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2010-2011
Rensselaer at Hartford
Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Table of Contents
……………………………………....1
Catalog…………………………………………………2
Welcome to Rensselaer………………………………...2
Frequently Asked Questions…………………………...4
Academic Calendar, Advanced Graduate Studies……..7
Educational Resources…………………………………9
Southeastern Connecticut Site………………………...11
Admissions ……………………………………….…..13
Financial Aid / Veterans' Benefits …………….……...15
Student Financial Services……………………………16
Academic Information and Regulations………………18
Department of Engineering and Science……………...28
•
Computer Science…………………….……..28
•
Information Technology………….…………32
•
Engineering…………………….……………35
Lally School of Management and Technology…….…48
International Scholars Program……………………….58
Course Descriptions…………………………………..60
•
Computer and Information Sciences………..61
•
Engineering…………………………………67
•
Management and Technology………………77
Executive and Professional Development……………85
Faculty………………………………………………..90
Administration, Board of Trustees………………...…96
Administration, Rensselaer's Hartford Campus….…..97
1
Rensselaer at Hartford
Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Welcome to Rensselaer
Rensselaer Overview
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, of Troy, New York, founded in 1824, is the nation's oldest technological research
university. Well known for its leadership in technology-based education and its rigorous approach to problem
solving, Rensselaer is a nonsectarian, coeducational institution. The branch campus in Connecticut has been the
home of Rensselaer-wide excellence in advanced Education for Working Professionals for more than fifty years.
The Hartford Campus and the Southeastern Connecticut Site provide a challenging educational environment and a
dynamic learning experience for students who need to balance their professional, academic, and personal lives.
Education for Working Professionals
Education for Working Professionals (EWP) is one of Rensselaer's core enterprises and encompasses a range of
programs designed specifically for current and future workforce leaders with a range of high-end, customized,
degree, certificate, and professional development programs. Program content flows from Rensselaer's research
strengths and unique academic programs. The EWP organization supports the Rensselaer vision by forging strategic
partnerships with businesses, governments, universities, and innovative professionals who impact society and
technology around the nation and the world.
Rensselaer's educational enterprise for working professionals is dedicated to providing a highly interactive learning
environment for students who are seeking high-level knowledge while they hone their analytical capabilities and
leadership skills and enhance their innovative thinking. The intent is to have Rensselaer graduates--executives,
senior professionals, managers, and individuals with high potential-- become architects of their futures. With
dramatic increases in the rate of change, working professionals expect and demand an academic environment that
fits the evolving needs of their fast-paced world.
Degree Programs
The Hartford Campus offers graduate programs in Business Administration, Management, Computer Science,
Computer and Systems Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Science, Mechanical Engineering, and
Information Technology. Specialized programs include the Dual Master's Degrees, the Accelerated M.B.A., the
Executive Master's Program, Industrial Process Management, and the International Scholars Program. Courses are
delivered by faculty with significant industry experience, solid academic credentials and scholarship, and
exceptional teaching skills whose expertise is grounded in sound research and best practices on a global basis. Each
course is designed to meet the needs of working professionals seeking to advance their careers and enhance the
success of their organizations. Rensselaer graduates are changing the world every day.
Graduate Certificate Programs
Several graduate certificates are available in Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering. For working
professionals not seeking a complete master's degree, Rensselaer's Graduate Certificate programs are tailored to
enhance or update skills in a shorter period of time. They have a selective focus and require that a student
successfully complete three or four courses in a specific area of study. With an advisor's approval, credits earned
may be subsequently applied as electives toward a master's degree.
International Scholars Program
Rensselaer's International Scholars Program (ISP) is a one-year accelerated master's degree program for recent
college graduates which includes a ten-week summer term abroad. ISP provides students with the edge they need as
they make the transition from college to the working world. The Rensselaer International Scholar will earn a
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
master's degree in either Management or Information Technology, with global emphasis on trade, innovation,
security, and competitiveness. Forty percent of the degree will be completed in Europe and Asia. ISP students will
visit major corporations in Rome and Shanghai, and will be taught by world leaders in industry.
Executive and Professional Education
Rensselaer is a firm believer in lifelong education, and encourages executives and other working professionals to
passionately pursue learning throughout their careers. A range of professional development programs and services
are offered at the Hartford Campus. These noncredit programs are designed to provide working professionals and
organizations with the critical skills needed to be effective in today's dynamic workplace. Training programs and
workshops are available in the areas of leadership and executive development and professional engineering exam
preparation. Rensselaer offers services designed to help companies and individuals understand and define their
developmental needs. Services include: needs assessment, custom program development, executive coaching, and
multiple delivery options and locations. See the Executive and Professional Development section for more
information.
Accreditation
Rensselaer is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, by the Board of Governors for
Higher Education of the State of Connecticut, and by a number of professional and academic societies. Rensselaer's
Lally School of Management and Technology is an accredited member of AACSB International, The Association to
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International.
Affirmative Action Policy
Rensselaer admits qualified students without regard to age, race, color, gender, sexual orientation, religion, national
or ethnic origin, veteran status, marital status, or disability. Rensselaer is committed to equal access and equal
opportunity. Should you require special accommodations in order to participate in any of the programs offered,
please contact the Director of Operations and Facilities at (860) 548-5392 or the Director of Admissions at (860)
548-2421. Alternative formats of course material may be provided upon request.
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Frequently Asked Questions
What is the relationship between the Rensselaer Hartford Campus, the Rensselaer Groton Site, and
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute?
Rensselaer's Hartford Campus is a branch campus of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, New York, offering
Master's Degrees, graduate certificate programs, and professional development courses. The Rensselaer Groton Site
serves students in southeastern Connecticut, offering graduate programs of the Rensselear Hartford Campus.
Students at Rensselaer's Hartford Campus and the Rensselaer Groton Site earn Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
master's degrees.
Do I have to apply to take classes?
Anyone wanting to take classes at Rensselaer must apply and be admitted. Although Rensselaer requires the formal
admission of all students prior to registering for a credit course (even if you are not seeking a degree), the process is
designed to be both streamlined and flexible. We also offer an online application that can be accessed at:
http://apply.ewp.rpi.edu/apply/.
How is an application evaluated?
The review process is designed to comprehensively evaluate an applicant's academic and professional background.
Some factors include: the undergraduate or graduate school attended, the applicant's major, the year graduated,
subsequent course work, performance in key subjects, rank in class (if available), awards and/or honors received,
letters of recommendations, a personal statement of goals, resume, and standardized test scores (if requested).
When should I apply?
The rolling admission process allows you to apply and enter a program during any of the three terms beginning in
September, January, or May. The application deadline is approximately one month prior to the start of a particular
term or program. Applications are reviewed on a first-come, first-accommodated basis.
How long does the application process take?
As soon as all of your materials are received your application will be considered for a decision. You will then be
contacted in writing with the admissions decision.
Do you require GMAT or GRE test scores?
All applicants to the MBA are required to submit GMAT scores.
•
•
Go to GMAT Information for Prospective Students
Go to GMAT Web site
The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required for our Master's programs in Engineering, Computer Science,
and Information Technology. Go to GRE
How long does it take to complete a degree and how long does a student have to complete all the
requirements?
The primary mission of Rensselaer is to provide education for working professionals. Classes are held once a week,
in the evenings or on weekends, on a trimester basis. A student sets his or her own pace depending upon the number
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
of classes he or she decides to take each term. All work for a 30-credit Master's degree must be completed within
three calendar years, beginning with the date on the original acceptance letter. All work for the 51-credit MBA must
be completed within five calendar years, beginning with the date on the original acceptance letter. However, oneyear extensions are granted for compelling reasons.
Are your programs accredited?
Yes. Rensselaer is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools (MSACS) and by the Board
of Governors for Higher Education of the State of Connecticut. Rensselaer's Lally School of Management and
Technology is accredited by AACSB International (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
International).
When are classes scheduled?
Computer Science, Information Technology, and Engineering classes are held Monday-Thursday from 5:30-8:30
p.m. Management courses are offered Monday-Thursday, from 5:30-9 p.m., and on alternating or consecutive
Saturdays. Each course meets once a week.
Will I have an advisor?
Each student, whether matriculated or non-matriculated, is assigned a faculty advisor.
How does the MBA differ from the Master of Science in Management?
The MBA is a 51-credit program (17 classes). It consists of 12 core management courses, a practicum, and 4
electives, which can be organized into a concentration. The MBA equips graduates with the skills necessary to
assume leadership positions in their organizations.
The M.S. is a 30-credit program (10 classes). It consists of 4 core management courses and 6 electives that must be
organized into a concentration. The M.S. is a more specialized program; the majority of the coursework focuses on
the area of specialization.
The Lally School of Management offers several different focal areas that can be applied to the M.S. in Management.
Please refer to the Lally School of Management section for details.
Do you require a Thesis for your MBA/Management program?
All students enrolled in the MBA and M.S. programs in the Lally School of Management and Technology are
required to complete a 3-credit CAPSTONE course. The CAPSTONE is an opportunity for students to synthesize
the body of knowledge gained during their course of study and is ordinarily completed in the final term of the degree
program.
What is the dual degree program?
The dual degree program is a combination of an MBA and an M.S. or M.Eng. program. Taken separately, the two
degrees consist of 81 credit hours. However, if done in a "dual" format, both may be earned in 72 credit hours. If
you are interested in a dual degree, it is beneficial to fill out a Plan of Study and meet with an advisor as soon as
possible.
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
How many classes can be transferred or waived?
A student in the MBA program may transfer two (6 credit hours) of appropriate graduate work. The process must be
approved by the faculty advisor and department chair, and the course must be taken within a five year period of the
student’s application. Transfer courses must be the same subject, depth, and breadth of a course offered by
Rensselaer. A student may also request, in writing, that a substitute course be used in place of a core management
course when the student has great depth of knowledge (at the graduate school level) in that subject.
A student in the M.S. program may transfer two graduate courses (6 credit hours) and the same rules apply.
What is the tuition?
Beginning with the Fall 2010 term, tuition is charged at the standard rate of $1410 per credit hour of graduate
instruction. Certain cohort programs have different pricing structures. There are no additional fees for registration,
use of the library, computing facilities, parking, or any other Rensselaer student service.
Do you offer Financial Aid?
Rensselaer participates in the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) and administers the Federal
Stafford Loan to help you manage graduate education expenses. The Stafford Loan requires enrollment of at least
six credits. For further requirements and Financial Aid options, please review the Financial Aid section of the Web
site. You may contact the Financial Aid Office at (860) 548-2406 or (800) 433- 4723, ext. 2406 to request financial
application materials, or go to the online Financial Aid section of the Web site.
If I still have questions, what should I do?
Contact the Office of Enrollment Management. Personnel are available to answer your questions over the phone, or
you may wish to schedule an appointment, or attend an Open House. For more information, please call (860) 5482420; (800) 433-4723, ext. 2420; or e-mail:
[email protected]
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Academic Calendar, Advanced Graduate Studies
Spring Term 2011
January 5 - Wednesday
New Student Welcome
January 10 - Monday
Classes begin
January 17 - Monday
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day - no classes, facilities closed
February 1 - Tuesday
Drop Deadline (Last day to drop a course without full financial penalty)
February 11 - Friday
Degree Applications due in Office of the Registrar for May 2011 graduates
February 21 - Monday
Presidents' Day - no classes, facilities closed
February 22 - Tuesday
Classes resume (Follow Monday class schedule. No Tuesday classes this week.)
February 28 - Monday
Absolute Deadline: Degree Applications due in Office of the Registrar for May 2011
graduates!
March 21 - Monday
Summer 2011 registration begins
April 8 - Friday
Application deadline for Summer 2011 new students
April 21 - Thursday
Classes and exams end
April 25 - Monday
Grades due
April 26 - Tuesday
Registration deadline for Summer 2011 - tuition due
May 28 - Saturday
Commencement at Rensselaer's Troy, New York, campus
Summer Term 2011
May 9 - Monday
Classes begin
May 30 - Monday
Memorial Day - no classes, facilities closed
May 31 - Tuesday
Drop Deadline (Last day to drop a course without full financial penalty)
June 17 - Friday
Degree Applications due in Office of the Registrar for August 2010 graduates
July 4 - July 9
No classes
July 4 - Monday
Independence Day - facilities closed
July 11 - Monday
Fall 2011 Registraton begins
August 5 - Friday
Application deadline for Fall 2011 new students
August 18 - Thursday
Classes and exams end
August 22 - Monday
Registration deadline for Fall 2011 - tuition due
August 23 - Tuesday
Grades due
August 31 - Wednesday
Official date of August degree award (Degrees will be available in October 2011)
Fall Term 2011
August 19 - Friday
Application deadline for Fall 2011 new students
August 22 - Monday
Registration deadline for Fall 2011 - tuition due
September 5 - Monday
Labor Day - no classes, facilities closed
September 6 - Tuesday
Classes begin
September 27 - Tuesday
Drop Deadline (Last day to drop a course without full financial penalty)
October 28 - Friday
Degree Applications due in Office of the Registrar for December 2011
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
graduates
November 14 - Monday
Spring 2012 registration begins
November 23 - 25 - Wednesday Friday
Thanksgiving recess - no classes
November 24 - 25 - Thursday - Friday Staff Holidays
November 28 - Monday
Classes resume
December 16 - Friday
Application deadline for Spring 2012 new students
December 15 - Thursday
Classes and exams end
December 19 - Monday
Grades due
December 22 - Thursday
Registration deadline for Spring 2012 - tuition due
December 24 January 2, 2012
Holiday Winter Break– facilities closed
December 30 - Friday
Official date of December degree award (Degrees will be available in
February 2012)
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Educational Resources
Hartford Campus
Technical and Information Services
Director: Brian J. Clement
Rensselaer has diverse computing resources that rival or exceed many systems currently installed in other
educational institutions and industries. Technical and Information Services (TIS) provides technical support services
to students, faculty, and staff for their academic, instructional, and research endeavors. TIS is responsible for the
design, development, implementation, and maintenance of a state-of-the-art computing environment for the Hartford
Campus community.
To meet this challenge, we have developed a computing environment based on a distributed network of personal
computers (PCs), high-end workstations, and fileservers using a client-server model, combined with high-speed
networking. This model provides a multi-user computing environment that is capable of handling demanding
database management and compute-intensive applications for students, faculty, and staff.
A variety of computing facilities, general access labs, technology classrooms and wireless access are available for
student use. Our facilities have consistent equipment installed (Sun Workstations, PCs, etc.) and numerous software
packages. TIS offices are located on Level 2.
Network and Servers
The Hartford Campus computing infrastructure is based on an open TCP/IP client-server architecture and uses Cisco
System’s routers and Catalyst switches to support a high-speed 10/100/1000 Mbps switched network. All servers
connect to the network via a dedicated 1000 Mbps full duplex link. Workstations and PCs connect to the switched
network via dedicated 10/100/1000Mbps links.
Users may access Hartford Campus network services from home or office via their Internet service provider. Robust
Internet access is provided via a gigabit connection to the Connecticut Education Network (CEN). An additional T1
links Hartford to the Groton Site. A Virtual Private Network (VPN) service is available for secure remote access to
internal campus resources.
Wireless Access is available at the Hartford Campus and the Groton Site. All wireless connections are secured either
using security protocols or via a wireless VPN service. The following areas feature wireless access: Level 2 (Plaza
Building, Cafeteria, and courtyard), Level 3, Level 4, Level 5 (Cole Library) and Level 7 with additional areas and
full campus coverage planned within a year.
The Hartford student file server is a Sun Microsystems’ Enterprise, a high-performance, multi-core, multi-processor
server with raid disk storage. In addition, Sun servers supply specialized network services and Web access. To
complete the computing environment, the Hartford Campus has high-speed, publication-quality printers. All printers
are networked and accessible throughout the building.
Personal Computer Laboratories
Students have access to several PC-based laboratories and technology classrooms. These facilities are located on the
first, second, fourth, and sixth levels of the main building, in the Cole Library, and at the Groton Site. The PCs in
these facilities are connected to our local area network, giving students access to the Internet as well as file and print
services. The technology classrooms are available for individual student use when they are not reserved for classes.
Contact TIS for availability of PC-based labs and the technology classrooms.
UNIX Workstation Laboratory and Classroom
The UNIX workstation laboratory on Level 1 and classroom on Level 2 contain workstations from Sun
Microsystems. These workstations are connected to our local area network, giving students access to the Internet as
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
well as file and print services. They feature high-speed I/O throughput, significant memory and disk capacity, plus
graphics acceleration. Technology classrooms are available for individual student use when they are not reserved for
classes.
Software Library
Each PC/Workstation has a variety of industry standard application software installed. The following describes some
of the application areas covered: programming languages/tools, office suite (word processing, spreadsheets,
presentation, and database applications) Web interface and virus protection.
The Robert L. and Sara Marcy Cole Library
Director: Mary S. Dixey
The Cole Library provides users with information resources and services that focus in the areas of management,
business, computer science, and engineering. Its specialized collection of print and electronic resources consists of
55,000 volumes; 400 print journals; and a variety of bibliographic and full-text online databases that offer access to
over 36,000 e-journals.
The Cole Library shares an online catalog with its sister library, the Folsom Library at Rensselaer in Troy, New
York. The Cole Library Web site provides access to both regional academic library catalogs and those across the
nation. The Cole Library has full membership in OCLC, Inc., an international bibliographic system, and has
borrowing privileges with over 5,000 member institutions.
Of particular interest to students and faculty are the publications of professional associations such as the Association
for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the American
Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Special online collections include proceedings of the ACM and IEEE.
Reference
The professional staff is available to assist students and faculty with research and reference needs using both the
Cole Library and other resources. Quick reference by e-mail form is also available. Referrals to other libraries in the
area augment in-house resources. Students and faculty may request material not available in the Cole Library
through Interlibrary Loan.
The Cole Library's instruction program offers subject-specific sessions on a class and individual basis. The staff is
especially attuned to the research needs of the adult student.
Electronic Access Resources
The Cole Library provides on-site and remote access to its resources. An open computer area provides online
databases that support both the management and the sciences curricula. A full gateway to the Internet is available
through PC workstations.
The Cole Library's home page is regularly updated. It offers tutorials and serves as a guide to course-related
resources. The information may be reached from remote locations through an Internet Service Provider.
Use of the Library
Students must register with the Cole Library to borrow materials. The Rensselaer ID card, issued at registration, also
serves as a Library Card. Material in the open collection is loaned for the entire term. Reserve materials are available
for shorter loan periods determined by the faculty. Students may contact the Cole Library at (860) 548-2490; (800)
433-4723, Ext. 2490; e-mail:
[email protected] ; or visit our home page www.ewp.rpi.edu/library.
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Southeastern Connecticut Site
Location
Rensselaer's Groton Site is located at the Mystic Executive Park, 115 Poheganut Drive, Groton. The Mystic
Executive Park is a modern, conveniently located facility with ample free parking. Rensselaer’s space features
newly built classrooms, a reception area, computer room, student lounge, and wireless network access.
Get directions to the Groton Site
Emergency Closing Information
Check the Emergency Closing page for a listing of radio stations and news sources that will provide emergency
closing information. If a decision to delay or cancel the opening of our facilities is made, the announcement will
also appear on the EWP home page.
Textbooks and Other Materials
Groton students may order their textbooks online. The complete procedure is available by clicking HERE.
Facility Information
Mystic Executive Park
115 Poheganut Drive, Groton, Connecticut
Telephone: (860) 449-8157
Fax: (860) 548-7918
Building Hours
for Rensselaer students:
Monday - Thursday: 3 - 9 p.m.
Friday, Saturday: Varies by class schedule.
Free on-site parking is provided. Entry is through the front or rear building entrances. Rensselaer's facilities are
located about halfway down the hallway that bisects the building, on the east side.
Cole Library Services
Both faculty and students are asked to refer to the "General Information" section for a more complete
introduction to services provided by the Cole Library. Resources are provided to students through the Cole
Library Web site. The borrowing, reference book collection, and print periodical holdings may be viewed from
selecting the appropriate link at the library catalog web page. Books from the Hartford collection are loaned to
students via the shuttle and are made available to you from the Administrative staff. To borrow books from the
Cole Library collection or to request a book from another library fill out the interlibrary loan form at:
http://illiad.lib.rpi.edu/illiad/GHG/logon.html. Journal articles and conference proceedings not available full-text
through the "Database" page, may also be obtained through interlibrary loan. Fill out the form online. Any
questions regarding interlibrary loan may be addressed to
[email protected] . Students are encouraged to
send reference questions through email
[email protected] . Turnaround time for answers is usually 24
hours. Consult "Research Help" for assistance in locating both print reference and Internet sites by subject
referral or other research approaches. You can reach the Cole Library staff at (860) 548-2490 or (800) 433-4723,
ext. 2490.
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Technical and Information Services
The Groton Site computing facilities have hardware and software resources consistent with those available in
Hartford. Students and faculty are asked to refer to the main TIS page for a complete listing of services and
resources provided in Hartford and Groton. Students have access to one computing classroom with twenty seven
PC desktop workstations. Each system has a myriad of software applications installed and is connected to the
Hartford Campus local area network, providing access to the Internet as well as file and print services. The
Groton file server is a high-performance Sun server with 150 GB of raid-based disk storage. Wireless access is
provided, along with hardwired connection points for students' laptops.
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Admissions
General Information For Degree and Nonmatriculated Applicants
Degree and nonmatriculated applicants have different application requirements. Please read the section that
pertains to you. If you are interested in nonmatriculated status at this time but may wish to matriculate in the
future, please read both sections. Application forms and complete application instructions are available by
contacting the Office of Enrollment Management.
Degree Applicants
An applicant may request degree status if he or she has received a Bachelor's degree from an accredited
undergraduate institution and demonstrates a strong academic record. Credentials will be reviewed to determine
whether the applicant has the necessary qualifications and meets the admissions standards established by
Rensselaer. Please refer to the checklist of application credentials needed to complete your file. Degree-seeking
applicants may sometimes be admitted with conditions. Admission and continued enrollment depend upon the
satisfactory fulfillment of the stated conditions.
Nonmatriculated Applicants
An applicant may request nonmatriculated status if he or she has received a Bachelor's degree from an accredited
undergraduate institution and meets the admissions standards established by Rensselaer. Admission is granted if
the supporting documents indicate strong academic achievement and demonstrate that the applicant has the
necessary preparation for the desired course(s). To apply, an applicant needs to submit an unofficial copy of the
Bachelor's degree transcript showing all courses, grades, and award of the degree, as well as a current résumé and
a brief description of the applicant’s reasons for pursuing the desired course of study. If the transcript is not
sufficient for a decision, Admissions may request additional supporting documents such as references or
admissions tests. Nonmatriculated students may request a change to degree status by obtaining departmental
approval. Please refer to Changes in Status for complete details.
Applicants with Postbaccalaureate Degrees
Applicants who have been awarded a postbaccalaureate degree may be eligible to participate in Rensselaer at
Hartford's special admissions process. Please call the Admissions Office for details.
Standardized Test Requirements for Graduate Degree Candidates (New)
All full-time applicants to the MBA, M.S. Management, M.S. Financial Engineering & Risk Analytics, or M.S.
Technology Commercialization and Entrepreneurship must submit a Graduate Management Admission Test
(GMAT). There are certain occasions when other graduate admissions examinations such as the Graduate Record
Examination (GRE) are accepted in place of the GMAT. Please contact the Office of Enrollment Management to
discuss your individual situation:
Applicants seeking entry to the part-time MBA or M.S. in Management are required to submit either a GMAT
score or a PPI (Personal Potential Index) evaluation. Part-time applicants to master’s program in Engineering,
Computer Science or Information Technology are required to submit either a GRE or the PPI.
Part-time applicants with limited work experience are asked to submit the GMAT or GRE exam. Those
professionals who possess significant work experience but may be concerned about the competitiveness of their
academic background are encouraged to submit a standardized test to enhance their candidacy for graduate study.
