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travel grant guidelines draft
NEWTON FUND RESEARCHER LINKS WORKSHOPS
– GUIDELINES FOR APPLICANTS APRIL 2016 –
1. Background
The Newton Fund aims to build UK-partner country collaborations centred on shared research and
innovation challenges which have direct relevance to Newton partner countries’ social welfare and
economic development.
Tackling global challenges – such as extreme weather conditions, urbanisation, access to
affordable health care, food and energy security, and meeting the social and economic needs of a
growing population – requires an integrated research and innovation approach, bringing together
communities from different disciplines, sectors, and countries in high-quality collaborations.
All Researcher Links-funded workshops will have the following three overarching objectives:
•
•
•
Support international development-relevant research – Workshops are intended to support
research areas relevant to the economic development and welfare of partner countries.
Contribute to capacity building of early career researchers – The proposal must include a
description of how the workshop will contribute to the personal and professional development
of the participants. Workshop coordinators should indicate how they envisage this occurring,
including any plans for long-term mentoring of early career researchers (either within each
country, or cross-nationally).
Establish new research links or significantly develop existing links, with the potential for
longer term sustainability – Coordinators must outline the specific outputs anticipated from
the workshop. The aim of the workshop is to stimulate longer term links between the UK and
partner countries, as well as to contribute to the personal and professional development of the
participants. The workshop proposal should include an explanation of the mutual benefits to the
UK and partner country researchers and institutions. They should also explore any potential
longer term benefit that might arise, thinking about who might benefit and how they might
benefit and describing the actions that will be taken to ensure that potential impact is realised.
2. Overview of the funding opportunity
Researcher Links Workshop grants are designed to provide financial support to bring together a
UK/partner country bilateral cohort of early career researchers to take part in workshops to meet
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Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshops Applicant Guidance April 2016 v.1
the overarching objectives. The programme is supported by UK government and partner country
funding and forms part of the Newton Fund
(http://www.britishcouncil.org/education/science/researcher-links).
Each workshop will be coordinated by two Leading Researchers1, one from each country, and will
focus either on a specific research area or on an interdisciplinary theme (for example ‘Sustainable
Cities’). Workshop coordinators can identify up to four additional Leading or Established
Researchers1 (two from each country) to be involved in the workshop and act as mentors, but the
remaining participants must be researchers at an earlier stage in their career.
Proposals in any discipline/multidisciplinary area will be accepted (including the natural sciences,
social sciences, arts and humanities). However, some countries have specified areas (see Annex
1 for country specific guidance).
For-profit organisations and not-for-profit organisations (other than not-for-profit higher education
institutions or publicly-funded research organisations) can participate in Researcher Links
workshops but are usually not eligible to apply for Workshop grants. For-profit organisations are
not eligible to receive any grant funds. Please see list of eligible UK research institutions here.
Please contact us at [email protected] if you are in doubt about the eligibility
of your institution.
UK institutions can partner with institutions affiliated to other UK institutions (e.g. an overseas
campus) to deliver workshops provided that the workshops also include other eligible higher
education institutions or research organisations in the partner country. Applicants will need to work
closely with and include early career researchers from the institutions based in the partner country
that are not affiliated to a UK university.
In the April 2016 call the following countries are inviting proposals for Researcher Links workshops:
Brazil, Egypt, India, Mexico (to be confirmed), South Africa (to be confirmed), Turkey
Please note that subsequent calls for proposals may involve different partner countries.
3. Relevance to economic development and social welfare
Researcher Links Workshops are intended to support research areas relevant to the development
of partner countries.
We define research with development relevance as research (applied or fundamental) that has the
potential to contribute to the economic development and social welfare of low- and middle- income
countries2, benefitting low income and vulnerable populations in these countries. In order to be
considered for funding under this programme, all proposals must clearly articulate a
plausible pathway showing how the research may lead to positive impact on these
populations within a reasonable timeframe (within 3-15 years). Applications which do not
meet this criterion cannot receive UK Newton Fund support.
