...

Pre-Game Warmup and Post-Game Stretches

by user

on
11

views

Report

Comments

Transcript

Pre-Game Warmup and Post-Game Stretches
SPRING 2015
For all Jericho Little League Baseball Coaches:
To better prepare our baseball players for the upcoming season, Jericho Baseball Association would
like to incorporate standardized pre-game warm ups and post-game stretches. This will help our
young athletes to get in the habit of preparing themselves for sport and preventing injury. Not only
will they learn correct training techniques, but they will also improve their musculoskeletal system
(which consists of the muscles, tendons, ligaments and bones).
A Dynamic Warm Up should be done pre-game to warm up the muscles to prepare them for sport,
and Static Stretching should only be done post-game, when the muscles are warm and able to hold
the stretch, to help prevent injury.
To best prepare any athlete for sports participation, it is essential to incorporate movement
fundamentals for the entire body. The seven athletic components for success in any sport are:
flexibility, co-ordination, balance, stamina, strength, speed and agility. Incorporating drills into your
practices or pre-game warm ups that help train your players in any of these areas, will benefit their
overall performance. Although sport specific training is necessary (i.e. Baseball drills), movement
training in each of these areas will help athletes to be physically well-rounded and better prepared
for sport. It will also help prevent potential injury from overtraining in one area.
In the following pages you will find a Dynamic Warm Up (6 min) and a post-game Static Stretch (8
min) that is recommended for all players. There will also be examples of different drills that
incorporate the seven athletic components mentioned above, as well as nutrition & fluid
recommendations. These drills and recommendations will vary based on age groups.
The following books are good resources for more information regarding training young athletes:
Athletic Fitness for Kids by Scott Lancaster and Radu Teodoresu
Strength & Power for Young Athletes by Avery Faigenbaum, EdD and Wayne Westcott, PhD
Have a safe, fun and successful baseball season!
Andrea Azevedo
Group Fitness BCRPA, CFES
[email protected]
1
Dynamic Warm Up (Pre-game) 6 min
shoulder rolls (forward & back)
15 sec each direction
= 30 sec
Figure 1
arm swings (forward, back & across)
15 sec each direction
= 45 sec
Figure 2 a & b
forearm extension and flexion (prone)
= 15 sec
Figure 3
leg swings (forward, back & across)
15 sec per leg /per swing
= 60 sec
Figure 4 a & b
hip rotations (15 sec each leg)
= 30 sec
Figure 5
knee hugs (alternating)
= 15
Figure 6
butt kicks
= 15
Figure 7
forward lunges (with 2count torso twist)
30 sec right leg then 30 sec left leg
= 60 sec
Figure 8
reverse lunges (alternating legs)
= 30 sec
Figure 9
squats
= 30 sec
Figure 10
jumping jacks
= 15 sec
Figure 11
squat jumps
= 15 sec
Figure 12
(Refer to figures beginning on page 3)
2
Dynamic Warm Up
Figure 2 a
Figure 1
Figure 2 b
Figure 4 a
Figure 4 b
Figure 5
3
Figure 3
Continued next page…
Figure 6
Figure 8
Figure 7
Figure 9
Figure 11
Figure 10
Figure 12
4
Static Stretch (Post- game) 8 min
It is important for each stretch to be at least 15 seconds, preferably 30. Though
it may be hard to round up the players after a game, it is essential for injury
prevention to stretch after sport. You may want to hand out snacks for the
younger players, after your post-game stretch and debrief.
For the stretch routine below, the last 3 stretches last only 15 seconds each as
the kids will be eager to move on by then, especially the younger ones. If 8
minutes is too long for the younger players, have them hold each stretch for 15
seconds, therefore reducing the total stretch time to 4.5 minutes.
quadriceps (30 sec each leg)
= 60 sec
Figure 1
hamstrings & calves (30 sec each leg)
= 60 sec
Figure 2
glutes (30 sec each leg)
= 60 sec
Figure 2
hip flexors (30 sec each leg)
= 60 sec
Figure 4
groin (30 sec each leg)
= 60 sec
Figure 5
biceps (30 sec each arm)
= 60 sec
Figure 6
triceps (30 sec each arm)
= 60 sec
Figure 7
chest (15 sec)
put chin to chest & do front neck stretch at same time
neck (15 sec each side and back)
= 15 sec
Figure 8
= 45 sec
Figure 9
(Refer to figures on page 6)
I would recommend doing the same stretches in the same order after each
game and practice, so the players (especially the younger ones) will learn to do
them automatically. On page 7 there are a number of variations and additional
stretches that might be helpful for your older players and pitchers who are
training at a higher intensity.
5
Static Stretch – Post-game
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 5
Figure 4
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 9
6
Figure 8
7
Practice or Pre-game Drills (optional) 5-10 min each
For Major B and Major C players - The following two drills can be used for
both the Major B and C players. Each drill will focus on different fitness
components. Though both will incorporate speed and stamina, Drill A will focus
on strength and agility & Drill B on coordination and balance.
Split the team into two areas for the drills so there is plenty of room. The
Major B players may want to make the drill a race between the split team,
creating a competitive component.
Alternate drills between practice and game days. For example, do Drill A as
