review
Committee will meet with the student, instructor or
employee, and dean or supervisor to hear the points
at issue in the appeal. The Committee will provide its
written decision to all parties within 5 instructional
days following the hearing. The decision is final and
may not be reviewed.
The process described above is not to be used for filing an appeal
based on the outcome of a summary or disciplinary proceeding,
financial appeal, or discrimination grievance as described in
other areas of the College Catalog or Student Handbook.
Federal and state laws, rules, and regulations, in addition to
policies, regulations, and procedures adopted by the State Board
for Community and Technical Colleges, shall not be grievable
matters. Students shall use Chapter WAC 495C-300 and 495C310 for grievances pertaining to sexual discrimination or equal
opportunity discrimination based upon handicap.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
Academic Forgiveness (Fresh Start)
A student may petition the Director of Enrollment Services to
have sub-standard Clover Park Technical College course work
set aside.
• The student must be currently enrolled.
• The forgiveness date must be at least two years prior
to the current quarter.
• All course work taken prior to the forgiveness will
be set aside. The student may not elect to retain
individual courses and set aside others.
• The academic forgiveness option may be exercised
only once.
Forgiven course work will remain on the transcript but will not be
used in determining the cumulative grade point average or the
calculation of honors. Forgiven course work may not be reinstated
or used to satisfy Prerequisites or degree/diploma requirements.
Students are advised that a decision to set aside course work may
or may not be honored by other educational institutions, since
each institution interprets transcripts according to its own policies.
Graduation
Clover Park Technical College grants two degrees, the
Associate of Applied Technology degree and the Associate of
Applied Science-T degree. These degrees are defined on page
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
138 of this catalog and the degree programs are listed in the
chapter Programs and Courses.
A Certificate is awarded to students who satisfactorily complete
the competencies and requirements for programs that are not
defined as degree programs. General Education courses are
required in certificate programs of 45 credits or more.
Courses numbered below 100 are not considered college level
and do not meet degree/certificate requirements.
STANDARD FOR GRADUATION
To be eligible for graduation, a student must have:
• a cumulative grade point average of no less than 2.0
• met all of the program requirements
• completed 50 percent of the technical coursework
at Clover Park Technical College
• 15 percent of the technical coursework in the final
credits taken at Clover Park Technical College
APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION AWARD
To receive an Associate degree or certificate from Clover Park
Technical College, a student must complete an Application for
Graduation Award form in the Student Records Office and
pay the non-refundable fee for each award requested. The
application must be filed by the fourth week of the quarter in
which the student expects to graduate.
COMMENCEMENT
Annually, Clover Park Technical College will offer an all
campus graduation ceremony at a local venue. Any eligible
student completing a degree, certificate, high school diploma,
or GED granted through Clover Park Technical College at
any time during the academic year, may participate. Students
must submit an application for graduation to participate.
Graduation deadlines will be announced in March.
The ceremony will be held Saturday, June 16, 2012 at
11:00 AM in the Tacoma Dome.
TIME LIMITATION
Clover Park Technical College curriculum is based on current
industry standards. Returning Clover Park Technical College
students who left prior to completion of their program must
meet the program’s graduation requirements as described in
the current Clover Park Technical College catalog.
Clover Park Technical College students who have completed
the technical requirements of their program but have not
completed the General Education requirements for a degree or
certificate will have one year from their date of withdrawal to
complete the required General Education classes. If a longer
period of time elapses before General Education courses are
completed, the student will be required to meet the program’s
graduation requirements as described in the current Clover
Park Technical College catalog.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Annual Notification of
Rights Under FERPA
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
affords students certain rights with respect to their
education records:
1 The right to inspect and review the student’s education
records within 45 days of the day Clover Park Technical
College receives a request for access.
Students should submit to the registrar a written request
that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The
registrar will make arrangements for access and notify
the student of the time and place where the records may
be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the
registrar, the student will be advised of the correct official to
whom the request should be addressed.
2 The right to request the amendment of the student’s
education records that the student believes are inaccurate
or misleading.
Students may ask Clover Park Technical College to amend
a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They
should write to the CPTC official responsible for the record,
clearly identify the part of the record they want changed,
and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.
If Clover Park Technical College decides not to amend the
record as requested by the student, Clover Park Technical
College will notify the student of the decision and advise
the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the
request for amendment. Additional information regarding
the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when
notified of the right to a hearing.
3 The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable
information contained in the student’s education records,
except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure
without consent.
One exception which permits disclosure without consent
is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational
interests. A school official is a person employed by CPTC
in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or
support staff position (including law enforcement personnel
and health staff); a person or company with whom CPTC
has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection
agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; a
volunteer or others performing institutional functions;
a student serving on an official committee, such as a
disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another
school official in performing his or her tasks.
A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the
official needs to review an education record in order to
fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
143
Clover Park Technical College designates the following information as Directory Information: Student name, address,
telephone number, date and place of birth, major field of
study, eligibility for and participation in officially recognized
activities, organizations, dates of attendance, honor roll,
enrollment status, degrees and awards received, student
photo, student e-mail address, and the most recent previous
educational agency or institution attended by the student.
Directory Information may be released by Clover Park
Technical College without student consent unless the student specifically requests that such information, or portions
thereof, not be released. Clover Park Technical College will
not release Directory Information for commercial purposes
or other purposes not related to the school program or the
conduct of official government business. Students currently
attending Clover Park Technical College should complete
a Request to Prevent Disclosure of Directory Information
form in the Student Records Office if they do not wish
Directory Information released.
4 The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department
of Education concerning alleged failures by Clover Park
Technical College to comply with the requirements
of FERPA. The name and address of the office that
administers FERPA:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
600 Independence Avenue SW
Washington DC 20202-4605
Transcripts
A transcript is a copy of a student’s academic record and
is released only with written permission of the student. All
students are eligible to receive a transcript if they have met
their financial obligation with the College.
A $5 processing fee is charged for each transcript. Transcript
request forms are available in the Student Records Office,
Building 17, and on the Clover Park Technical College website
at www.cptc.edu/transcript.
Students may obtain an unofficial copy of their transcript
at www.cptc.edu by selecting Current Students, then View
Unofficial Transcript, if they were enrolled at Clover Park
Technical College after Spring quarter 1994.
Change of Address
Student information, admission letters, statements, and
graduation awards are frequently mailed to students; therefore,
it is important to maintain the student’s current address.
Change of address forms are available in the Student
Records Office in Building 17, or call 253-589-5666.
Students may change their own address on the college
Website at www.cptc.edu under Current Students.
STUDENT RECORDS
Student Records
2011-2012 Catalog
144
2011-2012 Catalog
Student Code
of Conduct
14. Verbal or written threats and intimidation.
Disciplinary action may be taken for a violation of any
provision of this student code, for a violation of other college
rules, which may from time to time be properly adopted, or for
any of the following types of misconduct:
16. Entering any administrative office or any locked or
otherwise closed college facility in any manner, at any
time, without permission of the college employee or agent
in charge thereof.
1. Possession, use, sale, or distribution of any illegal drug on
the college campus. The use of illegal drugs by any student
attending a college-sponsored event is also prohibited, even
though the event does not take place at the college. The use
of alcohol by any student attending such events on college
or non-college property shall conform to state law.
17. Refusal to provide positive identification (e.g., valid
driver’s license or state identification card) in appropriate
circumstances to any college employee in the lawful
discharge of said employee’s duties.
2. Behavior in the classroom or at a college function that is
disruptive to the teaching and learning environment.
3. Engaging in lewd, indecent, or obscene behavior.
4. Where the student presents an imminent danger to college
property, to himself or herself or other students or persons
in college facilities on or off campus, or to the education
process of the college.
5. Dishonesty, including cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly
furnishing false information to the college.
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
6. The intentional making of false statements or filing of false
charges against the college and members of the college
community.
7. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of college documents, records,
funds, or instruments of identification with the intent to
defraud.
8. Theft from, damage to, or misuse of college premises or
property, or theft of or damage to property of a member of
the college community or college premises.
15. Malicious damage to or malicious misuse of college
property, or the property of any person where such
property is located on the college campus.
18. Violation of any rules or policies pertaining to the use of
computer and technology resources.
Dress Standards
Students are expected to present a well-groomed appearance
appropriate to the training environment and future employment conditions. Health and safety factors may require special
regulations pertaining to attire. Dress standards allow for some
flexibility within a training program but are consistent with
health and safety standards, and industry requirements.
Right to Demand Identification
For the purpose of determining whether probable cause exists
for the application of any section of this code to any behavior
by any person on a college facility, any college personnel or
other authorized personnel may demand that any person on
college facilities produce identification.
Hazing Policy
9. Failure to comply with the direction of college officials
acting in the legitimate performance of their duties.