In some disciplines, development relevance can be longer-term and less direct than in other areas
and impact may be societal. In all cases, it is the responsibility of the applicant to articulate how the
research area or activity proposed will meet these criteria. Applicants should not expect reviewers
to make assumptions about development impact that is not clearly described within the proposal.
1
For an indication of profiles for the different categories of participants, we suggest applicants refer to the
European Commission document ‘Towards a European framework for research careers’
(http://ec.europa.eu/euraxess/pdf/research_policies/Towards_a_European_Framework_for_Research_Caree
rs_final.pdf). Coordinators and mentors should be at ‘R4 – Leading Researcher’ level or ‘R3 – Established
Researcher’ level, and early career participants at ‘R2 –Recognized Researcher’ level or at the beginning of
R3 level.
2
As defined by the OECD DAC list of official development assistance (ODA)
recipients (http://www.oecd.org/dac/stats/daclistofodarecipients.htm).
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Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshops Applicant Guidance April 2016 v.1
In order to show development relevance within the context of their proposed project, applicants
are encouraged to include reference to any local or national consultation, links to government
policies, and any links with government institutions.
For more on our approach to ODA, please see http://www.newtonfund.ac.uk/about/what-is-oda/
Agreements for ownership and exploitation of intellectual property generated through project
activities must be consistent with the primary aim of addressing development issues.
Under this call, the following research and innovation challenge areas will be given priority (unless
specified further in Annex 1 for individual countries). Multidisciplinary proposals are welcome,
and may include Social Sciences and Arts and Humanities. The challenge areas are as follows:
o
Agriculture (e.g. irrigation, crop yields)
o
Climate and environment (e.g. climate change, green technology, sustainable
development, ecosystem services, resource scarcity)
o
Sustainable energy for all
o
Education research for development
o
Economic growth (e.g. equitable growth, financial sector development, private sector
development)
o
Health (e.g. HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, neglected tropical diseases, child
mortality, maternal health)
o
Water and sanitation
o
Food and nutrition (including food security)
o
Demographic change and migration
o
Rural and urban development
o
Infrastructure (including civil engineering, information and communication technologies,
big data for social and economic development)
o
Humanitarian disasters and emergencies, disaster risk reduction
o
Resilient and connected communities
o
Governance, society and conflict (e.g. transparency, accountability, effective
institutions, land and natural resource rights, poverty alleviation, social development,
structural inequalities, violence and security, peace building, civil society)
o
Development-relevant data collection, quality and access (including administrative data
and macroeconomic statistics).
Please see Section 19 for a list of our review panels.
4. Who can propose a workshop?
Leading Researchers (see footnote 1 on previous page) may apply to be workshop coordinators
and must propose a theme for the workshop using the online application form here. The proposal
must be a joint application, with one coordinator based at a UK institution and one based in the
partner country. Applications must have the support of the home institutions, confirmed by
checking a tick box in the online application. In this round, only one application may be submitted
per coordinator, but there is no limit to the number of applications submitted per institution.
5. Location of the workshops
It is expected that most workshops will take place in the partner country (i.e. outside of the UK)
unless indicated otherwise in Annex 1. However, if there is a compelling reason for the workshop to
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Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshops Applicant Guidance April 2016 v.1
take place in the UK, then this should be detailed in the proposal and agreed with the British
Council.
6. Duration of the workshops
The minimum duration of a workshop is 3 days and the maximum duration is 5 days.
7. Timing of the workshops
Workshops must take place between 1st February 2017 and 31st January 2018.
8. Participation in the workshops
Workshop coordinators must identify up to 4 Leading/Established Researchers (see footnote on
page 1 for a definition), two from each country, to act as mentors, but the remaining participants
must be researchers at an earlier stage in their career.
Workshop places must be allocated to early career researchers through an open call once the
British Council has notified the applicants that their proposal has been successful. Criteria for the
selection of early career researchers will be made available to workshop coordinators. However,
we would expect early career researchers to have been awarded their PhD not more than 10 years
prior to the workshop (or to have equivalent experience), with allowances made for career breaks.
If a researcher does not hold a PhD but has research experience equivalent to a PhD holder and
works in a field where a PhD is not a pre-requisite for established research activity, they can still be
considered eligible. Participants from for-profit organisations cannot be funded.