part of practice, and Drill B before a game, after the Dynamic Warm Up.
Drill A (360 Cone Relay)
3 cones - spread apart in a vertical line. 6 players line up single file a few feet
before the first cone. Player 1 runs to the 1st cone, places his right hand on top
of cone while circling it clockwise – then runs to 2nd cone placing left hand on
cone while circling counter clockwise - then runs to 3rd cone – does 2 squat
jumps (refer to Fig 12 of Dynamic Warm up) then does a Bear crawl back to the
starting line. Player 2 starts doing jumping jacks when Player 1 starts relay and
when Player 1 reaches the last cone Player 2 begins relay…then the next player
begins jumping jacks and so on. If using drill as race – the first team that
finishes wins the relay.
Drill B (H Formation Relay)
7 cones – spread apart to form the shape of the letter H. 6 players line up
single file a few feet before the first cone. Player 1 hops onto right foot while
tossing a ball from his left hand to his right hand – then hops onto left foot
while tossing the ball from right hand to left hand. He continues hopping and
tossing until he reaches 2nd cone where he places the ball on top of it. He then
runs to and around 3rd cone – then to cone 4 (centre of H formation) and on
around the other cones until he finishes the H formation and then returns to
starting line. Player 2 begins the relay when Player 1 reaches the 2nd
cone…then the next player begins relay when Player 2 reaches the 2nd cone
and so on. If using drill as race – the first team that finishes wins the relay.
(Refer to diagrams on page 9 for set up and direction)
8
Drill A (360 Relay)
Drill B (H Relay)
2 squat jumps
bear crawl
run
hop
Start
run
Start
player
#1
player
#1
#2
#2
#3
#3
#4
#4
#5
#5
#6
#6
Do a second formation for each drill (side by side) for other half of team.
Bear crawl
9
Drills for Major A players
The following 2 drills can be done at the same time (set up in two areas) with 6
players doing one & 6 doing the other, or if you are doing just one of the drills
– do the same in each area.
Although both drills incorporate speed, stamina, agility, coordination &
balance, this drill has a little more strength incorporated in the form of
burpees and push-ups.
Drill # C
6 cones (cones A) – spaced apart and lined up horizontally on one side of field
and 6 cones (cones B) lined up identically on other side of field (or designated
space).
6 players (at cones A) do lateral runs (right foot leading) across field to cone B
& do 5 burpees – then they do lateral runs back (left food leading) to cone A
and do 5 more burpees – then (starting with right foot) they do scissor runs to
cone B – do 5 burpees – then do scissor runs ( starting with left foot) back to
cone A and do 5 more burpees.
Drill # D
6 cones (cones A) – spaced apart and lined up horizontally on one side of field,
6 cones (cones B) lined up identically half way across field & 6 cones (cones C)
lined up identically on other side of field (or designated area)
6 players (at cones A) run to cone B, back to cone A, then to cone C where they
do 5 push-ups – then they run back to cone A, then to cone B, back to cone A,
then to cone C where they do 5 skater hops – Repeat the same sequence –
cone runs & push ups then cone runs and skater hops.
(Refer to diagrams on page 11 for set up and direction)
Burpee
10
Drill C Formation
cone B
cone A
player #1
#2
#3
#4
#5
#6
Drill D Formation
cone C
cone B
cone A
player #1
11
#2
#3
#4
#5
#6
Hydration, Nutrition & Rest
Below are some basic guidelines and tips to educate your players:
Hydration
Athletes need more than 8 cups of fluid a day. Without enough fluid, mild
dehydration (low energy, sluggishness, headaches) or possibly severe
dehydration (increased body temp, less sweat, disorientation) can occur.
Fluid recommendations are as follows:
16 ounces – 2 hrs before a game
8-16 ounces 15 min prior to game
5-10 ounces every 15-20 min during game
Drink as much as possible within 15 min of end of game
Nutrition
Carbohydrates are essential for endurance.
Complex carbs with a low glycemic index (GI) are recommended before a game
as they enter the bloodstream more slowly and help sustain energy. Most fruit,
vegetables and beans have a low GI.
Keep easy carb snacks with a higher GI (like raisins, bananas & juice) on hand
during and after exercise, because they enter the bloodstream quicker for
refueling.
Daily Sleep recommendations
Ages 7-9
9.5-10.75 hrs
Ages 10-13 9 – 10.5 hrs
12
Strength and Power for Baseball players
The striking action in baseball swings is initiated by the large muscles of the
legs and hips. Hip thrusts (using adductors and abductors) transfer weight
from the rear leg to the front leg and this force is transferred from the lower
body in the torquing action of the obliques. This thrust and rotation lead to the
striking action, shoulder rotation and arm swing. The chest (pectoralis major)
upper back (latissimus dorsi) and shoulders (deltoids) facilitate shoulder
rotation and arm swing. The tricep muscles contract in the arm extension
producing the force in batting and backhand drives. Strong neck muscles
stabilize the head which is essential for maintaining eye focus on a speeding
ball.
Incorporating a fitness routine for your players that develops all the major
muscles of the body is as important as your sport specific training.
13
Fly UP