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Please note: applicants who submit a PPI evaluation are not required to provide additional letters of reference.
•
•
•
Go to GMAT Information for Prospective Students
Go to GRE Information
Go to PPI Information
The GMAT is not required for applicants to the M.S. degree in Management. However, students concerned about
the competitiveness of their academic background may wish to take the GMAT exam to obtain an additional
academic credential.
Background Preparation for Master of Science in Computer Science and Nonmatriculated Computer
Science Applicants
Depending on academic background and professional experience, some students may be required to begin their
studies with one or more of the following prerequisite "immigration" courses. These courses will be taken in
addition to the standard 30 credits needed for degree completion.
CISH-4960 Introduction to Computer Programming
CISH-4010 Discrete Mathematics
CISH-4020 Object Structures
CISH-4030 Structured Computer Architecture
Students with immigration courses as prerequisites may be admitted conditionally. Since these are undergraduate
courses, students are expected to achieve a grade of "B" or better in each course. Achievement below this level is
cause for reexamination of admission. In addition, these immigration courses will not enter into the calculation of
a student's GPA for graduation.
Background Preparation for Master of Science in Information Technology (IT) and Nonmatriculated IT
Applicants
Depending on academic background and professional experience, some students may be required to begin their
studies with one or more of the following prerequisite "immigration" courses. These courses will be taken in
addition to the 30 credits needed for degree completion.
CISH-4960 Introduction to Computer Programming
CISH-4010 Discrete Mathematics
CISH-4020 Object Structures
Students with immigration courses as prerequisites may be admitted conditionally. Since these are undergraduate
courses, students are expected to achieve a grade of "B" or better in each course. Achievement below this level is
cause for reexamination of admission. In addition, these immigration courses will not enter into the calculation of
a student's GPA for graduation.
Background Preparation for Engineering Applicants
All Engineering applicants are expected to have earned a Bachelor of Science degree from an ABET accredited
college or university. The Bachelor of Engineering Technology (BET) is not generally appropriate for master’s
level courses or degree programs in Engineering. If you hold a BET degree and are interested in courses and/or a
degree in Engineering, please refer to the General Engineering Requirements listed in the Engineering section of
the Catalog. If you do not yet have the background indicated for a particular Engineering discipline, please
contact the Office of Enrollment Management to discuss your particular circumstances. In certain instances, you
may be required to submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Engineering Test or to pursue
further instruction in order to meet these background requirements.
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Financial Aid / Veterans’ Benefits
Checklist of Required Application Materials
For Federal Stafford Loan
•
•
•
Federal Student Loan Request Form
(Downloadable form - NOTE: Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view documents in PDF format.)
2010-2011 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) OR
2010-2011 Renewal FAFSA*
Please send application materials directly to
Rensselaer at Hartford’s Financial Aid Office.
*FAFSAs can be completed online by clicking below:
www.fafsa.ed.gov
(IMPORTANT - Rensselaer at Hartford's school code is E01127)
Contact the Rensselaer at Hartford Financial Aid Office:
John Gonyea, Financial Aid Officer
Rensselaer at Hartford
275 Windsor Street, Hartford, CT 06120
(860) 548-2406, (800) 433-4723, Ext. 2406
Fax: (860) 548-7912
E-mail:
[email protected]
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Student Financial Services
Manager, Financial Services: Natalie A. Sutera
Supervisor, Student Accounts: Audrey C. Cardillo
Tuition and Fees
Beginning with the Fall 2010 term, tuition for advanced graduate studies programs is $1410 per credit hour.
Registration is not complete until payment is received through any of the Payment Options outlined below.
Tuition payment is due two weeks before classes begin (see specific Program Schedule). Tuition paid after this
date will be subject to a late fee of $100 per course. Students will not be able to attend class until all financial
obligations have been met.
Beginning with the Fall 2011 term, tuition for advanced graduate studies programs will be $1480 per credit
hour.
No refunds will be issued for any courses dropped after the Drop Deadline for the specific Program.
There are no additional fees for registration, use of the library, computing facilities, Commencement, parking, or
any other Rensselaer student service.
Financial Responsibilities
Academic credit, degrees, grade reports, diplomas, and transcripts will not be granted to students who have
outstanding financial obligations to Rensselaer. In addition, students who have not satisfied their financial
obligations will be unable to register for future terms. Should a student fail to pay any amounts due Rensselaer in
accordance with the terms of the Catalog, Rensselaer may, at its option, increase the amounts due by any
attorneys’ fees, collection agency fees, or any other costs or charges incurred in the collection process.
Payment Options
Payments can be made through the office of Student Services at the Hartford Campus. Normal business hours are
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. For the convenience of our students, payments are also accepted at
the Reception Desk located on Level 3. Extended hours at the Reception Desk are Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. to
9 p.m., and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.. Other arrangements can also be made by contacting Student Accounts
directly at (860) 548-2413.
•
•
•
Checks, Money Orders, and Travelers Checks should be payable to Rensselaer. To expedite
processing, please also include your RIN (Rensselaer Identification Number) and name on all forms of
payment.
Credit Card Payments. Rensselaer accepts Mastercard, Discover, and American Express. If you wish
to pay all or a portion of your charges by credit card please log on to the Rensselaer Web site and pay
online.
Payment Plan. As an alternative to paying one lump sum at the beginning of the term, Rensselaer offers
a monthly installment plan. This plan, called “Tuition Pay,” is coordinated with Academic Management
Services (AMS). The plan permits tuition charges to be paid in four interest-free installments over the
course of the current term. The only additional cost is an application fee of $35 per term. For more
information on Tuition Pay through AMS, please contact Student Accounts, or AMS directly at (800)
635-0120 or visit their Web site at: www.tuitionpay.com.
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Employer Payments
1.
2.
Direct Billing. Rensselaer currently has contracts with several local employers to direct bill the
company for tuition charges incurred on behalf of certain qualified employees. If an employer
authorizes direct billing by Rensselaer, the appropriate authorization form/letter, or purchase order must
be submitted to Student Accounts at the time of registration. If you have questions as to whether or not
your employer has such an arrangement with Rensselaer or the documentation required for such
payments, please contact Student Accounts.
Tuition Reimbursement. If an employer is supporting tuition costs by reimbursing an employee
directly at the end of the term, this does not qualify a student for deferred payment. Students in this
situation are considered to be self-paying, subject to the standard financial responsibilities and payment
schedules described above.
Tuition Refunds
Students who withdraw from a course without registering for another course prior to the Drop Deadline will
receive a full tuition refund. All other withdrawals after the Drop Deadline will result in 100% forfeiture of
tuition.
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Academic Information and Regulations
Registrar: Doris M. Matsikas
Registration
Students will be registered prior to the beginning of each term as specified in the academic calendar. New
students are expected to contact their academic advisor for assistance in course selection. Returning students are
given the opportunity to automatically get registered each term, according to the courses on their Plan of Study.
Registration procedures are available online on the Student Homepage.
Residence and Time Limit
A student earning a master’s degree is required to complete a minimum of 24 credit hours at Rensselaer for each
Master of Science degree sought. Students engaged in professional programs (part-time students) must complete
all work for the master’s degrees requiring 30 credits within three calendar years of the original admission date.
Those Rensselaer students working on master’s degrees requiring 51 credits must complete the requirements
within five calendar years of the original admission date. Extensions may only be granted if the student is in good
academic standing and has an acceptable Plan of Study. Working professionals must petition the Registrar for an
extension. Final approval is granted by the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs.
Academic Load
A part-time student normally carries a maximum of six credit hours per term. Full-time registration requires
enrollment in a minimum of twelve credit hours per term unless the student's academic program does not permit
registering for twelve credit hours. In such cases, full-time status will require a minimum of nine credit hours.
Academic Standing
A student is considered in good academic standing if he or she is making satisfactory progress toward his or her
educational goals. Students not making satisfactory progress are subject to dismissal.
Academic Dismissal
Continuation in the graduate program requires satisfactory performance. Satisfactory performance is not limited
to the academic record, but also includes other appraisals of the student's ability.
The minimum GPA of all grades used for credit must be 3.0. If a student's grade average falls below 3.0, the
department will conduct a formal review to determine whether continuation is warranted.
A student will be dismissed from Rensselaer if:
•
•
•
He or she has accumulated six credit hours beyond the stated degree requirements and has not satisfied
the 3.0/4.0 GPA.
His or her record indicates two failing "F" grades or three "C" grades where the GPA is less than
3.0/4.0.
He or she fails to make satisfactory progress toward the completion of course work or a degree program.
Readmission
This policy applies to students who have completed only a few courses and have exceeded the three-year (M.S.
and M.Eng.) or five-year (MBA) limit to complete degree requirements. Graduate students requesting
readmission must receive the prior approval of the academic department official.
A student reapplies by completing the Rensselaer application. Resubmission of letters of recommendation and
official transcripts are generally not required. However, if the transcripts in the student's file are not official, or if
he or she has completed additional course work at another graduate institution since attending Rensselaer , the
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Office of Student Services will require the appropriate official transcripts and other documentation, if needed.
If readmission is approved, all course work for the master's degree must be completed within three or five
calendar years (depending upon degree) beginning with the date of the readmission letter. Course work taken
prior to readmission will be subject to evaluation by the academic department official and faculty advisor. When
a student is readmitted he or she must satisfy current program requirements.
Leave of Absence
A leave of absence is a period of time voluntarily spent away from Rensselaer. A student in good standing who
finds it necessary to withdraw for an allowable period of time must complete a Leave of Absence form, stating
reasons for the request, and submit it to the Office of the Registrar. A leave of absence is normally given for up
to one year, starting with the term during which the leave is requested. A leave of absence does not afford
additional time to complete the degree. Exceptions to this rule can be requested when the leave is taken for
maternity, medical, or military reasons.
Withdrawal from Rensselaer
In order to leave in good standing, a student who voluntarily withdraws during the academic year must request a
Withdrawal form and submit it to the Office of the Registrar.
Advisors
Students are required to establish and maintain working relationships with faculty advisors during their programs
of study.
Each student is assigned a faculty advisor to assist in academic program planning and the development of an
approved Plan of Study. It is mandatory that students contact the faculty advisor during their first term to
complete a Plan of Study. If no plan is on file prior to the next term, a flag will be placed on the student's record
preventing registration.
Students should also meet with the faculty advisor annually and prior to starting their last term before graduation
to assure that all degree requirements are being completed in compliance with established criteria. It is the
student's responsibility to ensure that the academic regulations are met and that any deviations from these
regulations are approved in advance by the advisor and the academic department official.
Requests for change of status, change in program plan, and transfer of credit should be submitted on the
appropriate form to the faculty advisor for review, consideration, and processing. Supporting letters and
documentation should accompany such requests as required.
In addition to assisting in academic program planning, faculty advisors are aware of Rensselaer policies which
may affect student status. They are also familiar with future elective course options which may be of special
interest to advisees.
Attendance Requirements
Requirements for class attendance are generally determined by the academic department. It is the responsibility
of each instructor to make these requirements clear at the beginning of the course, and it is the responsibility of
the student to abide by them. If the instructor does not inform the class of the attendance policy, he or she should
be asked to state the policy for the class.
The instructor who defers a class or changes his or her class schedule for any reason is responsible for arranging
for the work that is missed. The entire class must agree with any change to a class meeting schedule or final
exam schedule.
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Auditing
Auditing is attending a course without credit. Auditors may participate in recitations, discussions, or
examinations at the discretion of the instructor. Admitted students will be allowed to audit courses on a noncredit
basis with the written permission of the instructor.
A student is granted auditor status when the Auditor Registration Form has been signed by all appropriate parties
and returned to the Office of the Registrar.
Auditors are charged full tuition for courses audited and may not register for credit in the audited course later in
the same term. They may, however, register in a future term on a credit basis for the audited course. Tuition will
be charged at the time of registration. Auditors who have fulfilled the attendance requirements of the instructor
will be assigned the grade of "AU" for the audited course at the end of the term.
Changes in Course Registration
Add/Drop Regulations:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
A student may add a course, make a section change, or drop a course by completing the Add/Drop
Form. A revised Plan of Study must be submitted promptly following the Add/Drop procedure.
There is no refund of tuition after the first three weeks of the term. Tuition charges are based on the
number of credits for which the student is enrolled at the end of the third week of the term (Drop
Deadline), independent of any further late drops.
After the published Drop Deadline, a student may withdraw after submitting the Add/Drop Form and
providing a detailed explanation of the reason for the late withdrawal. Such late drops are assigned the
non punitive grade of "W" (Withdrawn) and the student is charged full tuition.
Failure to attend a class, verbal notification, or other unofficial communication with the instructor or
Office of the Registrar does not constitute dropping a course.
Students who fail to submit a Drop Form will be assigned the punitive grade "FA" (Administrative
Failure) by the Registrar at the end of the term.
A veteran who changes his or her original credit-hour load within a term, or who withdraws, must notify
the Veterans Coordinator immediately.
Students are reminded that the possibility of receiving a low grade is not sufficient ground to petition for
permission to withdraw during the final two weeks of the course. Late withdrawals involving
extenuating circumstances beyond the student's control are given individual consideration.
Changes in Status
All changes in student status require completion of a Change of Status Form. This Form may be used to request
one or more of the following:
1.
Admission to Degree Status (Non matriculated to Matriculated)
A prerequisite for admission to degree status is the completion of a minimum of two graduate courses (6
credit hours ) and before the completion of four graduate courses (12 credit hours) with grades of "A" or
"B" (minimum 3.0/4.0 GPA). No more than twelve credit hours earned as a nonmatriculated student will
be transferred to a degree program.
Nonmatriculated students may request admission to degree status by submitting the following
documents to the Office of the Registrar: 1) a Graduate Request for Change of Status Form, 2) a
proposed Plan of Study Form, and 3) the remaining documents required to complete the formal
application, if applicable. Note that the documents required for admission to degree status vary by
department. Admission to degree status is subject to the approval of the faculty advisor and the
academic department official.
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2.
Returning after an Absence
Students in good standing who have been inactive for one or more academic years may petition to return
to graduate study by submitting the Change of Status Form. All requests to return to a program after an
absence or to return to study after graduation are subject to the review and approval of the appropriate
academic officials.
3.
Entry to a Second Master's Program or Alumni Returning for Additional Course Work
Graduates of Rensselaer are welcome to return for another master's degree or additional course work. If
returning as an Alumni for additional course work, a Change of Status Form is required. If seeking
another master's degree, the Change of Status Form and Plan of Study Form are required. All requests to
enter a new degree program are subject to the review and approval of the academic department official.
4.
Change in Curriculum
Students wishing to change from one curriculum to another (such as from Mechanical Engineering to
Management) must file a new Change of Status Form and submit a new Plan of Study. All requests to
enter a new degree program are subject to the review and approval of the academic department official.
A student who petitions to change his or her curriculum must satisfactorily fulfill current admissions and
program requirements.
5.
Dual Degree
Matriculated students may request admission to seek dual degrees (earning two separate degrees
concurrently) by submitting a Change of Status Form and a Plan of Study Form for each degree
program. This request is subject to approval of the academic officials from each department.
Any change affecting the student's permanent record, such as change of name, address, Social Security number,
or status must be reported to the Office of the Registrar as soon as possible. Questions concerning Change of
Status procedures should be directed to the Office of the Registrar.
Consortium Registration
Rensselaer Students
Rensselaer is a member of the Hartford Consortium for Higher Education. Eligible students who wish to take a
course through the Consortium program should contact the Registrar for information and forms.
Students who wish to register at a Consortium school must bring the Consortium Graduate Student Registration
Form, validated by the Registrar at the Hartford Campus, to the other school. Rensselaer students are reminded
that attendance at the other school is on a space-available basis.
Approved courses taken at one of the Consortium colleges are entered on the student's record in the same manner
as courses taken at Rensselaer , and thus carry term and cumulative hours and quality points.
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Consortium Students From Other Schools
Rensselaer requires the formal admission, prior to registration, of all students or full-time employees of member
institutions who wish to take a course through the Consortium program.
Students participating in the Consortium Employee Agreement are limited to one course per term without tuition
obligation on a space-available basis.
Credit Hour Definition
Academic credit is assigned in terms of the credit hour. For formal course work, one credit hour is equivalent to
one class hour per week for one term as specified in the academic calendar. All courses carry three credit hours
except where noted.
Transfer of Credit
1.
2.
3.
4.
Credit for graduate work completed in residence at other accredited institutions (management courses
must be from AACSB-accredited programs) may be offered in partial fulfillment of the requirements
when the grade earned is a "B" or better, the work is substantially equivalent to the Rensselaer course it
replaces, the course has not been credited toward an undergraduate degree, and the course was
completed within five years of admission. No more than six credit hours may be transferred toward the
degree, and not more than six credit hours used for a master's degree in one area can be applied to a
second master's degree.
A matriculated student who obtains the approval of his/her academic advisor to take graduate-level
course work elsewhere while enrolled at Rensselaer must apply for transfer of credit as soon as the
credit has been earned.
It is the student's responsibility to complete the Transfer of Credit Form; submit an official transcript
indicating grade received, credit awarded; and any other documentation required by his or her advisor,
such as a catalog description of the course and a (new or revised) Plan of Study. Courses taken
elsewhere and approved for transfer to Rensselaer as part of a degree program are not considered in
computing the "B" average requirement. For additional information concerning the awarding of credit
by transfer, contact the Office of the Registrar.
On the student's official transcript, a Transfer of Credit will record only the course title and the credit
hours, but not the grade of the transferred course. The credit hours of a transferred course compute into
the cumulative earned hours, but do not affect the attempted hours column.
Substitutions
Courses required for any degrees may be waived only with substitution. A student whose prior academic
preparation is substantially equivalent to the level and content of a required core course may petition the
department for a waiver from the course.
M.S. students requesting substitution(s) must fill out Plan of Study and Request for Waiver with Substitution
Forms indicating the course or courses to be waived and include: 1) an unofficial transcript, 2) a catalog
description of the course, and 3) a letter justifying the rationale for the waiver. These materials should be
submitted to the advisor.
Grade Requirements
A "B" average must be maintained in order to fulfill degree requirements. When the student's academic
performance is unacceptable, one of the following actions will be taken.
1) The Registrar will inform the student in writing that his or her quality point average has fallen below the stated
"B" (3.0) average.
2) The Assistant Dean for Academic Programs may require that the student take a substitute course or repeat a
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course.
3) The Assistant Dean for Academic Programs may, under exceptional circumstances, request that the student be
reexamined in a course.
For further information please refer to the section on Academic Standing. .
Grading System
Letter grades and their meanings are:
A
Excellent
A-
Excellent
B+
Good
B
Good
B-
Good
C+
Average
C
Average
C-
Average
F
Failed
I
Incomplete course work
W
Withdrawn
A
U
Audit
U
Unsatisfactory in a satisfactory/unsatisfactory graded course
IP
In Progress (multiple-term course)
S
Satisfactory in a satisfactory/unsatisfactory graded course
Z
Grade unknown--see instructor
N
E
Not Examined
F
A
Failed (due to administrative reasons)
W
I
Failed (course that was previously graded "I" in which the student did not meet the deadline for
completing course work)
Grading System Explanation
FA Grade
The grade "FA" (Administrative Failure) is assigned by the Registrar to students who register for a course they
do not attend and do not submit an Add/Drop Form.
I Grade
The grade “I” (Incomplete) is given when a student is unable to complete required course work due to illness or
other extenuating circumstance such as a personal emergency beyond the student’s control.
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The “I” grade is given only after the contract form (“Authorization for the Grade of Incomplete”) is completed
and signed by the instructor and the student and received by the Registrar.
Under no circumstances may the “I” grade be given for the following situations:
•
•
•
•
Absence from a final exam or missing paper or project that is by choice and not beyond the student’s
control
Student on class list who never attended class
Student who wishes to do additional coursework or repeat the course to improve a grade
Student who attended only a few classes and needs to attend most of the classes again.
The work for which the “I” grade was given must be completed within one term.
If the agreements made in the “I” grade contract are not faithfully observed, or if the “I” grade is not cleared in
the time specified by the contract, the grade automatically becomes a “WI.” Once the “I” grade is changed to
“WI”, no other grade change will be accepted. The “I” is considered a penalty grade in the calculation of the term
GPA. Until changed, it is calculated as if it were the grade of “F.”
IP Grade
The "IP" (In Progress) grade is given at the end of preliminary term of multiple-term courses such as thesis,
project, seminar, culminating experience (CAPSTONE), or practicum.
NE Grade
The "NE" (Not Examined) grade is given by the instructor to a student who has been excused from taking a final
exam at the scheduled time. The "NE" grade is recorded on the student's record when the instructor submits the
"NE Grade Authorization" to the Office of the Registrar.
The grade of "NE" must be made up on the day specified by the instructor and prior to the end of the subsequent
term.
If the examination is not taken by the date specified, the grade automatically becomes an "F."
Once the "NE" grade is changed to an "F", no other grade change will be accepted.
It should be noted that the grade of "NE" is not considered in the calculation of the term GPA.
S Grade & U Grade
"S" (Satisfactory) and "U" (Unsatisfactory) grades can only be assigned in courses specifically approved for such
grading by the Curriculum Committee. Examples of such courses are seminar, thesis, project, or certain general
electives.
W Grade
The grade "W" (Withdrawn) is assigned by the Registrar when a student is permitted to withdraw from a course
after the drop deadline.
WI Grade
This letter grade is assigned by the Registrar to students who received an Incomplete ("I") grade but failed to
meet the criteria or the deadline specified in the "I" contract. The grade is calculated as an "F" in the student's
grade point average. Once the "I" grade is changed to "WI", no other grade change will be accepted.
Z Grade
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
The "Z" grade (Grade Unknown) is assigned by the Registrar when the grade roster is not submitted by the
instructor in time to print the term grade reports. The student should see his or her instructor for the grade.
AU Grade
The grade "AU" (Audit) is assigned to students who have officially registered as auditors and who have fulfilled
the instructor's attendance requirements.
NOTE: The grades A, B, C, F, FA, S, U, or WI cannot be appealed or changed six months after award by
instructor.
Grade Point Average (GPA)
A student's grade point average is determined on the basis of the following numbers assigned to the letter grades:
A=4.0, A- = 3.67, B+=3.33, B=3.0, B- = 2.67, C+=2.33, C=2.0, C- =1.67, F=0, I=0, FA=0, WI=0*. The grades
U, S, IP, NE, W, AU, and Z are not considered when computing averages. The grade point average is computed
by multiplying the number corresponding to the grade in each and every course by the number of credit hours for
the course, totaling these products and then dividing the sum by the total number of credit hours for the courses
considered. Credit granted for work taken at another institution other than a member of the Hartford Consortium
for Higher Education and credit granted by waiver and examination are not included in the GPA.
The grade point average for the term is computed at the end of each term. The cumulative quality point average is
computed at the end of each term for the full period of attendance at Rensselaer .
If a Graduate student repeats a course, both grades are entered on the record. However, course credit will count
only once and, although both grades appear on the transcript, the grade received in the repeated course is always
the one used in computing the GPA. The grade for a repeated course for which the student receives a grade of
"W" or taken at another institution cannot be used in place of the original course grade in calculating the GPA.
Grade Calculations
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F
Yes
0
0
No
No
Failed
I
Yes
0
0
No
Yes
Incomplete
W
No
0
0
No
No
Withdrawn
AU
No
0
0
No
No
Audit
U
No
0
0
No
No
Unsatisfacto
ry
IP
No
0
0
No
No
In Progress
S
No
0
0
Yes
No
Satisfactory
Yes
Grade
Unknown
(Grade due,
but not
submitted)
Yes
Not
Examined
(Missed
Final Exam)
No
Failed due
to
administrati
ve reasons
No
Failed (Did
not
complete
course that
was
previously
graded
incomplete)
Z
No
NE
FA
WI
No
Yes
Yes
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
No
No
No
No
Institutional Requirements
A candidate for a master's degree must:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Be in good academic and disciplinary standing.