Role of the workshop coordinators: Coordinators submit the online application form along with a
budget request, determine the workshop theme and shape the content/agenda of the workshop.
Workshop coordinators – overseen by the relevant British Council country office and in-country
partners, if appropriate – will also be responsible for selecting mentors and early career
researchers to participate in the workshop if the proposal is successful.
Under this call for proposals, workshop coordinators will be responsible for all organisational
aspects of the workshop logistics (including travel arrangements for participants and booking of the
workshop venue).
In most cases, the grant agreement will be signed by the UK workshop coordinator’s home
institution which will be responsible for the management of the grant (including financial reporting).
However, in some countries this is subject to change and the final terms will be communicated to
successful applicants.
Under future calls, in some participating countries, the relevant British Council country office may
organise the workshops on behalf of the coordinators, in which case all logistical arrangements will
be managed and paid for directly by the relevant country office. Please see Annex 1 for information
on which countries this applies to. However, responsibility for the preparation of the proposal
(including the budget request), the workshop content and the selection of early career participants
will still lie with the workshop coordinators.
Role of the Mentors: Established Researchers can give a limited number of keynote lectures but
must also act as mentors to the early career researchers during the workshop. Ideally, they would
also remain in contact with the early career researchers after the workshop has finished.
9. Language
Workshops will be held in English. It is expected that all participants will have a sufficient standard
of English to engage fully in discussion. However, consideration should be given to non-native
speakers.
10. Thematic focus of the workshops
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Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshops Applicant Guidance April 2016 v.1
Workshops may be specific to a particular field of research or interdisciplinary in nature. Any
relevant field of research can be covered, except where partner countries have indicated specific
priority areas (please see Annex 1 for country priority areas).
11. Content of the workshop
Workshop coordinators are expected to lead on developing the research content of the workshops.
However, workshops are intended to be a career development opportunity with a focus on
promoting international collaboration, and there are specific guidelines to facilitate this. The
following is a brief overview, and more detailed guidance will be provided to successful applicants:
Sessions should be as interactive as possible, and all participants encouraged to share knowledge,
experience and ideas. Workshop coordinators and mentors should share their expertise.
Suggested sessions:

Formal keynote lectures by the workshop coordinators and mentors. These must take up no
more than a half-day in total (ideally spread over the workshop).
Research sessions where the early career researchers are able to share their current
research. This could be in poster format or oral presentations.
Networking sessions where researchers are able to interact and explore opportunities for
collaboration (e.g. speed-networking sessions)
Overview of the research base and funding opportunities: a brief introduction to the research
base in the UK and partner country – how research is funded, size, strengths, international
collaborative activity and links with industry.
Career development opportunities in the UK and partner country. This could be an informal
discussion amongst the researchers or a more structured look at career development.
How to form international collaborations (intercultural skills, challenges, opportunities, best
practice etc.).
Optional content within workshops (where appropriate these sessions would be welcomed but
applications will not be disadvantaged if they do not include them):
- Depending on the research field or theme of the workshop, coordinators may wish to include
a session which invites industry or other non-academic partners to talk about cross-sectoral
collaboration.
- Public engagement activity/Cultural activity/ Visit to a relevant research facility.






12. Recruitment of participants
Following the selection process, successful workshop coordinators will be responsible for recruiting
participants to the workshops. Participants must be based in the UK or in the partner country.
Early career researchers recruited to participate in the workshop must have a PhD or equivalent
research experience. There must be an open call for participants which must be disseminated
through various defined channels3 (so that workshops are advertised as widely as possible). No
more than a third of early career researchers from each country may be recruited from within the
institutions of the coordinators and mentors.
The selection of early career researchers to participate in the workshop must be fair and
transparent. The British Council will provide a template application form for participants which
3
Examples of dissemination channels:
•
•
•
•
Euraxess: www.euraxess.org.uk
UK Research Staff Association: http://www.vitae.ac.uk/researchers/205761/UK-ResearchStaffAssociation.html
British Institute at Ankara website: http://www.biaa.ac.uk/home/
British Academy Africa Desk: http://www.africadesk.ac.uk/pages/home/
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Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshops Applicant Guidance April 2016 v.1
coordinators can adapt as appropriate, and British Council in-country teams will be available to
offer advice and oversight where necessary.