1. No student, or other person in attendance at Clover Park
Technical College, may conspire to engage in hazing or
participate in hazing of another. Hazing is defined as any
activity that includes one or more of the following:
10. Possession of firearms, except where approved by state
statute.
a. Activities that expose personal values to compromise
or ridicule
11. Engaging in unwelcome sexual advances, requests for
sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of
sexual nature where such behavior knowingly offends the
recipient, causes discomfort, or humiliates, or interferes
with job performance or learning environment.
b. Stunts which have no meaningful relationship to the
objectives of the organization
12. Falsely setting off or otherwise tampering with any
emergency safety equipment, alarm, or other device
established for the safety of individuals and/or college
facilities.
d. Activities that humiliate or subject individuals to
circumstances with which they are not comfortable,
or of which they are fearful
13. Actions and/or language directed to others that incites
disruptive behavior.
f. Activities which interfere with educational pursuits
or normal life functions
c. Activities that abuse the trust an organization is striving
to build between its members and prospective members
e. Activities which are illegal or violate College policy
2. Penalties
a. Any organization or association that knowingly permits
hazing shall: 1) be liable for harm caused to persons
or property resulting from hazing, and 2) be denied
recognition by Clover Park Technical College as an
official organization or association on this campus. If
the organization or association is a corporation, whether
for profit or nonprofit, the individual directors of the
corporation may be held individually liable for damages.
b. A person who participates in the hazing of another
shall forfeit any entitlement to state-funded grants,
scholarships, or awards for 90 calendar days.
c. Forfeiture of state-funded grants, scholarships, or awards
shall continue for 90 calendar days, up to and including
permanent forfeiture, based upon the seriousness of the
violations.
3. Disciplinary action may be taken under this chapter for
hazing violations.
4. Hazing violations are also misdemeanors punishable under
state criminal law, according to RCW 9A.20.021.
5. Conduct which causes embarrassment, ridicule, sleep
deprivation, verbal abuse, or personal humiliation, not
amounting to hazing, shall be subject to disciplinary action
under this chapter.
Loss of Eligibility—Student Participation
Any student found to have violated chapter 69.41 RCW, illegal
drugs, by virtue of a criminal conviction or by final decision of
the college president or designee shall, in lieu of, or in addition
to any other disciplinary action which may be imposed, be
disqualified from participation in any school-sponsored events
or activities.
Disciplinary Process
1. Infractions of college rules may be referred by any college
staff member to the appropriate dean or designee.
2. A student alleged to have violated a provision of this
chapter shall be notified to meet with the dean or designee
for possible disciplinary action.
3. After a careful review of the circumstances surrounding the
alleged misconduct, the dean or designee may take any of
the following actions:
a. Terminate the proceeding
b. Dismiss the case after whatever counseling and advice
the dean or designee deems appropriate
c. Impose appropriate disciplinary action (reprimand,
probation, suspension, expulsion), subject to the
student’s right of appeal
2011-2012 Catalog
145
4. The student will be notified in writing of the determination
made by the dean or designee.
5. If, after consideration of the alleged misconduct, the
recommendation of the dean or designee is for disciplinary
action, the student may:
a. Accept the disciplinary action, or
b. File, within fifteen (15) calendar days following receipt
of the notification of disciplinary action, a written
request for a formal hearing pursuant to the provisions
of WAC 495C-120-160. If the request is not filed within
the prescribed time, the right to do so is waived and the
disciplinary action becomes final.
6. If a hearing is requested, notice of the hearing shall be
given to all parties at least seven (7) days before the hearing.
The notice will indicate the names and addresses of all
parties, the names and addresses of their representatives, a
statement of the time, place, and nature of the proceeding,
a short and plain statement of the matters asserted, and the
legal authority and jurisdiction under which the hearing is
to be held.
Summary Suspension
If any college staff member has cause to believe that a student
presents an imminent danger to him/herself or other persons
on college facilities or to the educational process of the college,
then the staff member shall have authority to immediately
remove the student from the college premises.
The college staff member shall notify, as soon as possible,
the vice president for Student Services or designee who may
initiate summary suspension until such time as the college
staff is satisfied the student’s dangerous nature, behavior, or
situation has ceased.
The duration of summary suspension shall not exceed ten (10)
instructional days, except that the vice president for Student
Services or designee may continue summary suspension
beyond ten (10) instructional days in circumstances where
the student continues to present an imminent danger to the
people, facilities, or the educational process pending the
disciplinary proceedings provided for in this code.
1. If the vice president for Student Services or designee
desires to exercise the authority to summarily suspend
a student, the vice president or designee will cause the
student to be notified of the summary suspension.
2. A formal hearing, pursuant to the provisions of WAC
495C-120-160, will be scheduled and held as quickly as
feasible, provided the hearing shall be conducted by a
designee who has not participated in making the decision
to impose the summary suspension.
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
146
2011-2012 Catalog
Disciplinary Terms
The definitions set forth in this section reference
WAC 495C-120-180.
Disciplinary warning - oral notice of violation of college rules.
Reprimand - formal action after censuring a student for
violation of college rules or failure to satisfy the college’s
expectations regarding conduct. Reprimands are made in
writing to the student by the disciplinary official. A reprimand
indicates to the student that continuation or repetition of the
specific conduct involved or other misconduct will result in one
or more serious disciplinary actions described below.
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
Disciplinary probation - formal action placing conditions
upon the student’s continued attendance because of his or
her violation of college rules or failure to satisfy the college’s
expectations regarding conduct. The disciplinary official
placing the student on probation will specify, in writing, the
period of probation and the conditions, such as limiting the
student’s participation in extra-curricular activities. Disciplinary
probation warns the student that any further misconduct
will automatically raise the question of dismissal from the
college. Disciplinary probation may be for a specific term or
for an indefinite period, which may extend to graduation or
termination of the student’s enrollment in the college.
Suspension - temporary dismissal from the college and temporary termination of student status for violation of college
rules or for failure to meet college standards of conduct.
Expulsion - dismissal from the college and termination of
student status for an indefinite period of time, or permanently
for violation of college rules or for failure to meet the college
standards of conduct.
Summary suspension - temporary dismissal from the
college and temporary termination of a student’s status for a
period of time not to exceed ten (10) instructional days, unless
extended as provided in this chapter, which occurs prior to
invocation of the formal hearing procedures specified in these
rules due to a necessity to take immediate disciplinary action,
where a student presents an imminent danger to the college
property, or to himself or herself, or other students or persons
in college facilities on or off campus, or to the educational
process of the college.
Refunds & Access During
Disciplinary Action
Refund of fees for the period in which disciplinary action is
taken shall be in accordance with the college’s refund policy
in the Campus Policies section of this chapter. A student
suspended or expelled on the basis of conduct which has
disrupted the orderly operation of the campus or any facility
of the college, may be denied access to all or any part of the
campus or other facilities.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
Readmission After Suspension
or Expulsion
Any student suspended from the college for disciplinary
reasons will normally be readmitted upon expiration of
the time period for which the suspension was issued. If the
student has been expelled or feels that circumstances warrant
reconsideration of a temporary suspension prior to its
expiration, or if the student was suspended with conditions
imposed for readmission, the student may be readmitted only
upon approval of a written petition submitted to the vice
president for Student Services or designee. Such petition must
state reasons that support a reconsideration of the matter.
Readmission Into Instructional Program
Students who have been suspended pursuant to disciplinary
procedures set forth in WAC 495C-120-120 and 495C-120125 and whose suspension upon appeal is found to have been
unwarranted shall be provided the opportunity to re-enter
their instructional program, including an opportunity to retake
examinations or otherwise complete course offerings missed by
reason of such action.
Hearing Procedures for
Disciplinary Action
1. A student, if he or she wishes to appeal, has a right to a fair
and impartial hearing before the vice president for student
services, or designee (hereafter referred to as the hearing officer) on any charge of misconduct. The failure of a student
to cooperate with the hearing procedures, however, shall not
preclude the hearing officer from making his or her findings
of fact, reaching conclusions and imposing sanctions. Failure of the student to cooperate may be taken into consideration by the hearing officer in recommending penalties.
2.If a hearing is requested, notice of the hearing shall be
given to all parties at least seven (7) days before the hearing. The notice will indicate the names and addresses of all
parties, the names and addresses of their representatives, a
statement of the time, place, and nature of the proceeding,
a short and plain statement of the matters asserted, and
the legal authority and jurisdiction under which the hearing is to be held.
3. The student and/or his or her representative shall be entitled to hear and examine the evidence against him or her
and be informed of the identity of its sources. He/she shall
be entitled to present evidence in his or her own behalf
and question witnesses as to factual matters. The student
shall have all authority which is possessed by the college to
obtain information or to request the presence of witnesses
or the production of other evidence relevant to the issues at
the hearing.