Satisfy the culminating experience requirement as specified by the academic department.
Complete a Plan of Study with at least 30 credit hours (51 for the Master of Business Administration)
beyond the bachelor's degree with satisfactory grades.
Satisfy grade requirements with a minimum of 3.0/4.0 GPA.
Satisfy residence requirements.
Satisfy the department's practicum or seminar requirement, if applicable.
Present a thesis or project, if required.
Pursue a Plan of Study that will lead to the completion of all requirements.
Satisfy all financial obligations.
File a Degree Application with the Office of the Registrar by the date specified in the academic
calendar, for the term in which he or she plans to fulfill degree requirements. If a degree application was
filed for a previous term but the requirements were not fulfilled, a new degree application must be filed
for the term in which the student actually is graduating.
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A student pursuing more than one master's degree must meet the above requirements for each degree sought.
Master's Thesis and Master's Project
Certain departments may specify presentation of a thesis or completion of a project as a requirement for a
master's degree. Usually six, but no more than nine credit hours are allowed for a master's thesis or project.
Theses and projects are graded either "S" (Satisfactory) or "U" (Unsatisfactory).
In a department that ordinarily requires a thesis or project, a student may be permitted to substitute additional
courses on recommendation of the advisor and with the approval of the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs.
Submission of the thesis or project report and any final examination on the thesis or project must occur by the
dates listed in the academic calendar for the year. Students who wish to undertake a thesis or project in
Management should contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs for information and guidelines. Students
in the Engineering and Computer and Information Sciences curricula would complete the thesis or project under
the guidance of a thesis/project advisor. Details concerning deadlines, proposal, and defense are available in the
guide "Project/Thesis Requirements and Guidelines" which can be obtained from the department.
The candidate must submit the final original copy of the thesis or project, together with the advisor's written
approval of both content and format, to the Office of the Registrar at least one week before the end of the term in
which the degree is to be awarded.
Additional original copies, as specified by the individual department, may be requested. The record of
completion is forwarded to the Office of the Registrar and the thesis or project will be bound by the Cole Library.
Degree Completion
At the beginning of the term in which the degree is expected, eligible degree candidates who have fulfilled all
departmental requirements and satisfied all financial obligations must file a Degree Application Form and current
Plan of Study Form with the Office of the Registrar.
No student is considered a degree candidate until he or she files the Degree Application Form.
Students who apply for degree completion but do not fulfill degree requirements must reapply for degree
completion by submitting a new Degree Application Form for the term in which completion is anticipated.
Degrees are conferred in August, December, and May.
Degree candidates not registering for course work in their final term must register for EWP Degree Completion
(course number ADMN-5030H01). This no-credit designation carries a $50 administrative fee.
Commencement exercises are held on the grounds of Rensselaer's Troy, New York Campus in May to honor
graduates for the entire academic year. Information concerning the degree clearance procedure and deadlines
may be obtained by contacting the Office of the Registrar. Please see the Academic Calendar for the specific
date.
Transcript Requests
Students in Rensselaer's Hartford Campus programs may request an official transcript by writing to: Student
Records and Financial Services, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Academy Hall 2000 Level,
Troy, NY 12180-3590; request via Rensselaer's Web site: www.rpi.edu/dept/srfs/transcripts.pdf , or fax the
request to the Registrar's Office in Troy, New York, at (518) 276-6180.
Former students/graduates of The Hartford Graduate Center's Biomedical Engineering, Health Care
Management, and Corporate Fellows programs may request an official copy of their transcript by writing to the
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Office of the Registrar, Rensselaer at Hartford 275 Windsor Street, Hartford, CT 06120-2991
All requests for transcripts should include the student's full name, Social Security number, signature, and the
name and address of the recipient. The transcript will be mailed at no charge.
Note: Official transcripts bearing the seal of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will be issued only after all
financial obligations have been met.
Please note that transcripts submitted as part of the application process cannot be photocopied, faxed, or given to
the student. Students requiring these documents must, therefore, obtain these records directly from their college
or university.
Department of Engineering and Science
Assistant Dean for Academic Programs: Houman Younessi, Ph.D.
Department Home Page: www.ewp.rpi.edu/hartford/academic/does/
•
•
•
Computer Science
Information Technology
Engineering
Computer Science
Computer Science Full-time Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Position
Degree and Institution
Computer Science Adjunct Faculty
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Teaching Area
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
McCarthy, Charles F.
Adjunct Professor
M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Stevens, Michael
Adjunct Professor
M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Mathematics
Software Engineering/IT
Master of Science in Computer Science
Applicants are assumed to have knowledge of computer concepts and programming in a high-level language
(e.g., Java, C++). To receive the Master of Science Degree in Computer Science, students must earn a minimum
of 30 credit hours in Computer Science or Engineering courses and satisfy the following requirements:
1) Plan of Study
Each student completes a Plan of Study in consultation with his or her advisor. This Plan will include required
immigration courses (if any), five core courses, Research Methods course, the Culminating Experience
(Computer Science Project) and three elective courses. At least two of the elective courses should pertain to a
specific area that reflects the student's professional or academic interest.
2) Immigration Courses
Depending on academic background and professional experience, some students may be required to begin their
studies with one or more prerequisite "immigration" course(s) beyond the standard 30 credit hours. The
immigration courses are:
CISH-4010 Discrete Mathematics and Computer Theory
CISH-4020 Object Structures
CISH-4030 Structured Computer Architecture
Students with two or more immigration courses as prerequisites may be admitted conditionally. Since these are
the equivalent of undergraduate courses, students are expected to achieve a grade of "B"or better in each course.
Achievement below this level is cause for reexamination of admission. In addition, these immigration courses
will not enter into the calculation of a student's GPA for graduation.
3) Core Courses (15 credits)
Each Plan of Study will contain the following five courses:
CSCI-4210 Operating Systems
CSCI-4380 Database Systems
CSCI-6050 Computability and Complexity
ECSE-4670 Computer Communication Networks
ECSE-6770 Software Engineering I
Research Methods Course (3 credits)
CISH-6960H09 Research Methods in Computer Science
Culminating Experience (3 credits)
CISH-6970 Professional Project (for students admitted after Summer 2004)
Computer Science and Other Elective (9 credits)
With the exception of the immigration courses, all courses with the designation CISH or CSCI and most
designated ECSE may be used as electives for the degree.
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
4) Advanced Courses
At least 18 credit hours must be at the "advanced" level. All courses with suffix numbers 6000-6990 fall into this
category. These courses may include special topics courses which are offered under CISH or CSCI-6960 Topics
in Computer and Information Sciences, or ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering.
After completing course work in a particular area, students may elect to complete a six-credit Master's Project
(CISH or CSCI-6980) or Thesis (CISH or CSCI-6990) in that area.
5) Program Completion
Students will complete their program of study via one of two paths:
Applied Path:
Theory Path:
CISH-6960 Research Methods
A Theory Course
CISH-6970 Professional Project
Master's Thesis/Project
For More Information
Information concerning the Computer Science programs may be obtained by contacting Dr. Houman Younessi at
(860) 548-7880, (800) 290-7637, ext. 7880; e-mail:
[email protected]; or by visiting www.ewp.rpi.edu/does/.
Computer Science Graduate Certificate Programs
(Minimum of 12 Credit Hours)
The Computer Science Graduate Certificate Programs are designed with a selective focus and require that a
student successfully complete four graduate courses (twelve credit hours of which nine credit hours must be in
residence), with an average grade of "B" or better, in a specific area of Computer Science. Credits earned in
Graduate Certificates may be subsequently applied toward an M.S. degree as electives with advisor's approval.
Additional technical information about the Graduate Certificates can be obtained from the Certificate Program
Coordinators listed below. Graduate Certificates are offered in the following four areas:
Computer Network Communications
ECSE-4670 Computer Communication Networks
Select any three of the following courses:
CISH-6210 Computer Network Analysis and Design
CISH-6220 LANs, MANs, and Internetworking
CISH-6230 Network Management
CISH-6960 Cryptography and Network Security
ECSE-6660 Broadband Networks and Optical Networking
Program Coordinator: Roger H. Brown, (860) 548-2462, (800) 290-7637 ext. 2462, or e-mail:
[email protected]
Database Systems
CSCI-4380 Database Systems
Select any three of the following courses:
CSCI-6460 Advanced Database Management Topics
CISH-6110 Object-Oriented Database Systems
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
CISH-6120 Distributed Database Systems
CSCI-6960 Data Warehouse Systems
Program Coordinator: Houman Younessi, (860) 548-7880, (800) 290-7637 ext. 7880 or e-mail:
[email protected]
Information Systems
Required
ECSE-4670 Computer Communication Networks
CSCI-4380 Database Systems
COMM-6420 Foundations of Human-Computer Interaction Usability
Elective
ECSE-6770 Software Engineering I
or
CISH-6010 Object-Oriented Programming and Design
Program Coordinator: Roger H. Brown; (860) 548-2462, (800) 290-7637 ext. 2462, or e-mail:
[email protected]
Software Engineering
Required
ECSE-6770 Software Engineering I
CISH-6050 Software Engineering Management
Electives (Select any two of the following)
CISH-6010 Object-Oriented Programming and Design
CISH-6510 Web Application Design and Development
ECSE-6780 Software Engineering II
Program Coordinator: Houman Younessi, (860) 548-7880, (800)290-7637 ext. 7880, or e-mail:
[email protected]
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Information Technology
Master of Science in Information Technology
Program Objective
The primary intent of the Master of Science in Information Technology (MSIT) program is to prepare graduates
for professional practice in information technology. Although the term "information technology" may be subject
to many interpretations, we consider it to mean "applied computer science." Therefore, the program provides
students with exposure to a practical application of technology within an area of specialization. To this end,
students will gain a broad exposure to technology by completing a set of core courses and an in-depth exposure
to the application of technology in a particular discipline through courses in a student-selected application area.
Admission Requirements
Students enter the Master of Science in Information Technology program with diverse backgrounds. Ideally, a
student entering the program will have completed undergraduate courses which provide a background in the
following areas:
•
•
•
•
Computer programming in a high-level procedural language (e.g., COBOL, C)
Computer programming in an object-oriented language (e.g., C++, Eiffel)
Data structures and algorithm design
Discrete mathematics
Student lacking a background in any of the above areas may need to take one or more of the following
immigration courses:
•
•
CISH-4010 Discrete Mathematics and Computer Theory
CISH-4020 Object Structures
Academic Requirements
To meet the requirements for the MSIT, students must be formally admitted to the program and must complete an
approved Plan of Study that meets the following requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
A minimum of 30 credits
A minimum of 18 credits of advanced graduate-level course work (6000-level courses)
Five core courses in Information Technology
A minimum of 12 credits in an approved Application Area (see below)
A culminating/integrating experience
An additional requirement is that no more than half of the credits used toward the MSIT degree be taken from
courses offered by the Lally School of Management and Technology. These courses have the prefix "MGMT."
Core Courses
The core areas include database systems, telecommunications, software design, management of technology, and
human-computer interaction.
IT Core Area
Course Number and Name
32
Term(s) Offered
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Management of Technology
MGMT-6810 Management of Technical Projects Fall/Spring
Human Computer Interaction COMM-6420 Foundations of HCI Usability
Fall
If a student is granted a waiver from any Core area, an additional elective course (approved by the student's
advisor) must be taken.
Application Areas
An in-depth experience in the application of information technology to a particular discipline is achieved through
courses in a student-selected application area. Because technology changes so rapidly, the application of
technology also changes frequently. The available application areas in the MSIT program reflect these changes.
Below is a list of application areas currently available to students attending Rensselaer. To obtain an updated list
and the course requirements, consult the IT Program home page, www.ewp.rpi.edu/does/it_degree.html.
•
•
•
•
Networking
Database Systems Design
Software Design
Management Information Systems
Networking
Requirements: IT Core course in Telecommunications, at least three of the following courses, plus a culminating
experience:
•
•
•
•
ECSE-6660 Broadband Networks
CISH-6230 Network Management
CISH-6220 LANS, MANS, and Internetworking
CISH-6960 Cryptography and Network Security
Database Systems Design
Requirements: IT Core course in Database Systems plus at least three of the following plus a culminating
experience (maximum of 3 credits if Master's Project is chosen):
•
•
•
•
CSCI-6460 Advanced Database Management Topics
CISH-6110 Object-Oriented Database Systems
CISH-6120 Distributed Database Systems
CISH-6960 Data Warehouse Systems
Software Design
Requirements: IT Core course in Software Design, at least three of the following courses, plus a culminating
experience:
•
•
•
•
ECSE-6780 Software Engineering II
CISH-6010 Object-Oriented Programming and Design
CISH-6050 Software Engineering Management
CISH-6510 Web Application Design and Development
Management Information Systems
Requirements: IT Core course in Management, at least three of the following courses, plus a culminating
experience:
•
MGMT-6170 Advanced Systems Analysis and Design
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
•
•
•
MGMT-6180 Strategic IS Management
MGMT-6710 Designing, Developing, and Staffing High-Performance Organizations I
MGMT-6750 Legal Aspects of E-Business and Information Technology
Culminating Experience
The culminating experience may be satisfied by either of the following, depending on the application area and
the approval of adviser:
•
•
Master's Project (ITEC-6980, 3-6 credits)
Computer Science Seminar (CISH-69002, 3 credits)
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Engineering
Engineering - Full-time Faculty
Faculty
Position
Degree and Institution
Engineering - Adjunct
Faculty Emeritus
Faculty
35
Teaching Area
Rensselaer at Hartford
Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Dennis, Anthony J.
Adjunct Professor
Donachie, Matthew J., Jr. Adjunct Professor
Polytechnic Institute
Engineering Systems
Ph.D., University of
Connecticut
Applied Mechanics
Sc.D., Massachusetts
Institute
of Technology
Metallurgy
Lemcoff, Norberto O.
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D., University of
London
Mechanical Engineering
Foundations
Marcin, John J.
Adjunct Professor
M.S., Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute
Metallurgy
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D.E.E., University of
Manitoba
DSP, Control Systems,
Circuit Design,
Communication Systems
O’Gara, Edward M.
Adjunct Professor
M.E., Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute
ECSE, Nuclear Power
Engineering
Petti, Joe
Adjunct Professor
M.B.A., University of
New Haven
Decision Sciences and
Engineering Systems
Quinn, Joseph W.
Adjunct Professor
M.S., Trinity College
DSP, Instrumentation
Measurement
Probability
Rosenthal, Damon C.
Adjunct Professor
M.S.C.S and M.B.A.,
Decision Sciences and
Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute
Engineering Systems
Staroselsky, Alexander
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D., Massachusetts
Institute of Technology
Mechanical Engineering
Foundations
Tew, David E.
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D., Massachusetts
Institute of
Technology
Theory of Potential
Flow, Turbulence
Torrani, Robert
Adjunct Professor
M.S., Polytechnic
Institute of Brooklyn
Decision Sciences and
Engineering Systems
Wagner, Timothy C.
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D., Virginia
Polytechnic Institute
and State University
Radiation Heat
Transfer, Propulsion
Moon, Paul R.
Engineering
Rensselaer offers an engineering curricula designed to accommodate the evolving needs of the practicing
engineer. Each curriculum helps students establish and build on a solid theoretical base while allowing them to
practice their skills. This blend of academic excellence and industrial experience creates a unique learning
environment for engineering students at Rensselaer. Degree programs are offered in Mechanical Engineering,
Electrical Engineering, Computer and Systems Engineering, and Engineering Science together with Graduate
Certificate Programs in Control Systems and High-Temperature Materials
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Engineering Degrees
Master of Engineering and Master of Science degrees are offered in selected engineering disciplines. The Master
of Engineering degrees require completion of a three credit project as a culminating experience while Master of
Science degree candidates must carry out research leading to a six credit thesis. Apart from that, the curricula for
both degrees are identical. The Master of Engineering degree is designed to fulfill the needs of practicing
engineers in industry while the Master of Science degree is for those focused on a research career.
The following engineering degrees are being awarded (click each to go to that section):
•
•
•
•
•
•
M.Eng. in Computer and Systems Engineering
M.Eng. in Electrical Engineering
M.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering
M.S. in Engineering Science
M.S. in Electrical Engineering
M.S. in Mechanical Engineering
Candidates for the master's degree must complete an advisor approved plan of study consisting of:
•
•
•
At least 30 credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree with cumulative GPA of 3.0/4.0 or higher.
At least 18 of the total credit hours presented toward the degree must have the suffix numbers 60006990 or 7000-7990
At least 21 of the total credit hours presented towards the degree must be from courses taken within the
discipline.
A student may transfer credits for 2 graduate-level (equivalent to 6000 or 7000 level in the Rensselaer at Hartford
Catalog) courses (total of 6 credit hours) taken at an accredited graduate school with the grade(s) of “B” or better.
The transfer/waiver process must be approved by the faculty advisor and the Assistant Dean for Academic
Programs. Transfer courses must be relevant to the program of study being pursued by the student at Rensselaer.
Students must prepare their Plan of Study together with their advisor and have it reviewed and approved by the
advisor and the program coordinator before completion of their fourth course. All the above requirements must
be completed within three years of admission.
Culminating Experience (Engineering Project/Engineering Thesis)
The culminating experience is a requirement for the master's degree in Connecticut. It may be fulfilled by either
of the following:
•
•
Completing a three-credit-hour master's project along with 27 credit hours of appropriate course work
thus leading to the Master of Engineering degree.
Completing a six-credit-hour master's thesis along with 24 credit hours of appropriate course work thus
leading to the Master of Science degree.
Electrical Engineering
The Rensselaer at Hartford master's program in Electrical Engineering allows students to increase their
competence in a number of Electrical Engineering subjects, particularly in Digital Communications and Signal
Processing, Control Systems, and Communication Networks.
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Admission Requirements
1.
2.
Students who have received a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering from an
accredited institution, a GPA in the upper quartile, and some work experience in a high-technology
environment.
Students with a B.S. degree in another engineering discipline, mathematics, or physics may be admitted
subject to fulfillment of the following Electrical Engineering Background Requirements.
Electrical Engineering Background Requirements
•
•
•
•
•
•
Advanced Mathematics (i.e. Complex Variables, Laplace Transforms, Fourier Analysis, Probability)
(One term)
Electric Circuits (one term)
Electronic Circuits (two terms)
Signals and Systems (one term)
Digital Logic (one term)
Technical Design Elective (e.g., Communications Systems, Control Systems Engineering, Computer
Networks) (one term)
Students lacking any of the above courses must consult with their advisor to devise a plan for corrective action.
Areas of Specialization
Students must include in their plan of study a sequence of three 6000 (or 7000) level courses in at least one of the
following areas of specialization:
•
•
•
Digital Communications and Signal Processing
Control Systems
Communication Networks
Electrical Engineering Program Requirements
The Master's degree is awarded on successful completion of the following:
Required Core (15 credits)
ECSE-6510 Introduction to Stochastic Signals and Systems
ECSE-6400 Systems Analysis Techniques
ECSE-6560 Digital Communications Engineering
ECSE-6620 Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6980 Engineering Project
Electives (15 credits)
ECSE-4440 Control Systems Engineering
ECSE-4490 Fundamental of Robotics
ECSE-4670 Computer Communication Networks
ECSE-4770 Computer Hardware Design
ECSE-6050 Advanced Electronic Circuits
ECSE-6410 Robotics and Automations Systems
ECSE-6420 Nonlinear Control Systems
ECSE-6440 Optimal Control Theory
ECSE-6460 Multivariable Control Systems
ECSE-6590 Wireless Communications and Networks
ECSE-6630 Digital Image and Video Processing
ECSE-6660 Broadband and Optical Networking
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, LANs, MANs, and Internetworking
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, Embedded Digital Control Systems
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, Applied Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, Mechatronics
ECSE-7010 Optical Fiber Communications
ECSE-7100 Real-Time Programming and Applications
ECSE-4960 Fundamentals of Signals and Systems
(prerequisite course – not credited towards M.S. or M.Eng. degree)
Example Curricula for Three Areas of Specialization
Digital Communications and Signal Processing
ECSE-6510 Introduction to Stochastic Signals and Systems
ECSE-4670 Computer Communications Networks
ECSE-6400 Systems Analysis Techniques
ECSE-6560 Digital Communications Engineering
ECSE-6620 Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6630 Digital Image and Video Processing
ECSE-6590 Wireless Communications and Networks
ECSE-7010 Optical Fiber Communications
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, Applied Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6980 Engineering Project
Control Systems
ECSE-4440 Control Systems Engineering
ECSE-4490 Fundamentals of Robotics
ECSE-6510 Introduction to Stochastic Signals and Systems
ECSE-6400 Systems Analysis Techniques
ECSE-6420 Nonlinear Control Systems
ECSE-6440 Optimal Control Theory
ECSE-6460 Multivariable Control Systems or ECSE-6960 Embedded Digital Control Systems
ECSE-6560 Digital Communications Engineering
ECSE-6620 Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6980 Engineering Project
Communication Networks
ECSE-6510 Introduction to Stochastic Signals and Systems
ECSE-4670 Computer Communications Networks
ECSE-6400 Systems Analysis Techniques
ECSE-6560 Digital Communications Engineering
ECSE-6620 Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, LANs, MANs, and Internetworking
ECSE-6660 Broadband and Optical Networking
CISH-6230 Network Management or ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering , Cryptography and Network
Security
ECSE-7010 Optical Fiber Communications
ECSE-6590 Wireless Communications and Networks
ECSE-6980 Engineering Project
M.S. in Electrical Engineering Program Requirements
The M.S. requirements are the same as those for the M.Eng. in Electrical Engineering, except for the substitution
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
of a 6-credit-hour thesis in place of one elective and the three-credit-hour project.
Please contact Professor Farooque Mesiya at
Engineering program.
[email protected] if you have any questions about the Electrical
Computer and Systems Engineering
The Master of Engineering in Computer and Systems Engineering provides the student with the appropriate
hardware and software tools needed in such critical areas as digital communications and signal processing,
robotics and automation systems, computer communication networks, and software engineering.
Admission Requirements
1.
2.
Students who have received a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, or
Computer Science
Students with a B.S. degree in another engineering discipline, mathematics, or physics, subject to the
condition that the following essential prerequisites for their chosen area of specialization have been
completed:
Digital Communications and Signal Processing
ECSE-2010 Electrical Circuits
ECSE-2410 Signals and Systems (or ECSE-4960 Fundamentals of Signals and Systems)
ECSE-2610 Computer Components and Operations (or CISH-4030 Structured Computer Architecture)
Computer Communications Networks
ECSE-2010 Electrical Circuits
ECSE-2410 Signals and Systems (or ECSE-4960 Fundamentals of Signals and Systems)
ECSE-2610 Computer Components and Operations (or CISH-4030 Structured Computer Architecture)
Robotics and Automation Systems
ECSE-2010 Electrical Circuits
ECSE-2410 Signals and Systems (or ECSE-4960 Fundamentals of Signals and Systems)
ECSE-2610 Computer Components and Operations (or CISH-4030 Structured Computer Architecture)
Software Engineering
CSCI-1100 Computer Science I
ECSE-4960 Fundamentals of Signals and Systems
CSCI-2300 Data Structures and Algorithms (or CISH-4020 Object Structures)
ECSE-2610 Computer Components and Operations (or CISH-4030 Structured Computer Architecture)
Preparatory courses do not apply toward the minimum 30 credit hours required for the Master of Engineering
degree.