Equal opportunities and diversity are at the heart of the British Council’s cultural relations
ambitions. coordinators are encouraged to work towards as equal a gender balance as is
possible, promote diversity, and ensure that no applicants are excluded from participation on the
basis of ethnicity, gender, religious belief, sexual orientation or disability.
The maximum number of participants per workshop is 40 (including coordinators, mentors and
ECRs).
13. Funding
The level of grant funding available from the Newton Fund depends on the country: please see
Annex 1 for country-specific limits.
A condition for accessing funds from the Newton Researcher Links programme is that match
funding is secured from partners in each country. For the April 2016 call, the British Council has
secured match funding from most national funding agencies or other partners in each participating
country. Please see Annex 1 for more details for each country.
The grant contribution given to support the organisation of the Researcher Links workshops is
calculated using a combination of flat unit rates per person and accountable costs.
The 6 budget categories: International travel, Domestic travel, Subsistence, Event costs per day,
Additional costs and Admin costs. Please note that the unit costs given in Annex 4 constitute the
maximum amounts that can be requested in each category and that all budget requests will be
assessed for feasibility and appropriateness.
Please see Annex 4 for maximum amounts that can be requested in each budget category.
Applicants are required to provide a budget request upon submission of their proposal.
International travel
This is a contribution towards: travel costs to the country of the workshop for international
participants, visa costs, travel insurance and local transport to the workshop venue. It is calculated
using a unit cost for each workshop participant, at the travel rate stated for the country where the
workshop takes place.4 International economy class airfares should be booked by the workshop
coordinators as far in advance as possible to minimise costs.
Workshop coordinators and workshop participants must take out adequate insurance. The British
Council cannot take responsibility for any issues which occur when the participants are in-country.
Domestic travel
This covers costs of domestic travel to the venue for workshop participants based in the country
where the workshop takes place. The domestic travel contribution is calculated using a unit cost
for each workshop participant and is specific to the country where the workshop takes place.
Subsistence
This covers the costs of accommodation, medical insurance and daily expenses such as phone
and local transport. Subsistence is calculated using a unit cost for each workshop participant
multiplied by the number of days of the workshop, and is specific to the country where the
workshop takes place.
Event costs
4
Costs of any additional travel during the workshop – for international and domestic participants – may be
covered using the subsistence budget.
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Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshops Applicant Guidance April 2016 v.1
This covers the costs of venue hire and meals. The event rate grant contribution is calculated using
a unit cost for each workshop participant multiplied by the number of days of the workshop, and is
specific to the country where the workshop takes place.
Contribution to additional event costs
Workshop coordinators can request a sum of up to £200 to cover additional costs not already
covered, e.g. projector, flip charts and other materials needed for the organisation of the
workshops (including networking and social activities).
Administrative costs
Workshop coordinators can request a sum of up to £2,000 to cover administrative costs such as
telephone bills, printing costs and stationery.
Staff costs and honoraria cannot be covered by the Researcher Links grants. Only a
contribution of up to £2,000 can be requested to cover administrative costs (please see Annex 4).
14. Payment of the grant
The Newton Fund grant for Researcher Links workshops will be paid in 2 instalments: a 90% prefinancing payment will be paid within 30 days of signature of the Grant Agreement, and 10% postworkshop payment or recovery of the balance on approval by the British Council of a final report.
If the workshop has not been delivered as planned, or if fewer participants attended than originally
envisaged, resulting in a reduction in costs, the final payment may be withheld and if necessary a
proportion of the grant recovered. The Researcher Links Grant Agreement will be signed by and
the grant paid to one of the workshop coordinators’ home institutions, usually the UK. The grant
recipient institution that signs the agreement will then be responsible for the management of the
grant (including financial reporting). The final terms will be communicated to successful applicants.