4. Only those matters presented at the hearing, in the presence
of the student involved, will be considered in determining
whether the student is guilty of the misconduct charged.
However the student’s past record of conduct may be taken
into account in formulating the hearing officer’s recommendation for disciplinary action.
5. The student may be represented by counsel and/or accompanied by an advisor of his/her choice (who shall not
be a college employee). Provided, if the student elects, be
represented by a duly licensed attorney, the student must
notify the vice president for Student Services a minimum
of three (3) days prior to the hearing, excluding weekends
and holidays.
6. Hearings may be held in closed session at the discretion
of the hearing officer, the only exception being when the
student involved invites particular persons or requests an
open hearing. If, at any time during the conduct of the
hearing, invited persons are disruptive of the proceedings,
the hearing officer may exclude such persons from the
hearing room.
7. The hearing officer shall set the time, place, and available
seating capacity for a hearing.
8. All proceedings of the hearing officer will be conducted
with reasonable dispatch and terminated as soon as fairness
to all parties involved permits.
9. An adequate summary of the proceedings will be kept. As
a minimum, such summary would include a tape recording
of testimony. Such record will be available for inspection
and copying in the office of Student Services during regular
business hours.
10. The student will be provided with a copy of the findings of
fact and the conclusions of the hearing officer as well as a
statement of the available procedures and time limits for
seeking reconsideration or other administrative relief. The
student will be advised of his/her right to present, within
fifteen (15) calendar days, a written statement of appeal to
the president of the college before action is taken on the
decision of the hearing officer. In the case of an unemancipated minor, written notice of any action involving dismissal or disciplinary probation may be sent to the parents
or guardian of the student.
11. The vice president for Student Services or designee shall establish general rules of procedure for conducting hearings
consistent with these guidelines, the college’s rules of practice and procedure set forth in chapter 495C-108 WAC,
and the Administrative Procedure Act, chapter 34.05 RCW.
12. If no timely appeal is filed in writing in response to the
findings and conclusions of the hearing officer, the action
taken shall be final.
2011-2012 Catalog
147
Appeals Process
The outcome of any disciplinary hearing may be appealed,
subject to applicable timelines as provided in this section.
1. Notice of an appeal by a student shall be made in writing
and addressed to the president of the college within fifteen
(15) calendar days of receiving the formal notification of
the hearing outcome.
2. Review of appeals.
a The president must review the whole record or such
portions of it as may be cited by the parties.
b The president must afford each party the opportunity to
present written argument and may afford each party the
opportunity to present oral argument.
c The president must enter a final order disposing of the
proceedings or remand the matter for further proceedings,
with instructions.
d The final order must include a statement of findings and
conclusions, and the basis and reasons therefore, on all
material issues of fact, law, or discretion presented on the
record, including the remedy or sanction.
3 The president, after reviewing the case, shall either indicate
his or her approval of the conclusions of the hearing officer
by sustaining the decision, shall give directions as to what
other disciplinary action shall be taken by modifying his or
her decision, or shall nullify previous sanctions imposed by
reversing the decision, and shall then notify the official who
initiated the proceedings, the student, and the vice president
for Student Services.
4. The president will cause copies of the final order or remand
order to be served on each party.
5. The decision by the president shall constitute the final
decision of the college.
Reporting, Recording
& Maintaining Records
Records of all disciplinary cases shall be kept by the
appropriate disciplinary official and in the student’s official
college file. Except in proceedings where the student is
exonerated, all documentary or other physical evidence
produced or considered in disciplinary proceedings and all
recorded testimony shall be preserved, insofar as possible, for
not more than five (5) years. No other records of proceedings
wherein the student is exonerated, other than the fact of
exoneration, shall be maintained in the student’s file or other
college repository after the date of the student’s graduation, or
not more than five (5) years.
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
148
2011-2012 Catalog
Campus Policies
Campus Speakers
CAMPUS POLICIES
1. Student organizations officially recognized by the college
may invite speakers to the campus to address their own
membership and other interested students and staff, if suitable space is available and there is no interference with the
regularly scheduled program of the college. Although properly allowed by the college, the appearance of such speakers
on the campus implies neither approval nor disapproval of
them or their viewpoints. In the case of speakers who are
candidates for political office, equal opportunities shall be
available to opposing candidates if desired by them. Speakers are subject to the normal considerations for law and
order and to the specific limitations imposed by the state
constitution, which prohibits religious worship, exercise, or
instruction on state property.
2. In order to ensure an atmosphere of open exchange and
to ensure that the educational objectives of the college are
not obscured, the president or designee, in a case attended
by strong emotional feeling, may prescribe conditions for
the conduct of the meeting, such as requiring a designated
member of the staff as moderator, or requiring permission for comments and questions from the floor. Likewise,
the president or designee may encourage the appearance
of one or more additional speakers at any meeting or at a
subsequent meeting, so that other points of view may be
expressed. The president or designee may designate representatives to recommend conditions such as time, manner,
and place for the conduct of particular meetings.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
3. The crimes described in RCW 28B.10.571 and 28B.10.572
shall not apply to any employee who is engaged in the
reasonable exercise of their disciplinary authority.
4. Any person or persons who violate the provisions of subparagraphs 1) and 2) above will be subject to disciplinary
action and referred to the authorities for prosecution.
Commercial Activities
1. College facilities will not be used for commercial
solicitation, advertising, or promotional activities except
when such activities clearly serve educational objectives,
including but not limited to display of books of interest to
the staff or the display or demonstration of technical or
research equipment, and when such commercial activities
relate to educational objectives and are conducted under
the sponsorship or at the request of the college.
2. For the purpose of this regulation, the term commercial
activities does not include handbills, leaflets, newspapers or
similarly related materials as regulated in WAC 495C-120100.
Crime Statistics
CRIMES REPORTED
2007 2008 2009 2010
Murder
0
0
0
0
Rape
0
0
0
0
Robbery
0
0
0
2
Aggravated Rape
0
0
0
0
Burglary/Shoplifting
7
6
0
0
Catalog Policy
Motor Vehicle Theft
3
3
2
1
The college catalog provides an overview of the college’s
courses, programs, services, and policies. We make every effort
to convey accurate information, however, the college’s classes,
and programs and other activities are subject to change at any
time without notice. The catalog is not intended to create a
contractual obligation..
ARRESTS FOR THE
FOLLOWING CRIMES
2007 2008 2009 2010
Liquor Law Violations
0
0
0
0
Drug Abuse Violations
0
0
0
0
Civil Disturbances
Weapons Possession
0
0
0
0
In accordance with provisions contained in RCW 28B.10.571
and 28B.10.572:
*Statistics provided are based on reported case numbers to/by the
lakewood police department.
1. It shall be unlawful for any person, singly or in concert with
others, to interfere by force or violence with any employee
or student of the college who is in the peaceful discharge or
conduct of his/her duties or studies.
2. It shall be unlawful for any person, singly or in concert
with others, to intimidate by threat of force or violence any
employee or student of the college who is in the peaceful
discharge of his/her duties or studies.
Distribution of Information
1. Handbills, leaflets, newspapers, and similar materials
may be sold or distributed free of charge by any student
or students, or by members of recognized student
organizations, or by college employees on or in college
facilities at locations specifically designated by the president
or designee; provided such distribution or sale does not
interfere with the ingress or egress of persons or interfere
with the free flow of vehicular or pedestrian traffic.
2. Such handbills, leaflets, newspapers, and related matter
must bear identification as to the publishing agency and
distributing organization or individual.
3. All non-students shall register with the president or designee; prior to the distribution of any handbill, leaflet, newspaper, or related matter. Such distribution or sale must not
interfere with the free flow of vehicular or pedestrian traffic.
4. Any person or persons who violate the provisions
of subparagraphs 1) and 2) above will be subject to
disciplinary action.
Drug Free Environment
Clover Park Technical College aims for a Drug-Free
Environment. A program has been developed to prevent the
illicit use of drugs and the abuse of alcohol by students and
employees on college property or as any part of the college’s
activities. Possession and/or use of illicit drugs and alcohol
is a violation of the Student Code of Conduct and subject to
disciplinary action.
Free Movement on Campus
The president or designee is authorized in the instance of any
event that he or she deems impedes the movement of persons
or vehicles, or which he or she deems to disrupt the ingress
or egress of persons from the college facilities, to prohibit the
entry of, or withdraw the license of, or privileges of a person
or persons or any group of persons to enter onto or remain
upon any portion of the college facilities.