Areas of Specialization
Students must include in their plan of study a sequence of three 6000 or 7000 level courses in at least one of the
following areas of specialization:
•
Digital Communications and Signal Processing
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
•
•
•
Robotics and Automation Systems
Computer Communication Networks
Software Engineering
M.Eng. in Computer and Systems Engineering Program Requirements
Required Core (15 credits)
CSCI-4210 Operating Systems or ECSE-4440 Control Systems Engineering
ECSE-6510 Introduction to Stochastic Signals and Systems
ECSE-4670 Computer Communication Networks
ECSE-6620 Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6980 Engineering Project
Electives (15 credits)
ECSE-4490 Fundamental of Robotics
ECSE-4770 Computer Hardware Design
ECSE-6050 Advanced Electronic Circuits
ECSE-6410 Robotics and Automations Systems
ECSE-6420 Nonlinear Control Systems
ECSE-6440 Optimal Control Theory
ECSE-6460 Multivariable Control Systems
ECSE-6560 Digital Communications Engineering
ECSE-6590 Wireless Communications and Networks
ECSE-6630 Digital Image and Video Processing
ECSE-6660 Broadband and Optical Networking
ECSE-6770 Software Engineering I
ECSE-6780 Software Engineering II
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, LANs, MANs, and Internetworking
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, Embedded Digital Control Systems
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, Applied Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, Cryptography and Network Security
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, Mechatronics
ECSE-7010 Optical Fiber Communications
ECSE-7100 Real-Time Programming and Applications
CISH-6010 Object-Oriented Programming and Design
CISH-6050 Software Engineering Management
CISH-6320 GUI Building
CISH-6510 Web Application Design and Development
ECSE-4960 Fundamentals of Signals and Systems (prerequisite course – not credited towards M.S. or M.Eng.
degree)
Example Curricula for Four Areas of Specialization
Digital Communications and Signal Processing
ECSE-6510 Introduction to Stochastic Signals and Systems
ECSE-4670 Computer Communication Networks
ECSE-4440 Control Systems Engineering
ECSE-6400 Systems Analysis Techniques
ECSE-6560 Digital Communications Engineering
ECSE-6620 Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6630 Digital Image and Video Processing or ECSE-6660 Broadband and Optical Networking
ECSE-7010 Optical Fiber Communications
ECSE-6590 Wireless Communications and Networks
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ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, Applied Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6980 Engineering Project
Robotics and Automation Systems
ECSE-4440 Control Systems Engineering
ECSE-4490 Fundamental of Robotics
ECSE-6510 Introduction to Stochastic Signals and Systems
ECSE-4670 Computer Communication Networks
ECSE-6400 Systems Analysis Techniques
ECSE-6420 Nonlinear Control Systems
ECSE-6440 Optimal Control Theory
ECSE-6460 Multivariable Control Systems or ECSE-6960 Embedded Digital Control Systems
ECSE-6620 Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, Mechatronics
ECSE-6980 Engineering Project
Computer Communication Networks
ECSE-6510 Introduction to Stochastic Signals and Systems
ECSE-4670 Computer Communication Networks
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, LANs, MANs, and Internetworking
ECSE-4440 Control Systems Engineering
ECSE-6560 Digital Communications Engineering
ECSE-6620 Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6660 Broadband and Optical Networking
CISH-6230 Network Management or ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering, Cryptography and Network
Security
ECSE-7010 Optical Fiber Communications or ECSE-6590 Wireless Communications and Networks
ECSE-6980 Engineering Project
Software Engineering
ECSE-6510 Introduction to Stochastic Signals and Systems
CISH-4210 Operating Systems
ECSE-4670 Computer Communication Networks
ECSE-6620 Digital Signal Processing
ECSE-6770 Software Engineering I
ECSE-6780 Software Engineering II
CISH-6050 Software Engineering Management
CISH-6010 Object-Oriented Programming and Design
CISH-6230 GUI Building or CISH-6510 Web Application Design and Development
ECSE-6980 Engineering Project
Please contact Professor Farooque Mesiya at
and Systems Engineering program.
[email protected] if you have any questions about the Computer
Engineering Science
The Master of Science in Engineering Science degree serves students whose educational needs do not correspond
to the standard professional engineering curricula. It allows students to tailor a plan of study to their particular
requirements. Each student's course of study is developed in close consultation with the advisor to allow
meaningful and strongly directed interdisciplinary approach.
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The degree awarded in this area is not, nor is it intended to be, accredited for practice. Students entering the
Engineering Science program are expected to hold a Bachelor of Science degree in one of the traditional
engineering disciplines. Applicants not holding such degree must have evidence of coursework in at least:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Mathematics, through Ordinary Differential Equations (three terms or 12 credits)
Physics (two terms)
Chemistry and/or Engineering Materials (one term)
Mechanics (one term)
Electronics/Circuits (one term)
Probability and Statistics (one term)
Students lacking one or more of these courses are expected to take corrective action before entering the
Engineering Science program.
Please contact Professor Ernesto Gutierrez-Miravete at
Engineering Science program.
[email protected] if you have any questions about the
Mechanical Engineering
The master's degrees in mechanical engineering allow the student to increase his or her competence in a number
of mechanical engineering subjects, or to specialize in depth in the areas of fluid mechanics, heat transfer,
mechanical design, solid mechanics, or thermodynamics.
Admission Requirements
1.
2.
Students who have received a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from an accredited institution, a
GPA in the upper quartile, and some work experience in a high-technology environment.
Students with a B.S. degree in another engineering discipline, mathematics, or physics may be admitted
subject to fulfillment of the following background requirements.
Mechanical Engineering Background Requirements
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Chemistry (one additional term)
Dynamics (one term)
Fluid Mechanics(one term)
Machine Design (one term)
Mechanisms (one term)
Statics (one term)
Strength of Materials (one term)
Heat Transfer (one term)
Thermodynamics (one term)
Students lacking any of the above courses must work closely with their advisor to devise a plan for corrective
action.
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Catalog and Student Handbook 2010-2011
Mechanical Engineering Program Requirements
The Master's degree is awarded on successful completion of the following:
Required Core (15 credits)
MANE-5000 Advanced Engineering Mathematics I
MANE-7000 Advanced Engineering Mathematics II
MANE-5100 Mechanical Engineering Foundations I
MANE-7100 Mechanical Engineering Foundations II
MANE-6980 Mechanical Engineering Project (Culminating Experience
Electives (15 credits)
In consultation with advisor, select five courses from a single or several specialty area(s).
Specialty Area: Solids
MANE-4240 Introduction to Finite Elements
MANE-4610 Vibrations
MANE-4650 Fracture Mechanics
MANE-6180 Mechanics of Composite Materials
MANE-6200 Plates and Shells
MANE-6960 Advanced Topics in Finite Element Analysis
Specialty Area: Fluids
MANE-4800 Boundary Layers and Heat Transfer
MANE-5060 Introduction to Compressible Flow
MANE-5080 Turbomachinery
MANE-6530 Turbulence
MANE-6550 Theory of Compressible Flow
MANE-6720 Computational Fluid Dynamics
Specialty Area: Thermal Systems
MANE-6540 Advanced Thermodynamics
MANE-6630 Conduction Heat Transfer
MANE-6640 Radiation Heat Transfer
MANE-6650 Convection Heat Transfer
MANE-6840 An Intro to Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer
MANE-6830 Combustion
Specialty Area: Manufacturing and Materials
DSES-6110 Introduction to Applied Statistics
MTLE-4260 High Temperature Alloys
MTLE-6960 High Temperature Coatings Engineering
MTLE-7061 Casting and Joining Processes
Example Curricula for Master of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering
Solid Mechanics Focus
MANE-5000 Advanced Math for Engineers I (4000-level)
MANE-5100 Foundations of Mechanical Engineering I (4000-level)
MANE-6180 Mechanics of Composite Materials
MANE-6200 Plates and Shells
MANE-6310 Non-linear Vibrations
MANE-6960 Advanced Topics in Finite Element Analysis
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MANE-6980 Engineering Project
MANE-7000 Advanced Math for Engineers II (6000-level)
MANE-7100 Foundations of Mechanical Engineering II (6000-level)
Thermofluids Focus
MANE-4800 Boundary Layers and Heat Transfer
MANE-5000 Advanced Math for Engineers I (4000-level)
MANE-5100 Foundations of Mechanical Engineering I (4000-level)
MANE-6630 Conduction Heat Transfer
MANE-6650 Convection Heat Transfer
MANE-6720 Computational Fluid Dynamics
MANE-6980 Engineering Project
MANE-7000 Advanced Math for Engineers II (6000-level)
MANE-7100 Foundations of Mechanical Engineering II (6000-level)
Computational Focus
DSES-6110 Introduction to Applied Statistics
MANE-4240 Introduction to Finite Elements
MANE-5000 Advanced Math for Engineers I (4000-level)
MANE-5100 Foundations of Mechanical Engineering I (4000-level)
MANE-6530 Turbulence
MANE-6720 Computational Fluid Dynamics
MANE-6980 Engineering Project
MANE-6960 Advanced Topics in Finite Element Analysis
MANE-7000 Advanced Math for Engineers II (6000-level)
MANE-7100 Foundations of Mechanical Engineering II (6000-level)
Manufacturing/Materials Focus
MANE-4240 Introduction to Finite Elements
MANE-4650 Fracture Mechanics
MTLE-4260 High Temperature Alloys
MANE-5000 Advanced Math for Engineers I (4000-level)
MANE-5100 Foundations of Mechanical Engineering I (4000-level)
MANE-6980 Engineering Project
MANE-7000 Advanced Math for Engineers II (6000-level)
MANE-7100 Foundations of Mechanical Engineering II (6000-level)
MTLE-6960 High Temperature Coatings Engineering
MTLE-7061 Casting and Joining Processes
Multidisciplinary Focus
DSES-6110 Introduction to Applied Statistics
MANE-4240 Introduction to Finite Elements
MANE-4800 Boundary Layers and Heat Transfer
MANE-5000 Advanced Math for Engineers I (4000-level)
MANE-5100 Foundations of Mechanical Engineering I (4000-level)
MANE-6540 Advanced Thermodynamics
MANE-6830 Combustion
MANE-6980 Engineering Project
MANE-7000 Advanced Math for Engineers II (6000-level)
MANE-7100 Foundations of Mechanical Engineering II (6000-level)
MTLE-4260 High Temperature Alloys
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M.S. in Mechanical Engineering Program Requirements
The M.S. requirements are the same as those for the M.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering, except for the
substitution of a 6-credit-hour thesis in place of one elective and the three-credit-hour project.
Please contact Professor Ernesto Gutierrez-Miravete at
Mechanical Engineering program.
[email protected] if you have any questions about the
Engineering Graduate Certificate Programs
For working professionals not seeking a complete Master's degree, Rensselaer's Graduate Certificate Programs
are tailored to enhance or update skills in a shorter period of time. They have a selective focus and require that a
student successfully complete three or four graduate courses in a specific area of Engineering. With an advisor's
approval, credits earned may be subsequently applied as electives toward a Master's degree.
Graduate Certificate Program in Control Systems
Control systems are widely used in engineering to monitor the values of process variables by measurement so as
to make rational decisions about required corrective actions. Analysis and design of control systems requires
consideration of sensors, controllers, transmitters as well as auxiliary control and hardware elements.
Rensselaer at Hartford offers a Graduate Certificate in Control Systems designed to provide an understanding of
control systems engineering, including the fundamental principles of control systems and their application to
real-life engineering problems.
Admission Requirements
1.
2.
Students who have received a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, or
Computer Science
Students with a B.S. degree in another engineering discipline, mathematics, or physics, subject to the
condition that the following essential prerequisites have been completed:
ECSE-2010 Electrical Circuits
ECSE-2410 Signals and Systems (or ECSE-4960 Fundamentals of Signals and Systems)
The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies in Control Systems is awarded upon successful completion of the
following courses:
Core Courses (6 credits):
ECSE-4440 Control Systems Engineering
ECSE-6400 Systems Analysis Techniques
Elective Courses (Any two, 6 credits)
ECSE-4490 Fundamentals of Robotics
ECSE-6420 Nonlinear Control Systems
ECSE-6440 Optimal Control Theory
ECSE-6460 Multivariable Control Systems
ECSE-6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering: Mechatronics
ECSE-6960 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering: Embedded Digital Control Systems
ECSE-6410 Robotics and Automations Systems
Academic credit earned from these courses can then be applied towards a Master's degree.
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Please contact Professor Farooque Mesiya at
Systems Certificate Program.
[email protected] if you have any questions about the Control
Graduate Certificate Program in High Temperature Materials
Materials used in the "hot zones" of propulsion and power generation systems must satisfy stringent demands for
integrity and performance. Materials exposed to these extreme environments exhibit continuously evolving
microstructures and this must be accounted for during the component design stage of production.
Rensselaer offers a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies in High Temperature Materials designed to provide
an understanding of the properties of high temperature alloys as well as skills in improving those properties by
manipulating the material microstructure through processing.
The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies in High Temperature Materials is awarded upon successful
completion of the following courses.
MTLE-4260 High Temperature Alloys (Superalloys)
MTLE-7061 Casting and Joining Processes for Superalloys
MTLE-6960 High Temperature Coatings Engineering
Academic credit earned from these courses can then be applied towards a Master's degree. Please contact
Professor Ernesto Gutierrez-Miravete at
[email protected] if you have any questions about the Certificate of
Advanced Graduate Studies in High Temperature Materials.
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Lally School of Management and Technology at Hartford
Assistant Dean for Academic Programs: Houman Younessi, Ph.D.
Area Coordinator: John Maleyeff, Ph.D.
Department Home Page
The primary purpose of the Lally School of Management and Technology is to educate business leaders and
professionals in the strategic use of technology to create corporate value and sustainable competitive advantage
in the global business environment. The mission of the Lally School is to develop technically sophisticated
business leaders who are prepared to guide their organizations in the integration of technology for new products,
new businesses, and new systems. The Lally School has a vision to be pre-eminent among educational
institutions in integrating management and technology for innovation and value creation. The values that the
Lally School holds are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Passion for lifelong learning.
Dedication to the idea that management and technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship are critical to
improving the quality of life.
Vibrant relations with our business partners.
Rigor and relevance in intellectual contributions and business practice.
Highest standards of ethics, responsibility, and respect for individuals.
Creative solutions through interdisciplinary teamwork.
Commitment to serving our stakeholders.
The Lally School comprises two departments; one based in Hartford, Connecticut, and the other in Troy, New
York. The programs, degree requirements, and course offerings included in this section specifically pertain to the
Hartford department.
Faculty
Full-Time Faculty
The Lally School full-time faculty possess a broad range of academic and business experience. The diverse
backgrounds of the faculty help ensure that students receive high-quality academic experiences that are also
grounded in the practical realities of business. The faculty is focused on delivering an educational experience that
is relevant to the needs of full-time working professionals.
Faculty
Position
Degree & Institution
48
Teaching Area
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Kelly,
Leonard J.
Clinical
Professor
Ph.D., University of
Connecticut
Quantitative Management
Maleyeff,
John
Clinical
Professor
Ph.D., University of
Massachusetts
Operations Management
Peteros,
Randall G.
Clinical
Associate
Professor
J.D., Western New
England College School
of Law
Finance
Peters, Lael
Clinical
Associate
Professor
Ph.D., Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute
Management Information Systems
Rainey, David Clinical
L.
Professor
Ph.D., Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute
Technology, Innovation, & Environment
Stodder,
James P.
Clinical
Associate
Professor
Ph.D., Yale University
Economics
Younessi,
Houman
Clinical
Professor
Ph.D., Swinburne
University of
Technology (Australia)
Information Systems, Information Technology
and Innovation, Systems and Operations
Management
Adjunct Faculty
The Lally School adjunct faculty includes leading business practitioners whose in-depth knowledge of current
business practices enhances student's learning experience. The current Rensselaer adjunct faculty includes the
following:
Adjunct
Faculty
Position
Degree & Institution
Araujo,
Robert J.
Adjunct
Professor
M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and M.B.A. University of New
Haven
Ardito,
Mariyln
Bialecki,
Dennis M.
Ph.D., Fielding Institute
Adjunct
Professor
M.B.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Case, Mark B. Adjunct
Professor
Ph.D., University of Rhode Island
Corona,
Melissa
Adjunct
Professor
J.D., Quinnipiac University
Courtney,
Patrick
Adjunct
Professor
M.B.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Dellarippa,
Harry
Adjunct
Professor
M.B.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Dimodugno,
Louis
Adjunct
Professor
M.P.A., University of Oklahoma
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Downe,
Edward D.
Adjunct
Professor
Ph.D., New School University
Ghosh, Asish
Adjunct
Professor
Ph.D., University of Washington
Greene, Lisa
Adjunct
Professor
M.B.A., Northwestern University
Harris, Dale
M.B.A., University of Harford
Healy,
Timothy E.
Adjunct
Professor
M.B.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; M.A., University of Washington
Kerr, James
M.
Adjunct
Professor
M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Lagasse, Paul
Adjunct
Professor
Sc.D., University of New Haven
Lally, Robert
Adjunct
Professor
J.D., Western New England College
Lamy,
Raymond
Adjunct
Professor
M.B.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Luddy, Grace
B.
Adjunct
Professor
M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Marconi,
Robert L.
Adjunct
Professor
J.D., University of Connecticut
Mastrianna,
Adjunct
William F., Jr. Professor
M.S., Radford University
Mutchler,
John
Adjunct
Professor
J.D., Quinnipiac University
O'Donovan,
Edward G.
Adjunct
Professor
M.B.A., University of Connecticut
Olynyk, John
Paul
Adjunct
Professor
M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Peterson, Eric
Adjunct
Professor
M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Petti, Joseph
Adjunct
Professor
M.B.A., University of New Haven
Resecartis,
Paul
Adjunct
Professor
Ph.D., University of Connecticut
Rosenthal,
Damon C.
Adjunct
Professor
M.S.C.S. and M.B.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute
Roy, Roland
O.
Adjunct
Professor
M.B.A., University of New Haven
Russell, Susan Adjunct
P f
Ph.D., Fielding Institute
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Professor
Shemenski,
Bob
Adjunct
Professor
M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Siddiqi,
Shahid
Adjunct
Professor
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Stevens,
Michael
Adjunct
Professor
M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Swarr,
Thomas E.
Adjunct
Professor
M.B.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Torrani,
Robert
Adjunct
Professor
M.S., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn
Vikakovic,
Steven
Adjunct
Professor
M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Webster,
Steven
Adjunct
Professor
M.S., Western New England College
Weiss, Derek
J.
Adjunct
Professor
M.B.A., University of Connecticut
Young, Vann
J.
Adjunct
Professor
M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Programs
The programs offered by the Lally School for the Education of Working Professionals at Rensselaer are the
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) and the Master of Science (M.S.) in Management. Dual degrees
with the Department of Engineering and Science are also available. The M.S. in Management program contains
two different focal areas: Enterprise Management and Innovation and Entrepreneurship.
In its programs, the Lally School strives for a balance between theory and practice, and between rigor and
relevance. The programs place heavy emphasis on the application of knowledge through team-based projects.
The Lally School and all its programs are based on three core principles:
•
•
•
Technology and innovation are the primary lifeblood of the business enterprise and its competitiveness
in business and commerce.
Entrepreneurship and innovation involve the constant search for new and better ways of achieving
sustainable outcomes.
Management and leadership mean being on the leading edge of the changes in the business environment
and inspiring people within and outside the corporation to realize the vision and passion of the
organization.
Graduate Programs
Evening M.B.A.
The Lally School offers an evening version of its full-time daytime (Troy, NY) M.B.A. program which focuses
on innovation, globalization, and entrepreneurship. The evening M.B.A. provides students the same 51-credit
integrated learning experience of the daytime cohort in a convenient evening setting.
The Plan of Study includes:
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Core Courses (33 Credit Hours)
MGMT-7740
Accounting for Reporting and Control
MGMT-6040
Creating and Managing an Enterprise I
MGMT-7730
Economics and Institutions
MGMT-6100
Statistics and Operations Management I
MGMT-7050
Design, Manufacturing, and Marketing I
MGMT-7060
Design, Manufacturing, and Marketing II
MGMT-6140
Information Systems for Management
MGMT-6060
Business Implications of Emerging Technologies I
MGMT-6020
Financial Management I
MGMT-6840
Practicum in Management
MGMT-7030
Strategy, Technology, and Competition I
Flex Core Courses (6 Credit Hours)
Choose from two of the following:
MGMT-7750
Global Business and Social Responsibility
MGMT-6080
Networks, Innovation & Value Creation I
MGMT-xxxx
Ethical, Political, and Legal Context of Business
MGMT-6590
Commercializing Advanced Technologies
MGMT-6030
Financial Management II
Concentrations (12 Credit Hours)
Although electives may be chosen from multiple disciplines offered by the Lally School of Management and
Technology, concentrations are available for individuals who wish to pursue an in-depth study within a specific
discipline. Successful completion of four courses within the same subject area will award students a
concentration, demonstrating mastery in a certain field. Sample concentrations include:
• Technological Entrepreneurship
• Finance
• Information Systems and Operations Management
• Marketing and New Product Development
• Global Enterprise Management
Accelerated M.B.A. Program
In the Accelerated M.B.A. Program, students can earn an M.B.A. degree in a 39-month period of accelerated
instruction. Classes are conducted One evening per week and every other Saturday, consisting of two courses a
term for four terms a year, designed to enhance cumulative skill building and learning.
The accelerated schedule is designed to appeal to students with significant work experience who are unable to
attend classes during the week; who are interested in joining a group of mature students attending classes and
working and studying together; and who desire an opportunity to earn the M.B.A. degree in a two-and-a-halfyear period. The objective is to form a diverse weekend class of broadly experienced middle managers and
professionals.
For more information concerning the Accelerated M.B.A. Program, contact Kristin E. Galligan at (860) 5487881; (800) 433-4723, ext. 7881; or e-mail:
[email protected]
Executive Master's Program (EMP)
Rensselaer’s EMP is a 10-month curriculum focusing on Global Business Leadership and Enterprise-Wide
Strategic Management. The program was specially developed by the faculty of the Lally School of Management
and Technology for a cohort of high-level participants. Using a combination of interactive classroom sessions,
special guest speakers, and visits to two important international venues, the program creates a full immersion
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experience. Practical needs of busy professionals are accommodated with most of the activities taking place
conveniently on Friday evenings and alternating Saturdays. The curriculum stresses value creation for customers
by using the resources afforded by a global enterprise to develop sustainable long term success. Its goal is to
create visionary and ethical thinkers who can navigate the complex and changing global business environment.
The following courses make up the program curriculum:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Organizational Leadership, Design, and Change
International Accounting and Finance
Macroeconomics and Political Economy
Global Value Networks
Methods and Decision Making
Strategic Innovation
International Relationships
Global Investment Strategies and Risk Management
Strategic Management
International Trips and Special Guest Speakers
The trips to Singapore and Brussels will include visits to international, European-based and Asian-based
corporations, public enterprises, and other industrial venues. While on site at these locations, formal discussions
and informal engagements will be arranged with executives representing a broad range of business and industry,
including government infrastructure and economic development, aerospace, and consumer products. While in
Hartford, a number of expert guest speakers will be invited to speak on contemporary and important topics
related to the program’s coverage.
Information concerning the Executive Master's Program may be obtained by contacting Christa A. Sterling at
(860) 548-7842; (800) 433-4723, ext. 7842; or e-mail:
[email protected] .
Master of Science in Management
The M.S. in Management is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and capabilities to be
professional contributors and technical managers in a functional area of organizations. It is intended for students
who want to acquire more expertise in a specialized area before they seek general management skills and
capabilities later in their careers. The educational objective is to provide a learning environment that is centered
on analysis, decision making, and implementation.
The Master of Science in Management is a specialized program requiring a minimum of 30 credit hours of
graduate work and must:
•
•
•
Focus on enterprise management or innovation and entrepreneurship. It must not be of a general
business nature. See below for a list of areas of concentrations.