Funding offered under the Researcher Links programme is intended as a contribution towards the
costs of the workshops. Workshop coordinators are expected to add a contribution in-kind towards
the overall cost of the workshop by dedicating their time to the planning and delivery of the
workshops.
15. Reporting
Workshop coordinators must submit a final report within 30 days after the workshop. The final
report template will be sent to successful applicants as part of the grant agreement and will include
financial and narrative sections. Further details will be provided to successful applicants in the
detailed workshop guidelines.
Individual workshop participants will be asked to complete an online baseline survey, a baseline
follow up survey 6 months after the workshop and a post workshop feedback questionnaire.
Workshop coordinators will be asked to send the link to the baseline survey to their participants
and also to administer the post-workshop questionnaire.
16. Ethics and research governance
It is essential that all legal and professional codes of practice are followed in conducting work
supported under this Programme. Applicants must ensure the proposed activity will be carried out to
the highest standards of ethics and research integrity. Specifically, applications that involve
research on animals, human participants, human tissue or patient/participant data must be
accompanied by necessary permission certificates from the relevant local ethical review
committees/authorities in the UK and the partner country, or an undertaking to obtain this
permission in advance of the activity commencing. Failure to do so will result in applications being
rendered ineligible and any funding already committed through this Programme being rescinded.
Please refer to the Research Councils UK ‘Policy and Guidelines on Governance of Good Research
7
Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshops Applicant Guidance April 2016 v.1
Conduct’ (http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/Publications/researchers/grc/), the InterAcademy Partnership
report ‘Doing Global Science: A Guide to Responsible Conduct in the Global Research Enterprise’
(http://www.interacademycouncil.net/24026/29429.aspx)
or
contact
us
at
[email protected] for further guidance.
17. Diversity
While recognising that some research fields are dominated by one particular gender, coordinators
are encouraged to work towards as equal a gender balance as possible, promote diversity, and
must ensure that no applicants are excluded from participation on the basis of ethnicity, gender,
religious belief, sexual orientation or disability.
Applicants may apply for funding to cover extra costs for such participation. Please make costs to
cover the inclusion of under-represented groups clear in the ‘human resources’ section of the
budget request in your application.
Please contact us at [email protected] for further information on funding and
for more on the British Council’s approach, see our Equality Policy at
https://www.britishcouncil.org/sites/default/files/equality_policy_1.doc
18. Application process
Applicants must submit a completed online application form. Email submissions will not be
accepted. The online form and a Word version can be found on the British Council Researcher
Links webpage (http://www.britishcouncil.org/education/science/current-opportunities).
The online form allows applicants to enter information and save it for a later date until final
submission. There are strict character limits for each section which cannot be exceeded. Any
problems with the online submission system should be reported to the following email address: [email protected]
Applicants must confirm on the online form that:



applicants have obtained permission to submit the application on behalf of the UK and
partner country institutions
the UK or partner country coordinators’ institution is willing to receive the funds and to
sign a grant agreement with the British Council.
For institutions in Vietnam and Indonesia, the financial and/or in-kind contribution that will
be provided.
Once the online application is submitted, applicants will receive a confirmation email containing the
application ID number. This acts as acknowledgement of receipt by the British Council system.
This reference number must be used in all communications with the British Council. Applicants who
have not received an automated email confirmation should contact the British Council at
[email protected]
19. Application assessment and notification of results
Applications will be assessed against the eligibility and quality criteria (Annex 2 and 3). Applicants
whose application is rejected at the eligibility stage will have 10 days to appeal against the
decision.
Successful applicants will be notified approximately 3 months after the call deadline.
20. Selection Process
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Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshops Applicant Guidance April 2016 v.1
Selection begins with an eligibility check by the British Council against the eligibility criteria given
in these Guidelines, including Annex 1 and the Eligibility Checklist at Annex 2.
Eligible proposals then undergo independent external quality review on the basis of quality, fit to
development needs and country priorities and the overarching Researcher Links workshops
objectives.