Suspended Operations
In the event Clover Park Technical College must close or
operate on a delayed schedule due to weather or other
emergency conditions, the College will seek to provide that
information to all local radio and television stations, by 5
a.m. if reasonably possible. In addition, a recorded message
will be available on the School Closure & Information Line
at 253/589-5707. The information will also be posted on the
home page of the College web site, www.cptc.edu; and at the
Public Schools Emergency Communications system web site,
www.schoolreport.org..
No announcement means normal operation.
Announcements are for one day only.
Non-Discrimination Policy
Clover Park Technical College does not discriminate on the basis
of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, sexual orientation/
gender identity, religion, or age in its program and activities. The
following office has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies:
2011-2012 Catalog
149
Chief Human Resources/Legal Affairs Officer
4500 Steilacoom Boulevard S.W., Lakewood, WA 98499
Telephone (253) 589-5533
Registered Sexual Offender Policy
The full policy and regulations for enrollment of registered
sexual offenders is available in the College Policy and
Procedures Handbook. When the college is notified by a law
enforcement agency that a sexual offender is planning on
attending or is attending the college, appropriate notification
of the offender’s presence will be made to faculty, staff, and
students depending on the offender’s classification level. For
details, contact the vice president of Student Services office.
Safety and Hazardous Materials
Safety procedures are posted next to the First Aid kits located
in all offices and classrooms of the college. Accidents should
be immediately reported to a college staff member or Security
office at (253) 589-5682 and an Accident/Injury Report
completed. Some program areas utilize materials which are
classified as hazardous chemicals. The Occupational Safety
Health Act (OSHA) Communication Standard 1910.120,
and the State of Washington Right to Know Statutes require
that chemicals be appropriately labeled and that the college
has on file a Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for each of
the hazardous chemical products being packaged, handled,
or transferred. The MSDS provides a description of how the
identified chemical is to be handled and is readily available in
case of an emergency, or upon request. Questions or concerns
regarding hazardous chemicals should be referred to the faculty
for further information.
Smoking Policy
Smoking or the use of any tobacco is permitted only in
designated areas. Designated areas are: parking lots, open
areas, personal autos, or posted smoking shelters. Smoking will
not be permitted in any state-owned building or within 25 feet
of any building entryway.
Student Right to Know
In compliance with the federal Student Right-to-Know
(SR2K) and Campus Security Act of 1990 (Public Law
101-542), Clover Park Technical College makes available
information about program completions on the college
website, www.cptc.edu/sr2k. A printed copy of this
information may be obtained by calling (253) 589-5570.
CAMPUS POLICIES
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
150
2011-2012 Catalog
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Calendar
September 2011
Labor Day (College Closed)..................................................Sept 5
Opening Session of College 101.........................................Sept 20
Fall Quarter Start...............................................................Sept 26
October 2011
Middle School Math Conference.............................................Oct 6
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.).................Oct 12
College Transfer Fair...........................................................Oct 18
CPTC Health and Wellness Fair (Building 23 @11am-2pm)......Oct 18
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.).................Oct 26
Faculty In-Service................................................................Oct 28
November 2011
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)..................Nov 9
Veterans Day Ceremony.....................................................Nov 10
Veterans Day Observed (College Closed)..............................Nov 10
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)................Nov 23
Thanksgiving (College Closed)........................................ Nov 24-25
ACADEMIC CALENDAR
December 2011
Quarterly Fees Due.............................................................. Dec 1
Financial Aid Deadline for Winter 2012................................. Dec 2
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)................ Dec 14
Last Day of Fall Quarter...................................................... Dec 15
Opening Session of College 101......................................... Dec 16
Winter Break............................................................. Dec 16-Jan 2
Christmas (College Closed)................................................. Dec 26
January 2012
Winter Quarter Start............................................................. Jan 3
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)................. Jan 11
Martin Luther King Day (College Closed)............................... Jan 16
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)................. Jan 25
February 2012
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)...................Feb 8
President’s Day (College Closed)...........................................Feb 20
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.).................Feb 22
Financial Aid Deadline for Spring 2012................................Feb 24
March 2012
Quarterly Fees Due.............................................................. Mar 1
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)................ Mar 14
Last day of Winter Quarter.................................................. Mar 21
Opening Session of College 101......................................... Mar 22
Spring Break................................................................ Mar 22-27
Spring Quarter Start........................................................... Mar 28
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)................ Mar 28
April 2012
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.).................Apr 11
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.).................Apr 25
May 2012
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)................. May 9
Career Conference.............................................................May 10
College Transfer Fair..........................................................May 10
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)................May 23
Faculty In-Service...............................................................May 25
Memorial Day (College Closed)...........................................May 28
Quarterly Fees Due............................................................May 31
June 2012
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)..................Jun 13
Last day of Spring Quarter................................................... Jun 14
Graduation Ceremony..........................................................Jun 16
Quarter Break................................................................Jun 15-29
Opening Session of College 101...........................................Jun 21
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)..................Jun 27
July 2012
Summer Quarter Start..............................................................Jul 2
July Fourth (College Closed).................................................... Jul 4
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)...................Jul 11
Foundation Golf Tournament...................................................Jul 13
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)...................Jul 25
August 2012
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.).................. Aug 8
Program Information Session ([email protected] p.m.)................ Aug 22
Summer Quarter Ends......................................................... Aug 31
September 2012
Labor Day (College Closed)...................................................Sep 3
Summer Break.................................................................Sep 3-21
Opening Session of College 101..........................................Sep 18
Fall Quarter Start................................................................Sep 24
For some programs, calendar dates vary, depending on training schedules.
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
151
Aviation Maintenance Technician Program, South Hill Campus.
FACULTY & ADMINISTRATION
Clover Park People
For more info www.cptc.edu/catalog or call 253-589-5800.
Faculty and Administration 154
152
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
Full-Time Faculty & Administration
AMMONS, DOUG
CHASE-DEITRICH, DEBI
DAM, KEN
BA, Western Washington University;
MLIS, University of Washington
BS, Southern Illinois University;
MA, Chapman University;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
Machinist Certificate, Clover Park Vocational
Technical Institute; CPTC Vocational Certificate
CHIARO, LOREE
Cosmetology Instructor
Faculty Librarian
ANDERSON, ROBERT
HVAC
AAS, Tacoma Community College
AUTRY, TRISHA
Pharmacy Technician Instructor
Licensed Pharmacy Technician;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
Cosmetology Instructor
Licensed WA State Cosmetology Instructor/
Operator; CPTC Vocational Certificate
CLARK, KEZIA
Surgical Technology Instructor
BANASZAK, LORI
AAS, Spokane Community College;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
BA, MA, University of Washington
COLLINS, MARSHALL
BIRD, ANDREW
Avionics Diploma, Clover Park Technical College
Vice President/Instruction
Dean/Division 1
Professional Pilot Instructor
BS, ME, Western Washington University
COLLINS, TERRY
BOWMAN, MICHAEL
Licensed Registered Nurse;
AAS, BS, Pierce College;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
Interior Design Instructor
Parson’s School of Design;
ASID Certification; NCIDQ Certification;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
BRIDGES, WAYNE
Automotive Technician Instructor
FACULTY & ADMINISTRATION
Early Care & Education Instructor
Advanced Engine Performance; ASE Certified
Automobile; ASE Certified Master Automobile
Technician; CPVTI Automotive Technician;
WA State Journey Level Automotive Technician;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
BROWN, DAVE
Automotive Technology Instructor
ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician
AAT, Automotive Technician, Clover Park
Technical College Diploma, Automotive
Technician, Denver Automotive and Diesel College
WA State Journey Level Machinist / Jig & Fixture
Toolmaker, the Boeing Company; CPTC
Vocational Certificate
BROYLES, GLENDA
Computer Networking Technology Instructor
BS, Computer Science, University of Alaska &
Griffin College; AAT Computer Networking
Technology, CPTC Network Design &
Administration Certificate, CPTC Computer &
Network Support Certificate, CPTC Music
Technology for Teachers Specialist Certificate,
Berklee College of Music Novell Netware
Certificates Certified in Convergent Network
Technologies Certification (CCNT) Cisco
Certifications, CCAI, CCNA CompTIA
Certifications, A+, Net+, i-Net+, Microsoft
Certifications, MCT, MCSE, MCDST, MCP,