Include the four core courses as defined below, four courses in an approved area of concentration, one
elective, and a culminating experience (CAPSTONE course). The program must meet the requirements
of the Graduate School. A Plan of Study must be approved by the Assistant Dean for Academic
Programs
Include a three-credit CAPSTONE course ordinarily completed in the final term, which is satisfied by
either: MGMT-6680 Strategy, Technology, and Global Competitive Advantage; or MGMT-7980,
CAPSTONE Project Course with the approval of a full-time faculty member. See below for additional
details.
The following is a typical ten-course M.S. program sequence. The four core courses are normally offered every
term.
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Course Sequence
Credits
Management Core: Background in Key Areas of Management
MGMT-7740 Accounting for Reporting and Control
(Formerly MGMT-6190 Financial and Managerial Accounting)
3
MGMT-6040 Creating and Managing an Enterprise I
(Formerly MGMT-6710 Designing, Developing, and Staffing High-Performance)
Organizations I
3
MGMT-6020 Financial Management I
(Formerly MGMT-6310 Financial Management and Valuation of Firms)
3
MGMT-6050 Creating and Managing an Enterprise II
3
Concentration: Four Courses in a Focused Area of Study (see below)
MGMT-xxxx Concentration Course #1
3
MGMT-xxxx Concentration Course #2
3
MGMT-xxxx Concentration Course #3
3
MGMT-xxxx Concentration Course #4
3
MGMT-xxxx Elective Course
3
MGMT-xxxx CAPSTONE Course (MGMT-6680 or MGMT-7980)*
3
TOTAL CREDITS 30
* See below for more information on CAPSTONE.
Management and Technology Concentrations
A Concentration is a 12-credit-hour (four-course) sequence of related course work that is required for the M.S. in
Management program (see above) but not required for the M.B.A. Neither the diploma nor the transcript will
specify a concentration. There are two main concentrations; Innovation and Entrepreneurship, and Enterprise
Management. Specific requirements for each concentration are described below.
Innovation and Entrepreneurship
This concentration has been designed for students who have an interest in technological innovation, new product
development, technological entrepreneurship, and new venture creation in established firms and start-up
companies. It prepares professionals in the strategic management of innovation and the integration of the
technical function with other corporate functions and goals.
Students must select four concentration courses pertaining to Innovation and Entrepreneurship:
MGMT-6060 Business Implications of Emerging Technologies I or MGMT-6610 Global Strategic Management
of Technological Innovation
MGMT-6600 Research and Development Management
MGMT-6620 Principles of Technological Entrepreneurship
MGMT-6630 Starting Up A New Venture
MGMT-6730 Technological Change and International Competitiveness
MGMT-6810 Management of Technical Projects
MGMT-7003 Sustainable Business Development
MGMT-7050 Developing Innovative New Products and Services I (or MGMT-6560 Managing New Product
Development)
MGMT-7060 Developing Innovative New Products II
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Enterprise Management
This concentration has been designed for students who are interested in the integration of supply networks,
operations, marketing, finance, and management of information systems. It prepares student for management
careers at several different levels of the product and service organization by developing the knowledge necessary
to support and add value to the underlying strategic focus of a management system.
Students must select four concentration courses from one of the following areas of specialization:
Operations Management
Executives in every kind of organization-large and small, private and public, for-profit and not-for-profit, can
utilize the tools delivered in this specialization to form high level strategy and improve day-to-day operations; to
unlock the value of their data; to model complex systems; and to make better decisions with less risk. The
courses will help improve processes, productivity, and performance across the entire business enterprise, whether
its focus is service or production.
Select four courses from the following:
MGMT-6080 Networks, Innovation and Value Creation (or MGMT-7500 Managing Supply Networks)
MGMT-6100 Statistics and Operations Management I
MGMT-6110 Statistics and Operations Management II
MGMT-6450 Manufacturing Systems Management
MGMT-6470 Management of Quality, Processes, and Reliability
MGMT-6480 Service Operations Management
MGMT-6490 Competitive Advantage and Operations Strategy
Global Enterprise Management
This specialization explores the rapidly evolving managerial and technological environments which students will
encounter as professionals in a competitive global marketplace. Special emphasis is placed on the following
areas: multinational business environments, varying levels of technology, finance, trade issues, politics, and
cross-cultural dynamics.
Select four courses from the following:
MGMT-6080 Networks, Innovation and Value Creation (or MGMT-7500 Managing Supply Networks)
MGMT-6290 Macroeconomics and International Environments of Business
MGMT-6360 International Finance
MGMT-6390 International Operations (or MGMT-6350 International Business)
MGMT-6730 Technological Change and International Competitiveness
MGMT-7120 International Marketing
MGMT-7700 International Negotiations
MGMT-7710 Cultural Environment of International Business
Finance
This specialization prepares students for a career path in corporate finance functions and for careers in the
financial services industries. The special finance problems in high-tech industries are explored as well as the
impact of technology on financial markets and the financial manager in modern corporations. To provide
students with a broad finance background, students take four courses beyond the core financial management
courses (MGMT-6190 Financial and Managerial Accounting and MGMT-6310 Financial Management and
Valuation of Firms) which are prerequisites for the courses listed below:
Select four courses from the following:
MGMT-6030 Financial Management II (or MGMT-6380 Advanced Corporate Finance)
MGMT-6320 Investment Analysis I
MGMT-6330 Investment Analysis II
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MGMT-6340 Financial Markets and Institutions
MGMT-6360 International Finance
MGMT-6400 Financial Econometrics Modeling
MGMT-6960 Taxation for Business and Investment
MGMT-7210 Acquisition and Venture Analysis
Management Information Systems
This specialization is designed for professionals responsible for achieving competitive advantage through the
integration of information technology into organizations. The specialization courses use an interdisciplinary
approach to the practices and methodologies of systems analysis, design, development, and integration and
evaluation of information technology into business functions and processes.
Complete the following courses:
MGMT-6140 Information Systems Management
MGMT-6170 Advanced Systems Analysis and Design
MGMT-6180 Strategic Information System Management
MGMT-6750 Legal Aspects of E-Business and Information Technology
MGMT-6810 Management of Technical Projects
Dual Master's Programs
The dual degree option offers students the opportunity to receive two master's degrees (one in management and
the other in engineering, IT, or computer science) in a shorter period of time than if the degrees were pursued
independently. The objective is to combine technical expertise in information technology, engineering, or
computer science by obtaining an M.S. degree in one of these disciplines with an M.S. in management or an
M.B.A. degree.
The dual M.B.A./M.S. option allows the student to complete both degrees by taking a total of 72 credit hours (the
M.B.A. alone is 60 credits). The dual M.S./M.S. option allows the student to complete both degrees by taking a
total of 54 credit hours (the M.S. in management is 30 credits).
Upon acceptance to both programs, students confer with academic advisors in both disciplines to determine their
Plans of Study. The Plans of Study are submitted for both degree programs and separate diplomas reflect a
degree in each discipline.
Please contact your advisor for the name of the dual degree faculty coordinator.
The CAPSTONE Course Requirement
All students enrolled in the M.B.A. and M.S. programs in the Lally School of Management and Technology are
required to complete a 3-credit CAPSTONE course. The CAPSTONE serves as an opportunity for students to
synthesize the body of knowledge gained during their course of study and is ordinarily completed in the final
term of the degree program.
CAPSTONE Course Requirement for the M.B.A. Program
The CAPSTONE course requirement for the M.B.A. program is satisfied by students taking the required course
MGMT-7030, Strategy, Technology, and Competition.
CAPSTONE Course Requirement for the M.S. Program
The CAPSTONE course requirement for the M.S. program can be satisfied by either:
•
•
Taking MGMT-6680 Strategy, Technology, and Global Competitive Advantage or MGMT-7540
Leadership and Organizational Improvement.
Conducting an independent research project (MGMT-7980) with the approval of a full-time faculty
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advisor. The independent research should result in a high-quality research paper that is suitable for
publication in a journal. Such efforts are to be separate and independent of course work used to satisfy
other M.S. program requirements.
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International Scholars Program (ISP)
An International Experience
The transition to the working world has become even more competitive and college graduates are taking longer
to find jobs that meet their credentials. To land the jobs best suited for them, college graduates need that edge
which will differentiate them and catch the attention of prospective employers. Rensselaer’s International
Scholars Program provides that edge with a one-year accelerated master’s degree program which includes a tenweek summer term abroad.
Description
The Rensselaer International Scholar will earn an MBA or a master’s degree in Management, Engineering
Science, or Systems Engineering and Technology Management, with global emphasis on trade, innovation,
security, and competitiveness. Forty percent of the degree will be completed through a ten-week summer term
abroad in Rome and Shanghai, immersing the students in those cities while providing an intense learning
experience centered around their business and economic cultures. They will meet and be taught by world leaders
in industry and visit major corporations in both cities. Also, they will be part of a project team, gaining first-hand
understanding of global business and advanced technology.
Curriculum
The summer term is the central focus of the International Scholars Program, with four courses completed towards
MBA, M.S., or M.E. degrees. The degree program is built around these four courses, and students may begin
their degree on three different start dates, all leading to a master’s degree completed within a year. All students
will be a part of the international summer term, regardless of when they begin their master’s degree.
Start Dates
•
•
•
Fall Start: September 2010
Spring Start: January 2011
Summer Start: June 2011
The International Scholars Program summer term begins with an intensive academic retreat. The students will
then travel to Rome, Italy and spend four weeks there, studying, working on their team projects, attending site
visits and lectures from guest speakers, and most importantly, living. Those four weeks are followed by another
four in Shanghai, China. Once their time in Shanghai is complete, students will return to Hartford for a week to
finish the summer term.
ISP Summer Term
Begins: June 2011
Ends: August 2011
Schedule:
• Week 1: Intensive Academic Retreat
• Weeks 2-5: Rome, Italy
• Weeks 6-9: Shanghai, China
• Week 10: Rensselaer's Hartford, Connecticut Campus
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Courses:
ISP Enterprise Management
Course Name
Credits
International Operations
3
Global Business and Social Responsibility
3
Macroeconomics and International Environments of Business
3
ISP Project
3
Total Credits
12
ISP Energy Systems
Course Name
Credits
Introduction to Energy Technology and Technical Analysis
3
Energy Engineering
3
Sustainable Business Development
3
ISP Project (a project that integrates classroom studies with
international locations – the specific course name designation
depends on the degree sought)
3
Total Credits
12
Graduate Certificate
Students who successfully complete the international summer term will be awarded a Graduate Certificate.
Students may apply for either the Graduate Certificate by itself or the full degree program which includes the
Graduate Certificate.
Contact Information
To learn more about ISP, please contact a Program Manager at (860) 548-5600; toll-free at (800) 433-4723, ext.
5600; or visit: www.ewp.rpi.edu/isp.
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Course Descriptions
The course numbering system is alphanumeric beginning with a four-letter department name followed by a dash,
a three-digit course number, and a zero. All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise indicated. Below are the
four-letter subject codes arranged by schools. Click on each of the three disciplines to go to its course
descriptions.
Acronyms
COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES
CISH Computer and Information Sciences Hartford
CSCI Computer Science
COMM Communications
ENGINEERING
DSES Decision Sciences & Engineering Sciences
ECSE Electrical, Computer & Systems Engineering
MANE Mechanical, Aeronautical, Nuclear, and Engineering Physics
MTLE Materials Science and Engineering
MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY
MGMT Management
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Computer and Information Sciences
The course numbering system is alphanumeric beginning with a four-letter department name followed by a dash,
a three-digit course number, and a zero. All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise indicated. Below are the
four-letter subject codes for Computer and Information Sciences.
Acronyms
CISH Computer and Information Sciences Hartford
CSCI Computer Science
COMM Communications
Suffix Numbers
4000-4990
Courses open for credit to both advanced undergraduate and graduate students
6000-6990
Courses designed for graduate credit
NOTE: Asterisk (*) denotes an "immigration" course which will not count towards the M.S. in Computer
Science, M.S. in Information Technology, or M.Eng. in Computer and Systems Engineering degrees. Such
courses may count towards other degrees but consult with you advisor before registering.
CISH
Computer and Information Sciences Hartford
CISH-4010 Discrete Mathematics and Computer Theory*
Course covers foundations of discrete mathematics and fundamentals of computer theory. Topics include
propositional logic, truth tables, quantifiers, sets, set operations, sequences, complexity of algorithms,
divisibility, matrix manipulations, proofs, induction, recursion, counting and the pigeonhole principle,
permutations, combinations, repeated trials, expectation, relations (properties, representation, equivalence,
Warshall's algorithm), Boolean algebra, functions, logic gates, minimizing, Finite State Machines, Turing
machines, Regular expressions, context free grammars, language recognizers, derivation trees, pushdown
automata.
CISH-4020 Object Structures*
A study of object oriented software component design. This course introduces the object oriented paradigm and
its use in organizing software structures including arrays, stack, queues, lists, trees, graphs, and recursion.
Programming assignments require the use of an object oriented language. Prerequisite: CISH-4010 or equivalent
and knowledge of an imperative programming language (C, PASCAL, etc.).
CISH-4030 Structured Computer Architecture*
Introduction to computer architecture; the structure and function of a computer system consisting of processors,
memory, I/O modules, and its internal interconnections. Primary focus on the attributes of a system visible to an
assembly level programmer. Topics include: digital logic, VLSI components, instruction sets, addressing
schemes, memory hierarchy, cache and virtual memories, integer and floating point arithmetic, control structures,
buses, RISC vs CISC, multiprocessor and vector processing (pipelining) organizations. Examples are drawn from
contemporary (e.g. Intel Pentium, PowerPC) microcomputers. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in
"Introduction to Computer Science."
CISH–4210 Operating Systems
Discussion of various aspects of computer operating systems design and implementation. Topics include I/O
programming, concurrent processes and synchronization problems, process management and scheduling of
processes, virtual memory management, device management, file systems, deadlock problems, system calls, and
interprocess communication. Programming projects are required. Prerequisite: CISH-4020 and CISH-4030.
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CISH–4380 Database Systems
Discussion of the state of practice in modern database systems with an emphasis on relational systems. Topics
include database design, database system architecture, SQL, normalization techniques, storage structures, query
processing, concurrency control, recovery, security, and new direction such as object oriented and distributed
database systems. Students gain hands-on experience with commercial database systems and interface building
tools. Programming projects are required. Prerequisite: CISH-4020 or equivalent.
CISH-4940 Readings in Computer and Information Sciences
1 to 4 credit hours.
CISH-4960 Topics in Computer and Information Sciences
1 to 4 credit hours.
CISH-6010 Object Oriented Programming and Design
An introduction to the theory and practice of object oriented programming and design. Encapsulation,
inheritance, genericity, dynamic binding, and polymorphism. Students use these concepts to design and
implement a modest–sized system. One object oriented language (chosen by the instructor) is studied in detail
and required for the project. Other languages are covered briefly. Prerequisite: CISH-4210.
CISH-6050 Software Engineering Management
Introduction to the current issues in software engineering management. Topics include the origin of the software
crisis, current state–of–the–practice, modeling the software engineering process, the relationship of methods and
tools to process, software validation, risk mitigation, and software engineering economics. Prerequisite: CISH4020.
CISH-6110 Object Oriented Database Systems
Presents concepts and architectures for support of objects in a database system. Emphasis is placed on DBMS
issues rather than application issues with discussions of issues related to the object oriented view of data models,
query languages, versioning evolution, authorization, transaction control, storage management, indexing
techniques, distributed data. Current object oriented and object-relational database systems are reviewed and
compared. A programming project or research paper may be required. Prerequisites: CSCI–4380 and the object
oriented portion of either CISH-4020 or CISH–6010.
CISH-6120 Distributed Database Systems
Examines client/server DBMS and considers how a client–server architecture can be used to implement the
requirements of a DDBMS. Topics include DDBMS taxonomies, case studies, design considerations, transaction
management, and global query optimization. Concludes with an examination of multidatabase systems.
Prerequisite: CSCI–4380.
CISH-6150 Artificial Intelligence and Heuristics
Survey of machine implementation of processes as foundation to thinking and perceiving. Modeling and
representation of knowledge. AI systems and languages, reasoning and problem solving. Current literature is
discussed. Applications are chosen from computer game playing programs, English dialogue, theorem proving,
computer vision, robot implementation, and automatic programming. Limitations and performance of techniques.
Certain topics are programmed. Prerequisite: CISH-4030.
CISH–6220 LANs, MANs, and Internetworking
Explores the current capabilities and trends in LANs and MANs with additional focus on issues of
internetworking network systems or subsets. Topics include: Topologies and transmission media, Local and
Metropolitan Area Network (LAN and MAN) architectures and performance. LAN standards IEEE 802.x, and
ANSI Standard FDDI. Circuit switched local area networks, e.g., ATM, Fibre Channel. Internetworking
alternatives, bridges, network switches, routers and gateways. General LAN management tools. Prerequisite:
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ECSE–4670 or equivalent.
CISH–6230 Network Management
Introduction to methods, techniques and tools for the management of telecommunication systems and networks.
Major topics covered in the course are: Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMPv2, SNMPv3), Remote
Monitoring (RMON1, RMON2), Standard Management Information (MIBs), and Telecommunications
Management (TMN, CMIS/SMIP); configuration and name management, fault and performance management,
security, accounting management; and web-based network management. Prerequisite: ECSE–4670 or equivalent
basic concept computer and communication networks course.
CISH–6510 Web Application Design and Development
Students will learn approaches to the design, development, and maintenance of Web Sites. Students will study
software and information architectures for the Web, design techniques for distributed Web-based applications,
and methods and tools for the creation and maintenance of Web sites. Study will encompass the major
components of a Web site including browsers and client applications, Internet protocols that link client to server,
and server applications. Issues of performance, security, and usability will be examined. Prerequisite: CISH-4020
or CSCI-2300. Prior experience with HTML and Java. ECSE-4670 and CSCI-4380 recommended.
CISH–6900 Computer Science Seminar
For students following the Applied path, who are near the end of their program, a two-term course that meets
once per month from September through March and one Saturday in April when students give their presentations.
Registration is accepted during Fall registration only. Students are required to attend all eight meetings in order
to fulfill the Seminar requirement. 1 credit hour.
CISH–6902 Computer Science Seminar
For students following the Applied path, who were admitted after summer 2004. Registrations is allowed only
after acceptance of an approved project plan by a faculty advisor. Students are required to attend guest speaker
sessions and give a formal presentation of their own research results. 3 credit hours.
CISH–6940 Readings in Computer and Information Sciences
1 to 3 credit hours.
CISH–6960 Topics in Computer and Information Sciences
Contact the Department of Engineering and Science for descriptions of recently offered special topic classes.
1 to 3 credit hours.
CISH-6960 Topics in Computer Science: Artificial Intelligence and Heuristics
Survey of machine implementation of processes as foundation to thinking and perceiving. Modeling and
representation of knowledge. A.I. systems and languages, reasoning and problem solving. Current literature is
discussed. Applications are chosen from computer game playing programs, English dialogue, theorem proving,
computer vision, robot implementation, and automatic programming. Limitations and performance of techniques.
Certain topics are programmed. Prerequisite: CISH-4030.
CISH-6960 Topics in Computer Science: Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics (computational molecular biology) is a relatively new discipline, bringing together computational,
statistical, experimental, and technological methods, which is energizing and dramatically accelerating the
discovery of new technologies and tools for molecular biology. The solutions of bioinformatics problems very
often require searching through very large search spaces. Bioinformatics applies computer science techniques to
solve crucial problems in biology and medicine, on the other hand, the related area of DNA-based computing
uses biological techniques to solve hard computational problems in computer science. Typical tasks done in
bioinformatics include inferring a protein’s shape and function from a given sequence of amino acids, finding all
the genes and proteins in a given genome, determining sites in the protein structure where drug molecules can be
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attached.
CISH-6960 Topics in Computer Science: Cryptography and Network Security
Principles of number theory and the practice of network security and cryptographic algorithms. Topics include:
Primes, random numbers, modular arithmetic and discrete logarithms. Conventional or symmetric encryption
(DES, IDEA, Blowfish, Twofish, Rijndael) and public key or asymmetric encryption (RSA, Diffie-Hellman),
hash functions (MD5, SHA-1, RIPEMD-160, HMAC), digital signatures, certificates and authentication
protocols (X.509, DSS, Kerberos), electronic mail security (PGP, S/MIME), web security and protocols for
secure electronic commerce (IPSec, SSL, TLS, SET). Prerequisite: ECSE-4670 or permission of the instructor.
CISH-6960 Topics in Computer Science: Evolutionary Computation
The purpose of this course is to learn the foundations, techniques and rich applications of evolutionary
computation - a powerful new sub-area of computer science, inspired and based on natural evolution, and
targeting real-world intractable problems. The course will deal with a form of evolution, called Evolutionary
Algorithms that takes place in a computer. In evolutionary algorithms, selection operates on population of
individuals, called chromosomes, and stored in a computer's memory. They are evolved using mutation and
crossover in much the same way that natural populations evolve. This form of computation is called Evolutionary
Computation.
CISH-6960 Topics in Computer Science: New Horizons in Computer Architecture and Networks
A course that examines the current state of the art and future technological growth in computers (mainframes to
microprocessors), memory, information display, and the growth of data/voice/video communication networks
(wired and wireless). What are the current limits of technologies and what breakthroughs are needed to reach the
next plateau. What technologies are on the horizon and what will it mean to current and future IT systems and
applications. Successful completion of this course may lead to additional 3-credit projects.
CISH-6960- Topics in Computer Science: Data Warehouse Systems
Moving large volumes of data to a centralized, integrated, subject-oriented environment with high granularity
and extensive history is studied. Dimensional modeling is covered using specific techniques applied to case
studies from industry. The recurring patterns and process that apply across the many sub-systems of the
warehouse are examined. Connections to advanced analytics, data mining, and business intelligence are
reviewed. The non-technical challenges of building a massive, shared environment are discussed throughout.
Prerequisite: CISH-4380 or strong relational database experience.
CISH-6960 Developing Enterprise Applications
Discussion of the architecture, design, and implementation of modern multi-tiered applications. Students will
develop components that can be installed in containers provided by application servers, and learn how to access
container-managed services like persistence, security, and distributed transactions. Asynchronous messaging
through the use of message queues and topics will also be discussed. Web services and service oriented
architectures will be examined as an integration mechanism for leveraging existing systems. Common design
patterns will also be evaluated for large-scale system development. The course will use the Java 2 Enterprise
Edition as an example of available API's and reference implementations. Prerequisite: CISH-6510 or equivalent
Java experience.
CISH-6960 Topics in Computer Science-Evolutionary Computation
The purpose of this course is to learn the foundations, techniques and rich applications of evolutionary
computation - a powerful new sub-area of computer science, inspired and based on natural evolution, and
targeting real-world intractable problems. The course will deal with a form of evolution, called Evolutionary
Algorithms that takes place in a computer. In evolutionary algorithms, selection operates on population of
individuals, called chromosomes, and stored in a computer's memory. They are evolved using mutation and
crossover in much the same way that natural populations evolve. This form of computation is called Evolutionary
Computation.
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CISH–6960H09 Research Methods
Course will review the major considerations and tasks involved in conducting scientific research, particularly in
the area of computer science. It introduces the essential aspects of designing, supporting and conducting a
research project. Those who successfully complete the course will be able to: produce a well-developed research
proposal; select an appropriate methodology with which to conduct the research and defend the methodology of
their selection; understand the various tasks required to carry out the research; find the resources needed to guide
them through the research process and the documentation of its findings.
CISH–6961 Ethics and Computer Science in the Information Age
Computers and high-speed communication networks are transforming our world. Although these technologies
have brought us many benefits, they have also raised many social and ethical concerns. A thoughtful response to
information technology requires a basic understanding of its history, an awareness of current informationtechnology-related issues, and a familiarity with ethics. Besides an introduction to ethics, this course will discuss
such topics as: intellectual property (software patents vs. open source software), Digital Rights Management (file
sharing of copyrighted material vs. fair use), privacy and civil liberties, risks and liabilities of computer-based
systems.