Eligible workshop proposals will be assessed in the UK by one of five Review Panels:
•
Arts and Humanities
•
Biological and Medical Sciences
•
Engineering, Physical and Space Sciences
•
Environment, Agriculture and Food Sciences
•
Social Sciences
Workshop coordinators must indicate in their online application form which Review Panel their
proposal should be assessed by, and the subject(s) their research covers. Up to 3 subject areas
can be selected in priority order, but the applicant must indicate only one Selection Panel.
In the UK Workshop proposals will be assessed by two reviewers against the quality criteria in
Annex 3. Each review results in a total score between 0 and 60. The final score will be decided by
the full Review Panel. Applications scoring less than 30 points will be considered not fundable.
However, please note that achieving an average score of 30 or above does not imply that the
proposal will be funded.
The final selection decision will be made in-country in collaboration with national stakeholders and
partner funding organisations. National and partner research priorities will be considered in the final
decision in addition to the general assessment criteria under this programme. Please see Annex 1
for priority areas by country.
As detailed in section 9 of this guideline, only those proposals will be considered for funding that
have clearly articulated relevance to the economic development and social welfare of low- and
middle-income countries, benefitting poor and vulnerable populations in these countries.
21. Call deadline
The submission deadline is 16:00 UK time on 27 June 2016. Proposals submitted after the
deadline will not be considered for funding.
22. Data protection
As part of the online application form, the British Council will ask applicants’ permission to:
•
Use the information provided in the application for processing the application, making any
consequential award, for the award payment, monitoring, maintenance and review of the
award. In some cases information will be shared with national programme partners for the
purpose of selection and monitoring of the award.
•
Make information on the successful applications available to the public on their website and
other publicity, and in reports and documents.
• Contact applicants in the future to inform them about future British Council opportunities.
Under UK Data Protection laws applicants have the right to ask for a copy of the information we
hold on them, for which we may charge a fee, and the right to ask us to correct any inaccuracies
in that information. More information on this is available on the British Council data protection
webpage (http://www.britishcouncil.org/home-data-protection.htm). Alternatively, it can be
requested from the local British Council office or the Data Protection Team at
[email protected]
23. Applicant screening
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Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshops Applicant Guidance April 2016 v.1
In order to comply with UK government legislation, the British Council may at any point during the
application process, carry out searches of relevant third party screening databases to ensure that
neither the applicant nor any of the applicant’s employees, partners, directors, shareholders is
listed:

as an individual or entity with whom national or supranational bodies have decreed
organisations should not have financial dealings;

as being wanted by Interpol or any national law enforcement body in connection with crime;

as being subject to regulatory action by a national or international enforcement body;

as being subject to export, trade or procurement controls or (in the case of an individual) as
being disqualified from being a company director; and/or

as being a heightened risk individual or organisation, or (in the case of an individual) a
politically exposed person.

If the applicant or any other party is listed in a Screening Database for any of the reasons
set out above, the British Council will assess the applicant as ineligible to apply for this grant
call.
The applicant must provide the British Council with all information reasonably requested by the
British Council to complete the screening searches.
Please read the text to this effect on the application form and tick the box to show that you
understand this.
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Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshops Applicant Guidance April 2016 v.1
Annex 1 – Country-specific guidance and grant rates
Please note that the unit costs given below constitute the maximum mounts that can be requested in each category and that all budget requests will
be assessed for feasibility and appropriateness. While the maximum contribution cannot be exceeded, applicants can request less in which case the
amount requested cannot be increased at a later stage.
1. Brazil
National Co-funders: CONFAP and FAPESP
Research priorities:


All areas in the global call (see page 3)
Zika virus
Additional eligibility criteria:
Please refer to the information here www.britishcouncil.org.br/newton-fund/chamadas/researcher-links-confap-fapesp-2016-2017 for specific
requirements for the different Brazilian states.
The British Council will pay 50% of the grant to the UK institution and CONFAP or FAPESP will pay 50% of the grant to the Brazilian institution. The
link above gives further details of the Brazilian requirements.