MCP+I; CPTC Vocational Certificate
Nursing Program Instructor
COLOMBINI-HYKE, LISA
Early Care and Education Instructor
Manufacturing Technologies
DAVID, GAIL
Licensed WA State Cosmetology Instructor/
Operator
DAVIS, LOREN
Director of NWCTHS
BA, Columbian Christian College;
MEd, City University
DAY, CHARLENE
Dental Assistant Instructor
Certified Dental Assistant; Dental Assistant
Certificate, Clover Park Technical College;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
DEBRUYNE, DAVID
Mathematics Instructor
BS, Washington State University;
MS, University of Washington;
MS AF Institute of Technology;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
BA, Gonzaga University;
ME, Lesley College;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
DORUM, LUCY
COVINGTON, GARY
DOYON, GREG
WA State Journey Level Automotive Technician;
Associate Level Certified Electronic Technician;
ASE Certification; BTI Consumer Electronics;
Automotive Technician Certificate, Clover Park
Technical College; CPTC Vocational Certificate
Airframe & Powerplant Certification, Inspection
Authorization-Aircraft Certification, Federal
Aviation Administration; ASE Master Technician
Certification; ASE L1 Advanced Engine Diagnosis
Certification; Aviation Maintenance, Airframe
Powerplant License; CPTC Vocational Certificate
Automotive Technician Instructor
COYNER, BILL
Professional Pilot Instructor
Airline Transport Pilot Certification, Flight
Engineer-Turbojet, Certified Flight Instructor,
Certified Instrument Instructor-Flight, Federal
Aviation Administration; AAS, Ft Steilacoom
Community College; BS, Southern Illinois
University; CPTC Vocational Certificate
CREECH, DANIEL
Accounting Instructor
BS, Western Washington University
Aviation Maintenance Technician Instructor
EDMONDS, MABEL
Dean of Workforce Development/Division V
BA, Harris Teachers College;
MA University of Missouri
EDMONDSON, REBECCA
Early Care & Education Instructor
CDA; BA, Pacific Lutheran University
Aviation Maintenance Technician Instructor
ELLIS, STEVEN
Commercial Pilot License, Flight Instructor
License, AMP Mechanics License, Advanced
Ground Instructor License
Dean/Division III
BA, Virginia State University;
MBA, University of Phoenix
CROPPI, CARMEN
ERRIGO, JENNIFER
Director of Basic Skills
BA, University of the Americas;
MEd, University of Washington
Esthetics Instructor
Licensed Esthetician;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
2011-2012 Catalog
FELCH, LINDA
GOVE, SALLY
JOHNSON, ROBERTA
AA, Spokane Falls Community College;
BA University of Puget Sound; CPTC Vocational
Certificate
BS, University of New Hampshire;
MA, Northeastern University;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
Licensed WA State Cosmetology Instructor/
Operator; CPTC Vocational Certificate
FREDERICK, SANDY
HATHAWAY, KATHLEEN
Restaurant Management Instructor
Licensed WA State Cosmetology Instructor/
Operator; CPTC Vocational Certificate
AAS, Tacoma Community College;
BA, University of Puget Sound;
MA, Pacific Lutheran University;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
Early Care & Education Instructor
Cosmetology Instructor
FREEMAN, KURT
Automotive Collision Technician Instructor
ASE Certification—Nonstructural Analysis and
Damage Repair, Structural Analysis and Damage
Repair; Automotive Structural Repair Certificate;
Shark Electronic Measuring System Certificate;
Mobile Air Conditioning Society Worldwide
Certificate; Journey Level; CPTC Vocational
Certificate
Written Communications Instructor
Social Services Instructor
HOLLAND-O’HERN, CAROL
Early Care & Education Instructor
CPTC Vocational Certificate
HOLLOWELL, KELLY
Cosmetology Instructor
JOLLY, WILLIAM
Hospitality Production Certification;
AAS, South Seattle Community College;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
JONES, MICHELE
Medical Assistant Instructor
Certified Medical Assistant; Medical Assistant
Certificate, Clover Park Technical College;
AAS, Tacoma Community College;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
Computer & Information Systems
Security Instructor
KLUG, DENISE
Licensed WA State Cosmetology/Esthetics/
Manicurist/Barber Operator/Instructor;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
Licensed WA State Cosmetology
Instructor/Operator
Certified Microsoft Pre-installation Specialist for:
Windows XP, 2000, 2000 Server, 9x, Millennium
(Me), and Office XP; CompTIA A+, Net+, Linux+
Certificate; Microprocessors and Controllers
Certificate; Microsoft (70-210) Win2k Pro (MCP),
(70-215) Win2k S; CPTC Vocational Certificate
FRITZ, ANDREW
HOLSTER, ELAINE
FRINK, BARBARA
Cosmetology Instructor Adjunct
(Purdy location)
Environmental Sciences
& Technology Instructor
Certified Naturalist, Certified Land Resources
Analyst, Environmental Analyst, Au Sable
Institute; BS, Gordon College; MS, Northeastern
University; CPTC Vocational Certificate
GANYON, MICHELLE
Cosmetology Instructor
Licensed Cosmetology Instructor/Operator;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
GOINGS, AMY
VP for Operations and College Relations
BA, Mills College;
MPA, The Evergreen State College
Faculty Librarian
BA, BS, University of Texas;
MLIS, University of Texas
HOOKER, STEVE
Mathematics Instructor
BA, Eastern Connecticut State University;
MA, University of Phoenix
HOUSER, SUNNY
Interior Design Instructor
Cosmetology Instructor
LAMB, DEAN
Architectural Engineering Design Instructor
Member, CSI & ICC; Licensed WA State
Architect; ESRI Authorized ArcGIS 1© Instructor;
BA, BS, Washington State University;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
LAZARUS, BRENDA
LPN Instructor
Licensed Registered Nurse;
BSN, Pacific Lutheran University
LEWANDOWSKI, DEBRA
Dental Assistant Instructor
AAS, Clover Park Technical College;
BA, Western Washington University
Certified Dental Assistant; Dental Assistant
Diploma, Clover Park Vocational Institute;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
HUNTER, FRAN
LIND, CONNIE
CPTC Vocational Certificate
Dental Business Office Assistant Instructor
Cosmetology Instructor
Electronic/Fire Security
Technician Instructor
IVERSON, AUSTIN
Licensed WA State Cosmetology/Esthetics/
Manicurist/Barber Operator/Instructor;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
United States Marine Corps Air Wing Avionics;
ADT Security Systems, BA, FA, CA, CCTV;
Washington State Journeyman Electrician;
Northern Computers Card Access Authorization;
Fire-Lite Mass Evacuation Certification;
NICET Fire Codes Certification level II;
Seattle Fire Department Certificate FA-1;
CPTC Vocational Certificate
AAS, Clover Park Technical College
LOFGREN, RAY
GORDON, JIM
3D Arts & Animation Instructor
JENNISON, SHAWN
Automotive Upholstery & Glass Instructor
Director of Marketing & Communications
Automotive Upholstery & Glass Technician
Certificate, Clover Park Technical College
BA, Pacific Lutheran University;
AAS, Tacoma Community College
LOVEDAY, JOYCE
JOHNSON, JIM
HVAC Instructor
Mechanical Engineering Instructor; WA Specialty
Electrician License; CFC Universal License,
Refrigeration License; Hazmat Teaching Certificate
153
Assistant Vice President for Instruction
BA, Wheaton College;
MBA, Idaho State University;
PhD, Oregon State University
MACDOUGALL, JUDY
Registrar
FACULTY & ADMINISTRATION
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
154
MAIN, DANIEL
NIX, ROGER
RICHARDS, GREG
AA, South Puget Sound Community College
BS, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
AWS Certified Welding Inspector
WABO Certified Welder
WABO Certified Welder Examiner
Provisional Teaching Certificate;
BA, University of Washington
ADP Shop Link Computer Estimating
Certification; WA State Journey Level Auto Body
Technician; ASE Master Certified, Certified
Collision Estimating I-CAR CR3000, Finish
Matching, Plastics; CPTC Vocational Certification
Welding Technology Instructor
MANDLEY, LARITA
Dean of Division II
BA, The Evergreen State College;
ME, City University
MASSEY, DEAN
Culinary Arts Instructor
Pierce County Food Service Management License;
Food Service Specialist Certification; Advanced
Food Service Specialist Certification, Clover Park
Vocational Institute
MAY, RANDY
Residential Construction
AA Central Texas Certified Graduate Remodeler
(CGR) Certified Aging in Place Specialist (CAPS)
MCGLAUTHLIN, DEBRA
Cosmetology Instructor
Licensed WA State Cosmetology /Esthetics/
Manicurist/Barber/Operator; Reflexology
Certification, Digits International, Reflexology
Institute; Aromatic Studies Certification, Michael
Schoels School of Aromatic Studies; CPTC
Vocational Certificate
FACULTY & ADMINISTRATION
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
MCGOVERN, TAYLOR
Counselor
BA, Psychology, PLU;
MA, Theological Studies, Faith Seminary
MEZIERE, YVONNE
Massage Therapy Instructor
License WA State Massage Practitioner;
CPTC Vocational Certification
MOECKEL, STEVE
Automotive Technology Instructor
Automotive Technology Certification;
ASE Certification; WA State Journeyman
Certification; CPTC Vocational Certification
MOLLAS, TULA
Mathematics/English Instructor
AA, South Puget Sound Community College;
BS, Southern Illinois University
MOYER, JOHN
Graphic Technologies Instructor
Graphic Arts Program, Washington Technical
Institute; CPTC Vocational Certification
MUIR, CARRIE
Architectural Engineering Design Instructor
AAT, Clover Park Technical College
NARANJO, GENEVIEVE
Business Support Services Instructor
Legal Secretary Procedures Certificate;
CPTC Vocational Certification
Adult Basic Education Instructor
NOLAN, DANIELLE
Surgical Technology Instructor
Certified Surgical Technologist; State Registration,
CST-R; AAS, Tacoma Community College;
CPTC Vocational Certification
OFFERDAHL, ROBERT
Automotive Technician Instructor
ASE Certified Master Technician, L1–Advanced
Engine Performance; Automotive Technician
Program, Clover Park Vocational Institute;
CPTC Vocational Certification
OWENS, DARRYL
Graphic Technologies Adjunct Faculty
BA, Western Washington University;
AA, Pierce College
PARNELL, SAM
Mathematics Instructor
BA, Evergreen State College;
CPTC Vocational Certification
PEARCE, DONALD
HVAC Technician Instructor
EPA Registered Proctor; Refrigeration Service
Engineer Society Service Technician;
AA, HVAC/R Technology; CPTC Vocational
Certification
PEDERSEN, MARY
Automotive Collision Technician Instructor
ROBBINS, TOM
Computer Networking Technology
Instructor
Novell Network Engineering Certificate;
Certified Electronics Technician (CET) ISCET;
A+ Certification, CompTIA; Data Comm
Technologies (CTC) Certificate; Electronic
Equipment Service Technician, Bates; Computer
Maintenance Service Technician; CPTC AAS, Ft
Steilacoom Community College; CPTC
Vocational Certification
ROBERTS, DAN
Landscape Management Instructor
BS, Washington State University;
CPTC Vocational Certification
ROBINSON, RAY
Computer & Information Security
Instructor
A+, NET+, Server+, Security+ Certifications;
Microsoft Certified Professional & Administrator;
Certified Novell Administrator 50; Linux+
Certified Professional; Certified Network Systems
Technician; FEMA Certifications: IS00001,
IS00003, IS0005A, IS0000; CPTC Vocational
Certification
Counselor
SANDOVAL, LORETA
BA, University of Washington;
MS, Western Washington University
ABE Instructor / GED Test Administrator
BS, Saint Louis University
PENNISI, TRACY ROSE
SCHMELING, LAVERTA
Social Services Instructor
Mathematics Instructor
Licensed WA State Registered Counselor;
BA, Vanderbilt University;
MS, Eastern Michigan University
BA, Portland State University; Professional
Diploma, University of Hawaii; MEd, University of
Washington-Tacoma; American Ethnic & Gender