CISH–6970 Professional Project
Active participation in a term-long project, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. A Professional Project
often serves as a culminating experience for a Professional Master's program but, with departmental or school
approval, can be used to fulfill other program requirements. With approval, students may register for more than
one Professional Project. Professional Projects must result in documentation established by each department or
school but are not submitted to the Graduate School and are not archived in the library. Grades of A, B, C, or F
are assigned by the faculty advisor at the end of the term. If not completed on time, a formal Incomplete grade
may be assigned by the faculty advisor, listing the work remaining to be completed and the time limit for
completing this work.
CISH–6980 Master's Project
Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 3 to 6 credit hours.
CISH–6990 Master's Thesis
Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 3 to 6 credit hours.
CSCI
Computer Science
CSCI–6050 Computability and Complexity
This course discusses modern concepts of computability and computational complexity theories. The ChurchTuring thesis. Variations of Turing Machines; Algorithms; Decidability; the Halting Problem; Reducibility; The
Recursion theorem; The Concept of Information; the Time and Space Complexity; Intractability; NP
completeness and Cook's theorem; Elements of Cryptography. Prerequisite: CISH-4010.
CSCI–6210 Design and Analysis of Algorithm
Theoretical and empirical analysis of algorithms; tools for on–line monitoring of the algorithm's performance.
Advanced algorithms for polynomial problems; randomized heuristic and approximate algorithms. Problems
include computation in discrete mathematics, number theory, linear algebra, graph theory, numerical and
symbolic computing. It is suggested that students take CSCI–6050 before taking this course.
CSCI-6390 Database Mining
This course will provide an introductory survey of the main topics in data mining and knowledge discovery in
databases (KDD), including: classification, clustering, association rules, sequence mining, similarity search,
deviation detection, and so on. Emphasis will be on the algorithmic and system issues in KDD, as well as on
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applications such as Web mining, multimedia mining, bioinformatics, geographical information systems, etc.
CSCI–6460 Advanced Database Management Topics
Continuation of CSCI–4380/CSCI-4380, presents a more theoretical approach to logical and physical database
design. Algorithms for logical database design, primary and secondary indexing techniques, query processing
and query optimization, and database security. Problems of interfacing a database system with an operating
system, and some of the issues in implementing distributed database systems. Much of the material comes from
recent research papers. A term paper may be required. Prerequisite: CSCI–4380 or CISH-4380.
CSCI-6480-Theory of Compiler Design
Use of language theory and automata theory in the design of compilers. Syntax-directed compilers, Lexical
analysis, computer implementation and finite state machines. Syntax analysis, parsing versus restructuring. Topdown and bottom-up parsing algorithms. TD(k) and LR(k) grammars. The Younges algorithm. Syntax-directed
transducers. Prerequisites: CISH 4010 and CISH 4210. Knowledge of PASCAL, C or LISP.
CSCI–6940 Readings in Computer Science
1 to 3 credit hours.
CSCI–6960 Topics in Computer and Information Sciences
Contact the Department of Engineering and Science for descriptions of recently offered special topic classes. 1 to
3 credit hours.
CSCI–6970 Professional Project
Active participation in a term-long project, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. A Professional Project
often serves as a culminating experience for a Professional Master's program but, with departmental or school
approval, can be used to fulfill other program requirements. With approval, students may register for more than
one Professional Project. Professional Projects must result in documentation established by each department or
school but are not submitted to the Graduate School and are not archived in the library. Grades of A, B, C, or F
are assigned by the faculty advisor at the end of the semester. If not completed on time, a formal Incomplete
grade may be assigned by the faculty advisor, listing the work remaining to be completed and the time limit for
completing this work. 3-4 credit hours
CSCI–6980 Master's Project in Computer and Information Sciences
Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 3 to 6 credit hours.
CSCI–6990 Master's Thesis in Computer and Information Sciences
Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 3 to 6 credit hours.
COMM
Communications
COMM–6420 Foundations of Human-Computer Interaction Usability
In this course, we will consider methods for gathering users' requirements for product functions and information,
ways to test products and information for usability and suitability, and procedures for incorporating the results
learned through testing. We will design and conduct usability tests on products, documents, and interfaces of
interest.
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Engineering
The course numbering system is alphanumeric beginning with a four-letter department name followed by a dash,
a three-digit course number, and a zero. All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise indicated. Below are the
four-letter subject codes for Engineering.
Acronyms
DSES Decision Sciences and Engineering Systems
ECSE Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering
MANE Mechanical, Aeronautical, Nuclear, and Engineering Physics
MTLE Materials Science and Engineering
Suffix Numbers
4000-4990 Courses open for credit to both advanced undergraduate and graduate students
5000-5990 Courses offered only at Rensselaer Hartford Campus for graduate credit
6000-6990 Courses designed for graduate credit
7000-7990 Courses offered only at Rensselaer Hartford Campus for graduate credit
Groton courses are scheduled term by term in consultation with students.
DSES Decision Sciences and Engineering Systems
DSES-6070 Statistical Methods for Reliability Engineering
Statistical methods for the analysis of life-test, failure, or other durational data. Engineering applications are
emphasized, but the methods are applicable to biometric, actuarial, and social science durational data. Included
are basic reliability concepts and definitions; statistical life and failure distributions such as the exponential,
gamma, Weibull, normal, lognormal, and extreme value; probability and hazard plotting techniques; maximum
likelihood and other estimation methods. Prerequisite: DSES-6110.
DSES–6110 Introduction to Applied Statistics
A graduate course in basic statistics. It stresses common tasks such as summarizing large databases, making
quick estimates, establishing relationships among variables, forecasting, and evaluating alternatives. Topics
include probability; common, discrete, and continuous distributions; sampling; confidence intervals; hypothesis
tests; contingency tables; statistical process control; and multiple regression analysis. It involves extensive use of
computers for the analysis of data sets.
DSES-6230 Quality Control and Reliability
Topics include basic concepts of system and component reliability; statistical distributions such as the
exponential, gamma, Weibull, and lognormal, important in the description of life and failure phenomena; and the
graphical and quantitative analysis of complete and censored life-testing and failure data. Prerequisite: DSES6110.
ECSE Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering
ECSE–4440 Control Systems Engineering
Application of linear feedback theory to the analysis of large–scale, integrated control systems. Derivation of
complex mathematical models of physical systems. Synthesis thesis of appropriate control laws to provide
stability of these plants. Simulation of complex control systems on digital computers. Prerequisite: ECSE-4960.
ECSE–4490 Fundamentals of Robotics
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A survey of the fundamental issues necessary for the design, analysis, control and implementation of robotic
systems. The mathematical description of robot manipulators in terms of kinematics and dynamics. Hardware
components of a typical robot arm. Path following, control, and sensing. Examples of several currently available
manipulators. Electrical and Mechanical Engineering majors at Rensselaer in Troy have taken this course.
Prerequisite: ECSE-2410.
ECSE–4500 Probability for Engineering Applications
Axioms of probability, joint and conditional probability, random variables, probability density and distribution
functions, functions of random variables, statistical average, and Markov chains. Applications to such areas as
sampling, reliability, statistical physics, and information theory. Prerequisite: ECSE-2410.
ECSE–4670 Computer Communication Networks
Problems, solutions, and limitations associated with interconnecting computers by communication networks. The
seven layer ISO reference model of open systems interconnection (OSI) serves as a framework. Topics include:
physical layer standards, data link protocols, queuing models, routing, satellite communications, local area
networks, multiplexing, coding, and network configurations. Prerequisite: CISH–4010 or equivalent.
ECSE–4770 Computer Hardware Design
Digital design methodologies including timing chain and counter based "hardwired" microprogram design,
modules, and modular design. The course bridges LSI and MSI design treating microprocessors, and I/O
interfacing. Bus protocol standards, interrupts, direct memory access, priority arbitration, asynchronous timing,
and overlap or double buffering. Specific examples of design include controllers for disks, Cassettes, video
systems, and stepping motors. Course includes a laboratory with access to LSI-11 and M6800 microprocessors.
Prerequisite: ECSE-2610 or CISH-4030.
ESCE-4960 Fundamentals of Signals and Systems
(Formerly ECSE-4960-Linear Systems Analysis)
This course delivers a comprehensive introduction to continuous- and discrete-time signals and systems. The
extensive use of MATLAB in the course is intended to develop the fluency required for graduate level
engineering courses. Material covered includes time- and frequency-domain representation of continuous- and
discrete-time signals. Time-domain analysis of continuous and discrete-time systems. Laplace transform and its
use in the analysis of continuous-time systems. Transfer function, poles and zeros. Continuous Fourier series and
transform. Discrete Fourier transforms. Sampling and aliasing. Frequency domain analysis of continuous and
discrete-time systems. Frequency response of the systems and filter concepts. Discrete-time system analysis
using the z transform. Introduction to Digital filters.
ECSE–5010 Instrumentation and Measurement
Complete survey of current instrumentation technology. Mathematical development of ideal first and second
order instruments. Expands to cover temperature, pressure, flow, and motion measurements. Basic measurement
statistical and error analysis techniques. Prerequisite: ECSE-4960.
ECSE–6050 Advanced Electronic Circuits
Design and analysis of wideband amplifiers, differential amplifiers, and operational amplifiers; the characteristics
of op-amps and their use as linear and non-linear elements, including compensation techniques; regulated power
supplies. Prerequisite: ECSE-2050 or an undergraduate course in analog electronics.
ECSE–6400 Systems Analysis Techniques
Methods of analysis for continuous and discrete–time linear systems. Convolution, classical solution of dynamic
equations, transforms, and matrices. Emphasis on the concept of state space. Linear spaces concept of state,
modes, controllability, observability, state transition matrix. State variable feedback, compensation, decoupling.
Prerequisite: ECSE-4960.
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ECSE–6410 Robotics and Automation Systems
Methods of design and operation of general purpose and industrial manipulator systems. Kinematic and dynamic
models of mechanical arms. Arm control through coordinate transformations, feedback, and microcomputers.
Hardware components. Computer software and languages. Robotic vision and sensors. A unified theory for
hierarchically intelligent control, and its application to advanced automation and to the industry of the future.
Prerequisites: ECSE-6400, ECSE-4490 desirable.
ECSE–6420 Nonlinear Control Systems
Phenomena peculiar to nonlinear systems. Linearization, iteration, and perturbation procedures. Describing
function stability analysis. Phase plane methods. Poincare's theorems. Relaxation oscillations and limit cycles.
Stability analysis by Lyapunov's method. Popov's theorem. Prerequisite: ECSE-6400.
ECSE–6440 Optimal Control Theory
Optimal control from the Calculus of Variations point of view. Continuous and discrete variational calculus,
discrete and continuous minimum principle. Other topics include: singular control, minimum fuel problems,
numerical methods for non–linear optimal control, solutions to Riccati equations, sensitivity in optimal control,
and observers. Prerequisite: ECSE–6400.
ECSE–6460 Multivariable Control Systems
Advanced course in the synthesis and analysis of linear multivariable control systems. Topics include: output
feedback, reduced–order modeling and control, disturbance accommodation and counteraction pole–zero
relocation via feedback, decoupling, vector frequency domain methods, decentralized control, numerical methods
for controller syntheses. Emphasizes contemporary approaches to feedback controller design and connections
between time and frequency domain methods. Material from technical journals and textbooks. Computer design
problems. Prerequisite: ECSE–6400 and ECSE-6440.
ECSE-6510 Introduction to Stochastic Signals and Systems
Deterministic signal representations and analysis, introduction to random processes and spectral analysis,
correlation function and power spectral density of stationary processes, noise mechanisms, the Gaussian and
Poisson processes. Markov processes, the analysis of linear and nonlinear systems with random inputs, stochastic
signal representations, orthogonal expansions, the Karhunen-Loeve series, channel characterization, introduction
to signal detection, linear mean-square filtering, the orthogonality principle, optimum Wiener and Kalman
filtering, modulation theory, and systems analysis. Prerequisite: ECSE-4960, undergraduate course in
Probability.
ECSE–6560 Digital Communications Engineering
Functional characterization of digital signals and transmission facilities, band–limited and duration–limited
signals, modulation and demodulation techniques for digital signals, error probability, intersymbol interference
and its effects, equalization and optimization of baseband binary and M–ary signaling systems, error control
coding techniques, digital filtering current practices in modern design. Introduction to communication networks
and switched systems, store–and–forward communication systems, broadband communication techniques,
channel protocol, current developments in digital communication systems design and operation. Prerequisite:
ECSE-6510.
ECSE–6590 Principles of Wireless Communications
Course presents a unified treatment of all wireless networks -- from cellular, WLANs to 3G. Principles of air
interface design are covered which include characterization of the wireless channel, transmission techniques for
the PHY layer, and multiple access alternatives applied to wireless networks. Wireless network design
fundamentals including channel allocation techniques, cellular concepts, architectural methods used for
expansion of the network, mobility management, radio resources and power management. Implementation of
cellular telephone and mobile data networks based on TDMA/GSM and CDMA technologies. Wideband local
access technologies: EEE 802.11 WLAN standards. Discussion of developments towards IMT-2000 3G
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standards, including W-CDMA and CDMA2000. Prerequisites: ECSE-6510 or ECSE-6560 and ECSE-4670.
ECSE–6620 Digital Signal Processing
Comprehensive treatment of the theory, design, and implementation of digital signal processing structures.
Sampling, quantization and reconstruction process. Design of digital filters in both time and frequency domains.
Analysis of finite word length effects. Theory and applications of discrete Fourier transforms and the FFT
algorithm. Applications from the communication, control, and radar signal processing areas.
Prerequisite: ECSE-4960.
ECSE–6630 Digital Image and Video Processing
Theory of multidimensional signal processing and its application to digital image and video processing. The first
half will cover signals and systems, Fourier transform, z-transform, discrete Fourier transform, FIR and IIR
filters and their design. The emphasis will be on the unexpected and important differences from the onedimensional case. The second half consists of applications in image and video signal processing, e.g.,
compression coding, noise reduction, motion estimation, deblurring, and restoration. Prerequisites: ECSE-6620.
ECSE–6660 Broadband and Multimedia Networking
Review of fundamental concepts and protocols for broadband and multimedia networking. The course addresses
various traffic management techniques for providing QoS in ubiquitous TCP/IP networks. These include traffic
classification and conditioning, packet scheduling, buffer management, and congestion control. Both differential
services and integrated services models of the Internet are discussed. Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) as
the next generation QoS enabled network platform is then presented. The course provides detailed coverage of
Internet multimedia protocol architecture that supports real-time delivery of multimedia information. Protocols
for real-time interactive applications are considered in detail, including RTP, RTCP and SIP including SIP based
implementation of Voice over IP telephony (VoIP). The course concludes with the study of ATM networks and
technology options for broadband access and transport. Prerequisite: ECSE-4670, ECSE-6510.
ECSE–6770 Software Engineering I
Engineering approach to the development of large programming projects. Successive steps of requirements
analysis, specification, design (e.g., –down modularization), coding (e.g., structured programming), debugging,
testing, maintenance, and thorough documentation, as illustrated by examples and papers from current literature.
Team project is required. Prerequisites: CISH-4020.
ECSE–6780 Software Engineering II
(Continuation of ECSE–6770)
Current techniques in software engineering with topics selected from portability, security, public key
cryptosystems, legal protection of software, reliable software, management of large projects, charging for
computing resources, and source–to–source transformations for optimization. Prerequisite: ECSE–6770.
ECSE–6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering
ECSE–6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering
Applied Digital Signal Processing
DSP chip architecture. Implementing signal processing algorithms on a DSP chip; Fixed point implementations
and DSP programming. DSP software development tools, code optimization. Take several algorithms from a
high level implementation such as MATLAB to a low level implementation on a DSP chip using C
programming. Students will complete a design project(s) on a commercially available DSP board. Prerequisites:
ECSE-6620, knowledge of C language and MATLAB programming is required.
ECSE–6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering
Cryptography and Network Security
Principles of number theory and the practice of network security and cryptographic algorithms. Topics include:
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Primes, random numbers, modular arithmetic and discrete logarithms. Conventional or symmetric encryption
(DES, IDEA, Blowfish, Twofish, Rijndael) and public key or asymmetric encryption (RSA, Diffie-Hellman),
hash functions (MD5, SHA1, RIPEMD-160, HMAC), digital signatures, certificates and authentication protocols
(X.509, DSS, Kerberos), electronic mail security (PGP, S/MIME), web security and protocols for secure
electronic commerce (IPSec, SSL, TLS, SET). Prerequisite: ECSE-4670 or permission of the instructor.
ECSE–6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering
Embedded Digital Control Systems
Course focuses on the design of an embedded digital controller that can be relied upon in situations where the
systems's response to external events must be both timely and accurate in real time. The course will cover the
following:
(i) Design of a digital controller and its implementation as a real time system using lab equipment
(microcontrollers, Lap Pack) and embedded Linux or a commercial available Real Time Operating System
(RTOS).
(ii) Development of digital controllers (using finite states) to control systems with discrete states or discrete
operating modes. Modeling of systems will be done on examples from industries such as automotive, chemical,
communication and robotics.
(iii)Interaction and cooperation of analog and digital systems. Design of fail-safe systems for use in safetycritical situations. Prerequisite: ECSE-2410; ECSE-4440 desirable.
ECSE–6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering
Mechatronics
Mechatronics, as an engineering discipline, is the synergistic combination of mechanical engineering, electronics,
control engineering, and computers, all integrated through the design process. It involves the application of
complex decision making to the operation of physical systems. Mechatronic systems depend on computer
software for their unique functionality. This course studies mechatronics at a theoretical and practical level;
balance between theory/analysis and hardware implementation is emphasized; emphasis is placed on physical
understanding rather than on mathematical formalities. A case-study, problem-solving approach, with hardware
demonstrations, either on video or in class, and hardware lab exercises, is used throughout the course. This
covers mechatronic system design, modeling and analysis of dynamic physical systems, control sensors and
actuators, analog and digital control electronics, continuous controller design and digital implementation,
interfacing sensors and actuators to a microcomputer/microcontroller, and real-time programming for control.
These are the fundamental areas of technology on which successful mechatronic designs are based. Throughout
the coverage the focus is kept on the role of each of these areas in the overall design process and how these key
areas are integrated into a successful mechatronic systems design. The course involves 12 weeks of lectures and
6 lab sessions. Prerequisite: ECSE-4960 or equivalent.
ECSE-6960 Nuclear Power Engineering
Basic plant cycles of PWR and BWR systems, overview of basic radiation and fission process, neutron life cycle
and six-factor formula, reactivity and startup rate, reactivity coefficients, fuel and poison loading, delayed
neutrons, reactor startup and shutdown, decay heat, overview of heat transfer and fluid flow including natural
circulation, reactivity control, reactor protection, print reading (Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams, Electrical
Diagrams, Control Wiring Diagrams, and Logic Diagrams), Electrical Distribution and emergency responses
(plant trip, loss of offsite power, and safety injection actuation), motor controllers, specified electrical
requirements (10CFR, submitted plant design, Technical Specifications, Abnormal and Emergency Operating
Procedures), process instrumentation, nuclear instrumentation, Appendix R (Fire Safety and Safe Shutdown)
electrical requirements. Prerequisites: Undergraduate degree in electrical engineering or electrical power
engineering recommended.
ECSE–6980 Master's Project in Electrical Engineering
Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 3 to 6 credit hours
ECSE–6990 Master's Thesis in Electrical Engineering
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Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 6 credit hours
ECSE–7010 Optical Fiber Communications
Review of the state–of–the–art in optical fibers, light sources, and photodetectors. Topics include: propagation,
coupling, dispersion, loss and cut off characteristics of guided wave models in optical fibers, structural and
operating parameters of various types of hetrostructure lasers and light–emitting diodes and quantum efficiency,
response time and noise characteristics of silicon PAD and PIN diodes. Digital and analog transmission over
optical fibers. DWDM systems. Optical amplifiers. Optical networks. Prerequisite: ECSE-4500 or equivalent.
ECSE-6560 desirable.
ECSE–7100 Real–Time Programming and Applications
Hardware and software characteristics of real–time systems for analysis and control. Real–time programming
techniques, standard interfaces and busses, sensors, data smoothing, digital filtering, and digital control.
Prerequisite: CISH–4030 (or ECSE–4730) and CSCI–4210.
MANE Mechanical, Aeronautical, Nuclear, and Engineering Physics
MANE–4240 Introduction to Finite Elements
Introductory course in the Finite Element Method (FEM) beginning with the "direct method" for discrete systems
such as springs, trusses, elastic frames, and pipe networks. FEM is then applied to continua, considering one
dimensional problems in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and elasticity using variational and weighted residual
methods. Algorithms for the construction and solution of the governing equations.
MANE–4610 Vibrations
Free and forced linear vibrations of damped and undamped mechanical and electrical systems of n degrees of
freedom. Continuous system vibration. Manual and computer methods of finding natural frequencies. Self– and
nonself–adjoint problems. Eigenfunction expansion. Integral transforms. Methods of approximating natural
frequencies. Rayleigh, Rayleigh–Ritz, Ritz–Galerkion, Stodola, Holzer, Myklestad matrix iteration. Perturbation
techniques. Stability criteria.
MANE–4650 Fracture Mechanics
Mechanics aspect of failure, fracture, and fatigue. Brittle fracture criteria. Linear elastic fracture methods. Stress
fields around cracks. Statistical aspects of fatigue. Cumulative damage. Contact fatigue. Prerequisite: MANE4320.
MANE–4800 Boundary Layers and Heat Transfer
Navier–Stokes equations and boundary layer approximations. Exact solutions and integral methods for
incompressible boundary layers. Transition; turbulence. Convective heat transfer in laminar and turbulent flow.
Special problems at high temperature.
MANE–5000 Advanced Engineering Mathematics I
A presentation of mathematical methods useful in engineering practice. The course covers analytical and
numerical techniques used in linear algebra, the numerical solution of nonlinear equations, the foundations of
vector and tensor algebra and an introduction to vector operators. Also covered are methods of polynomial and
trigonometric interpolation and approximation, numerical solution methods for initial and boundary value
problems for ordinary differential equations and an overview of the fundamentals of probability and statistics
including random variables, density and distribution functions and hypothesis testing. Symbolic manipulation
and scientific computation software used extensively. Emphasis on reliable computing is made throughout.
MANE–5060 Introduction to Compressible Flow
One–dimensional isentropic compressible flow. Normal stationary and moving shock waves. Design on inlet and
ducted diffusers, steady flow wind tunnels and shock tubes. Flow in ducts with friction and heat transfer.
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MANE–5080 Turbomachinery
Representation of performance of turbomachines; mechanism of energy transfer; factors limiting design and
performance including surge, choking, and cavitation; two– and three–dimensional flow phenomena;
performance analysis including multistage effects and off–design performance.
MANE–5100 Mechanical Engineering Foundations I
A presentation of the principles of macroscopic transport useful in the analysis of mechanical engineering
systems. The course covers the formulation energy mass and momentum balances in continua; the development
of mathematical models of heat conduction and mass diffusion in solids and of flow in ideal and Newtonian
fluids. Models are illustrated using examples from mechanical engineering. Particular attention throughout is
devoted to the development of the ability to create realistic and reliable models.
MANE–6180 Mechanics of Composite Materials
Mechanics of elastic heterogeneous solids and thermoplastic behavior. Mechanics of distributed damage.
Mechanical behavior.
MANE–6200 Plates and Shells
Preliminaries on linear, three–dimensional elasticity theory. Reduction of the elasticity theory to the theories of
plates and shells. Anisotropy. Nonlinear theories. Applications.
MANE-6410 Celestial Mechanics
Introduction to celestial mechanics, orbits, and perturbations, exterior ballistics, powered flight trajectories, space
flight trajectories.