Grant rates
International travel: £1000
Domestic travel: £110
Subsistence costs per person per day: £250
Event costs per person per day £190
Additional administrative costs: £ 200
Additional events costs: £ 2000
2. Egypt
Co-funder: Science and Technology Development Fund
Research priorities:
Proposals must be relevant to at least one of the five core Newton-Mosharafa themes:

Sustainable water management



Food production and sustainable agriculture
Renewable energy
Affordable and inclusive healthcare
 Cultural heritage and archaeology
Additional eligibility criteria:
 Applicants from Egypt must hold a PhD
 Only applicants that are affiliated with institutes of an Egyptian identity are eligible to apply
 For Egypt, applications need to be submitted as documents (word/PDF) on the STDF website.
 http://www.stdf.org.eg/index.php/submit-your-proposal
 For enquiries relating to the Egypt side of the grant or to STDF procedures, please contact STDF directly ([email protected] )
Workshops can only take place in the UK if any security reasons arise.
Successful applicants contracted by STDF will follow STDF's payment schedule. To work out the total amount of the grant, applicants should
use the exchange rate published by the Central Bank of Egypt for the week beginning 17th April
Grant rates
International travel: £800
Domestic travel: £100
Subsistence costs per person per day: £70
Event costs per person per day £25
Additional administrative costs: £ 200
Additional events costs: £ 2000
3. India
Co-funder: The Royal Society of Chemistry
Research priorities:
 Chemical sciences
Within the chemical sciences proposals related to the following challenge areas are particularly welcome:




Human Health – eg. Antimicrobial resistance, neglected diseases, medical chemistry, bio-materials
Energy – e.g. sustainable fuels, chemicals and energy storage.
Environment and Sustainability – e.g. new materials, nanomaterials, water quality, climate, agriculture, air.
Research with relevance to the above areas at the Chemistry-Biology interface, the Chemistry-Materials interface and the ChemistryEnvironmental Science interface.
Additional eligibility criteria: none
Grant rates:
International travel: £800
Domestic travel: £95
Subsistence costs per person per day: £32
Event costs per person per day £30
Additional administrative costs: £ 200
4. Turkey
National co-funder: The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK)
Research priorities:















Agriculture
Climate and environment
Sustainable energy for all
Education research and innovation for development
Economic growth
Health
Water and sanitation
Food and nutrition
Demographic change and migration
Rural and urban development
Infrastructure
Humanitarian disasters and emergencies, disaster risk reduction
Resilient and connected communities
Governance, society and conflict
Development-relevant data collection, quality and access
Additional eligibility criteria:
All Turkish researchers who apply must be registered to TÜBİTAK ARBİS (Researcher Information system) through the following link:
http://arbis.tubitak.gov.tr
If requested, all researchers should receive Official Legal/ Private Permission Documents or Ethical Issues Documents
For detailed information, please follow links below:
http://www.tubitak.gov.tr/sites/default/files/yasal_izin_bilgi_notu_07_08_15.pdf
http://tubitak.gov.tr/sites/default/files/etik_onay_bilgi_notu_23_07_13.pdf
Proposals without the required Official Legal/ Private Permission Documents or Ethical Issues Documents will not be funded.
Grant rates
International travel: £600
Domestic travel: £150
Subsistence costs per person per day: £100
Event costs per person per day £30
Additional administrative costs: £ 200
Additional events costs: £ 2000
Calculating your budget request
To calculate the budget contribution that can be requested in each category, applicants should use the unit costs for each country where the
workshop takes place, as indicated in Annex 1.
International travel unit rates and visa costs should be multiplied by the number of international participants.
Domestic travel unit rates should be multiplied by the number of domestic participants.
Subsistence should be multiplied by the combined number of International and domestic participants and by the number of days the workshop lasts.
Additional costs must be a maximum of £200
Administrative costs must be a maximum of £2000
The budget for a workshop lasting 4 days and taking place in Egypt attended by 20 UK-based researchers and 20 researchers based in Egypt
would be calculated as follows:
20 X £800 (international travel) = £16000
20 X £100 (domestic travel) = £2000
40 X £70 (subsistence costs) = £2800 X4 days (duration of the workshop) = £11200
40 X £25 (event rate) = £1000 X4 days (duration of the workshop) = £4000
£200 (additional costs)
£2000 (administrative costs)
= £35,400 total maximum contribution that can be requested.