Studies Certificate, Tacoma Community College
POTTER, MIKE
Aviation Maintenance Technician Instructor
SCOTLAND, TERESA
Airframe & Powerplant Mechanic Certification,
Designated Mechanic Examiner Certification,
Federal Aviation Administration;
CPTC Vocational Certification
Health Unit Coordinator Instructor
RANDALL, JODY
Licensed Esthetician
Computer Information & Security
AAT PC/LAN Support Technician;
Microprocessor and Controller Technician, A+,
Network +, Certified Novell Netware 5
Administrator, & BrainBench Linux +
Certification; CPTC Vocational Certification
CPTC Vocational Certification
SHIELDS, MAUREEN
Esthetics Instructor
SIBBERS, DONNA
Nursing Program Instructor
BA, Idaho State University;
Licensed Registered Nurse
2011-2012 Catalog
SIEDLICKI, MELISSA
SWEERUS, NEIL
WEBSTER, MARK
Licensed WA State Cosmetology/ Manicurist/
Esthetics/Operator; Clinical Esthetics Certification
AAS, Computer Programming; AAS, Web
Development; AAS, Anthropology; BA, ME,
Stevens Institute of Technology; MS, University of
Massachusetts; MS, Brown University; PhD,
Northeastern University; Certificate in American
Ethnics & Gender Diversity; CPTC Vocational
Certification
Graphic Communications International Union,
Local 767M; Journeyman Press Operator, Offset
Reprographics, Clover Park Vocational Institute;
Web Design & Development Certificate, Clover
Park Technical College
THOMPSON, TIM
BA, Eastern Washington University;
MA, Temple University;
CPTC Vocational Certification
Esthetics Sciences (Medical) Instructor
SIMMONS, MAUREEN
Sparks Pharmacy Technician Instructor
WA State Certified Pharmacy Technician;
Nationally Certified Pharmacy Technician;
Clover Park Technical College Licensed Pharmacy
Technician; CPTC Vocational Certification
SIMPKINS, MICHELLE
Mathematics Instructor
Psychology Instructor
Massage Therapy Instructor
BA, University of Washington;
MS, University of Washington
Licensed WA State Massage Practitioner;
BA, University of Puget Sound;
CPTC Vocational Certification
TUTTLE, JIM
SMITH, DANIEL
Adjunct Faculty/Basic Construction
SMITH, KATHRYN
Environmental Sciences
& Technology Instructor
BA, Washington State University;
MES, The Evergreen State College;
CPTC Vocational Certification
Chief Human Resources/Legal Affairs Officer
Media Design & Productions Instructor
WEIGELT, GLEN
Adult Basic Education Teacher
WESTERBERG, ROSALIE
BSS/Computer Application Specialist
JD, Willamette University;
BA, University of Washington
Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Master;
WAOL Certified; AAS, Community College of
Aurora; BA, Eastern Washington University
VAN BEEK, CAROLYN
WHEELER, MIKE
BS, Central Washington University;
MA, Chapman University
Licensed WA State Mental Health Counselor;
BS, Washington State University;
MS, Pacific Lutheran University
Counselor
VAN BEEK, MARK
Psychology Instructor
Computer Information Technology
Instructor
WHITE, DUKE
Counselor
MEd, Lesley University;
BA, Pacific Lutheran University
BA, Seattle Pacific University;
MA.Ed, Seattle University
VENDITTI, PHILLIP
MA, Pacific Lutheran University;
BA, Western Washington University;
AA, Fort Steilacoom Community College
SOLBRACK, ANNEMARIE
Social Services
Speech / Communications Instructor
WILSON, JACKIE
BA, University of Colorado; MS, University of
Tennessee; MA, School for International Training;
MA, University of WA, PhD, University of Texas
Customer Service/Call Center Specialist
Instructor
CPTC Vocational Certification
VICK, PHIL
WIRTH, ROBERTA
CPTC Vocational Certification
STACEY-CLEMONS, JUNE
Vice President for Student Services
Airframe & Powerplant Mechanic Certification;
Inspection Authorization Certification; Federal
Aviation Administration; CPTC Vocational
Certification
MA, Western Washington University;
BA, University of Kentucky
WAGERS, JANE
SOUZA, DON
Computer & Information Systems
Security Instructor
Microsoft Certification, MCP; CompTIA Certified
A+; BrainBench Certifications Network
Technician; AA, Community College of the Air
Force; CPTC Vocational Certification
STEVENS, HEATHER
Aviation Instructor
Materiels Management Instructor
ESL Instructor
Licensed Practical Nurse; Licensed Surgical
Technologist; AA, Big Bend Community College
MEd, City University;
BA, The Evergreen State College;
TESOL Certificate
WALSTRUM, JOHN
STROUP, LINDSEY
Medical Assistant Instructor
Certified Medical Assistant;
CPTC Vocational Certification
President
AA, Catonsville Community College;
BS, MA, PhD, University of Maryland
WATTS, JULIE
Interior Design Instructor Adjunct
BA, Pacific Lutheran University;
AAS, Clover Park Technical College;
AAS, Pierce College
155
Dental Assistant Instructor
YOST, KATHY
Interim VP Finance & Budget
BS, Limestone College;
MBA, The Citadel College
FACULTY & ADMINISTRATION
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
156
Index
A
Academic Calendar.......................................150
Academic Progress.........................................141
Academic Standards......................................134
Accounting, Bookkeeping Clerk, Certificate.........27
Technician, Courses......................................84
Course Descriptions..........................................77
Aviation Maintenance Technician, Airframe
Maintenance Technician, Certificate...............33
Course Numbering.........................................135
Aviation Maintenance Technician, Courses..........84
Culinary Arts, Courses......................................95
Aviation Maintenance Technician, Degree...........32
Aviation Maintenance Technician,
Powerplant Technician, Certificate..................33
Accounting, Courses.........................................77
B
Accounting, Degree.........................................26
Biology, Courses..............................................86
Accreditation.....................................................5
Board of Directors..............................................6
A+ Certification...............................................75
Board of Trustees...............................................6
Adult Basic Education, Courses..........................78
Bookstore........................................................23
Adult Basic Skills..............................................15
Business, Courses.............................................87
Adult High School Completion...........................12
Aerospace Composite Technician, Certificate......32
Aerospace Composite Technician, Courses..........86
Affiliated Child Care Center Program.................24
Agency Funding...............................................19
American Sign Language, Courses.....................80
ANEW (Apprenticeship & Non-Traditional
Employment for Women)...............................75
INDEX
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
2011-2012 Catalog
C
Campus Life & Services....................................22
Campus Map................................................158
Campus Policies.............................................148
Career Center.................................................12
Central Service/Sterile Processing, Certificate.....34
Central Service/Sterile Processing, Courses.........87
Annual Notification of Rights Under FERPA........143
Chemistry, Courses...........................................87
Architectural Engineering Design,
Architectural: CAD Drafting, Certificate..........28
Clover Park Technical College Degrees.............138
Architectural Engineering Design, Courses..........79
Clover Park Technical College Foundation.............5
Architectural Engineering Design, Degree...........27
Clubs & Organizations.....................................23
Art, Courses....................................................80
College Advisory Council....................................6
Assessment........................................................9
College Success, Courses..................................88
Associated Student Government.........................22
Commencement.............................................142
Attendance Policy..........................................134
Computer Applications, Courses........................88
Automotive Collision, Refinishing
Technician, Certificate..................................28
Computer Information Technology,
Computer Programmer, Certificate.................36
Automotive Collision, Structure
Repair Technician, Certificate........................28
Computer Information Technology, Courses.........88
Automotive Collision Technician, Certificate.........28
Automotive Collision Technician, Courses............80
Computer Information Technology,
.Net Developer, Certificate............................36
Automotive Restoration & Customization - Finishing,
Assessment & Research, Certificate................29
Computer Information Technology,
Web Developer, Certificate...........................37
Automotive Restoration &
Customization - Finishing, Certificate..............29
Computer Networking & Information
Systems Security, Cisco Network
Design & Security, Certificate........................38
Automotive Restoration &
Customization - Finishing, Courses.................81
Automotive Technician, Courses.........................82
Automotive Technician, Degree..........................29
Automotive Technician, Drive Train Technician,
Certificate...................................................31
Automotive Technician, Electrical, Electronics &
AC/Heating Technician, Certificate................31
Automotive Technician, Engine Repair & Engine
Performance Technician, Certificate................31
Automotive Technician, Ford Maintenance & Light
Repair Technician, Certificate........................30
Automotive Technician, Front End & Brakes,
Certificate...................................................32
Automotive Technician, Hybrid & Alternative Fuel
Vehicle Maintenance, Certificate....................31
Automotive Technician, Hybrid &
Alternative Fuel Vehicle Technician, Degree.....30
Automotive Upholstery & Glass
CLEP & DSST Credit.......................................137
Computer Information Technology, Degree..........34
Culinary Arts, Basic Cooking Skills, Certificate....41
Culinary Arts, Degree.......................................40
Culinary Arts, Pastry Arts, Certificate..................42
Culinary Arts, Pastry Arts, Degree......................41
Culinary Arts, Restaurant
Management, Certificate..............................41
D
Degree/Certificate Completion Procedures........140
Dental Administrative Specialist, Certificate.........44
Dental Administrative Specialist, Courses............97
Dental Assistant, Certificate...............................43
Dental Assistant, Courses..................................96
Dental Assistant, Degree...................................42
Dietary Manager Program Certificate.................75
Disabilities Accommodations.............................14
Disciplinary Process........................................145
Dress Standards.............................................144
Drug Free Environment....................................149
Dual Credit for High School Students..................11
E
Early Care & Education,
Childhood Foundation, Certificate..................45
Early Care & Education,
Childhood Leadership, Certificate..................46
Early Care & Education,
Childhood Specialist, Certificate....................46
Early Care & Education, Courses.......................97
Early Care & Education,
Creating a Green Classroom, Certificate........46
Early Care & Education, Degree........................44
Early Care & Education, School-Age