MANE-6420 Multibody Dynamics
Analytical and numerical analysis of dynamic behavior of multibody mechanical systems. Emphasis on
understanding all aspects of modeling and analysis process associated with real (spacecraft, automotive,
biomechanical, etc.) systems. Review of traditional dynamic analysis methods (Newtonian-Euler, Lagrange,
etc.), presentation of more efficient, powerful, recently developed methods (including Kane's method).
Comparison of the different formulations and their applicability to computer simulation. Treatment of
constraints, extraction of data from equations of motion, and computational issues.
MANE-6490 Plasticity
Stress invariants. Polyaxial stress-strain relation for strain-hardening materials. Ideal plasticity, various yield
conditions and associated flow rules. Variational principles. Limit analysis. Applications in elastic-plastic stress
analysis, metal forming, plastic collapse, and plastic instability.
MANE–6530 Turbulence
Navier–Stokes and energy equations, exact solution, weighted residuals methods, linearized viscous flow, inner
and outer solutions, boundary layer theory, existence and uniqueness, higher order approximations, transition,
mathematical models of turbulent flow, applications. Prerequisite: MANE–4800 or equivalent.
MANE–6540 Advanced Thermodynamics
Review of the first and second laws. Criteria of equilibrium. Auxiliary functions and general thermodynamic
relations. Thermodynamic properties. Chemical equilibrium. Availability and irreversibility.
MANE–6550 Theory of Compressible Flow
General equations of compressible flow. Specialization to inviscid flows in two space dimensions. Linearized
solutions in subsonic and supersonic flow. Characteristic equations for supersonic flow with applications in
external and internal flow. One dimensional non–steady compressible flow.
MANE–6630 Conduction Heat Transfer
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Analytical, finite difference and finite element solutions of steady and transient heat conduction problems.
Illustrated with applications from engineering practice.
MANE–6640 Radiation Heat Transfer
Introduction to radiation heat transfer in diathermanous media and participating media. Selected applications
from spacecraft design, furnace design, meteorology, temperature measurement, environmental control.
MANE–6650 Convective Heat Transfer
Fundamental study of convection heat transfer in laminar and turbulent, internal and external flows. Unsteady
flows, combined heat and mass transfer, conjugated unsteady heat transfer and buoyancy induced convection.
Selected applications from aeronautics and heat exchanger design. Prerequisite: MANE–4800 or equivalent.
MANE-6720 Computational Fluid Dynamics
Course focuses on computational approaches to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. Course assumes knowledge
of numerical methods and therefore directly attacks the obstacles to applying these methods to the Navier-Stokes
equations. Issues concerning implementation of finite difference methods (FDM), finite volume methods (FVM)
and finite element methods (FEM) will be discussed. These issues include: the discrete formulation, non-linear
equation iterator (steady)/marcher(time-accurate), linear equation formation, boundary condition prescription and
linear equation solution. Prerequisite: MANE-6660 or equivalent.
MANE-6830 Combustion
Review of fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, fluid mechanics, and modern diagnostics.
Discussion of flame propagation, thermal and chain explosions, stirred reactors, detonations, droplet combustion,
and turbulent jet flames. Introduction to computational tools for complex equilibrium and kinetic calculations.
Applications to problems such as pollutant formation. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
MANE-6840 An Introduction to Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer I
This course is intended to give students a state-of-the-art understanding about single and multicomponent boiling
and condensation heat transfer phenomena. Applications include the analysis of nuclear reactors, oil wells, and
chemical process equipment. Student satisfactorily completing this course are expected to thoroughly understand
the current thermal-hydraulics literature on multiphase heat and mass transfer and be able to conduct independent
research in this field. Prerequisite: A working knowledge of fluid mechanics and heat transfer.
MANE–6960 Topics in Mechanical Engineering
MANE–6960 Advanced Fracture Mechanics
This course covers Linear and Non-linear Fracture Mechanics. The following are the course topics: Tensor
Analysis, Stress, Strain, Equilibrium, Compatibility, Constitutive equations. Theory of elasticity solutions for a
cracked body, Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM), Energetics of cracked bodies, The J integral, Plastic
zones, Fracture Toughness and R curve analysis, Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPRM), DugdaleBarenblatt and Bilby-Cottrell-Swinden (BCS) solutions using yield strips, Hult-McClintock solutions,
Hutchinson-Rice-Rosengren (HRR) solutions, Slip-line solutions, Engineering approach to elastic-plastic
fracture, J integral testing, J controlled crack growth, Computational methods for elastic-plastic fracture.
MANE–6960 Topics in Mechanical Engineering:
Mechatronics
Mechatronics, as an engineering discipline, is the synergistic combination of mechanical engineering, electronics,
control engineering, and computers, all integrated through the design process. It involves the application of
complex decision making to the operation of physical systems. Mechatronic systems depend on computer
software for their unique functionality. This course studies mechatronics at a theoretical and practical level;
balance between theory/analysis and hardware implementation is emphasized; emphasis is placed on physical
understanding rather than on mathematical formalities. A case-study, problem-solving approach, with hardware
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demonstrations, either on video or in class, and hardware lab exercises, is used throughout the course. This
covers mechatronic system design, modeling and analysis of dynamic physical systems, control sensors and
actuators, analog and digital control electronics, continuous controller design and digital implementation,
interfacing sensors and actuators to a microcomputer/microcontroller, and real-time programming for control.
These are the fundamental areas of technology on which successful mechatronic designs are based. Throughout
the coverage the focus is kept on the role of each of these areas in the overall design process and how these key
areas are integrated into a successful mechatronic systems design. The course involves 12 weeks of lectures and
6 lab sessions. Students will need a laptop computer for lab session. Students who have previously taken MANE
4490, 4250, or Sensors and Actuators are not eligible to take this course for credit.
MANE–6960 Advanced Topics in Finite Element Methods
The basic concepts of the finite element method are developed. Direct, Galerkin and variational approaches to
element formulations are emphasized. Although the procedures presented are general, the majority of examples
and special topics are from solid mechanics including two and three dimensional elasticity, plate banding and
shells. In addition to the fundamentals of finite element, the student will be exposed to the analysis of example
problems.
MANE-6960 Friction and Wear of Materials
Description to come
MANE–6960 Topics in Mechanical Engineering:
Modeling and Analysis of Machining Systems
A hands-on exposure to modeling, analysis, and simulation methodologies applicable to the investigation of the
efficiency of metal machining systems. Topics covered include the physical principles of metal chip forming
processes, thermo mechanical finite element analysis of metal cutting processes, materials science modeling,
machine tool path simulation modeling, machine tool vibration dynamics, machine shop scheduling and
sequencing, discrete event simulation, and economic modeling of machining systems and processes. Students
working in teams and individually will develop expertise in selected modeling techniques by carrying out termlong research projects.
MANE–6980 Master's Project in Mechanical Engineering
Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 3–6 credits
MANE–6990 Master's Thesis in Mechanical Engineering
Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 6 credits
MANE-7000 Advanced Engineering Mathematics II
A continuation of the advanced presentation of mathematical methods useful in engineering practice. The course
covers the Frobenius method for the solution of boundary value problems; the representation of arbitrary
functions by characteristic functions; calculus of functions of more than one variable including the study of
extreme; overview of calculus of variations; principles of vector and tensor analysis; analytical and numerical
techniques for the solution of initial and boundary value problems in partial differential equations. Symbolic
manipulation and scientific computation software used extensively. Emphasis on reliable computing is made
throughout.
MANE–7100 Mechanical Engineering Foundations II
A presentation of the most common physical and mathematical modes used in the description of the mechanical
behavior of materials. The course covers the microstructural and thermodynamic foundations of constitutive
material behavior of interest in mechanical engineering applications; overview of elasticity and plasticity and
their relationship to microstructural features; principles of rheology; viscoelasticity and creep; failure
mechanisms including fracture crack propagation and fatigue crack growth. Particular attention throughout is
given to the development of the ability to utilize the mathematical models to assess the reliability and life of
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mechanical engineering components at the design state.
MTLE Materials Science and Engineering
MTLE–4260 High-Temperature Alloys
Basic characteristics of nickel, cobalt, and iron-base superalloys, and refractory metals such as columbium,
tantalum, tungsten, and molybdenum for gas turbine, steam turbine, and space power applications.
Characterization of systems, relationship of mechanical properties to microstructure, processing by casting and
working, joining and heat treatment, oxidation and protection of alloys, applications and future trends, invited
lectures.
MTLE–6960 Topics in Materials Engineering
MTLE–6960 Topics in Materials Engineering:
Creep and Fatigue of Metals
A presentation of mechanical behavior and metallurgical phenomena encountered at high and intermediate
temperatures and also under cyclic loading conditions. The course discusses measurement and testing of creep
and fatigue, description of micro structural processes, data presentation and scatter, design aspects, instabilities
and the parametric representation of creep-rupture data.
MTLE-6960 Topics in Materials Engineering:
Intermediate Temperature Degradation and Protection
A course about protection against degradation of materials exposed to many industrial environments including
gas turbine engines in the intermediate temperature range. It builds on High Temperature Coatings Engineering,
previously offered. Tribological phenomena such as Friction, Wear, Erosion, and Impact will be addressed in
practical as well as theoretical terms. Interaction of the tribological processes with foreign materials deposition,
and resulting corrosion and oxidation will also, be highlighted. Protection against degradation by the above
phenomena will be covered. These will include surface treatments, lubrication, and wear and erosion coatings.
MTLE–6960 Topics in Materials Engineering:
Light Metal Alloys
Concentrates on aluminum, magnesium, and titanium with fully half of the course devoted to titanium.
Production of alloys, fabrication, properties, and microstructure, corrosion resistance, and more are covered.
Emphasis on the use of alloys of all three light metals in engineering applications. Textbooks available on
titanium and on light metal alloys in general.
MTLE–696x High-Temperature Coatings Engineering
Background and working knowledge about the oxidation and hot corrosion behavior of high-temperature
materials (primarily nickel-cobalt-and iron-based alloys and the protective coatings for application from about
1000F to 2200F. The course includes detailed discussion of types of coating, processing methods,
characterization, properties, and evaluation techniques. Upon completion of this course a student will have a
familiarity with and be able to make informed judgments on the selection of coatings for high-temperature
service.
MTLE–7061 Casting and Joining Processes
Principles of melting, pouring, and solidification. Types of casting processes. Mold design and materials. Design
for casting. Welding, diffusion bonding, brazing, and soldering. Adhesive and mechanical fasteners. Principles of
joining. Design for welding.
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Management and Technology
The course numbering system is alphanumeric beginning with a four-letter department name followed by a dash,
a three-digit course number, and a zero. All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise indicated. Below is the
four-letter subject code for Management and Technology.
Acronym
MGMT Management
Schedule of Course Offerings
Course availability is presented in the Three-Year Course Schedule. Course availability may change. Check the
Hartford and Groton course schedule at THIS LINK for the latest information.
Students should contact their faculty advisor for guidance in creating the Plan of Study. Plan of Study forms can
be found at: Office of the Registrar.
MGMT-6020 Financial Management I
(Formerly MGMT-6310)
The purpose of this course is to develop a working understanding of the major investment and financial decisions
of the firm. Emphasis will be placed upon identifying and solving the problems commonly faced by financial
managers. The course presents the needed theory and develops financial problem solving skills through
individualized problem solving, structured case analysis, and industry and company analysis using Internet
sources. Prerequisite: MGMT-7740.
MGMT-6030 Financial Management II
(Formerly MGMT-6380)
This course, built on the Economic & Financial Analysis I, provides a conceptual framework whereby
accounting, corporate finance and investment decisions can be viewed and understood in a unified context of risk
and return as it is applicable to all types of businesses and organizations. The course prepares students for future
specialized courses in advanced accounting, corporate finance, financial institutions and markets, investment
theory, and entrepreneurial finance. The contemporary issues covered in this course include risk and
diversification; asset pricing models; capital structure and financing alternatives; dividend and stock repurchases;
corporate governance; mergers, acquisitions and takeovers; financial distress and reorganization; and different
international financial.
MGMT-6040 Creating and Managing an Enterprise I
(Formerly MGMT-6710)
This course is designed to help students understand the critical challenges and tasks associated with developing,
growing, and managing a successful business. Students learn how to lead and manage an enterprise as well as
gain a fundamental understanding of each functional department required to operate a business and how each fits
into the greater scope of the business organization.
MGMT-6050 Creating and Managing an Enterprise II
This course builds upon the principles learned in Creating and Managing the Enterprise I within the context of
start-ups, internal new ventures, strategic alliances, joint ventures, and other organizational forms. Success in
creating and managing any business is contingent upon careful analysis and management of five key segments–
people, product, market, finances, and competition. Students have an opportunity to put into practice the latest
management theory while balancing the resources and constraints of these five segments. Prerequisite: MGMT6040.
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MGMT-6060 Business Implications of Emerging Technologies I
(Formerly MGMT- 6610)
This course investigates the business dimensions of major technological advances, highlighting how industry
structures and organization, the dynamics of competition, patterns of innovation, operational decisions, and
financial investment are all influenced by various types of technical breakthrough. Students also get to explore
the interplay between emerging technology development and commercialization. The challenges associated with
intellectual property protection and utilization, as well as the socio-economic and ethical dimensions of new
technology adoption, are explored. Each year, a different set of key technologies will be examined and analyzed.
MGMT-6080 Networks, Innovation and Value Creation
(Formerly MGMT-7500)
This course considers the evolving new models of value creation and business growth being introduced across
different industries and examines such critical issues as product and process technology strategy, operational
innovation, IT strategies and infrastructures, networks and organization, and finance. Utilizing a series of case
studies from across a range of industry networks, students will have a chance to learn how companies can
participate in such networks and what unique business resources and capabilities they can employ to enhance
their probability of commercial success.
MGMT–6100 Statistics and Operations Management I
An introduction to deterministic and probabilistic methods for business applications and particularly quantitative
approaches applied to managerial problem solving and decision-making. Topics include basic descriptive and
inferential statistics, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance and regression analysis.
Extensive use of computers allows students to explore the various quantitative techniques for analyzing,
interpreting and communicating a wide range of business-related quantitative data and information.
MGMT–6110 Statistics and Operations Management II
Continues the study of collection, analysis, and use of information in a technologically advanced setting. This
course shifts focus from statistical methods to other problem solving approaches including regression analysis,
linear programming, network models, queuing systems, and simulation. The emphasis is on integration of
analysis techniques to address the management issues at hand, with application drawn from production, finance,
project management, and system design. Prerequisite: MGMT-6100.
MGMT–6140 Information Systems for Management
Analyzes the use of information and communications technology to improve performance and to achieve
organizational goals. Examines information systems in sales, marketing, finance, and operations. Provides a
framework for understanding and evaluating IS contributions to product services and managerial effectiveness.
Focuses upon implementation of information technology as a strategic weapon for productivity and competitive
advantage. Lectures, case discussion, projects, and technical supplements.
MGMT–6170 Advanced Systems Analysis and Design
An advanced course in systems analysis and design that presents conceptual material about both traditional
approaches to systems development such as process–oriented and data–oriented methodologies and, evolving
approaches such as object–oriented development methods. Key stages of the systems development life cycle
including planning, analysis and design are the focus of this course. Models and procedures for understanding
and modeling an organization's existing and planned information systems are presented. Computer–Aided
Software Engineering tools are used to provide hands–on experience in designing information systems. A case–
based approach is used to provide students an opportunity to apply the analytical and design techniques covered
in the course. In addition, students are expected to do a real–life systems development project. The course also
focuses on the issues and challenges in managing systems development. Prerequisite: MGMT-6140.
MGMT-6180 Strategic Information Systems Management
Information technology (IT) is a strategic asset that is being used to mold competitive strategies and change
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organizational processes. As IT and its uses become more complex, developing strategies and systems to deliver
the technology has become more difficult. The net result is a growing need for guidance on the issues, strategies,
and tactics for managing the use of information technology. This course is designed to partially fulfill this need
and to enable students to integrate concepts and theories learned in previous IT courses. Prerequisite: MGMT6140
MGMT–6290 Macroeconomics and International Environments of Business
This course identifies major forces acting on the enterprise from the macroeconomic and international
environment. Key factors include national income and output, interest rates, economic growth and business
cycles, international trade and balance of payment, exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policy. Factors are
analyzed in terms of their impact on the economic and technological decisions of the enterprise.
MGMT–6320 Investment Analysis I
Introduction to investment instruments and modern methods of pricing them. Basic components of viable
investment programs are outlined. Topics include expected utility theory and risk aversion, modern portfolio
theory, equilibrium in capital markets (CAPM, APT), index models, futures and options, theory of active
portfolio management. Prerequisite: MGMT-6020.
MGMT–6330 Investment Analysis II
Advanced study in investment analysis, decision making, and practice. Emphasis on bond market analysis and
bond portfolio management, including asset–backed securities, high–yield bonds, venture capital, and derivative
securities. Topics include bond pricing, the term structure and risk structure of interest rates, duration concepts
and immunization strategies, analysis of embedded options in fixed income securities. Application of strategies
to real data set. Prerequisite: MGMT–6320 or permission of instructor.
MGMT–6340 Financial Markets and Institutions
Focus on U.S. and international banking and financial markets, new instruments and techniques for financing,
risk management and its application to financial institutions. Overview of U.S. financial systems, including the
Federal Reserve System, bank supervision, and monetary policy - and its counterparts in other countries.
Emphasis on impact of technology on securities markets and banks. Discussion of current issues in securities
markets and banking, such as securitization, financial derivatives, junk bonds, bank failures, mergers and
acquisitions, and international banking. Prerequisite: MGMT-6020.
MGMT-6360 International Finance
Examines the financial opportunities and risks involved in the management of a multinational firm. Tool and
techniques for measuring and managing currency risk including interest rate and currency swaps, futures,
forwards, and option are explored. The international currency markets, including the history of international
financial systems (Gold Standard, Bretton Woods, Dollarization, European Monetary System, etc.) are examined
The international banking, bond and equity markets and their role in modern portfolio management is assessed.
MGMT–6390 International Operations
(Formerly MGMT-6350)
This course provides a foundation in the facts and ideas underlying the globalization of production and delivery
of goods and services. Topics include: designing global supply chains, managing risks of cross border business
relationships, international logistics, establishing world class manufacturing service and R&D in developing
countries, integrating superior operating practices and technologies from across the world in diverse national
environments, and political and societal issues associated with global operations.
MGMT-6400 Financial Econometrics Modeling
This course addresses financial modeling as an empirical activity. Several key issues and assumptions of finance
are addressed through empirical modeling. Topics may include asset pricing, event studies, exchange rate
movements, term structure of interest rates, and international linkages among financial markets. Computers are
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used extensively both in and out of class.
MGMT–6450 Manufacturing Systems Management
An overview of how product and service requirements are translated into manufacturing facilities, procedures,
and organizations. The control systems considered include demand forecasting, inventory planning, production
scheduling, quality control, MRP, and project control. In addition, a management perspective is used to examine
decisions having a long–term manufacturing impact: capacity planning, location, and distribution, manufacturing
processes, factory layout and factory focus. The course concludes with an introduction to manufacturing policy.
MGMT–6470 Management of Quality, Processes, and Reliability
Definitions; corporate, economic, and government environments; international considerations; business processes
and physical processes in manufacturing and services; control and enhancement of processes; organizing for and
effecting change; experimental design for design and change; information systems; Deming approach; product
and processes development; capital investment; empowerment of workers; people make it happen. Prerequisite:
MGMT–6100 or permission of instructor.
MGMT–6480 Service Operations Management
Discusses the role of services in an economy, managing services for competitive advantage, structuring the
service enterprise, managing service operations, service productivity, quality, and growth.
MGMT–6490 Competitive Advantage and Operations Strategy
Includes topics such as manufacturing as a competitive weapon; management of quality; manufacturing
technology implementation; strategic impact of advanced manufacturing technologies; and manufacturing's role
in new product development. Prerequisite: MGMT–6450 or permission of instructor.
MGMT–6550 Marketing Research
Marketing strategy decisions are developed in the framework of many case studies. Marketing research
techniques, including questionnaire development and data analysis, are introduced and utilized in a team project.
Prerequisite: MGMT–6100.
MGMT–6600 Research and Development Management
The course deals with the responsibilities of, and operating problems faced by managers of research and
development. The following areas are included: technology forecasting, technology planning, selection and
evaluation of R&D projects, resource allocation, planning and control, measuring results of R&D. Particular
attention is given to creative problem solving, motivating and managing creative individuals, barriers to
innovation, and organization alternatives for R&D, including matrix and project organizations. Prerequisite:
MGMT-7740.
MGMT-6620 Principles of Technological Entrepreneurship
An introductory graduate course in initiating new technology-based business ventures and developing them into
self-sustaining and profitable enterprises. Examines the process whereby a person decides to become an
entrepreneur, screens opportunities, selects an appropriate product/market target, and obtains the necessary
resources. Provides the theoretical and practical knowledge for the preparation of formal business plans.
MGMT-6630 Starting Up A New Venture
An understanding of the critical issues related to starting up a new business is gained through team-based
experiential learning. Small teams of students develop a comprehensive business plan that can be used to raise
money for a new or relatively new venture. The experiential learning process is enhanced through team meetings
with faculty and/or course advisers and through oral presentations to the entire class.
MGMT–6680 Strategy, Technology, and Global Competitive Advantage
This course emphasizes the linkage between technology, strategy, and achieving global competitive advantage.
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Develops the concept and practical tools of strategy, strategic planning, and implementation of both at the
business unit and corporate levels. The strategies of technology-intensive international companies are compared.
FOR M.S. STUDENTS ONLY.
MGMT–6730 Technological Change and International Competitiveness
Analysis of the differences among technical systems and interactions with industrial growth is undertaken with
regard to nation states, industrial sectors, and companies. To develop tools of analysis regarding technological
change, industrial policy, and corporate performance. The impact of technological change on industrial growth
and competitiveness is viewed from three perspectives: the general manager, the technical professional, and the
public official.
MGMT–6750 Legal Aspects of E-Business and Information Technology
Legal, regulatory, and public issues related to E-Commerce/E-Business, the Internet, and Information
Technology are explored through an analytic, critical thinking approach. Topics include: e-contracts, digital
signatures, B2B and B2C agreements; ownership, protection, and exploitation of intellectual capital including
patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets; regulatory issues; ISP and Web site liability including
defamation; copyright infringement, securities regulation, and criminal acts; policy issues including privacy,
security and encryption, and obscene materials. Global E-Commerce will be explored.
MGMT–6810 Management of Technical Projects
Enables the technically-oriented manager to select projects of value to the organization, develop a project plan
including staffing, perform a risk analysis on the project, and successfully execute the project. Students, working
alone or in teams, practice the project management process by planning a current project in the area of new
product development, process reengineering, information systems or any other project with business
implementation.
MGMT-6840 Practicum in Management (MBA Students Only - course summary below applies to Hartford
MBA students)
MBA students in Hartford are required to include a non-pay community service (Practicum) project in which
students use training in service and process innovation to help solve local community problems. Individual
faculty will supervise teams of students who work with local agencies and small business start-ups. Projects
come from faculty in conjunction with local organizations, agencies and businesses. This project is normally
done as part of a scheduled course rather than an independent project.
MGMT–6940 Independent Study
1 to 6 credit hours.
MGMT–6960 Topics in Management
3 credit hours
MGMT-6960 Lean Strategies for Manufacturing & Services
Lean management uses principles and techniques developed at Toyota to improve performance through the
elimination all forms of waste, with the ultimate goal to create additional value for customers. The fundamental
concepts of Lean can be applied to manufacturing as well as services operations. Internal business processes,
such as product development, R&D, information technology, tooling & instrumentation, and training can also
benefit, reducing life cycle costs and improving market responsiveness.