Annex 2 – Eligibility criteria checklist
The application has been submitted by the applicant by the published deadline
The applicants have uploaded letters of support from each of the coordinators’ home
institutions.
The application form is completed in full and complies with instructions given
The application form has been completed in English
Only one application per coordinator has been submitted in this round (please note that there
is no limit on the number of applications submitted per institution)
The workshop will take place between 1
st
st
February 2017and 31 January 2018
The institutions where the workshop coordinators are based are recognised publicly funded
research establishments or Higher Education Institutions (can include private universities)
Applicants must have the capacity to administer a grant and satisfy British Council
requirements to prevent bribery, fraud and professional misconduct. Applicants will confirm
that they comply with British Council requirements by responding to pre-submission questions
in the online application form.
For proposals involving the Vietnam and Indonesia, the applicants have provided confirmation
that the lead partner country institution is able to provide matched financial and/or in-kind
funding for the workshop
Annex 3 - Scoring system
Assessment of the quality and development relevance of the proposals will be performed by panel
members in the UK, and the final funding decisions will be made in discussion with British Council
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country office and in-country partners, if applicable. Proposals with an average score of less than 30
points are considered not fundable. Equally, only proposals that have clearly articulated relevance to
economic development and social welfare of the partner country will be considered for funding.
Yes/No
Section 1 – Relevance to economic development and
social welfare
The proposal clearly articulates a plausible pathway along
which the research may contribute to the economic
development and social welfare of the partner country and
lead to positive impact on the lives of people on a low
income within a reasonable timeframe (10 to 15 years)
Please see guidance for applicants for further details
Score
Section 2 – Research quality and relevance
Range
0-20
20 points: Meets all criteria to
an exceptional level
The academic importance and timeliness of the research
topic is clearly demonstrated.
16 to 19 points: Meets the
majority of the criteria to a very
high level
The workshop coordinators have sufficient relevant
experience to lead the proposed workshops and achieve
the stated objectives.
The collaborating institutions are of appropriate academic
standing
11 to 15 points: Meets the
majority of the criteria to a high
level
6 to 10 points: Meets the
majority of the criteria to an
adequate level
1 to 5 points: Meets some of
the criteria to an adequate level
-
Section 3 – Workshop Proposal
0 points: Fails to meet any of
the criteria to an adequate level.
0-20
16
20 points: Meets all criteria to
an exceptional level
The description of the workshop includes clear, feasible
and realistic objectives and outputs.
16 to 19 points: Meets the
majority of the criteria to a very
high level
There is clear evidence that the proposed workshop
supports new links or significantly extends and develops
existing links.
The benefits and relevance of the collaboration to the UK
and partner country institution, and to the research itself,
are clearly described.
11 to 15 points: Meets the
majority of the criteria to a high
level
There is strong evidence of support from both the home
and host institutions.
6 to 10 points: Meets the
majority of the criteria to an
adequate level
The workshop is justified as a stand-alone activity, or as
part of a larger programme.
1 to 5 points: Meets some of
the criteria to an adequate level
The agenda of the workshop is will structured with
interactive sessions.
0 points: Fails to meet any of
the criteria to an adequate level.
Section 4 – Sustainability and Capacity Building
0-20
The potential in terms of professional development and
capacity building for early career researchers taking part in
the workshop, and for other potential beneficiaries, is
clearly described.
The proposal includes a clear and feasible
description of how the workshop coordinators’
institutions intend to sustain their collaboration
over the longer term.
20 points: Meets all criteria to
an exceptional level
16 to 19 points: Meets the
majority of the criteria to a very
high level
11 to 15 points: Meets the
majority of the criteria to a high
level
6 to 10 points: Meets the
majority of the criteria to an
adequate level
1 to 5 points: Meets some of
the criteria to an adequate level
-
0 points: Fails to meet any of
the criteria to an adequate level.
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