Out-of-School Program, Certificate.................47
Early Care & Education,
Special Needs, Certificate............................47
Early Care & Education,
Sustaining a Green Program, Certificate.........47
Economics, Courses.......................................100
Computer Networking & Information Systems
Security (CNISS), Courses.............................91
Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security, Certificate.... 48
Computer Networking & Information Systems
Security, Computer & Communications Security,
Certificate...................................................38
Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security, Degree......47
Computer Networking & Information Systems
Security, Computer Networking & Information
System Security Professional, Certificate..........39
Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security, Courses...100
Emergency Call Taker Certificate........................75
English as a Second Language, Courses...........102
English, Courses............................................101
Environmental Sciences & Technology, Courses..103
Computer Networking & Information
Systems Security, Degree..............................37
Environmental Sciences & Technology, Degree.....48
Computer Networking & Information Systems
Security, Microsoft Network Admin & Security,
Certificate...................................................39
Esthetic Sciences, Degree..................................49
Construction Residential, Courses.......................93
Esthetic Sciences, Courses...............................104
Esthetic Sciences, Esthetics, Certificate................49
Esthetic Sciences, Medical Esthetics, Certificate...50
Continuing Education.......................................11
F
Core Allied Health, Courses..............................93
Financial Aid...................................................17
Cosmetology, Certificate...................................40
Flagger Training..............................................76
Cosmetology, Courses......................................94
Food Services..................................................23
Counseling/Advising Center.............................14
157
2011-2012 Catalog
Forklift Certificate.............................................75
Practitioner, Certificate..................................59
Professional Pilot, Commercial Pilot, Certificate....71
Full-Time Faculty & Administration....................152
Massage Studies, Courses...............................114
Professional Pilot, Courses...............................128
Massage Studies, Degree.................................58
Professional Pilot, Degree..................................70
Massage Studies, Swedish
Practitioner, Certificate..................................59
Professional Pilot, Flight Instructor, Certificate.......72
Material Science, Composites, Degree...............60
Professional Pilot, Private Pilot, Certificate...........72
G
GED Preparation Classes & Testing....................15
General Education.........................................136
Geography, Courses......................................106
Geology, Courses..........................................106
Getting Started..................................................8
Graduation...................................................142
Graphic Technologies, Courses........................106
Graphic Technologies, Degree...........................50
Graphic Technologies, Graphic Design,
Certificate...................................................51
Graphic Technologies, Prepress Operations,
Certificate...................................................51
H
Health Unit Coordinator, Certificate....................52
Health Unit Coordinator, Courses.....................107
Heating & Air Conditioning/Refrigeration Service
Technician, Basic HVAC/Refrigeration Service
Technician, Certificate..................................53
Heating & Air Conditioning/
Refrigeration Service Technician, Degree........52
Heating & Air Conditioning Service
Technician (HVAC), Courses........................107
Hemodialysis, Courses....................................109
Hemodialysis Technician, Certificate...................53
Honor Societies.............................................140
Human Resources Generalist Certificate..............75
Material Science, Courses...............................116
Material Science, Eddy Current
Testing, Certificate........................................61
Material Science, Magnetic Particle
& Liquid Penetrant Testing, Certificate.............61
Program Descriptions........................................26
Project Head Start............................................24
Psychology, Courses.......................................130
R
Material Science, Nondestructive
Testing, Degree............................................60
Refund Policy...................................................16
Material Science, Radiographic
Testing, Certificate........................................61
Rights & Responsibilities....................................20
Material Science, Ultrasonic Testing, Certificate.... 62
Mathematics, Courses.....................................118
MCSE Certificate.............................................76
Media Design & Production, Courses...............119
Media Design & Production, Degree..................62
Media Design & Production, Web Design &
Open Source Web Development, Certificate.... 63
Medical Assistant, Certificate.............................63
Medical Assistant, Courses..............................121
Medical Billing Specialist Certificate...................75
Medical Histology Technician, Courses.............122
Medical Histology Technician, Degree................64
Medical Laboratory Technician, Courses...........122
Medical Laboratory Technician, Degree..............65
Medical Transcription Certificate........................76
Human Resources Management Certification.......76
Military Experience........................................137
Human Services/Chemical Dependency,
Courses....................................................109
Music, Courses..............................................123
Human Services/Chemical Dependency,
Degree.......................................................54
Professional Pilot, Instrument Pilot, Certificate.......72
Multicultural Student Services.............................14
Repeating a Course........................................135
Right to Demand Identification.........................144
Running Start...................................................12
S
Safety and Hazardous Materials......................149
Satisfactory Academic Progress.........................20
Scholarships....................................................19
Security..........................................................24
Servicemember Opportunity College (SOC)......137
Short-Term Training Programs............................75
Smoking Policy..............................................149
Sociology, Courses.........................................130
Student Academic Responsibilities....................134
Student Center.................................................23
Student Code of Conduct................................144
Student Concerns/Academic Appeal................141
Student Council................................................22
Student Loans..................................................19
Student Progress Policy...................................140
N
Student Records.............................................143
Human Services/Chemical Dependency
Specialist, Certificate....................................55
Network+ Certification.....................................76
Surgical Technology, Courses..........................130
Non-Discrimination Policy...............................149
Surgical Technology, Degree.............................73
Human Services, Degree...................................54
Northwest Career & Technical High School.........11
Suspended Operations...................................149
Human Services, Gang Intervention
Specialist, Certificate....................................56
Nursing Assistant Certificate..............................76
Sustainable Building Science, Courses..............131
Nursing, Courses...........................................123
Sustainable Building Science, Degree.................73
I
Nursing, Nursing Assistant, Certificate................66
Sustainable Building Science,
Residential Construction, Certificate................74
Interior Design, Courses..................................112
Interior Design, Degree.....................................56
Nursing, Nursing Assistant (I-BEST), Certificate....66
Nursing, Practical Nursing, Certificate................67
T
Interior Design, Green Design, Certificate...........57
Nursing, RN Option, Degree.............................68
Transcripts.....................................................143
Interior Design, Kitchen & Bath, Certificate..........57
O
Transfer Agreements.......................................138
International Students.......................................21
On-Campus Child Care....................................24
L
Opportunity Grant...........................................19
Library & Computer Labs...................................24
P
M
Parking & Transportation...................................23
Manufacturing Technologies, Courses...............114
Manufacturing Technologies, Degree..................57
Manufacturing Technologies,
Machinist Apprentice, Certificate...................58
Pastry Arts, Courses.......................................127
Paying for College...........................................16
Pharmacy Technician, Certificate........................69
Pharmacy Technician, Courses.........................128
Manufacturing Technologies,
Machinist Helper, Certificate.........................58
Pharmacy Technician, Degree............................69
Massage Studies, Clinical Massage
Policies & Procedures.....................................133
Physics, Courses............................................128
Transfer Rights and Responsibilities...................138
Tuition and Fees...............................................16
Tutoring Services..............................................15
V
Veterans..........................................................12
W
Welding, Courses..........................................132
Welding Technology, Certificate.........................74
Worker Retraining Grant...................................13
Workfirst.........................................................12
INDEX
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
PASSWORD = free
33P
26P
25
29
23
event parking
Student
Center
22
DR IV E
18
19
Early Care & Education ................................................................................. 10
Electrician Low Voltage Fire/Security ........................................................... 16
eLearning .......................................................................................................... 16
Environmental Sciences & Technology......................................................... 16
Esthetic Sciences .............................................................................................. 8
Expressions Apparel......................................................................................... 23
Financial Aid ...................................................................................................... 17