MGMT-6960 Taxation for Business and Investment Planning
An introduction to the tax environment and how taxes affect individual and business decision-making. Topics
include examining the economic and social policy implications underlying the tax law, the relationship between
tax and financial accounting theory, taxes and technology, the tax consequences of various personal, investment
and business activities including the legal factors associated with choice of business entity. The tax compliance
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and audit process, and effective dispute resolution with the various government taxing authorities will also be
addressed. This course will enable students to identify tax issues and opportunities, to become conversant with
tax concepts and terminology, to conduct effective tax research, and develop tax planning strategies designed to
maximize the after-tax cash flow from a variety of business transactions.
MGMT–7xxx Seminar in Management
Advanced study of selected topics in a particular field. May be taken more than once if subjects are sufficiently
different. May be designed as fulfilling the CAPSTONE requirement. Always has one or more prerequisites.
MGMT-7003 Sustainable Business Development
The course provides a strategic-level perspective on integration of sustainable development, enterprise
management, and innovation management and their contributions for creating competitive advantages and
exceeding the needs of the global business environment. Sustainable development is a broad management
construct that focuses on how an enterprise improves the social, economical, environmental, and business
impacts and consequences of its technologies, products processes, and operations. Sustainable development
constructs use life-cycle thinking, technological innovation, and product development. Sustainable development
requires activity , knowledge, experience, and learning for solving existing problems and managing new
challenges. The course focuses on global corporations that are using sustainable development as an integration
construct for achieving success in the 21st century. Sustainable development means leading change, dealing with
the environmental consequences of products, processes and operations from cradle to grave, and improving every
facet of the enterprise.
MGMT-7030 Strategy, Technology, and Competition I
(Formerly MGMT-6650)
This course covers the fundamentals of business and corporate strategy, integrating these concepts into an
environment of technological change, competition, and entrepreneurship. The course includes the following areas
of emphasis: concepts of strategy, industry environment, resources and capabilities of the firm, organization and
systems of the firm, the dynamics of competitive advantage, strategic alternative analysis, and strategies in
different contexts. The course uses business cases and a project to enrich the theoretical concepts. FOR M.B.A.
STUDENTS ONLY.
MGMT-7050 Design, Manufacturing, and Marketing I
(Formerly MGMT-6560)
This course immerses students in the practices and activities that lead to the creation of innovative new products
and services. Through a team-based learning experience, students generate an idea for a new product or service
and follow the development process from conception through planning for commercialization. Through lectures,
cases, and practical exercises, students learn how to overcome hurdles inherent in new product and service
development. Students apply this knowledge in all phases of product development, including concept testing,
product design, production planning, and market strategy.
MGMT-7060 Design, Manufacturing, and Marketing II
This course immerses students in the practices and activities that lead to the creation of innovative new products
and services. Through a team-based learning experience, students generate an idea for a new product or service
and follow the development process from conception through planning for commercialization. Through lectures,
cases, and practical exercises, students learn how to overcome hurdles inherent in new product and service
development. Students apply this knowledge in all phases of product development, including concept testing,
product design, production planning, and market strategy. The project undertaken in this course provides student
teams with an opportunity to create a new venture that may then be carried forward utilizing Rensselaer’s
technological resources such as the Incubator Program and Rensselaer’s Technology Park.
MGMT-7070 Managing on the Edge: Corporate Innovation for the Coming Years
This course investigates the challenges of managing and leading organizations in situations characterized by their
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non-linear, unpredictable nature. Students will be challenged to develop innovative responses and solutions,
drawing upon the full array of knowledge, skills, and insights they have gained from their two years of MBA
study. Along with learning to deal with risk and uncertainty, the soon-to-be MBA graduates will be prepared for
addressing the increasing degrees of fluidity and turbulence found in today’s business, economic, and
competitive environments.
MGMT-7120 International Marketing
Theoretical and practical overview of International Marketing; discussion and analysis of International Marketing
issues, problems and solutions using text, case studies and examples. This course is designed for professionals
involved in corporate strategic planning, export sales, marketing and international management.
MGMT–7210 Acquisition and Venture Analysis
Recent years have seen an accelerated commitment to growth and asset reallocation through acquisitions and
corporate restructurings. Indeed the accounting profession is taking a fresh look at how these deals are accounted
for in the firms' financial statements. The rate of deals is exponential and covers the full spectrum from
established industries to high technology, computer, biotechnology, and internet firms. Topics covered in this
course are reasons for acquisitions, valuing, and structuring a transaction. Determining the currency to be used,
achieving strategic and organizational alignment, takeover defenses, and post-deal integration. Students study a
recent transaction of their own choosing and prepare an oral and written report focusing on those aspects that
made the deal successful. Prerequisite: MGMT-6020 or permission of instructor.
MGMT-7500- Managing Supply Networks
An overview of the set of activities related to flow of information, goods, and services from raw material through
production to the end-use customer. Course will focus on the planning, analysis, decision making, and measuring
methods used to manage supply networks in order to improve customer satisfaction. A comparison of different
supply chain strategies will be presented with an emphasis on the application of business strategies that minimize
waste.
MGMT–7540 Leadership and Organizational Improvement
An advanced course in leadership that closely examines the relationship between operating practices and
behaviors. Comparisons are made between leadership behaviors, business metrics, and decisions that are resultsfocused versus those that are processes-focused and designed to eliminate waste. The impact of the different
types of waste on leadership effectiveness, credibility, organizational capability building, stakeholder buy-in, and
financial results are critically examined. The framework for this course is the application of Lean principles and
practices to a wider range of individual and enterprise-level challenges. Prerequisites: MGMT-6040 and MGMT6190.
MGMT–7700 International Negotiations
Examines international negotiation techniques, practica and styles. Students are given an in–depth profile
questionnaire to assess individual strengths and weaknesses in international negotiations. Profiles of international
negotiators are examined. Negotiation sessions and group presentations are videotaped and analyzed.
MGMT–7710 Cultural Environment of International Business
The emerging role of the multinational manager, cultural impact of international management, managing culture
shock, organizational responsibilities and cultural differences. Foreign deployment, cultural specifics for
managerial effectiveness, cultural themes and patterns, American macro– and micro–cultures, working in the
global market environment.
MGMT-7730 Economics and Institutions
(Formerly MGMT-6300)
The main course objective is to introduce students to basic economics principles and establish economics as a
managerial decision-making framework. The course will draw on economic analysis of such concepts as cost,
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demand, profit, competition, pricing strategy, and market protection and tie them to operational business
decisions.
MGMT-7740 Accounting for Reporting and Control
(Formerly MGMT-6190)
This course introduces theories and practices of financial as well as managerial accounting. The financial
accounting sessions provide an overview of external financial statements. The managerial accounting sessions
focus on how accounting information is used in the internal managerial decision making process within a firm as
well as cover cost accounting, budgeting, and performance evaluation tools.
MGMT-7750 Global Business and Social Responsibility
(Formerly MGMT-6800)
The course examines different responses of American, European and Asian firms to a global economy, within an
historic and evolving context. Models of economic, social, political, technological, and national development will
be introduced. Various conflicting demands of national governments, interest groups, corporations, unions,
NGOs and consumers are often expressed in terms of ethical and social responsibility. Cases will be analyzed in
terms of models of global business practices and conflicting claims will be critically evaluated.
MGMT–7980 CAPSTONE Project Course
Independent research project. Student must meet with a full-time faculty member to determine the independent
study topic. The independent research should result in a high-quality research paper that is suitable for
publication in a journal. Such efforts are to be separate and independent of course work used to satisfy other M.S.
program requirements.
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Executive and Professional Development
Executive and Professional Development is a department of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute focused on
providing opportunities for professionals to enhance their knowledge and skills without enrolling in a creditbased academic program. Its mission is to develop superior short programs that address the interface between
technical skills, management, and leadership.
Professional Engineering
Lean Six Sigma Certificate Program - NEW!
We also offer support to engineers who are interested in
receiving the designation Professional Engineer by
providing preparatory courses for the Fundamentals in
Engineering examination; the Professional Engineering
examinations in mechanical, civil, and electrical
engineering; and the Land Surveyor examination.
Rensselaer has developed an enhanced Process
Improvement Program designed to help you select and
successfully implement improvements in one of your
key business processes.
Go to Lean Six Sigma Certificate Program
Go to Professional Engineering
Leadership Infusion Program
This special Leadership program is offered to Rensselaer students to complement their Master's programs with
critical leadership and interpersonal skills.
Go to Leadership Infusion Program
Professional Engineering
Exam Review Programs at Rensselaer at Hartford
Rensselaer at Hartford has prepared well over 2,000 engineers studying to pass the Fundamentals in Engineering,
Civil, Mechanical, as well as the Land Surveyor Exam. Experts in each of the specific engineering areas review
and solve problems judged to be representative of the type and complexity encountered in the examination. The
success of our students has made Rensselaer at Hartford's PE and LS programs the most popular of its kind in the
area.
If you are preparing for these exams, let Rensselaer at Hartford assist you. You will review study tips and
fundamental concepts, in addition to solving problems similar to those on the exams. Teams of practicing
Professional Engineers and members of Rensselaer at Hartford Engineering faculty are selected to teach in their
specific areas of expertise. The course fee includes comprehensive guides which cover both background review
topics and sample questions similar to those found on the exams.
Veteran Approved Programs
The PE and LS Review programs are approved for VA. For details, please e-mail:
$1750 per program (Includes all teaching materials)
Please click here for schedule
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•
•
•
•
PE01- Fundamentals of Engineering
PE02- Civil - Principles & Practices
PE03- Mechanical - Principles & Practices
LS01- Land Surveyor Exam Review
Lean Six Sigma Certificate Program
A Process Improvement Program Built to Impact Your Bottom Line
Rensselaer’s new Lean Six Sigma Certificate Program was created to enable participants to achieve tangible
results within their companies. One key differentiator of this program is its outcome-driven methodology. The
overarching objective is to complete an actual business project during the course of the program. A Lean sensei
with over 20 years of process improvement experience will lead the program and provide guidance in project
selection to enable maximum return on investment. Participants will be asked to select a project that has the
potential for realizing at least $100,000 in annualized savings. Sending multiple members from a company who
can work on a project together can yield even larger gains during and after the training.
Program Content
Participants in this intensive hands-on program will bring with them a business problem or opportunity to resolve
and then receive real-time coaching to help them stay on track and learn at a rapid pace. The principles and
methodologies of Lean Six Sigma that are taught will be applied immediately and throughout the program to
improve business performance. See the schedule of monthly seminars below.
Upon successful completion of this program, participants will leave with powerful knowledge of Lean Six Sigma
tools and a Green Belt Certificate, as well as confidence gained from having applied this learning to an actual
company project.
Schedule of Monthly One-Day Seminars
Classes meet monthly over a nine-month period. This reflects the actual timeframe necessary to implement
participants’ work projects. The order of the seminars themselves also supports the order of process steps. In
addition, on-site consulting and one-on-one coaching provide additional support to enable success.
DATE
SEMINAR
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Monthly Seminar 7
How to use Problem Solving Tools to help Reduce the Time to
Implementation
Monthly Seminar 8
Using Design of Experiment to Help you Successfully Navigate through Pilot
Phase
Monthly Seminar 9
Using the Tools for Building a Sustaining Process so that your Improvements
Last
A $10,000 all-inclusive price encompasses:
•
•
•
Nine days of seminars (one day per month over 9 months)
One day of on-site consulting
One-on-one coaching at Rensselaer – Four sessions (1 hour each)
Registration
Contact Clarence Byers, Senior Program Manager, for more information about the program. Clarence can be
reached at:
Telephone:
(860) 548-2479 or (800) 433-4723, Ext. 2479
E-mail:
[email protected]
Leadership Infusion Program
Complement your education with critical leadership and interpersonal skills to enhance your success in the
classroom and beyond!
In this program, you will:
•
•
•
Increase your self-awareness, emotional intelligence, and potential for growth.
Gain the confidence you need to deliver outstanding presentations and lead projects.
Earn a Leadership Certificate upon completion.
Leaders today are faced with unprecedented levels of organizational, social, cultural, and economic change. The
opportunities for both major breakthroughs and breakdowns abound. To maximize one’s value, it is necessary to
be both technically savvy and interpersonally astute. The Leadership Infusion Program is a powerful
development experience that increases personal and interpersonal awareness, and emotional and social
intelligence.
Please note that this is a noncredit
program and will not count as
credit toward your master’s degree.
Check your company’s training
program reimbursement policy.
Topics Covered
•
•
•
Leading Change: How does a person with significant scientific,
engineering, and/or managerial competence make a successful
transition to being an effective leader?
Emotional and Social Intelligence, Appreciative Leadership: What is the path for leveraging the
strengths of your colleagues for innovative and successful performance?
Coaching, Managing Conflict, Leading Teams: How do you become more comfortable and skilled with
the interpersonal challenges of leading a team or organization?
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Faculty
A team of experienced leadership and organizational experts have designed and will facilitate this integrated
program. The small size of these classes will enable valuable personal attention and coaching.
Agenda
The Leadership Infusion Program takes place in two sessions over the course of two months: Session I comprises
two days of instruction and Session II comprises three days. All sessions meet 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. You can attend
the program either at Rensselaer's Hartford Campus, 275 Windsor Street, Hartford, Connecticut or at Rensselaer's
Groton Site, 115 Poheganut Drive, Groton, Connecticut. Session dates for both locations follow the agenda
below.
SESSION I
SESSION II
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•
•
•
•
Use a team development model to identify
success factors within a team
Explore team leadership styles and their
effect upon team members’ motivation and
effectiveness
Practice the skills of effective team
leadership
Identify the behaviors of shared leadership
that contribute to team effectiveness
For More Information
Contact Mike Bozzi, Program Administrator:
Telephone:
E-mail:
(860) 548-5347 or (800) 433-4723, Ext. 5347
[email protected]
Executive and Professional Development strives to meet the needs of our corporate partners, alumni, and the
general community. If there are programs you believe are missing from our portfolio, please contact us. We may
be able to create a Custom Program for your organization's specific needs or add a new public offering to this
list. Click here for more information.
There are five ways to register for a program:
Online: See registration links within course descriptions.
E-mail:
[email protected]
Call: 860-548-7864; or 800-433-4723, ext. 7864
Fax*: 860-548-7999
Mail*: 275 Windsor Street, Hartford, CT 06120
*Download and print Registration Form
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Faculty
Office of the Assistant Dean
Title
Coordinating Faculty
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Farooque
(860) 548-5300
[email protected]
Computer Systems Engineering
Peteros, Randall G.
(860) 548-5403
[email protected]
Faculty Coordinator for Executive MBA (EMBA)
Peters, Lael
(860) 548-2438
[email protected]
Academic Coordinator for Accelerated MBA Cohort Program 22 (Hartford)
Rainey, David
(860) 548-7830
[email protected]
Subject Area Coordinator for Technology and Innovation
Academic Coordinator for M.S. in Management (Sustainable Enterprise Management
concentration) and Accelerated MBA Cohort Program 21 (Hartford)
Stodder, James
(860) 548-7860
[email protected]
Subject Area Coordinator for Economics and Finance
Triscari, Thomas
(860) 548-5411
[email protected]
Academic Coordinator for Accelerated MBA Cohort Program 23 (Hartford)
Venkateswaran,
Venkat
(860) 548-2458
[email protected]
Program Coordinator, Decision Science and Systems Engineering
Kevin Wall
(860) 548-5305
[email protected]
Academic Coordinator, MBA
TBA
Program Coordinator, Software Engineering
Faculty
Teaching Area
Albright, Robert R.,
II
(860) 548-5481
[email protected]
Strategy, Organization, and Marketing
Annigeri, Balkrishna
[email protected]
du
Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering
Araujo, Robert
[email protected]
u
Marketing, Global Business and Environment, Industrial Ecology
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Ardito, Marilyn
Organizational Behavior
Bak, Michael
[email protected]
u
Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering
Project Management, Operations Management, R&D Management
Bialecki, Dennis M.
[email protected]
u
Bortoff, Scott A.
[email protected]
du
Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering
Bose, Sudhangshu
(860) 548-5331
[email protected]
Materials Engineering
Brown, Kenneth W.
[email protected]
edu
Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering
Brown, Roger H.
(860) 548-2462
[email protected]
Computer Science, Information Technology, and Computer Systems Engineering
Case, Mark B.
[email protected]
du
Decision Sciences
Clarke, David L.
(860) 565-9395
[email protected]
u
Computer Science, Software Engineering
Courtney, Patrick
Statistics, Design of Experiments
Dennis, Anthony J.
[email protected]
edu
Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering
DiModugno, Louis
Service Management
Donachie, Matthew
J.
[email protected]
u
Materials Engineering
Downe, Edward
Finance
Eberbach, Eugene
(860) 548-5332
[email protected]
Computer Science and Computer Engineering
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Gingerella, Louis
W., Jr.
(860) 548-7803
[email protected]
Accounting, Finance, and Financial Management
Gutierrez-Miravete,
Ernesto
(860) 548-2464
[email protected]
Mechanical and Materials Engineering
Harris, Dale
Accounting, Finance
Hartley, Timothy J.
[email protected]
u
Computer and Information Sciences
Healy, Timothy
Marketing Research, Statistics
Hine, Paul
(860) 548-5350
[email protected]
Lean Six Sigma I and II
Hoole, Jeevan
(860) 548-5356
[email protected]
Electrical, Power and Mechanical Engineering
Kelly, Leonard
(860) 548-7821
[email protected]
Decision and Information Sciences and Operations
Kerr, James M.
Strategy, Global Business
Kline, Gary L.
[email protected]
du
Computer Science, Software Engineering, and Information Technology
Kousen, Ken
(860) 508-1865
[email protected]
du
Computer Science, Software Engineering, and Information Technology
Lagasse, Paul
Quantitative Methods
Lally, Robert V.
Taxation for Business and Investment Planning
Lamy, Raymond
Accounting
Lemcoff, Norberto
(860) 548-5356
[email protected]
Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering
Luddy, Grace B.
[email protected]
Global Business
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Madison, James
[email protected]
Computer and Information Sciences
Maleyeff, John
(860) 548-7870
[email protected]
Decision Science, Operations Management
Marcin, John J.
[email protected]
edu
Materials Engineering
Mesiya, Mohammed
Farooque
(860) 548-5300
[email protected]
Electrical Engineering, Communications, Electrical Power
Mutchler, John
Business Law, Technological Innovation
O'Donovan, Edward Marketing, Project Management
G.
[email protected]
du
Olynyk, John P.
Project Management
Peteros, Randall G.
(860) 548-5403
[email protected]
Finance, Taxation, Business Law
Peters, Lael
(860) 548-2438
[email protected]
Organizational Behavior and Information Technology
Peterson, Eric
Strategy, Leadership
Petti, Joseph
Quality Management
Quinn, Joseph W.
[email protected]
edu
Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering
Rainey, David L.
(860) 548-7830
[email protected]
Technology, Innovation, and Business Policy
Resetarits, Paul
Lean Management
Roy, Roland
Business Strategy, International
Organizational Behavior and Human Resources
Russell, Susan A.
[email protected]
du
Sanderson, Susan
International Operations, Innovation
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Scholte, Eelco
Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering
Shemenski, Robert
Engineering Design for Six Sigma
Slimon, Scot
Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering
Staroselsky,
Alexander
Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering
Stevens, Michael E.
Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering; Information Systems
[email protected]
edu
Stodder, James P.
(860) 548-7860
[email protected]
Economics and Finance
Swarr, Thomas
Innovation, Ethics, Sustainability
Tew, David E.
Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering
[email protected]
edu
Torrani, Robert
Quality Management
Triscari, Thomas
Project Management, International
Venkateswaran,
Venkat
(860) 548-2458
[email protected]
Decision Science and Systems Engineering
Vidakovic, Steven
International Operations
Wagner, Timothy C. Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering
[email protected]
du
Kevin Wall
(860) 548-5305
[email protected]
Accounting and Finance
Webster, Steven
Statistics, Quality Management
Younessi, Houman
(860) 548-7880
[email protected]
Information Systems, Computer Science, Software and Systems Engineering,
Financial Engineering
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Administration, Board of Trustees
Members
•
•
•
•
Charles F. Carletta, J.D., Secretary of the Institute and General Counsel, Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute
Virginia C. Gregg, M.S., Vice President for Finance, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Robert E. Palazzo, Ph.D., Provost, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Curtis N. Powell, M.S., Vice President Human Resources, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Corporate Officers
•
•
•
•
Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D., President, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
John A. Minasian, Ph.D., Vice President and Dean, Rensselaer Hartford Campus
Charles F. Carletta, J.D., Secretary
Lorraine Kammerer, Assistant Secretary
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Administration, Hartford Campus
Office of the Vice President and Dean
Vice President and Dean, John A. Minasian, Ph.D
Operations Manager, Lorraine Kammerer
Administrative Assistant, Anita Sladyk
Business Analyst, Mark W. Crosskey, B.S.
Data Analyst, Eric Patenaude, B.A.
Office of Student Services
Manager, Student Services, Natalie A. Sutera, M.S.
Conference Facility Coordinator, Deneice Jordan
Receptionist, Rosalind Dawson
Receptionist, Barbara Grady
Receptionist, Ann Montgomery
Receptionist, Traymeshia Story
The Cole Library
Director, Mary S. Dixey, MLS
Instructional Services Librarian, Linda M. Knaack, MLS
Consortium Cataloger, Part-time, Gale Brancato, MLS
Distributed Education and Multimedia
Director, Brian J. Clement, M.B.A.
Multimedia Producer, Paul Sartini, M.S.
Multimedia Producer/Operations Coordinator, Karen Silva, B.A.
Enrollment Management
Director, Enrollment Management and Marketing, Kristin E. Galligan, M.S.
Senior Program Manager, Clarence E. Byers, B.S.
Senior Program Manager, Amy H. Cunningham, M.B.A.
Senior Program Manager, Roger E. Lavallee, B.S.
Senior Program Manager, Christa A. Sterling, M.B.A.
Program Manager, Jonathan G. Judd, M.S.
Program Manager, Robert F. Sheftel, M.S.
Executive and Professional Development
Director, Elliot B. Field, B.S.
Program Administrator, Carole Charles, M.S.
Program Specialist, Susan Kramer
Financial Aid Office
Senior Student Services and Financial Aid Administrator, John F. Gonyea
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Financial Services
Accounts Receivable Specialist, Lynn Vitale, B.A.
Payroll/Benefits Coordinator, Patricia O'Brien, B.S.
Rensselaer Groton Site
Associate Technical Coordinator, Shameka Owens-Hayward, A.S.
Production Assistant, Geoffrey Owens
Production Assistant, Tunnesia Owens, A.S.
Production Assistant, Kelli Lacey
Marketing and Business Development
Director of Marketing and Business Development, Elliot B. Field, B.S.
Business Analyst, Brendan L. Wilson, B.S.
Program Manager, Michael Bozzi, B.A.
Program Manager, Donald F. Pendagast III, B.S.
Office of Student Services
Student Services and Financial Aid Administrator, John F. Gonyea
Office of Communications
Communications Manager, Thomas J. Bittel, B.A.
Communications Coordinator, Robin M. Micket, M.A.
Office of the Registrar
Registrar, Doris M. Matsikas
Assistant Registrar, Angela Buonannata
Supervisor, Student Accounts (Accounts Receivable), Audrey C. Cardillo, A.S.
Operations and Facilities
Manager, Paul J. Murphy, M.B.A.
Technical and Information Services
Director, Brian J. Clement, M.B.A.
Administrative Systems Coordinator, Richard Silva, B.A.
Director, Network Information Systems, Gary Trail, M.S.
Engineer, Lloyd Omphroy
Programmer Analyst/Administrative Systems, Doria DiNino, M.B.A.
Senior Analyst/PC System Administrator, Adam Hechler
System Administrator, Brian Hartlieb, M.S.
Academic Department and Programs
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Assistant Dean for Academic Programs, Houman Younessi, Ph.D.
Administrative Specialist, Florence Josephs
Administrative Associate, Linda Kresge, B.A.
Lally School of Management and Technology
Area Coordinator, John Maleyeff, Ph.D.
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