Foundation ......................................................................................................... 19
GED Testing ....................................................................................................... 17
Graphic Technologies ...................................................................................... 11
Head Start ........................................................................................................ 20
Health Unit Coordinator .............................................................................. 10
Heating/Air Conditioning Service Technician ........................................... 25
Hemodialysis ..................................................................................................... 16
Human Resources ............................................................................................ 17
Human Services Program ............................................................................... 10
IBEST ................................................................................................................. 37
Instruction ......................................................................................................... 17
Interior Design ................................................................................................. 19
International Programs .................................................................................. 22
KVTI Radio Station ......................................................................................... 11
Lakewood Chamber of Commerce ............................................................. 19
Landscape Management ................................................................................. 25
Learning Lab ...................................................................................................... 17
Library ................................................................................................................ 15
Maintenance Office/Shop .............................................................................. 22
Manufacturing Technologies .......................................................................... 25
Massage Studies Lab ........................................................................................ 8
Massage Studies Classroom ........................................................................... 10
Material Science: Non Destructive Testing ................................................ 25
Math Labs ........................................................................................................... 16/35P/15
Media Design & Production ........................................................................... 11
Medical Assistant ............................................................................................. 37
Medical Histology Technician ......................................................................... 16
Medical Laboratory Technician ..................................................................... 14
= ENTRANCE
27P
30P
OOD
Lakes Body Shop
RE DW
Water Tower
Lakewood Fire Station
Main Entrance/Hageness Drive
17
11
14
20
20
PERIMETER DRIVE
16
15
FRONT STREET
3
Rotunda
Radio
12 Tower
10
8
6
3
5
2
REVISED 7/26/11
Nursing Programs ........................................................................................... 2
NW Career & Technical High School .......................................................... 14
Operations/Facilities........................................................................................ 17
Parking ................................................................................................................ 23
Personal Care Services .................................................................................. 8
Pharmacy Technician ....................................................................................... 11
Pierce County Television ................................................................................ 11
Pierce County Television Offices ................................................................. 12
President’s Office ............................................................................................. 17
Professional Pilot ............................................................................................. SHC
Radio Station (KVTI) ...................................................................................... 11
Rainier Room Cafe/ Culinary Arts .............................................................. 31
Resource Center (Library) ............................................................................ 15
Restaurant Operations Program ................................................................. 31
Retail Business Marketing/Management ...................................................... 23
Rotunda ............................................................................................................. 3
Security Office ................................................................................................. 22
Self Paced Computer Lab ............................................................................... 19
Shipping/Receiving ........................................................................................... 22
South Sound Washington Business Center ............................................... 19
Student Center ................................................................................................ 23
Student Programs and ASG .......................................................................... 23
Student Records ............................................................................................... 17
Student Services ............................................................................................... 17
Studio A .............................................................................................................. 11
Studio B .............................................................................................................. 11
Surgical Technology ......................................................................................... 14
Tutoring Center .............................................................................................. 15
Veterans Resource Center ............................................................................ 22
Video Teleconference Center ........................................................................ 23
Welding Technology ........................................................................................ 25
Worker Retraining ........................................................................................... 17
WorkFirst Learning Center .......................................................................... 16
Workforce Training & Development ............................................................ 16
4500 Steilacoom Blvd SW, Lakewood, WA 98499-4004
35P
28P
32P
= ADA ENTRANCES
34P
38P
REDWOOD DRIVE
31
NORTH
2011-2012 Catalog
L A K E W O O D / O R C H A R D DRIVE
Accounting ....................................................................................................... 10
Aerospace Composite Technician ............................................................... SHC
Administrative Offices .................................................................................... 17
Adult Basic Education .................................................................................... 37
Advising ............................................................................................................. 17
Architectural Engineering Design ................................................................. 19
Assessment Center ......................................................................................... 17
Associated Student Government ................................................................. 23
Aviation Maintenance Technician ................................................................. SHC
Automotive Programs .................................................................................... 3
Barbering ............................................................................................................ 8
Boardroom ....................................................................................................... 3/Rotunda
Bookstore .......................................................................................................... 23
Business Office ................................................................................................. 17
Business Support Services ............................................................................. 19
CAD Laboratory .............................................................................................. 19
Cafeteria/Espresso ........................................................................................... 23
Career Center ................................................................................................. 17
Central Service/Sterile Processing .............................................................. 37
Child Development Center ........................................................................... 20
, 11
College Relations (Building 11 in KVTI Offices)....................................................... 17
Computer Applications ................................................................................... 19
Computer Information Technology .............................................................. 16
Computer Networking & Information Systems Security........................16
Conference Center ........................................................................................ 23
Conference Center Event Parking .............................................................. 23
Construction – Residential/Sustainable Building ......................................5
Continuing Education ...................................................................................... 19
Cosmetology ..................................................................................................... 8
Counseling/Advising ........................................................................................ 17
Culinary Arts .................................................................................................... 31
Custodial Services .......................................................................................... 22
Customer Service/Call Center Specialist ................................................... 10
Dental Assistant ............................................................................................... 14
Dental Business Administrative Specialist ................................................... Online
WIRELESS NETWORK = cptc
SHC = South Hill Campus
= located in select areas of these buildings.
P = portable building
(253) 589-5800
www.cptc.edu
39P
36P
37
STEILACOOM BOULEVARD
MARKET STREET
STEILACOOM BOULEVARD
E
AV E N
U
LAKE
V IE W
CAMPUS MAP
158
CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • (253) 589-5800 • www.cptc.edu
The instructors at Clover Park provided more than education, they
gave
me the confidence to challenge myself and inspired me
to embrace lifelong learning.
Redefine Education
4500 Steilacoom Boulevard SW
Lakewood Washington 98499-4004
www.cptc.edu
(253) 589-5800
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